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The Pronk Pops Show 1170, November 7, 2018, Story 1: The Big Winner Is President Donald J. Trump — Senators: Republicans 55 — Democrats 45, Representatives: Republicans 197 — Democrat — 238 — No Wave But Blue Ripple — Videos — Story 2: President Trump’s Reaction To Election Results — Trump Puts Progressive Press In Its’ Place — Sit Down — Videos — Story 3: President Trump Fires  Attorney General Jeff Sessions By Accepting His Requested Letter of Resignation — Second Special Counsel To Investigate and Prosecute Clinton Obama Democrat Criminal Conspiracy? — The 2020 Presidential Election Begins –Videos

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Story 1: The Big Winner Is President Donald J. Trump — Senators: Republicans 55 — Democrats 45, Representatives: Republicans 201 — Democrats — 234 — No Blue Wave But Blue Ripple — Videos —

Midterm election 2018: The biggest winners

Republicans, Democrats weigh in on midterm election results

Trump will help Republicans win midterm elections: Rep. Biggs

Story 2: President Trump’s Reaction To Election Results — Videos —

See the source image

 

Trump press conference following midterm elections

Trump holds press conference after mixed night at midterms

Donald Trump: 50 supporters explain why they love him – BBC News

A look at potential 2020 contenders

‘Sit down, you’re very rude, you’re fake news!’ President Trump’s extraordinary confrontation with CNN reporter as his aide wrestles for the microphone and he takes credit for mid-terms ‘victory’

  • Democrats took control of the House of Representatives during the US mid-terms in a blow to Donald Trump 
  • Party vowed to frustrate his populist political agenda while launching investigations into his administration
  • But Republicans are set to increase their majority in the Senate, providing the President with a partial victory
  • Trump hailed a ‘big win’ for his party and those who backed his pro-business, anti-illegal immigration agenda 
  • He also threatened to go to war in the Capitol if Democrats try to launch investigations into his administration

Donald Trump hailed ‘a historic day’ for Republicans in the American mid-term elections and became embroiled in an extraordinary confrontation with a CNN reporter at his press conference today.

Democrats won back control of the House of Representatives, and are projected to win 238 seats to the Republicans 197 seats – with Republicans projected to retain control of the Senate and increase their majority to 54 seats.

At the press conference President Trump took credit for victory, then when taking questions from the media, got into a furious row with CNN reporter Jim Acosta who challenged his characterisation of migrants heading for the US border in a ‘caravan’ from Central America as ‘an invasion.’

A riled President Trump points and admonishes CNN reporter Jim Acosta in a tense argument between the two at his press conference today. The duo often clash during the President's briefings at the White House

President Trump denied using a migrant caravan making its way to the US border through Mexico to whip up fear ahead of Tuesday’s election to win votes, and then went on to admonish Acosta

Acosta attempted to ask a further question that was denied to him before him and a White House Aide then got into a strange fight over the microphone.

The reporter attempted to ask a question about whether President Trump was ‘concerned about the investigation into Russia’, with a quick riposte coming from Trump who said the investigation was a ‘hoax.’

The President added: ‘CNN should be ashamed of itself having you working for them. You are a very rude ..terrible person.. the way you treat Sarah Huckabee is…’

The room went temporarily silent before another question from a reporter was taken who defended Acosta describing him as ‘diligent’.

President Trump shot back at the reporter he ‘wasn’t a big fan of his either’ to laughter from the room, before Acosta stood up again and started talking to the President.

Trump said ‘just sit down please’ and then accused Acosta of reporting ‘fake news’ and branded him ‘an enemy of the people.’

A White House aide takes the microphone from Jim Acosta as he attempts to ask a further question to President Trump. The reporter managed to ask a further question about Russia that President Trump rebutted saying the investigation was a 'hoax'

A White House aide takes the microphone from Jim Acosta as he attempts to ask a further question to President Trump. The reporter managed to ask a further question about Russia that President Trump rebutted saying the investigation was a ‘hoax’

At the start of the news conference President Trump claimed the largest Senate gains for a President’s first midterms since President Kennedy in 1962.

He said: ‘We saw the group of candidates I supported achieve tremendous success last night.’

The President said he they had a ‘big day yesterday, an incredible day and last night the Republican party defied history to expand our Senate.’

They managed this despite being ‘getting bombarded with money on the other side’ and ‘a very hostile media coverage to put it mildly,’ he added – ‘it set a new standard.’

Donald Trump hailed a 'Big Win' for Republicans in the mid-term elections on Tuesday after the party increased its majority in the Senate, marking the first time since 2002 that a ruling party has picked up seats in the upper house of government

Donald Trump hailed a ‘Big Win’ for Republicans in the mid-term elections on Tuesday after the party increased its majority in the Senate, marking the first time since 2002 that a ruling party has picked up seats in the upper house of government

Trump said he had made history in raising the number of Senators to 55, ‘the largest number of Republican Senators for the last 100 years.’

Responding to Democrats threats over claims of Russian election tampering, Trump said ‘It’s been a long time they’ve got nothing.’

He continued, ‘They can play that game but we can play it better because we’ve got the Unites States Senate.’

He was also critical of some Republican candidates who did not accept his ’embrace.’

‘Those are some of the people that decided for their own reasons – whether its me or what we stand for, but what we stand for meant a lot to most people and we have had tremendous support of the Republican party – at 93% its a record.’ Trump said.

 There may be some room, however, for Trump and Democrats to work together on issues with bipartisan support such as a package to improve infrastructure or protections against prescription drug price increases.

‘It really could be a beautiful bipartisan situation,’ Trump said.

He said Nancy Pelosi, who may be the next speaker of the House, had expressed to him in a phone call a desire to work together. But Trump doubted there would be much common ground if Democrats press investigations.

‘You can’t do it simultaneously,’ he said.

He also said he hopes he can work with Congress to get enough money to build his long-promised border wall but that he would not necessarily force a government shutdown over the issue.

‘We need the money to build the wall, the whole wall, not pieces of it,’

‘We need the wall, many Democrats know we need the wall, and we’re just going to have to see what happens.’

Republicans are forecast to hold 54 out of 100 seats in the Senate once all votes are counted, up from 51, while the Democrats are projected to take 238 seats in the House of Representatives, with 218 needed for a majority.

Trump used the result – the first time since 2002 that the ruling party has gained Senate seats – to congratulate himself, saying: ‘Yesterday was such a very Big Win, and all under the pressure of a Nasty and Hostile Media!’

Despite the Democrats making gains, Tuesday failed to live up to expectations that a ‘blue wave’ of support would sweep them into power in both houses and leave Trump as a lame duck.

But winning the House does give Democrats the ability to block Republican legislation they disagree with, frustrating Trump’s political agenda for the remaining two years of his term.

They also win control of several powerful committees which they have pledged to use to launch investigations into Trump, including subpoenaing tax records he refused to release during the 2016 election and probing whether he has received money from Russia.

Trump preempted that tactic on Wednesday, vowing to go to war on Capitol Hill if necessary.

He said: ‘If the Democrats think they are going to waste Taxpayer Money investigating us at the House level, then we will likewise be forced to consider investigating them for all of the leaks of Classified Information, and much else, at the Senate level. Two can play that game!’

The President used the victory to attack critics within his own party, saying that those who supported his pro-business, anti-illegal immigration policies 'did very well'

The President used the victory to attack critics within his own party, saying that those who supported his pro-business, anti-illegal immigration policies ‘did very well’

As well as gaining the House, Democrats gained control of powerful committees which they plan to use to investigate Trump. But he preempted that tactic on Wednesday, vowing to fight fire with fire 

As well as gaining the House, Democrats gained control of powerful committees which they plan to use to investigate Trump. But he preempted that tactic on Wednesday, vowing to fight fire with fire

The Democrats are on course to win 238 seats in the House following the mid-term elections on Tuesday, though the figure falls short of the upper limit of 245 that they hoped to win

Republicans clung on to power in the Senate after the Democrats were defeated in key battleground states of Indiana, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas and North Dakota

Nancy Pelosi, who could return as Democrat House Speaker after last night's result, proclaimed victory and said the party would work to impose Constitutional checks and balances on Donald Trump 

Trump tweeted out his support for Pelosi after she said the Democrats would work with Republicans in the House 'where we can find common ground'

Trump tweeted out his support for Pelosi after she said the Democrats would work with Republicans in the House ‘where we can find common ground’

Nancy Pelosi thanks candidates for returning House to Dems

Should any of these bills pass both houses and make it to Trump’s desk, it could force him to veto the legislation, something he hasn’t had to do so far and allowing Democrats to paint him as the bad guy.

But maintaining control of the Senate allows Trump to nominate justices and recruit members of his cabinet unopposed, and puts a stop to any hopes the Democrats may have had of impeaching him.

The result also helps silence Trump’s critics within his own party, a fact he seemed very aware of when he tweeted: ‘Those that worked with me in this incredible Midterm Election, embracing certain policies and principles, did very well. Those that did not, say goodbye!’

The omens are not all bad for Trump’s hopes of winning a second term in 2020 either. Obama lost the House and Senate in the 2010 mid-terms, which he described as a ‘shellacking’, but went on to win a second term in 2012.

Nancy Pelosi, former Democrat Speaker in the House, hailed the victory early Wednesday, vowing to apply ‘checks and balances’ to Trump’s power, but also saying Democrats would cooperate with Republicans where possible.

The Democrats also made gains in the elections for state governors – which act like lesser Presidents for the state they represent – gaining seven seats from the Republicans.

However, high-profile candidates Andrew Gillum and Stacey Abrams fell short in Florida and Georgia, leaving the Republicans with a majority of governors nationwide.

Gillum was hoping to become the first black governor of Florida, while in Georgia Stacey Abrams was aiming to enter history as America’s first female black governor.

Gillum finished less than a percent shy of Republican rival Ron DeSantis, while Abrams finished two per cent short of Brian Kemp. However, Abrams was refusing to concede on Wednesday, in the hopes that a recount could force another contest in December.

Encouragingly for the Democrats, they won governor’s races in states where Trump claimed victory in 2016, and while facing down candidates the President had endorsed.

In Kansas, Laura Kelly triumphed by a four-point margin over Kris Kobach – a strong ally of Trump’s immigration policies – while in Michigan, Gretchen Whitmer opened up an eight-point lead over Republican Bill Schuette.

Taylor Swift’s intervention also flopped as Marsha Blackburn won the Senate in Tennessee by 11 points over Democrat candidate Phil Bredesen, who the singer backed.

Trump called the night a 'tremendous success' for Republicans on Twitter because the incumbent party typically loses seats during the mid-terms, while he managed to make gains in the senate

Trump called the night a ‘tremendous success’ for Republicans on Twitter because the incumbent party typically loses seats during the mid-terms, while he managed to make gains in the senate

The President also praised himself as a ‘magic man’, quoting from TV news reports that said the Republicans were ‘lucky’ to have him as their leader

One key Senate battleground was Texas, which had been widely seen as a safe seat for Republican Ted Cruz (pictured) until Beto O'Rourke emerged from obscurity to take him on

One key Senate battleground was Texas, which had been widely seen as a safe seat for Republican Ted Cruz (pictured) until Beto O’Rourke emerged from obscurity to take him on

Ultimately Beto (pictured alongside wife Amy Sanders) fell short of victory, though many have pegged him as a rising star within the Democrat part

Ultimately Beto (pictured alongside wife Amy Sanders) fell short of victory, though many have pegged him as a rising star within the Democrat part

I’m so f***ing proud of you! Beto drops F-bomb after defeat
Ted Cruz supporter Marie Rice sheds tears of joy as Cruz declares victory at their election night headquarters

Ted Cruz supporter Marie Rice sheds tears of joy as Cruz declares victory at their election night headquarters

While the Democrats’ grass-roots organisation allowed them to seize the House, Trump’s showmanship and personality thwarted them in key Senate battleground states of Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee – where he held rallies in the closing days of the election.

WHY IS LOSING THE HOUSE SIGNIFICANT?

Losing the House of Representatives will make it more difficult for Trump to govern by making it harder for Republicans to pass laws.

Laws start their life as bills submitted in either the House of Representatives – often shortened to House – or Senate, which makes up the legislative branch of the US government.

Bills must pass a vote in both of those houses before they can become law, giving the Democrats an opportunity to thwart bills they disagree with.

Holding the House also gives Democrats the opportunity to introduce bills on subjects the Republicans would rather not discuss – such as gun control, the environment, or healthcare – and force a debate.

Finally, the House includes several powerful committees which the Democrats now control and could use to probe Trump’s misdeeds.

Russian election meddling, Trump’s tax returns, and security clearances granted to members of the Trump clan could all come under scrutiny.

If a Democrat bill does make it through both the House and Senate it will land with the executive branch – which Trump leads – for approval.

This could force Trump into vetoing legislation he disagrees with, which is something he has not had to do so far.

However, maintaining control of the Senate allows Republicans to hold sway over the third branch of government – the judiciary – which is responsible for enforcing these laws.

The President is responsible for appointing justices, but they must be confirmed by Senators, which is why keeping control here was a key goal.

Senators are also responsible for confirming nominations to Trump’s cabinet, which he will also keep control of after Tuesday.

One of the most bitter defeats for the Democrats came in Texas, where rising star Beto O’Rourke was defeated by incumbent Ted Cruz – a onetime foe of Trump who has since warmed to him – though the contest was closer than anticipated.

In Arizona, Republican Martha McSally looked set to triumph over Kyrsten Sinema as counting stopped early on Wednesday, though the result might not be announced until later in the week.

The seat was left vacant after Jeff Flake, a Republican critic of Trump, announced he was retiring from politics.

Clare McCaskill, a moderate Democrat senator for Missouri, was handed a thumping defeat on Tuesday by Josh Hawley, a Republican who has allied himself to Trump, who won by more than 10 percentage points.

As the dust settled on Wednesday, Democrats standing ready to return next year as chairmen of House Oversight and Judiciary Committees were sharpening their pens and preparing to drag Trump through his own swamp.

 ‘We probably will’ seek Trump’s tax returns, said Reps. Elijah Cummings and Jerrold Nadler.

As Tuesday headed to Wednesday, presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway told reporters at the White House: ‘I guess they could try.’

‘I don’t know that there will be much of an appetite … for their members to be spending all of their time, or even most of their time, or a fraction of their time investigating, instigating, trying to impeach or subpoena people,’ Conway said.

Nadler said it was ‘way too early’ to talk about impeaching Trump, but wouldn’t rule it out depending on the results of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s expansive Russia probe.

‘He’s going to learn that he’s not above the law,’ he said, according to CNN.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters that ‘the president’s agenda isn’t going to change regardless of whose party is there.’

Democrats will also find themselves empowered to launch probes into voting-rights matters and questions about whether Trump has violated the Constitution’s ‘Emoluments Clause’ that prohibits presidents from receiving income from foreign governments.

Security clearances in the Trump White House could also come under close examination, along with prescription drug prices, family separations along the U.S.-Mexico border, gun control and insurance coverage for Americans with pre-existing medical conditions.

As results rolled in from around the country, the Democrats made gains in suburban areas outside of Washington, Philadelphia, Miami, Chicago and Denver that fell to Trump in 2016.

In Florida, Trump's adopted home state, Ron DeSantis won the race to become state governor, defeating rival Andrew Gillum

Gillum said he regretting not being able to 'bring it home' in Florida after he lost the election with 49 per cent to 50 per cent

Gillum said he regretting not being able to ‘bring it home’ in Florida after he lost the election with 49 per cent to 50 per cent

Speaking alongside his tearful wife, Gillum urged Democrats not to give up the fight in Florida, which was a key battleground state in 2016 that ultimately went to Trump

Speaking alongside his tearful wife, Gillum urged Democrats not to give up the fight in Florida, which was a key battleground state in 2016 that ultimately went to Trump

Blackburn (above) shook off Swift's foray into politics to win election Tuesday night
Swift said she got involved in politics for women's issues and LBGT issues

Republican Marsha Blackburn (left) claimed victory in Tennessee despite an unexpected intervention by pop princess Taylor Swift (right), who urged people to vote for her Democrat rival Phil Bredesen

Scott Walker, the Republican governor of Wisconsin who ran for President against Trump in 2016 (pictured), lost his race against Democrat Tony EversScott Walker, the Republican governor of Wisconsin who ran for President against Trump in 2016 (pictured), lost his race against Democrat Tony Evers
Marsha Blackburn defeats Bredesen in Tennessee’s senate race

But Trump tightened his grip on support in rural areas and among blue-collar workers. In Kentucky, one of the top Democratic recruits, retired Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath, lost her bid to oust to three-term Rep. Andy Barr.

History was working against the president in the Senate: 2002 was the only midterm election in the past three decades when the party holding the White House gained Senate seats.

As the news broke that the Republicans had achieved just that, Trump began retweeting quotes from later night news bulletins praising himself as a ‘magic man’.

Whether voters opposed or supported him, Trump certainly electrified the mid-term contest, which has been a lackluster event under previous administrations with voter turnout struggling to hit 40 per cent.

High turnouts were recorded across the nation on Tuesday following record spending on advertising. Two thirds of those who voted said that Trump was the reason they cast their ballot, either to support or oppose him.

Overall, 6 in 10 voters said the country was headed in the wrong direction, but roughly that same number described the national economy as excellent or good.

 Twenty-five percent described health care and immigration as the most important issues in the election.

Claire McCaskill (left), the incumbent Democrat in Missouri, lost her Senate seat to Republican challenger Josh Hawley, who attacked her for refusing to nominate Trump’s two Supreme Court picks

Stacey Abrams, who was bidding to become the first female African American governor in American history, has refused to concede a closely-fought contest in Georgia 

Abrams’s supporters cheer after learning she was making up ground on opponent Brian Kemp, though the election was still too close to call on Wednesday morning

The night was a record-breaker for women, who now hold more seats in the House than at any point in history. Among them is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a 29-year-old Democrat who has come to embody what Trump brands the 'far left'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez beats Republican Anthony Pappas

Trump encouraged voters to view the first nationwide election of his presidency as a referendum on his leadership, pointing proudly to the surging economy at recent rallies.

He bet big on a xenophobic closing message, warning of an immigrant ‘invasion’ that promised to spread violent crime and drugs across the nation. Several television networks, including the president’s favorite Fox News Channel, yanked a Trump campaign advertisement off the air on the eve of the election, determining that its portrayal of a murderous immigrant went too far.

The president’s current job approval, set at 40 percent by Gallup, was the lowest at this point of any first-term president in the modern era. Both Barack Obama’s and Bill Clinton’s numbers were 5 points higher, and both suffered major midterm losses of 63 and 54 House seats respectively.

Democrats, whose very relevance in the Trump era depended on winning at least one chamber of Congress, were laser-focused on health care as they predicted victories that would break up the GOP’s monopoly in Washington and state governments.

Yet Trump’s party will maintain Senate control for the next two years, at least.

In Texas, Sen Ted Cruz staved off a tough challenge from Democrat Beto O’Rourke, whose record-smashing fundraising and celebrity have set off buzz he could be a credible 2020 White House contender.

In Indiana, Trump-backed businessman Mike Braun defeated Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly. In Missouri, Josh Hawley knocked off Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. And in Tennessee, Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn defeated former Gov. Phil Bredesen, a top Democratic recruit.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Trump has no plans to alter his political agenda despite losing the House to the Democrats

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said that Trump has no plans to alter his political agenda despite losing the House to the Democrats

Democrat voters in Georgia learn that Stacey Abrams is trailing her Republican opponent, though she has refused to concede

Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, cheers as she declares victory in the governor's race in Detroit, Michigan, one of the areas which was key to Trump's victory in 2016 
Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, cheers as she declares victory in the governor’s race in Detroit, Michigan, one of the areas which was key to Trump’s victory in 2016

A Democrat supporter puts her head in her hands as she learns that Republicans are projected to hold the Senate

What are the mid-terms and why do they matter?

Mid-term elections come mid-way through a President’s term in office, and typically serve as a referendum on their work so far while shaping how the rest of their term will play out.

The office of President is not on the ballot paper, however, and voters are instead asked to pick candidates for the two houses of government – the House and Senate – and state governor, who acts like a lesser President for their own state.

In the November 2018 mid-terms, all 435 seats in the House and 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate were up for election, along with 36 out of 50 state governors.

The Republicans held majorities in both houses before the election, allowing them to pass legislation, nominate judges, and appoint members of Trump’s cabinet unimpeded.

The Democrats were hoping to win back control of both houses in a so-called ‘blue wave’ that would have left Trump a lame duck and made it extremely difficult for him to get anything done in his last two years.

Supporters of Democrat Beto O'Rourke, who was running for the Senate in Texas, wait to hear the result. He ultimately lost the race to incumbent Republican Ted Cruz

As it happened, a divided nation produced a divided result, with Democrats winning back control of the House but Republicans increasing their majority in the Senate.

For Trump, that means the business of governing will become more difficult, with Democrats vowing to frustrate his populist political agenda.

Democrats also gained control of several powerful House committees and have promised to use them to investigate Trump, including a potential subpoena of his tax records.

But any hopes of impeachment, which was whispered about in Democrat circles during the campaign, are firmly off the table since the Senate would be required to find Trump guilty of an impeachable offence – which Republicans will not do.

Good showings for candidates who closely aligned themselves with Trump and his views will also help to quieten his opponents within his own party, and having Democrats in the House could provide a useful scapegoat for failed policies.

While state governors cannot affect Trump’s national agenda in the same way that representatives or senators can, he will rely on them to help enact his policies at a local level – and in these races, Republicans also lost ground.

The Democrats gained seven seats from Republicans, flipping states like Kansas and Michigan where Trump won big in 2016, but lost out in high profile races in Florida and Georgia.

A man dressed as Donald Trump lends his support to Florida governor candidate Ron DeSantis, an ally of the President who ultimately won his election against Democrat Andrew Gillum

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6361843/Dems-House-midterm-elections-Republicans-control-Senate.html

 

Story 3: President Trump Fires  Attorney General Jeff Sessions By Accepting His Requested Letter of Resignation — Second Special Counsel To Investigate and Prosecute Clinton Obama Democrat Criminal Conspiracy? — — The 2020 Presidential Election Begins –Videos Videos

Jeff Sessions resigns as Attorney General

Special Report: Jeff Sessions resigns as Attorney General

Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired

Schumer says he finds timing of Sessions’ resignation ‘suspect’

Trump slams Jeff Sessions: ‘I don’t have an attorney general’

GOP lawmakers call on Sessions to resign

Embattled Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigns under pressure from Trump

  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions is leaving the Trump administration after more than a year of public criticism from his boss, President Donald Trump.
  • Trump has repeatedly hammered Sessions for his decision last year to recuse himself from the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with the Kremlin.
  • Sessions’s chief of staff Matthew Whitaker will serve as acting attorney general, Trump announced. Whitaker also will assume oversight of the ongoing investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, and possible collusion by Trump’s campaign in that meddling.

Embattled Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned at the “request” of President Donald Trump on Wednesday after more than a year of public criticism from the president.

Sessions’s chief of staff Matthew Whitaker will serve as acting attorney general, Trump announced.

Whitaker also will assume oversight of the ongoing investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, and possible collusion by Trump’s campaign in that meddling, according to the Justice Department.

Whitaker, who has publicly criticized the Mueller investigation, by law can serve as acting AG for a maximum of 210 days.

Whitaker will have the power to fire Mueller “for cause” as outlined under rules governing the special counsel’s office, if such cause is found.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein up till now has had oversight over the Mueller probe, as a result of Sessions’ move to recuse himself from the investigation in 2017.

Sessions, 71, had been repeatedly blasted by Trump for his recusal.

Trump has said that moment opened the door to special counsel Mueller’s probe, which the president has repeatedly called a “witch hunt.”

Sessions’ resignation was expected to happen sometime after Tuesday’s midterm elections, particuarly given the drumbeat of the president’s repeated criticism of the attorney general.

Bob Woodward’s recently published book about the Trump administration, “Fear,” says that Trump had called Sessions “mentally retarded” and a “dumb southerner.” Trump has publicly claimed, “I said neither” about Sessions.

“I don’t have an attorney general,” Trump told The Hill in an interview with that news site in September.

But the abruptness of the move, less than 24 hours after the close of the polls Tuesday, stunned Trump’s closet allies both inside and outside of the White House.

“I didn’t know this was coming, especially so soon after the midterms,” one source said on the condition of anonymity.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

We are pleased to announce that Matthew G. Whitaker, Chief of Staff to Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice, will become our new Acting Attorney General of the United States. He will serve our Country well….

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

….We thank Attorney General Jeff Sessions for his service, and wish him well! A permanent replacement will be nominated at a later date.

Hours before the resignation was announced, Trump was asked about Sessions’ future in the administration.

“I’d rather answer that at a little bit different time,” Trump answered.

Trump’s press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the White House received a resignation letter from Sessions earlier Wednesday and Trump accepted it.

Sessions’ letter to Trump, which is not dated, begins by saying, “At your request, I am submitting my resignation.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Getty Images
Attorney General Jeff Sessions

A spokesman for Mueller’s office declined to comment when contacted by CNBC about the resignation.

But Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who is the odds on favorite to become the next speaker of the House of Representatives, called Sessions’ “firing” a “blatant attempt” by Trump to undermine Mueller.

Nancy Pelosi

@NancyPelosi

It is impossible to read Attorney General Sessions’ firing as anything other than another blatant attempt by @realDonaldTrump to undermine & end Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation.

Nancy Pelosi

@NancyPelosi

It is impossible to read Attorney General Sessions’ firing as anything other than another blatant attempt by @realDonaldTrump to undermine & end Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation.

Nancy Pelosi

@NancyPelosi

Given his record of threats to undermine & weaken the Russia investigation, Matthew Whitaker should recuse himself from any involvement in Mueller’s investigation. Congress must take immediate action to protect the rule of law and integrity of the investigation.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, the New York Democrat and Senate minority leader, said, “Protecting Mueller and his investigation is paramount.”

“It would create a constitutional crisis if this was a prelude to ending or greatly limiting the Mueller investigation and I hope President Trump and those he listens to will refrain from that,” Schumer said.

Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-NY, the incoming chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, in a tweet wrote: “Americans must have answers immediately behind” Trump removing Sessions from the Justice Department.

“Why is the President making this change and who has authority over Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation? We will be holding people accountable,” Nadler wrote.

Additional reporting by Kevin Breuninger and Brian Schwartz of CNBC.

Read Jeff Sessions’ resignation letter here.

See the source image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/07/trump-says-attorney-general-jeff-sessions-resigns.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1169, November 5, 2018, Story 1: Red Wave Breaking — Senators — Republican 56, Democrat 44 — House Representatives — Republican 226 — Democrat 209 — Videos — Story 2: Top Three Issues — The Economy/Jobs, Illegal Alien Invasion, Healthcare — Videos — Story 3: Waiting For Successful and Viable New Political Party — Videos

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Story 1: Red Wave Breaking — Senators — Republican 56, Democrat 44 — House Representatives — Republican 226 — Democrat 209 — Videos —

Midterm elections: Republican voters show strong turnout in early voting

How Trump’s approval rating could affect midterms | CITIZEN by CNN

The Ingraham Angle Fox News 11/5/18 Breaking Fox News November 5, 2018

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#LionelNation🇺🇸Immersive Live Stream: The Greatest Upcoming Election . . . Before 2020

 

People line up to vote.
Analysts cautioned against drawing broad conclusions about which party could gain an advantage from high early vote totals. | Jim Mone/AP Photo

ELECTIONS

A staggering 36 million people have voted early, setting the stage for big midterm turnout

The turnout could be a source of error in pre-election surveys if pollsters did not calibrate properly for such high rates of voting.

A staggering 36 million voters cast their ballots ahead of Election Day this year, setting the stage for much-higher-than-usual turnout for a midterm — and, potentially, big surprises on Tuesday night.

Republican enthusiasm for President Donald Trump and Democrats’ itch to repudiate him at the ballot box have driven people to the polls far faster than in 2014, when 27.2 million people voted early, according to Michael McDonald, a University of Florida professor who tracks voter turnout.

And that trend is expected to extend into Election Day. Early voters in three states — Texas, Nevada and Arizona — have already surpassed total turnout in the last midterm election, McDonald’s data shows, and more states will blow past their normal non-presidential turnout with just a handful more votes on Election Day. The high voting rates have transformed expectations about who will show up in the midterms — and they could inspire results that diverge from any pre-election polls that did not reckon with this year’s unusually high enthusiasm.

“This is not a normal election,” McDonald told POLITICO. “The best guess is that we’re looking at some sort of hybrid midterm/presidential election” in terms of turnout.

Analysts cautioned against drawing broad conclusions about which party could gain an advantage from the high early vote totals. But they did note that pre-election polls make built-in assumptions about how many people will vote, and pollsters who leaned too heavily on past midterm turnout may have misfired.

McDonald and the team at Edison Media Research, which is conducting a revamped exit poll this election after stumbling in 2016, predict that 105.5 million people will vote this year — about 45 percent of the voting eligible population. That’s up from 2014, an unusually low-turnout year in which fewer than 82 million people voted for the highest office on their ballot, but still lower than 2016, when about 137 million people voted for president.

“I think we’ve all made a very safe assumption that 2018 will look nothing like 2014,” Bonier said, noting that underestimating certain demographics by even a few percentage points in a poll could have an outsized effects on the results.

Some pollsters, like Monmouth University and the New York Times/Siena College, have adjusted this year by publishing multiple results for each poll, detailing how the results would change under different turnout scenarios. And the baseline estimates have gone up in recent weeks: The first Times/Siena poll of Rep. Pete Sessions’ (R-Texas) contested reelection race, for example, projected that about 194,000 people would turn out, while the second poll projected 211,000 voters would cast ballots in that slice of the Dallas suburbs.

Over 188,000 voters have already cast early ballots in the Dallas County portion of the battleground district, according to county data. (Another 7 percent of the district’s population is in another county that has not published early vote totals by congressional seat.)

Higher-than-expected turnout helped Democrats in some but not all of the Times/Siena polling models.

Mara Suttmann, a professor of government at Connecticut College, noted that it’s hard to predict which party will benefit from early voting because many voters would have voted whether or not early voting was an option — “cannibalizing” the Election Day vote instead of adding many new voters to the electorate.

Bonier noted that there has been in a surge in non-usual voters, including young people and people voting for the first time, which could favor Democrats. But even this does not guarantee electoral success for Democrats on Tuesday.

“The open question that won’t be answered until [results are in]: Do those early vote trends carry on through Election Day?” Bonier asked. “Or are they reversed? In 2016, in a lot of cases, they were reversed. I don’t think you can bet one way or another at this point.”

These low-propensity voters still make up a proportionally small portion of both the early voter electorate and the expected overall electorate. Data from TargetSmart shows that early voters younger than 39 are still easily outnumbered by voters aged 50-64, and even more so by voters over the age of 65.

And even in states where Democrats lead Republicans in early ballots cast — like Florida, where there’s a tight gubernatorial and Senate election — the election is still far from over.

And there’s still a likely majority of votes to be cast on Election Day.

“We may see another 60 million votes cast [on Election Day]. Most people who will have ended up voting in this election have still not voted,” Bonier said. “In the end, what happens on Election Day turnout will, to some extent, swamp what happened in the early vote.”

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/11/05/early-voting-turnout-2018-elections-midterms-963149

Story 2: Top Three Issues — The Economy/Jobs, Illegal Alien Invasion, Healthcare — Videos —

Tucker: Elections turn on issues that affect the country

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With him or against him, Trump looms large over Election Day

today
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FILE- In this Nov. 2, 2018, file photo residents vote early at the Douglas County Election Commission office in Omaha, Neb. For voters across America, this year’s midterm elections represent something far greater than whatever Senate and House races appear on their ballots. It is a referendum on President Donald Trump and the venomous political culture that many blame for gridlock in Congress and a recent spate of hate crimes and politically motivated attacks. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Michael Gregoire marched along a downtown sidewalk in the tense days before the midterm elections, waving a hand-painted sign at passing traffic: “DEFEAT REPUBLICANS 2018.”

“The survival of the country is going to depend on this election,” he said as another man stopped for a moment to argue. The strangers faced each other from opposite edges of the great American divide, Democrat versus Republican, both convinced the election is among the most consequential in their lifetimes and that they must save the nation from the other side.

President Donald Trump looms large over Tuesday’s election, which is expected to draw historic numbers to the polls and will determine which party controls Congress. For Gregoire and Kanter — and for voters across the country — the election represents something far greater than whatever Senate and House races appear on their ballots. It is a competition for the soul of America — a referendum on Trump and the venomous political culture that many blame for gridlock in Congress and a recent spate of hate crimes and politically motivated attacks.

Less than two weeks ago in this city, a white man gunned down two African-American shoppers at a grocery store in what police described as a racially motivated attack. Days later, an avid Trump supporter was arrested for mailing pipe bombs to prominent critics of the president, all of whom Trump routinely derides as “evil” and “un-American.” The next day, another gunman opened fire in a synagogue in Pittsburgh, massacring 11 worshippers and telling police “all these Jews need to die.”

Don Albrecht, a 75-year-old accountant and Republican who voted for Trump in 2016, lives blocks away from the Louisville grocery store where two people died. He’d pulled into the parking lot minutes after the gunfire erupted, saw the police cars and shaken employees, and felt like the country’s poisonous political climate had landed in his backyard. He wishes he could take back his vote for Trump.

“He has diarrhea of the mouth and diarrhea of the brain. He’s just so irresponsible,” said Albrecht, who worries Trump’s embrace of the far-right is remaking his party. “I don’t think the American public is going to put up with it. I think there’s going to be a big backlash against Republicans because of this divisiveness.”

Other Trump voters remain staunchly behind him, and plan to choose Republican candidates to help him make good on his pledges, including vows to implement more hardline immigration policies. “I want to see the wall go up,” said Joe Spirko, 57, as he peddled Trump flags outside of one of the president’s rallies in Florida last week. “Since Trump come along, I feel a lot better.”

Trump has stepped up his rhetoric on immigration ahead of the elections, focusing on a caravan of Central American migrants heading toward the United States. Trump and his backers have called it “an invasion” — though the group of a few thousand people, including mothers and children, remains hundreds of miles away — and suggested without proof that there are criminals and terrorists in the crowd of those fleeing violence and poverty. In a White House speech, the president said he would sign an order preventing border-crossers from claiming asylum, a legally questionable proposition, and said he’d told military troops he’s mobilizing to the border to respond to thrown rocks like they were “rifles.”

Julie Hoeppner, a 67-year-old psychologist in Indiana, voted early for Republican candidates, also citing illegal immigration as a primary concern.

A friend recently sent Hoeppner a photo of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with a note that said: “For our ancestors, this is their caravan.” Hoeppner didn’t respond but thought to herself that her ancestors arrived legally. “Which is a big difference,” she said. “They didn’t come trying to storm the border.”

Pedro Panelo, the 21-year-old president of the College Republicans at Wheaton College in Illinois, is frustrated immigration became a last-minute political football, because the issue is more complex than what either Democrats or Republicans make it out to be. Panelo, the son of a Mexican immigrant, said migrants shouldn’t be demonized, but he stopped short of criticizing the president, and plans to vote for Republican candidates who could help push Trump’s agenda.

“When it comes to his actions, I’m not a huge fan of his tweets,” Panelo said. “But what I say is look what he’s done for the country and not always what he’s said on Twitter.”

He said he’s felt an extraordinary level of enthusiasm for this election among his fellow students. Young people, who historically sit out of midterm elections, and women are both expected to be pivotal forces Tuesday. In Georgia, Democratic campaign volunteer Adrienne White said she struggled to recruit volunteers ahead of the 2016 presidential election but that it’s been easy this year, especially among women.

In Pittsburgh, where residents just finished burying those gunned down at the Tree of Life synagogue, some voters saw their Election Day decisions as a way to send a message that the country is headed down a dark and dangerous path.

“This is probably the most important election in the past 100 years. This will turn the tables,” said Barbara Villa, 71, who with her husband planted a crop of “Vote Blue” signs outside their home.

Rose Cathleen Bagin, 77, lives in the same neighborhood as the synagogue. She lashed a sign to her front porch reading “VOTE FOR GUN CONTROL,” and she is stunned every time she sees the crowd at Trump rallies on television cheering for his divisive language.

“I can’t stand the terrible things he says and the terrible things he’s doing,” said Bagin, who plans to vote Democratic Tuesday. “I’m terrified. We’re going to a place I just don’t understand.”

___

Also contributing were AP reporters Allen G. Breed and Adam Geller from Pittsburgh and Tamara Lush from Estero, Florida.

https://apnews.com/464f27b585d34fc597884d88d8ab10af

Democrats’ Pickup Chances Rise In More House Races, Analyst Says

More U.S. House races are competitive and leaning toward Democrats with Election Day tomorrow, according to the latest ratings changes by Cook Political Report. The new rankingsshow nine districts shifting toward Democrats and only one becoming better for Republicans.

Democrats’ chances to pick up seats have improved in key races in Georgia, Pennsylvania, California and Washington, according to ratings changes by Cook’s David Wasserman. The contest to succeed retiring California Republican Darell Issa is likely going to Democrat Mike Levin, and in Washington state’s 8th district, Democrat Kim Schrier’s chance of replacing retiring Republican Dave Reichert has moved from “Toss Up” to “Lean Democratic.”

“Bottom line: anything from a Democratic gain of 20 to 45 seats remains well within the realm of possibility, but a gain of 30 to 40 seats – and House control – is the most likely outcome,” Wasserman wrote today in an online post.

In Georgia, GOP Rep. Karen Handel’s race moved to “Toss Up” from “Lean Republican.”

Handel, elected in a special election last year, is facing headwinds from a gubernatorial contest that is energizing Democrats in her north Atlanta district. Handel’s challenger, Democrat Lucy McBath, is a gun-control activist and African American who could be helped by a possible surge in black voter turnout led by enthusiasm for Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, according to Wasserman.

Democrats’ Pickup Chances Rise In More House Races, Analyst Says

Meanwhile, a new congressional map in Pennsylvania is giving Freedom Caucus member Scott Perry his first competitive general election bid. The race is now considered a “Toss Up” as the three-term Republican continues to be out raised by Democrat George Scott.

The re-election bids of Republicans Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida and Fred Upton of Michigan both moved from “Likely Republican” to “Lean Republican.” In Texas, House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul’s race and retiring Republican Joe Barton’s open seat were previously considered “Solid Republican,” but now are rated “Likely Republican.” Wasserman also moved West Virginia Republican Representative Alex Mooney’s re-election from “Solid Republican” to “Likely Republican.”

The good news for Republicans out of the latest rating changes is in Arizona’s 1st Congressional District. Incumbent Democrat Tom O’Halleran’s race moved from “Likely Democrat” to “Lean Democrat,” as the freshmen member continues to defend a seat in a district President Donald Trump narrowly won in 2016.

Story 3: Waiting For Successful and Viable New Political Party — Videos

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The Top 10 Most Successful Third Party/Independent Presidential Candidates

 

Exclusive poll: Only half of Americans have faith in democracy

Just 51% of Americans said they have faith in democracy, and 37% say they have lost faith in democracy, according to a new Axios/SurveyMonkey poll conducted in late October.

Why it matters: It suggests that recent political turmoil has caused people to doubt the very foundation of American society, particularly leading up to election day.

Show less

Since October 2016, just before the last presidential election, SurveyMonkey has tracked Americans’ views toward democracy.

What’s happening: Despite the political turbulence over the past two years, Americans’ faith in democracy has been relatively stable — with two exceptions.

  • Just before heading to the polls in 2016, 52% of voters had faith in democracy.
  • That number grew from pre-election numbers (by 8 percentage points) immediately following the election in November 2016 and in February 2017, after President Trump’s inauguration.
  • One year ago, in October 2017, faith in democracy dropped by 7 percentage points and has held fairly steady since then.
  • The other half of Americans have either lost faith in democracy or never had faith in it to begin with, according to the poll.

The big picture: SurveyMonkey also found that half the country believes America is more divided today than ever before — and that these divisions will probably continue far into the future (ranging between 46% and 51% over the past two years).

  • About one-third of Americans agree America is more divided today, but are optimistic that Americans will come together in the near future.
  • 18% say America is not more divided today than it has been in the past.

Methodology: This survey was conducted Oct. 19–24 among 3,913 adults. Respondents were selected from the more than 2 million people who take surveys on the SurveyMonkey platform each day. Data have been weighted for age, race, sex, education and geography using the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to reflect the demographic composition of the United States age 18 and over.

The modeled error estimate for the full sample of that survey is plus or minus 2 percentage points and full crosstabs are available here.

Go deeper:

https://www.axios.com/poll-americans-faith-in-democracy-2e94a938-4365-4e80-9fb6-d9743d817710.html

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1168, November 2, 2018, Story 1: Jobs Report — U.S. Economy Added 250,000 Jobs — Real Wages Up 3.1% and Capital Spending Growth — Civilian Labor Participation Rate Up .2% Going in Right Direction — Getting Better– All The Time — Videos — Story 2: Federal Reserve Will Be Increasing Fed Funds Target Rate by .25% In December 2018 — No Real Surprise — Videos — Story 3: President Trump’s Job Approval Rising — Hits 51% — Top Three Concerns of American People — The Economy, Illegal Immigration and Obamacare — Videos

Posted on November 4, 2018. Filed under: Addiction, American History, Banking System, Barack H. Obama, Bill Clinton, Blogroll, Books, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, College, Congress, Corruption, Countries, Deep State, Defense Spending, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Eating, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Former President Barack Obama, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Housing, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Insurance, Investments, Labor Economics, Language, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Medicare, Monetary Policy, National Interest, Networking, News, Obama, Obesity, Overweight, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Progressives, Public Corruption, Public Relations, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Security, Spying, Success, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP_, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Terrorism, Trade Policy, Trump Surveillance/Spying, Unemployment, United States Constitution, United States of America, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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Story 1: November 2018 Jobs Report — U.S. Economy Added 250,000 Jobs With 3.7% U-3 Unemployment Rate  — Real Wages Up 3.1% and Capital Spending Growth — Civilian Labor Participation Rate Up .2% Going in Right Direction Up! — Getting Better– All The Time — Videos 

The Beatles – Getting Better

Getting Better
It’s getting better all the time
I used to get mad at my school (No, I can’t complain)
The teachers who taught me weren’t cool (No, I can’t complain)
You’re holding me down
Turning me round
Filling me up with your rules
I’ve got to admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
I have to admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Me used to be angry young man
Me hiding me head in the sand
You gave me the word, I finally heard
I’m doing the best that I can
I’ve got to admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
I have to admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Getting so much better all the time!
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
I used to be cruel to my woman
I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved
Man, I was mean but I’m changing my scene
And I’m doing the best that I can (ooh)
I admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
Yes, I admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Getting so much better all the time!
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
Getting so much better all the time!
Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney
Getting Better lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Trump celebrates strong jobs report at rally

Job growth powers ahead

Economy adds 250K jobs in October

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Jim Cramer on October jobs report: We have to move fast

CEA’s Hassett on China Trade, Jobs Report, Debt and Deficit

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A Deep Dive Into the U.S. October Jobs Report

How Wall Street Views the October Jobs Report

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What Is 3%? Jim Cramer on the Jobs Report

Alan Greenspan: Tightest labor market I’ve ever seen

Greenspan: We are in uncharted territory

Alan Greenspan: We have to deal with entitlements

Greenspan: The financial community doesn’t care about bookkeeping, they’re going to confront inflation

Defining the Unemployment Rate

Is Unemployment Undercounted?

Labor Force Participation

Cyclical Unemployment

Frictional Unemployment

Structural Unemployment

Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve

Monetary Policy: The Best Case Scenario

Milton Friedman: Inflation vs Unemployment

Milton Friedman – Stimulus and Inflation

Milton Friedman – Money and Inflation (Q&A)

Responsibility to the Poor

Milton Friedman: There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

TAKE IT TO THE LIMITS: Milton Friedman on Libertarianism

156,562,000: Record Employment for 12th Time Under Trump

By Susan Jones | November 2, 2018 | 8:41 AM EDT

A sign of the times in an Illinois shop window. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – The economy is the second most important issue for registered voters as the midterm election nears, a new Gallup Poll says. And there was very good economic news on Friday, as the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics rolled out the October employment report — the final one before next week’s midterm election.

The number of employed Americans has never been higher. The 156,562,000 Americans employed in October is the twefth record set under President Donald Trump.

In October, the number of employed men age 20 and up — 80,405,000 — set the 12th record since Trump took office; and likewise, for the 12th time, the number of employed women age 20 and up set a record, reaching 70,909,000 in October.

The unemployment rate held at 3.7 percent, the same as September, which is the lowest it’s been in decades — since the end of 1969. And the Hispanic unemployment rate, 4.4 percent, has never been lower.

The unemployment rate for African-Americans, 6.2 percent, remained near the all-time low of 5.9 percent set in May.

On top of those numbers, the economy added a whopping 250,000 jobs last month. After revisions, job gains have averaged 218,000 over the past 3 months.

(“Wow!” Trump tweeted on Friday morning. “The U.S. added 250,000 Jobs in October – and this was despite the hurricanes. Unemployment at 3.7%. Wages UP! These are incredible numbers. Keep it going, Vote Republican!”)

The number of Americans not in the labor force dipped to 95.8 million, down from last month’s record high; and the labor force participation rate increased two-tenths of a point to 62.9 percent, a move in the right direction.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent), adult women (3.4 percent), teenagers (11.9 percent), Whites (3.3 percent), Blacks (6.2 percent), and Asians (3.2 percent) showed little or no change in October.

In October, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 5 cents to $27.30. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 83 cents, or 3.1 percent.

In October, the nation’s civilian noninstitutionalized population, consisting of all people age 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution, reached 258,514,000. Of those, 162,637,000 participated in the labor force by either holding a job or actively seeking one.

The 162,637,000 who participated in the labor force equaled 62.9 percent of the 258,514,000 civilian noninstitutionalized population, the same as August.

The higher the participation rate, the better, but economists expect this percentage to remain stagnant and decline in the years ahead as an increasing number of baby boomers retire.

President Trump highlghted the booming economy at his rally in Missouri yesterday, telling voters that next week’s election “will decide whether we build on an extraordinary prosperity,” or whether Democrats “will wipe it all away.”

“The unemployment rate just fell to the lowest level in over 50 years,” the president said. “More Americans are working now than any time in history. Think of that…So today, right now, we have more Americans working than at any time, any time in the history of our country. That’s pretty good,” he said. “That’s pretty good!”

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Alternate Unemployment Charts

The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.

The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

 

Public Commentary on Unemployment

Unemployment Data Series   subcription required(Subscription required.)  View  Download Excel CSV File   Last Updated: November 2nd, 2018

The ShadowStats Alternate Unemployment Rate for October 2018 is 21.2%.

Republishing our charts:  Permission, Restrictions and Instructions (includes important requirements for successful hot-linking)

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Civilian Labor Force Level

162,637,000

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155357(1) 155526 156108 155404 155564 155742 156011 156124 156019 156383 156455 156301
2015 157063(1) 156734 156754 157051 157449 157071 157035 157132 156700 157138 157435 158043
2016 158387(1) 158811 159253 158919 158512 158976 159207 159514 159734 159700 159544 159736
2017 159718(1) 159997 160235 160181 159729 160214 160467 160598 161082 160371 160533 160597
2018 161115(1) 161921 161763 161527 161539 162140 162245 161776 161926 162637
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Labor Force Participation Rate

62.9%




Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.6 62.3 62.5 62.5 62.7
2016 62.8 62.9 63.0 62.8 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.7 62.7 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.9

Unemployment Level

6,075,000

 

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 15046 15113 15202 15325 14849 14474 14512 14648 14579 14516 15081 14348
2011 14013 13820 13737 13957 13855 13962 13763 13818 13948 13594 13302 13093
2012 12797 12813 12713 12646 12660 12692 12656 12471 12115 12124 12005 12298
2013 12471 11950 11689 11760 11654 11751 11335 11279 11270 11136 10787 10404
2014 10235 10365 10435 9724 9740 9474 9610 9602 9266 8972 9064 8704
2015 8951 8634 8578 8546 8662 8265 8206 7996 7891 7884 7948 7907
2016 7811 7806 8024 7942 7465 7812 7723 7827 7919 7761 7419 7502
2017 7642 7486 7171 7021 6837 6964 6956 7127 6759 6524 6616 6576
2018 6684 6706 6585 6346 6065 6564 6280 6234 5964 6075

Not in Labor Force

95,877,000

 

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91557 91559 91150 92036 92058 92072 92012 92105 92428 92274 92390 92726
2015 92660 93165 93326 93214 93006 93592 93841 93963 94625 94403 94312 93893
2016 94010 93766 93515 94049 94662 94421 94413 94340 94357 94621 94996 95006
2017 94364 94248 94179 94407 95038 94743 94684 94759 94480 95395 95416 95512
2018 95665 95012 95335 95745 95915 95502 95598 96290 96364 95877

U-3 Unemployment Rate

3.7%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.3 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.6 4.7
2017 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.1 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.7

 U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.4 %

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.7 9.8 9.8 9.8 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.3 9.1
2017 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.8 7.5 7.4 7.5 7.4

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until            USDL-18-1739
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, November 2, 2018

Technical information:
 Household data:     (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data: (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:        (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                        THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- OCTOBER 2018


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 250,000 in October, and the unemployment rate
was unchanged at 3.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job
gains occurred in health care, in manufacturing, in construction, and in transportation
and warehousing.

   __________________________________________________________________________________
  |                                                                                  |
  |                               Hurricane Michael                                  |
  |                                                                                  |
  | Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle on October 10, 2018,    |
  | during the reference periods for both the establishment and household surveys.   |
  | Hurricane Michael had no discernible effect on the national employment and       |
  | unemployment estimates for October, and response rates for the two surveys were  |
  | within normal ranges. For information on how severe weather can affect employment|
  | and hours data, see Question 8 in the Frequently Asked Questions section of this |
  | news release.                                                                    |
  |                                                                                  |
  | BLS will release the state estimates of employment and unemployment on           |
  | November 16, 2018, at 10:00 a.m. (EST).                                          |
  |__________________________________________________________________________________|


Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate remained at 3.7 percent in October, and the number of unemployed
persons was little changed at 6.1 million. Over the year, the unemployment rate and
the number of unemployed persons declined by 0.4 percentage point and 449,000,
respectively. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent),
adult women (3.4 percent), teenagers (11.9 percent), Whites (3.3 percent), Blacks
(6.2 percent), Asians (3.2 percent), and Hispanics (4.4 percent) showed little or no
change in October. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially
unchanged at 1.4 million in October and accounted for 22.5 percent of the unemployed.
(See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate increased by 0.2 percentage point to 62.9 percent in
October but has shown little change over the year. The employment-population ratio
edged up by 0.2 percentage point to 60.6 percent in October and has increased by 0.4
percentage point over the year. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as
involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 4.6 million in October.
These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part
time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time jobs.
(See table A-8.)

In October, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little
changed from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were
not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job
sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had
not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 506,000 discouraged workers in October, about
unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers
are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available
for them. The remaining 984,000 persons marginally attached to the labor force in
October had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family
responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 250,000 in October, following an average
monthly gain of 211,000 over the prior 12 months. In October, job growth occurred in
health care, in manufacturing, in construction, and in transportation and warehousing.
(See table B-1.)

Health care added 36,000 jobs in October. Within the industry, employment growth
occurred in hospitals (+13,000) and in nursing and residential care facilities
(+8,000). Employment in ambulatory health care services continued to trend up
(+14,000). Over the past 12 months, health care employment grew by 323,000.

In October, employment in manufacturing increased by 32,000. Most of the increase
occurred in durable goods manufacturing, with a gain in transportation equipment
(+10,000). Manufacturing has added 296,000 jobs over the year, largely in durable
goods industries.

Construction employment rose by 30,000 in October, with nearly half of the gain
occurring among residential specialty trade contractors (+14,000). Over the year,
construction has added 330,000 jobs.

Transportation and warehousing added 25,000 jobs in October. Within the industry,
employment growth occurred in couriers and messengers (+8,000) and in warehousing
and storage (+8,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing
has increased by 184,000.

Employment in leisure and hospitality edged up in October (+42,000). Employment was
unchanged in September, likely reflecting the impact of Hurricane Florence. The
average gain for the 2 months combined (+21,000) was the same as the average monthly
gain in the industry for the 12-month period prior to September.

In October, employment in professional and business services continued to trend up
(+35,000). Over the year, the industry has added 516,000 jobs.

Employment in mining also continued to trend up over the month (+5,000). The industry
has added 65,000 jobs over the year, with most of the gain in support activities for
mining.

Employment in other major industries--including wholesale trade, retail trade,
information, financial activities, and government--showed little change over the
month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.1
hour to 34.5 hours in October. In manufacturing, the workweek edged down by 0.1 hour
to 40.8 hours, and overtime was unchanged at 3.5 hours. The average workweek for
production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls, at 33.7 hours,
was unchanged over the month. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In October, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls
rose by 5 cents to $27.30. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by
83 cents, or 3.1 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and
nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $22.89 in October. (See tables B-3
and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for September was revised down from
+134,000 to +118,000, and the change for August was revised up from +270,000 to
+286,000. The downward revision in September offset the upward revision in August.
(Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and
government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation
of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 218,000 over the
past 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for November is scheduled to be released on Friday,
December 7, 2018, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).



The PDF version of the news release

News release charts

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Oct.
2017
Aug.
2018
Sept.
2018
Oct.
2018
Change from:
Sept.
2018-
Oct.
2018

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

255,766 258,066 258,290 258,514 224

Civilian labor force

160,371 161,776 161,926 162,637 711

Participation rate

62.7 62.7 62.7 62.9 0.2

Employed

153,846 155,542 155,962 156,562 600

Employment-population ratio

60.2 60.3 60.4 60.6 0.2

Unemployed

6,524 6,234 5,964 6,075 111

Unemployment rate

4.1 3.9 3.7 3.7 0.0

Not in labor force

95,395 96,290 96,364 95,877 -487

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

4.1 3.9 3.7 3.7 0.0

Adult men (20 years and over)

3.8 3.5 3.4 3.5 0.1

Adult women (20 years and over)

3.6 3.6 3.3 3.4 0.1

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.7 12.8 12.8 11.9 -0.9

White

3.5 3.4 3.3 3.3 0.0

Black or African American

7.3 6.3 6.0 6.2 0.2

Asian

3.0 3.0 3.5 3.2 -0.3

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 -0.1

Total, 25 years and over

3.3 3.2 3.0 3.1 0.1

Less than a high school diploma

6.1 5.7 5.5 6.0 0.5

High school graduates, no college

4.3 3.9 3.7 4.0 0.3

Some college or associate degree

3.6 3.5 3.2 3.0 -0.2

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.0 2.1 2.0 2.0 0.0

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,214 2,875 2,796 2,850 54

Job leavers

731 862 730 726 -4

Reentrants

2,001 1,846 1,877 1,906 29

New entrants

626 584 586 606 20

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,128 2,208 2,065 2,057 -8

5 to 14 weeks

1,943 1,720 1,720 1,821 101

15 to 26 weeks

856 923 861 856 -5

27 weeks and over

1,645 1,332 1,384 1,373 -11

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

4,880 4,379 4,642 4,621 -21

Slack work or business conditions

2,960 2,551 2,782 2,816 34

Could only find part-time work

1,615 1,365 1,447 1,436 -11

Part time for noneconomic reasons

20,897 21,781 21,464 21,512 48

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,535 1,443 1,577 1,491

Discouraged workers

524 434 383 506

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Oct.
2017
Aug.
2018
Sept.
2018(P)
Oct.
2018(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

271 286 118 250

Total private

277 267 121 246

Goods-producing

38 49 42 67

Mining and logging

1 7 4 5

Construction

17 31 20 30

Manufacturing

20 11 18 32

Durable goods(1)

10 11 14 21

Motor vehicles and parts

-1.6 2.7 1.0 6.8

Nondurable goods

10 0 4 11

Private service-providing

239 218 79 179

Wholesale trade

7.5 20.6 3.3 9.1

Retail trade

6.5 9.1 -32.4 2.4

Transportation and warehousing

13.7 23.1 20.8 24.8

Utilities

0.0 0.9 0.1 1.2

Information

0 -4 -4 7

Financial activities

9 9 15 7

Professional and business services(1)

60 54 46 35

Temporary help services

19.8 10.8 7.6 3.3

Education and health services(1)

15 67 26 44

Health care and social assistance

35.7 52.5 34.9 46.7

Leisure and hospitality

110 30 0 42

Other services

17 8 4 7

Government

-6 19 -3 4

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

169 220 190 218

Total private

167 199 175 211

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.7 49.7 49.7

Total private women employees

48.1 48.3 48.3 48.3

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.5 34.4 34.5

Average hourly earnings

$26.47 $27.17 $27.25 $27.30

Average weekly earnings

$910.57 $937.37 $937.40 $941.85

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

107.8 110.0 109.7 110.3

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.3 -0.3 0.5

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

136.5 142.8 143.0 143.9

Over-the-month percent change

0.4 0.6 0.1 0.6

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

63.2 64.5 60.7 65.7

Manufacturing (76 industries)

63.8 56.6 65.1 62.5

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2017 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

The Beatles – Hey Jude

Hey Jude
Hey Jude, don’t make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better
Hey Jude, don’t be afraid
You were made to go out and get her
The minute you let her under your skin
Then you begin to make it better
And anytime you feel the pain, hey Jude, refrain
Don’t carry the world upon your shoulders
For well you know that it’s a fool who plays it cool
By making his world a little colder
Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah
Hey Jude, don’t let me down
You have found her, now go and get her
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better
So let it out and let it in, hey Jude, begin
You’re waiting for someone to perform with
And don’t you know that it’s just you, hey Jude, you’ll do
The movement you need is on your shoulder
Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah yeah
Hey Jude, don’t make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her under your skin
Then you’ll begin to make it
Better better better better better better, oh
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney
Hey Jude lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

 

Getting Better

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“Getting Better”
Getting Better - The Beatles (sheet music).jpg

Original UK sheet music for the song
Song by the Beatles
from the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
Released 26 May 1967[1]
Recorded 9 March 1967
Genre
Length 2:47
Label ParlophoneCapitolEMI
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin

Getting Better” is a song written mainly by Paul McCartney, with lyrical contributions from John Lennon (credited to Lennon–McCartney).[3] It was recorded by the Beatles for the 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Composition

The song, which has been said to be musically reminiscent of the hit single “Penny Lane,”[4] moves forward by way of regular chords, produced by Lennon’s guitar, McCartney’s electric piano,[verification needed] and George Martin, who struck the strings of a pianet with a mallet. These heavily accented and repetitive lines cause the song to sound as if it is based on a drone. Lead guitarist George Harrison adds an Indian tanpura part to the final verse, which further accentuates this impact.

McCartney’s bassline, in counterpoint to this droning, was described by music critic Ian MacDonald as “dreamy” and “well thought out as a part of the production by McCartney”.[5] It was recorded after the main track was completed, as were many of the bass lines on Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.[6] Starting out in the verse with a pedal on the root note (G) that leaps two octaves, McCartney moves to a marching quarter-note (walking) bass line for the first (and only the first) chorus. In stark contrast, all subsequent choruses are played using a fluid, swing feel, full of anticipated notes that propel the song forward despite the quarter-note droning of the guitar and keyboard.

The song’s title and music suggest optimism, but some of the song’s lyrics have a more negative tone. In this sense, it reflects the contrasting personas of the two songwriters. In response to McCartney’s line, “It’s getting better all the time”, Lennon replies, “Can’t get no worse!”[7] In a December 1983 interview, McCartney praised this contribution as an example of things he “couldn’t ever have done [him]self”.[8]

Referring to the lyric “I used to be cruel to my woman/I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved/Man I was mean but I’m changing my scene/And I’m doing the best that I can”, Lennon admitted that he had done things in relationships in the past that he was not proud of.[9]

In a 1980 interview in Playboy with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Lennon, when asked about the song, said that the song’s lyrics came personally from his own experience abusing women in relationships in the past. He states: “It is a diary form of writing. All that ‘I used to be cruel to my woman / I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved’ was me. I used to be cruel to my woman, and physically—any woman. I was a hitter. I couldn’t express myself and I hit. I fought men and I hit women. That is why I am always on about peace, you see. It is the most violent people who go for love and peace. Everything’s the opposite. But I sincerely believe in love and peace. I am a violent man who has learned not to be violent and regrets his violence. I will have to be a lot older before I can face in public how I treated women as a youngster.”

According to the author Hunter Davies and music critic Ian MacDonald, the initial idea for the song’s title came from a phrase often spoken by Jimmie Nicol, the group’s stand-in drummer for the Australian leg of a 1964 tour.[3][5]

Lennon on the roof

One of the recording sessions for “Getting Better” is infamous for an incident involving Lennon. During the 21 March 1967 session in which producer George Martin added a piano solo to “Lovely Rita“, Lennon complained that he did not feel well and could not focus.[10][11]He had accidentally taken LSD when he meant to take an upper.[12] Unaware of the mistake, Martin took him up to the roof of Abbey Road Studios for some fresh air, and returned to Studio Two where McCartney and Harrison were waiting. They knew why Lennon was not well, and upon hearing where Lennon was, rushed to the roof to retrieve him and prevent a possible accident.[11][13][14]

Personnel

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[4]

Live performances

Paul McCartney performed the song live for the first time by any Beatle on his 2002 Driving World Tour. He later reprised the song on his 2003 Back in the World Tour.[citation needed]

Cover versions

Notes

  1. Jump up^ Everett 1999, p. 123. “In the United Kingdom Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…was rush-released six days ahead of its official date, June 1.”
  2. Jump up^ Unterberger 2009.
  3. Jump up to:a b Miles 1997, pp. 312–313.
  4. Jump up to:a b MacDonald 2005, p. 241.
  5. Jump up to:a b MacDonald 2005, p. 200.
  6. Jump up^ MacDonald 2005.
  7. Jump up^ Miles 1997, p. 314.
  8. Jump up^ “December 1983 interview”. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  9. Jump up^http://www.recmusicbeatles.com/public/files/bbs/jl_yo.playboy/lennon4.html
  10. Jump up^ Spitz 2005, pp. 670–671.
  11. Jump up to:a b Lewisohn 1988, p. 104.
  12. Jump up^ Miles 1997, p. 382.
  13. Jump up^ The Beatles 2000, p. 242.
  14. Jump up^ Emerick & Massey 2006, p. 172–173.
  15. Jump up^ http://www.beatlesebooks.com/getting-better

References

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Getting_Better

 

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Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Friday shows that 51% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Forty-seven percent (47%) disapprove.

The latest figures include 37% who Strongly Approve of the president is performing and 40% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -3. (See trends)

Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

Now that Gallup has quit the field, Rasmussen Reports is the only nationally recognized public opinion firm that still tracks President Trump’s job approval ratings on a daily basis. If your organization is interested in a weekly or longer sponsorship of Rasmussen Reports’ Daily Presidential Tracking Poll,  please send e-mail to beth@rasmussenreports.com  .

With early voting in full swing and Election Day approaching, we asked voters if they’re more likely or less likely to tell people how they are voting. Trump voters held back in 2016, and that unmeasured margin fooled most pollsters, not Rasmussen Reports  Find out at 10:30 if that silent vote is still out there.

 

Seventy-seven percent (77%) of Republicans say they always vote in midterm elections, as do 71% of Democrats and 63% of voters not affiliated with either major political party. The real story on Tuesday will be which side turns out even more than usual.

Look for Rasmussen Reports’ final Generic Congressional Ballot on Monday morning. Democrats now hold a three-point lead on the survey which has a +/- 2 margin of error.

President Trump is sending troops to the southern border to stop thousands of Central Americans now in Mexico from entering the United States illegally. Voters tend to agree with the president’s decision, but as is frequently the case on issues related to illegal immigration, there’s a sharp difference of opinion between Democrats and Republicans.

Illegal immigration is the most important voting issue in the upcoming elections for 22% of Republicans, 15% of unaffiliated voters and eight percent (8%) of Democrats.

 

20-Jan-1711-Apr-1729-Jun-1719-Sep-1711-Dec-1706-Mar-1824-May-1815-Aug-1802-Nov-180%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%www.RasmussenReports.comTotal Approve (Trump)Total Approve (Obama)

Sixty-one percent (61%) of Americans favor the death penalty, and among these adults, 68% think it needs to be carried out in a more timely fashion rather than delayed for all possible legal appeals.

Following last weekend’s massacre at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Americans continue to worry that media overcoverage of horrific events like this inspires copycats.

Democrats (51%) are much more likely than Republicans (13%) and those not affiliated with either major party (25%) to blame the availability of guns for mass shootings more than the person who pulls the trigger.

-320-Jan-1711-Apr-1729-Jun-1719-Sep-1711-Dec-1706-Mar-1824-May-1815-Aug-1802-Nov-1810%20%30%40%50%60%www.RasmussenReports.comStrongly DisapproveStrongly Approve

Some readers wonder how we come up with our job approval ratings for the president since they often don’t show as dramatic a change as some other pollsters do. It depends on how you ask the question and whom you ask.

To get a sense of longer-term job approval trends for the president, Rasmussen Reports compiles our tracking data on a full month-by-month basis.

Rasmussen Reports has been a pioneer in the use of automated telephone polling techniques, but many other firms still utilize their own operator-assisted technology (see methodology).

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 2.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Results are also compiled on a full-week basis and crosstabs for full-week results are available for Platinum Members.

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentariesare available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/political_updates/prez_track_nov02

Trump, Economy Top Voter Concerns

Thursday, October 25, 2018

President Trump and the economy are the major concerns for voters going into the midterm congressional elections.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 30% of Likely U.S. Voters view Trump as the most important issue to their vote in the upcoming elections. The economy is most important for 22%, followed by 15% who rank illegal immigration that way and 14% who say the same of Obamacare. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

(Want a free daily email update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 23-24, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/october_2018/trump_economy_top_voter_concerns

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The Pronk Pops Show 1163, October 26, 2018, Story 1: Bomb Device Suspect, Cesar Altier Sayoc, Arrested Trump Supporter — Red Capped Make America Great Again Native American Indian — Crazy Van Easy Rider — Busted — Videos — Story 2: Incoming Caravan of Illegal Alien Mob Moving in Mexico towards United States — Invasion of America By Illegal Aliens Continues — Where is The Wall? — Videos — Story 3: Advanced Estimate Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Increases By 3.5% In Third Quarter — Consumption Up By 4.0%, Investment Flat And Housing Construction Slump — Videos

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Pronk Pops Show 1163 October 26, 2018

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Pronk Pops Show 1149, October 1, 2018

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He posted a photograph of himself wearing a MAGA hat in front of the US Capitol in 2017Political Cartoons by AF Branco

Real GDP: Percent change from preceding quarterA driver snapped a photo of this van, believed to belong to Sayoc. The van is seen covered in stickers expressing support for Trump, and disdain for his liberal critics

See the source image

Story 1: Bomb Device Suspect, Cesar Altier Sayoc, Arrested Trump Supporter — Red Capped Make America Great Again Native American Indian — Crazy Van Easy Rider — Busted — Videos —

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PICTURED: Trump-supporting, bodybuilding, Native American Florida strip-club worker is revealed as the ‘MAGAbomber’ who ‘sent suspicious packages to 12 liberals’

  • Federal authorities arrested a suspect in the mail bombing spree on Friday in South Florida
  • The suspect is reportedly a male in his 50s who has a history of threatening judges 
  • FBI discovered suspicious package addressed to Senator Cory Booker in Florida on Thursday night
  • Then a postal inspector intercepted another package to James Clapper in Manhattan Friday morning
  • The suspicious package was addressed to Clapper at headquarters of CNN, where he is a contributor
  • NYPD bomb squad’s Total Containment Vessel responded to postal facility in Midtown to remove package
  • Discoveries mark the 11th and 12th suspicious packages targeting outspoken critics of President Trump
  • FBI warns the public to be on the lookout for similar packages and says there could be more bombs 

The suspect in a mail bombing spree targeting critics of President Donald Trump has been identified.

Cesar Altier Sayoc was taken into custody on Friday morning in Plantation, Florida in connection with the 12 suspicious packages that have been discovered this week.

According to Sayoc’s Facebook page, he is a Trump fan who posted pictures and videos of himself at one of the President’s rallies in October 2016.

He is Native American, and according to a picture posted on his social media page, he is a member of the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

In a post a year ago, Sayoc shared a photograph of Governor Rick Scott and Donald Trump, writing: ‘The greatest Governor in Country Fla Rick Scott and great friend of We Unconquered Seminole Tribe . Trump Trump Trump’

He shared bodybuilding pictures and appears to have worked in a strip club.

He expressed his dislike of Hillary Clinton and posted stories about incidents of Islamic terrorism.

The suspect in his 50s was arrested in front of an AutoZone store in Plantation, a police source tells DailyMail.com.

Michelle Taylor, a nurse at the Senior Medical Associates clinic, saw police taking a vehicle believed to be Sayoc’s into custody.

‘We’ve been in the office for an hour and we’re so nervous,’ she said. ‘The police were surrounding some kind of a van. Thank god we’re done with our patients for the day and there’s only two of us in here.’

He posted a photograph of himself wearing a MAGA hat in front of the US Capitol in 2017

Sayoc is seen at an event supporting Trump and wearing a 'MAGA' hat in this photo posted to Facebook in October 2016

A driver snapped a photo of this van, believed to belong to Sayoc. The van is seen covered in stickers expressing support for Trump, and disdain for his liberal critics

The person who took the photos was not aware of the connection to the investigation, but noted the odd amount of stickers

A witness who works at Marlins Insurance said dozens of police cars descended on the area around State Road 7 and SW 8th Street about 10am, a few feet away from her office.

‘It’s really bad,’ the woman said by telephone. She declined to give her name. ‘We heard a loud bang, like a bomb exploding. Police officers who told us to stay inside said they were arrested the guy who’s been sending bombs all over the place. It’s pretty scary but we’re inside trying to get some work done.’

The suspect is reportedly a former resident of New York who is living in Florida. The 12 mail bombs are all believed to have been handled by a regional mail sorting facility in southern Florida.

The suspect is known to law enforcement, and has a history of making terroristic threats to judges, sources said.

Heavy police activity was seen in Plantation, Florida, a town to the west of Fort Lauderdale and directly south of Sunrise, the location of Debbie Wasserman-Schultz’s office, which the bombs listed as a return address.

Police impounded a white panel van that is believed to be connected to the investigation.

The Department of Justice announced a press conference for 2.30pm at which further details are expected to be available.

Police impounded a white panel van (above) that is believed to be connected to the investigation

Investigators are seen impounding a white panel van in Plantation, Florida on Friday in connection with an arrest

The van as covered with a blue tarp and transported away by investigators after the arrest on Friday

Earlier in the day, the investigators said they had found two new packages believed to be part of the mail bombing spree, addressed to Senator Cory Booker and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

The package to Booker was found on Thursday night at a mail sorting facility in Florida, and the package addressed to Clapper was found at a postal facility in Manhattan on Friday.

The two new packages marked the 11th and 12th suspected mail bombs in a spree that has targeted critics of Trump.

Trump’s first public response to the latest suspicious packages was a tweet at 10.19am reading: ‘Republicans are doing so well in early voting, and at the polls, and now this ‘Bomb’ stuff happens and the momentum greatly slows – news not talking politics. Very unfortunate, what is going on. Republicans, go out and vote!’

Senator Cory Booker
former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper

The FBI found two new packages believed to be part of the mail bombing spree, addressed to Senator Cory Booker (left) and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (right)

The suspicious package (above) addressed to James Clapper at the Time Warner Center was intercepted by postal inspectors at a Manhattan sorting facility on Friday morning

The suspicious package (above) addressed to James Clapper at the Time Warner Center was intercepted by postal inspectors at a Manhattan sorting facility on Friday morning

NYPD's Total Containment vessel arrives as law enforcement respond to the scene of a suspicious package at a postal facility on Friday in New York

The Total Containment Vessel is used to transport explosive devices and is designed to contain powerful blasts

The Total Containment Vessel is used to transport explosive devices and is designed to contain powerful blasts

The special NYPD vehicle is seen transporting the package addressed to James Clapper to a secure facility in the Bronx

The special NYPD vehicle is seen transporting the package addressed to James Clapper to a secure facility in the Bronx

NYPD Deputy Commissioner Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller was on scene during an investigation of a bomb addressed to James Clapper at a US Post Office on W 52nd Street on Friday in Manhattan

NYPD Deputy Commissioner Intelligence and Counterterrorism John Miller was on scene during an investigation of a bomb addressed to James Clapper at a US Post Office on W 52nd Street on Friday in Manhattan

FDNY set up a command post at an investigation of a bomb at a postal sorting facility in Midtown Manhattan on Friday

FDNY set up a command post at an investigation of a bomb at a postal sorting facility in Midtown Manhattan on Friday

A police dog assists in a suspicious package response at a postal facility in Manhattan on Friday morning

A police dog assists in a suspicious package response at a postal facility in Manhattan on Friday morning

Postal workers stand on the street after evacuating a sorting facility during a report of a suspicious package in Manhattan

Postal workers stand on the street after evacuating a sorting facility during a report of a suspicious package in Manhattan

Postal workers stand on the street after evacuating a Midtown Manhattan postal facility on Friday

Postal workers stand on the street after evacuating a Midtown Manhattan postal facility on Friday

The facility was evacuated after inspectors intercepted a suspicious package addressed to James Clapper

The facility was evacuated after inspectors intercepted a suspicious package addressed to James Clapper

The map above shows the locations of 12 suspicious packages that have all been linked to a mail bombing spree

The map above shows the locations of 12 suspicious packages that have all been linked to a mail bombing spree

The package to Clapper was addressed to CNN’s headquarters in the Time Warner Center in Midtown Manhattan, but was intercepted before delivery.

A photo of the package showed that it matched notable characteristics of the previous mail bombs, none of which have exploded.

Clapper joined CNN as a contributor after stepping down as the nation’s most senior intelligence official last year.

‘At least they got the correct spelling of my name and they got the right network,’ Clapper said in remarks to CNN, referring to a mail bomb sent to CNN earlier this week and addressed to ‘John Brenan’.

John Brennan, a former CIA director, is a contributor for MSNBC.

‘This is definitely domestic terrorism, no question about it in my mind,’ Clapper said in an interview with the cable network. ‘This is not going to silence the administration´s critics.’

Clapper said that he had been on vacation with his wife, and had warned the neighbors who were collecting his mail to be on the lookout for suspicious packages as the mail bomb spree developed this week.

Like the other targets in the mail bomb spree, Clapper has been harshly critical of Trump. In a speech last year, he said that Trump was guilty of ‘ignorance or disrespect’.

First respondents are seen on the scene where suspicious package was found in Midtown. There were no reports of injuries and the stretcher is believed to be a precaution

Police respond to a report of a suspicious package at a postal facility in Midtown Manhattan on Friday morning

Police respond to a report of a suspicious package in the Manhattan borough of New York

Police swarmed the area outside a Manhattan postal facility after a package was found

The package intercepted on Friday was addressed to Clapper care of CNN, but was spotted by postal inspectors at a sorting facility before delivery.

The NYPD bomb squad was on scene at the postal facility at West 52nd Street and 8th Avenue on Friday morning.

The NYPD’s Total Containment Vessel was spotted at the scene by about 9.30am.

Streets in the area were closed off and postal workers were seen waiting on the sidewalks after the facility was evacuated.

The containment vehicle departed the area at 10am transporting the suspected bomb to a secure police facility in Rodman’s Neck in the Bronx.

Police respond to a report of a suspicious package addressed to James Clapper in Manhattan

Streets were shut down and the facility evacuated after a suspicious package was found

Streets were shut down and the facility evacuated after a suspicious package was found

Police respond to a report of a suspicious package in the Manhattan borough of New York on Friday

On Thursday, a local police bomb squad and canine units joined federal investigators to examine a sprawling U.S. mail distribution center at Opa-Locka, northwest of Miami, Miami-Dade County police said.

Investigators believe that all of the suspicious packages were sorted at the facility, which processes mail regionally in South Florida.

It was at the Opa-Locka facility that the 11th bomb was discovered, addressed to Senator Booker.

Booker is a Democrat from New Jersey. Like Clapper and the other targets of the mail bombs in the recent spree, he is an outspoken critic of Trump.

The identity and motives of the bomber have not been revealed, however, with the FBI saying it is pursuing the case as the agency’s highest priority.

No one has claimed responsibility for the bombs.

A police car sits outside New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker's office in Camden, New Jersey on Friday. The FBI says a suspicious package addressed to Booker has been recovered in Florida and is similar in appearance to recent mail bombs

A police dog is loaded into an SUV outside New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker's office in Camden, New Jersey

A police dog is loaded into an SUV outside New Jersey Democratic Senator Cory Booker’s office in Camden, New Jersey

A police officer and dog are shown outside a postal facility on Thursday in Opa-locka, Florida. The search uncovered a suspicious package addressed to Senator Cory Booker

A police officer and dog are shown outside a postal facility on Thursday in Opa-locka, Florida. The search uncovered a suspicious package addressed to Senator Cory Booker

Senator Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, told MSNBC on Friday that the mail bombs were stoking fear across the county and that U.S. leaders, including Trump, must reassure the public.

Elected officials and others need to say that this is not who we are as a country, Warner said. ‘That would be a heck of a lot stronger if that message also came from the White House.’

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said that Florida appeared to be the starting point for at least some of the bomb shipments.

‘Some of the packages went through the mail. They originated, some of them, from Florida,’ she said during an interview with Fox News Channel on Thursday.

‘I am confident that this person or people will be brought to justice.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6321331/Suspected-mail-bomber-identified-Cesar-Altier-Sayoc.html

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Story 3: Advanced Estimate Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Increases By 3.5% In Third Quarter — Consumption Up By 4.0%, Investment Flat And Housing Construction Slump — Videos

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Gross Domestic Product, 3rd quarter 2018 (advance estimate)

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 3.5 percent in the third quarter of 2018 (table 1), according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the second quarter, real GDP increased 4.2 percent.

The Bureau emphasized that the third-quarter advance estimate released today is based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (see “Source Data for the Advance Estimate” on page 2). The “second” estimate for the third quarter, based on more complete data, will be released on November 28, 2018.

Real GDP: Percent change from preceding quarterThe increase in real GDP in the third quarter reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), private inventory investment, state and local government spending, federal government spending, and nonresidential fixed investment that were partly offset by negative contributions from exports and residential fixed investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased (table 2).

The deceleration in real GDP growth in the third quarter reflected a downturn in exports and a deceleration in nonresidential fixed investment. Imports increased in the third quarter after decreasing in the second. These movements were partly offset by an upturn in private inventory investment.

Current dollar GDP increased 4.9 percent, or $247.1 billion, in the third quarter to a level of $20.66 trillion. In the second quarter, current-dollar GDP increased 7.6 percent, or $370.9 billion (table 1 and table 3).

The price index for gross domestic purchases increased 1.7 percent in the third quarter, compared with an increase of 2.4 percent in the second quarter (table 4). The PCE price index increased 1.6 percent, compared with an increase of 2.0 percent. Excluding food and energy prices, the PCE price index increased 1.6 percent, compared with an increase of 2.1 percent.

Personal Income (table 8)

Current-dollar personal income increased $180.4 billion in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $180.7 billion in the second quarter. Accelerations in rental income, wages and salaries, and nonfarm proprietors’ income were offset by a downturn in farm proprietors’ income and a slowdown in dividend income.

Disposable personal income increased $155.0 billion, or 4.1 percent, in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $168.9 billion, or 4.5 percent, in the second quarter. Real disposable personal income increased 2.5 percent, the same increase as in the second quarter.

Personal saving was $999.6 billion in the third quarter, compared with $1,054.3 billion in the second quarter. The personal saving rate — personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income — was 6.4 percent in the third quarter, compared with 6.8 percent in the second quarter.

Source Data for the Advance Estimate

Information on the source data and key assumptions used for unavailable source data in the advance estimate is provided in a Technical Note that is posted with the news release on BEA’s Web site. A detailed “Key Source Data and Assumptions” file is also posted for each release. For information on updates to GDP, see the “Additional Information” section that follows.

https://www.bea.gov/news/2018/gross-domestic-product-3rd-quarter-2018-advance-estimate

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The Pronk Pops Show 1161, October 23, 2018 — Story 1: Can Radical Progressive Democrats Win Statewide Races? — Florida Should Test The Proposition — Videos — Story 2: Blue Wave Slip Sliding Away — Videos — Story 3: Make No Waves Elections — Two Party Tyranny With Big Government Parties Unconstrained Government Spending — Day of Reckoning — Videos —

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Story 1: Can Radical Progressive Socialist Democrats Win Statewide  Races? — Florida Will Test The Proposition — Videos —

A closer look at Democratic Florida governor candidate Andrew Gillum

Florida’s Socialist Candidate Graduated from Same Training School as Other ‘Soros Revolutionaries’

FULL SPEECH: Ron DeSantis & Andrew Gillum Gets CNN The Florida Governor Debate | CNN Today 10/21/18

How Black Democrats Are Harnessing the Progressive Left | NYT News

Who Is Andrew Gillum?

Andrew Gillum speaks at his rally for governor

Jim DeFede Interviews Candidate For Florida Governor Andrew Gillum

Democrats’ Florida governor candidate soars ahead in polls – but is hit by neo-Nazi group’s racist robocalls and revelations he got Broadway tickets in an FBI sting

  • The Democratic candidate Andrew Gillum has led in every state poll 
  • He currently holds a 5-point edge in a polling average 
  • A racist robo-call ad includes a minstrel impersonation and calls him a ‘negro’ 
  • Documents reveal he accepted ‘Hamilton’ tickets from an undercover agent 

Andrew Gillum, the Democratic candidate for the Florida governorship, holds a continued lead in state polling – but now faces the twin perils of racist robo-calling and revelations he accepted ‘Hamilton’ tickets from an undercover agent.

Gillum opened up a 6-point lead over Republican Trump backer Rep. Ron DeSantis in the latest Quinnipiac University poll.

He leads DeSantis by 52 to 46 per cent, and has led in every pre-election poll in the state – although he held a 9-point margin in the same poll in late September, and his negative ratings have been rising.

Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis (L), shakes hands with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum after a CNN debate in Tampa, Florida, U.S., October 21, 2018. Photo taken October 21, 2018. DeSantis, a Donald Trump ally, brought up the issue of 'Hamilton' tickets in a televised debate

He holds about a 5 point lead in a RealClearPolitics polling average.

He took the tickets after an offer from lobbyist and friend Adam Corey, who in an email mentioned another man, Mike Miller, who is believed to be the agent.

‘Just checking in with you. Mike Miller and the crew have tickets for us for Hamilton tonight at 8 p.m.,’ Corey texted Gillum in August, Politico reported.

‘The question is, did you pay for the ‘Hamilton’ ticket, or did the undercover FBI agent pay for the ‘Hamilton’ ticket?’ DeSantis asked him.

Florida Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum leads by 6 points in a new Florida Governor poll

Gillum would be the first black governor in a state that has seen racial tensions

Gillum would be the first black governor in a state that has seen racial tensions

Documents show Gillum accepted tickets to see Hamilton from an under cover FBI agent after a friend and lobbyist said they were available 

‘I didn’t take free trips from anybody,’ Gillum hit back, without answering directly. ‘I’m a hardworking person. I know that may not fit your description of what you think people like me do. But I’ve worked hard for everything that I’ve gotten in my life, and I don’t need anybody handing me anything for free.’

Gillum told NBC’s ‘Meet the Press Daily’ on Tuesday: ‘Today’s news was no news for us at all. I always knew that if we were able to connect in New York, we would go and see “Hamilton”. When I got to the theatre, my brother handed me the ticket.’

He continued: ‘The idea that I accepted a gift never came to me. What I’ve tried to do throughout this whole process is be as open and transparent as I possibly can be. I understand that my opponent is attempting as best he can to muddy the waters here.’

Gillum, who would be the first black governor of Florida if elected, also has been the subject of racist robocalls.

On the calls, someone pretends to be Gillum and uses a minstrel dialect, calling himself a ‘negro.’

‘Well hello there. I is the negro Andrew Gillum and I’ll be askin’ you to make me governor of this here state of Florida,’ the voice says on the call.

‘My state opponent, who done call me monkey, is doin’ a lot of hollerin’ about how ‘spensive my plans for health care be,’ it continues.

‘These disgusting, abhorrent robocalls represent a continuation of the ugliest, most divisive campaign in Florida’s history,’ a Gillum spokesman said in a statement, NBC reported. ‘We would hope that these calls, and the dangerous people who are behind them, are not given any more attention than they already have been.’

The call says it was paid for by a white supremacist website out of Idaho.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6309261/Gillum-soars-Florida-governor-polls-hit-revelations-got-Broadway-tickets-sting.html

Ron DeSantis and Andrew Gillum Face Off Like Richard Nixon vs. John F. Kennedy Debate

With two weeks left in the contentious campaign for governor, Democrat Andrew Gillum and Republican Ron DeSantis spent their first debate hammering each other on policy and personal fights that have defined the election.

The debate put into focus the differences between DeSantis, a Donald Trump-endorsed conservative Republican, and Gillum, who ran in the primary as a progressive Democrat backed by Bernie Sanders.

The one-hour debate, sponsored by CNN, included a big helping of sharp-tongued rhetoric. Gillum called DeSantis a “stooge” of Trump, while DeSantis countered by saying he would have a better relationship with the White House, which means a boost for the Everglades, transportation, and the military.

Gillum’s jumping-off point was Trump’s most recent tweet in support of DeSantis. He called Tallahassee, the city where Gillum is mayor, one of “worst and most corrupt” cities in America. That came on the heels of Hurricane Michael, which hammered the Florida panhandle, including inflicting damage on Tallahassee, some of which remains.

“He insulted people just as they are trying to get out of harm’s way,” Gillum said of Trump’s tweet. “Congressman DeSantis said nothing about that. Why? Because he is his stooge.”
DeSantis, a former three-term congressman, did not back away from Trump’s support, but noted that he has stood up to him on a handful of issues. That included when the Trump administration added the waters off Florida to a list of those that could see additional offshore drilling, which is hugely unpopular in Florida.

“When the president wanted to do offshore drilling, I opposed him on that,” DeSantis said. “He listened to me, he listened to Gov. [Rick] Scott.”

Trump played a big role in pushing DeSantis over the finish line in the GOP primary and gave him so much help that DeSantis ran a commercial of him reading the “Art of the Deal” to his kids and playing with blocks as he says, “build the wall!”

DeSantis said the ad was intended to be self-deprecating.

“My wife and I were poking a little fun at ourselves,” DeSantis said.

Gillum disagreed sharply with him over whether Trump was a good role model for kids.

“Donald Trump is weak. And he performs as all weak people do,” Gillum said. “They become bullies. And Mr. DeSantis is his acolyte. He’s trying out to be the Trump’s apprentice.”

Race has also played a large factor in the race. Gillum is trying to become Florida’s first black governor, and DeSantis has fended off attacks throughout the general election that he is associated with groups with ties to white supremacist groups, and on the first day of the general election DeSantis said Florida should not “monkey this up” and elect Gillum.

DeSantis said he did not return money from a donor who used the N-word to describe former President Barack Obama because the donor “made a mistake. He apologized.”

Gillum said DeSantis was intentionally trying to use race as part of his campaign strategy.

“The ‘monkey this up’ comment said it all,” Gillum said. “And he has only continued in the course of his campaign to draw all the attention he can to the color of my skin. And the truth is, you know, I’m black. I’ve been black all my life. So far as I know, I will die black.

More broadly, DeSantis pointed to his military service and time as a federal prosecutor as proof that he was color blind. He then pivoted to Gillum’s decision to sign “The Freedom Pledge” from the leftist group Dream Defenders that targets the NRA and private prison companies. The group also opposes police and the state of Israel as currently governed, and DeSantis criticized Gillum for these associations, echoing attack ads from Republican groups that have aired for more than a month.

“The fact is Andrew signed a pledge with the Dream Defenders’ pledging to support this radical manifesto. If you read that, they are so vicious about hating law enforcement,” he said. “They say the police and prisons have no place in justice, and that law enforcement should be defunded, and the money diverted for welfare programs.”

Gillum responded by saying he had “no idea what pledge he is talking about. The only thing I said is that, as governor, I will not see private prisons operating here in the state of Florida.”
Gillum then brought the subject back to race.

“That was a clever attempt to get away from the fact that Mr. DeSantis himself used to moderate a xenophobic, racist Facebook page,” Gillum said.

“That is not true,” DeSantis interjected.

“It is in fact true,” Gillum said. “When you became the Republican nominee your response was, ‘I don’t even do social media.’ You got caught.”

But DeSantis said he was added as a moderator to the Facebook page without his knowledge and when the issue was brought to his attention, he had his name removed.

The race has been tight in most public polling, though trend lines point to Gillum having a slight lead. The Real Clear Politics average of polls has Gillum up 3.7 percentage points, but that includes a CNN poll released ahead of the debate that had Gillum up 12. Most viewed that as an outlier, and has been viewed with a skeptical eye by many on social media.

DeSantis took note of Tallahassee’s crime rate under Gillum, and tried to tie him to an FBI investigation of a Tallahassee economic development agency that has long dogged Gillum’s campaign, even though he has not publicly been accused of wrongdoing. There are pictures of Gillum with lobbyist and longtime friend Adam Corey, a central figure in the probe, on a boat tour in New York harbor. On the same trip, which included an undercover FBI agent, Gillum was given free Broadway musical tickets.

DeSantis called Gillum “corrupt” and said he should “not have gotten the Broadway tickets.”
CNN host Jake Tapper, who moderated the debate, directly asked about Gillum’s association with Corey, who has played a role in Gillum’s political ascent.

“We all have friends that sometimes let us down,” Gillum responded. “I’m not under FBI investigation, and neither is my city.”

On a policy front, the two sparred over health care.

Gillum avoided answering questions about supporting “Medicare for all” — a federal issue that he nevertheless mentioned on the campaign trail — and instead pivoted to calling for an expansion of Medicaid, a state issue.

DeSantis called “Medicare for all” a “euphemism” for a single-payer health system that would dramatically alter the health system, degrade quality and increase costs.

“Andrew’s running away from Medicare for all,” DeSantis said. “Under a single payer plan? Man, that’ll make the VA waiting list look like the Fast Pass at Disney World.”

Gillum struck back by noting that DeSantis repeatedly voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which protected people with preexisting conditions. He noted that DeSantis has yet to release a health care plan in the campaign and once told a cancer patient that he could always go to the emergency room for care.

“Health care is the major issue on Floridians minds,” Gillum said. “We deserve to hear from the congressman exactly what his health care proposal is. He’s been promising one for months. Nothing has come from his office.”

DeSantis accused Gillum of wanting “to take away employer-provided coverage. He thinks it should be illegal.”

“That’s not true,” Gillum interjected.

DeSantis said “Medicare for all” would destroy private coverage. Gillum then asked DeSantis to define “Medicare for all.”

“So you don’t support Bernie Sanders’ ‘Medicare for all?'” DeSantis asked.

“What I support is expanding Medicaid for over 800,000 Floridians who deserve to have access to their own doctor,” Gillum said, ignoring DeSantis’s repeated question about whether Gillum would sign a ‘Medicare for all’ bill.

https://www.politico.com/states/florida/story/2018/10/21/insults-fly-in-desantis-gillum-debate-658307

Florida Democratic activists love Andrew Gillum. They seem oblivious to the investigation.

One Democratic candidate for governor draws big crowds in Tampa Bay. A public corruption investigation looms over him.

Tallahassee Mayor and Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum talks with reporters before addressing a group of gay and lesbian Democrats in Tallahassee on Aug. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Brendan Farrington)

Four major candidates are running for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 2018, and each regularly visits Tampa Bay to court voters and donors.

Only one consistently draws sizable crowds of activists.

“Andrew Gillum is definitely my candidate,” said Sheira Hope, a St. Petersburg homemaker, before an online debate between Gillum, Tallahassee’s mayor, and Republican House Speaker Richard Corcoran. “I like his energy, I like his ideas, I like his honesty.”

Democratic organizers throughout Tampa Bay say it can be a struggle mustering decent crowds when former congresswoman Gwen Graham of Tallahassee, businessman Chris King of Winter Park or former Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine campaign here. Not so with Gillum, a charismatic speaker and proud liberal aggressively courting the Bernie Sanders wing of his party.

Andrew Gillum, Chris King and Gwen Graham participate in a Democratic gubernatorial forum in Hollywood, Fla. (Times files)
Andrew Gillum, Chris King and Gwen Graham participate in a Democratic gubernatorial forum in Hollywood, Fla. (Times files)

“That’s definitely true. He is the favorite of the more progressive members of the party,” Hillsborough County Democratic Party Chairwoman Ione Townsend said.

“People are really looking for somebody that is hopeful and inspiring, and Gillum really meets that,” said Women’s March Pinellas organizer Lisa Perry, likening Gillum’s grass roots enthusiasm to the kind generated by Sanders and Barack Obama. “Gillum may have the least funding, but he’s created a really big ground game here already.”

Those sentiments are widespread among liberal Democrats, which is pretty remarkable given that just a few months ago the most common question about Gillum’s candidacy was why hasn’t he pulled the plug. Much of the party establishment wrote off Gillum amid revelations eight months ago that Tallahassee City Hall was the focus of a public corruption investigation.

Fundraising all but dried up as the Tallahassee Democrat spit out ominous news nuggets: A federal grand jury last summer subpoenaed five years of city records related to redevelopment deals and developers, including a longtime friend, lobbyist and political ally of Mayor Gillum’s. … The FBI interviewed Gillum, who stressed that the FBI told him he was not “the focus” of their investigation. … A photo showed Gillum on a boat in New York City in 2016 with his lobbyist friend — Tampa native Adam Corey — and an undercover FBI agent who had been posing as a developer looking to do deals in Tallahassee.

A couple of dozen Democratic activists gathered at St. Petersburg’s Queens Head restaurant earlier this month to watch Gillum’s debate with Corcoran. They talked about Gillum’s youth, his agenda, including Medicare for all and a $15-an-hour minimum wage, and his potential to excite the Democratic base in a way that avowed centrist nominees in the past four gubernatorial races did not.

“He knows what normal people have to go through to make a living,” Ray Kervahn, a retired sales manager, said of Gillum, the African-American son of a construction worker and school bus driver and the first person in his family to attend college.

Asked about the corruption investigation looming over Gillum’s candidacy, person after person called it a non-issue.

“The information I have is that he has been cleared of all charges,” Hope said.

Perry said concerns about that investigation used to be common, “but lately most of those fears have been put to rest.”

Except they haven’t.

Scott Maddox. (Times files, 2005)
Scott Maddox. (Times files, 2005)

Gillum, 38, has not been implicated in any wrongdoing, but that does not mean he has been cleared. The only elected official named in grand jury subpoenas has been Tallahassee City Commissioner Scott Maddox, the former chairman of the Florida Democratic Party and unsuccessful candidate for attorney general, agriculture commissioner and governor. Earlier this month, the Democrat published a search warrant mistakenly posted on the Northern District of Florida Court’s website that revealed Maddox is suspected of bribery and mail fraud.

The FBI does not issue press releases declaring politicians innocent of wrongdoing they might be looking into, and public corruption investigations can plod along for years without an indictment or announcement.

Fairly or unfairly, this investigation could loom over Gillum well past election day.

He has not helped himself by refusing to discuss almost anything about the matter.

The Democrat reported in August that an undercover FBI agent may have invited Gillum to attend Hamilton on Broadway and a Mets game. Gillum last week would not even say whether he attended either.

“All I can confirm is I never did anything that I didn’t pay for,” he said, explaining that the FBI did not want him to discuss the case.

“All I would ask people do is follow the facts. I have not been mentioned in any one of the subpoenas so far that have been issued, not the public, not the private, not anybody who works for me.”

Not a terrific campaign slogan: I have not been mentioned so far in any subpoena.

Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum speaks at the meeting of the Tiger Bay Club at the Tucker Civic Center in Tallahassee on May 31, 2017. (Hali Tauxe/Tallahassee Democrat via AP)
Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum speaks at the meeting of the Tiger Bay Club at the Tucker Civic Center in Tallahassee on May 31, 2017. (Hali Tauxe/Tallahassee Democrat via AP)

He acknowledged the FBI may have suspected him of wrongdoing.

“I have no doubt that if they were on an effort to search out public corruption that they would want to get to know more closely and more intimately the elected officials that they wanted to determine whether or not they could get them or convince them to do something inappropriate. They didn’t get that with me, at all,” Gillum said. “In fact, most of my interactions with them, as I told the Tallahassee Democrat, were as a result of a trusting relationship that I had with a friend that I had known since our day creating bills in student government (referring to Corey). I regret that by virtue of my trust of him that I allowed people in my space to hang out with me. … But what they will never have and what the facts will never lead to is me having done anything inappropriate, anything illegal.”

Democratic primary opponents do not directly attack Gillum over the city government scandal, probably out of fear of antagonizing voters. If the investigation appears to remain open and unresolved, though, nobody doubts Republicans will hammer Gillum with it if he is the nominee.

“It absolutely worries me what the Republicans would do with that,” Hills­borough Democratic chairwoman Townsend said.

A campaign spokesman brushed off the concern.

“The mayor is the most viable progressive candidate for governor in Florida’s history,” Geoff Burgan said. “They are going to come after him because he represents a change they don’t want: working people with a voice, teachers no longer being called ‘evil’ and finally standing up to the gun lobby.”

So far, Gillum’s political talent and message are helping him overcome a scandal that would have ended most candidates’ primary campaigns. Overcoming photos of him with an undercover FBI agent conducting a corruption probe would be a far greater challenge in the general election.

Times Washington Bureau chief Alex Leary contributed to this report.

https://www.tampabay.com/florida-politics/buzz/2018/02/23/florida-democratic-activists-love-andrew-gillum-they-seem-oblivious-to-the-dark-cloud/

Top 7 Reasons Progressive Gillum Can Defeat DeSantis in Florida

Congressional representative and Florida gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis shocked the nation on Wednesday by warning Florida voters not to “monkey it up” by electing African-American Democratic standard-bearer Andrew Gillum, whom he incorrectly described as a “socialist.” Gillum was a Hillary Clinton delegate and voted for her, and his career as mayor of Tallahassee was not characterized by an expanded public sector or by a shrinkage of entrepreneurial opportunities. He does, however, support Medicare for all (i.e., single-payer universal health insurance), which a slight majority of Republican voters say in polling they also support. It has been alleged that DeSantis has been one of 52 administrators of an openly racist Facebook site.

DeSantis played the race card right from the beginning for a reason. Florida is a toss-up state that could go either way. DeSantis is signaling that he will attempt to scare the white business community in Florida silly at the prospect of an African-American governor who cares about the public and not just about the business elite.

Here are the reasons for which Gillum could well win:

1. Florida can go either way, Democrat or Republican and state and federal at-large elections are often very close. Any Democratic candidate can expect to come within one percentage point of winning a state-wide election there, right off the bat, which means that Gillum is very much in play. We saw this phenomenon in 2000 when whether George W. Bush or Al Gore won depended on some hanging chads and some ballot boxes apparently buried in the Everglades. That close result was no fluke. In 2008, Florida in a profound mortgage crisis went for Obama by 4,282,367 votes versus McCain’s 4,046,219, nearly a 3-point spread for the Democrats. But in 2012, Obama’s margin against Romney was much smaller, slightly less than 1 percent–though Obama did win. In 2016 Trump as Republican reversed this pattern, defeating Hillary Clinton by 1.2% of the vote. These results tell us that Florida can go either way, and this conclusion has been true since at least 2000. The same thing is true with regard to the governor’s office. In the 2014 governor’s race, Republican Rick Scott received 2,865,343 votes. Charlie Crist, a former Republican left behind by the Tea Party who ran as a Democrat, got 2,801,198 votes, thus losing by a margin of exactly 1 percent.

2. Florida’s demographic make-up is in flux. From 2010 to today, the population has grown from 18.8 million to about 21 million, an 11% increase. Immigrants into Florida tend to be Democrats (true of non-Cuban Latinos, African-Americans, and urban whites and youth). I think Florida is probably slightly bluer today than it was in 2010, despite the close results of state-wide elections mentioned above. As of August 2018, Professor Susan A. MacManus estimates that 40% of Floridians are Democrats, while only 36% are Republicans. Of course, voter suppression measures like voter i.d. requirements and anointing Democratic candidates like Crist who are literally Republicans can give the nod to the other side if they reduce the enthusiasm to come out and vote of Democrats, including minorities. Inability to attract Obama-level support from African-Americans doomed Clinton, as well. Obviously, Gillum at least has a shot at getting the Democratic base, including African-Americans, out to the ballot box.

3. Jerusalem embassy versus the Nazi factor. Five percent of Floridians are Jewish, and the vast majority of them vote Democratic. In the age of Trump and Neo-Nazis in Charlottesville chanting “Jews will not replace us,” Republicans may find it harder to win simply by playing the Israel card (a tactic that never worked against Obama in Florida presidential politics). It all depends on whether they think it is more important that Trump is moving the US embassy to Jerusalem or more important that he thinks anti-Semitic white nationalists are very fine people. DeSantis is a Trumpie, and Gillum might be able to tar him with that brush in Boca.

4. African-Americans comprise about 17% of the population of Florida, but only about 13 percent of the registered voters. (Some 20 percent cannot vote because of Florida’s Draconian law barring ex-felons from the voting booth). Gillum cannot count on their coming out to vote for him simply because he is an African-American. But if he inspires them to enthusiasm, this community could be important to his victory, as it was for Barack Obama. Initial indications are that he is inspiring African-Americans in Florida with a great deal of enthusiasm.

5. The Latino Factor: Slightly over a quarter of the population is Latino, though about a third of them are Cuban-Americans who trend Republican. That leaves 16.6% of the population as non-Cuban Latinos, including persons of Puerto Rican, Mexican, Dominican and other heritage. They mostly vote Democratic, and it would be surprising in the era of Trump if they weren’t pushed even further in the direction of that party. The third who are Cubans are much more in flux than in the past, with some younger Cuban-Americans having supported Obama. Gillum could make inroads here. Likewise, there are now 1.2 million Puerto Ricans in Florida. As American citizens, they can vote for president wherever they are. Hundreds of thousands may have left the island in the botched aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Only 7% say they are Republicans. Whether the newcomers will register and actually vote in Florida is a question mark. But remember that many statewide elections in Florida are decided by small numbers of voters.

6. Millennials trend heavily Democratic, but only 28% say they plan to vote in the midterms nationally. If the Parkland wave in Florida, which Gillum is courting by seeking sensible firearm safety regulation, turns into enthusiasm at the ballot box, it could be significant. Obama famously won the Iowa primaries in 2008 in large part because of the youth vote. Gillum has to galvanize the youth to vote if he is to win.

7. The environment. Florida is in a crisis caused by algal blooms, which are caused by industrialized agriculture and the run-off into the water of chemicals. Likewise, Florida is perhaps the state most at risk from the negative effects of climate change. Outgoing governor Rick Scott, now running for the Senate, has a horrible record on both issues. In the past, that record did not seem to matter, but close local observers are arguing that a sea change is happening even among some Florida Republicans on the environment. It is not a sure thing, but 2018 could be the year when environmental issues came to the fore in Florida politics. If so, DeSantis is toast.

One thing is for sure: the Florida gubernatorial race will be relatively close. And given that nearly half the state is neither white Protestant nor non-Hispanic Catholic, and given the big white progressive vote in Miami-Dade and other urban areas, playing the race card there could backfire big time.

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/top-7-reasons-progressive-andrew-gillum-can-defeat-ron-desantis/

10 REASONS ANDREW GILLUM IS TOO RADICAL, TOO CORRUPT FOR FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, FL- The Republican Party of Florida today released a new animated graphic sharing 10 reasons why Andrew Gillum is too radical and too corrupt for Florida (Link to watch: https://youtu.be/LIbLOcK31fY).

“Andrew Gillum’s corruption and radical agenda flew under the radar during the Democratic primary and it’s time voters learned the truth,” said RPOF Communications Director Meredith Beatrice. “Under Andrew Gillum’s watch, murder and violent crime in Tallahassee have increased dramatically. At the same time, Gillum has repeatedly denied funding for additional law enforcement officers but approved $2 million in taxpayer funding for a restaurant now at the center of an ongoing FBI investigation involving his closest associates and friends.”

10 REASONS ANDREW GILLUM IS TOO RADICAL, TOO CORRUPT FOR FLORIDA

  1. Saw Tallahassee’s Average Murder Rate Increase by 52% on his watch from 2010-2017. Gillum says he has provided exemplary leadership as a mayor, but in reality more people have been murdered under Gillum’s watch as Tallahassee’s average murder rate has increased 52 percent from 2010 to 2017. Gillum served as a city commissioner from 2003 to 2014 and was elected mayor in 2014. Learn more: TallahasseeReports.com
  2. Said NO to More Police in Tallahassee but Yes to $2 Million in Tax Dollars for His Friend’s Restaurant. Gillum says he will protect the state’s most vulnerable, but when it came to protecting his own residents he repeatedly denied law enforcement requests for additional police officers in Tallahassee but approved $2 million in taxpayer funding for a restaurant now at the center of an ongoing FBI investigation. Learn more: TallahasseeReports.com
  3. Closely Linked to an Ongoing FBI Investigation AND Vacationed With Undercover FBI Agents and Lobbyists in NYC and Costa Rica. Gillum says he is transparent and open, but in reality he refuses to come clean about a suspicious $15,000 deposit in his bank account and who paid for the luxury trip to Costa Rica he took with undercover FBI agents in 2016. Learn more: ReleaseTheReceipts.com
  4. Wants to Raise Taxes by Over $1 Billion. Gillum says he wants to provide hope for those who are left out, but in reality he wants to raise taxes by $1 Billion on hardworking Florida families so that he can pay for his radical agenda. Learn more: PolitiFact
  5. After Hurricane Hermine, Refused Help From Non-Union Electric Workers, Leaving Thousands Without Power For Even Longer. Gillum says he wants to lead our state, but he failed the people of Tallahassee when Hurricane Hermine devastated the community, refusing additional help and admitting mistakes were made. Learn more: Politico
  6. Wants to Abolish ICE and Protect Criminal Illegal Immigrants. Gillum says he wants to protect Floridians, but he wants to abolish ICE, leaving our state vulnerable and less safe. Learn more: CNN
  7. Supported by Ultra-Liberal Billionaires George Soros and Tom Steyer AND Socialists Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Gillum says he is not a far-left socialist, but in reality his agenda is taken directly from ultra-left billionaires George Soros and Tom Steyers and socialists like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Learn more: Politico | CBS News
  8. Wants a $33 Trillion Single-Payer Health Plan That Would Take Away Current Coverage for Floridians. Gillum says that healthcare should be a right, but in reality he wants to impose a single-payer healthcare system which would cost $33 TRILLION and take away everyone’s current health insurance. Learn more: CNN
  9. Opposes School Choice but Stands With Union Bureaucrats. Gillum says he wants our children to succeed, but in reality he wants to take away school choice opportunities from over 140,000 minority, poor and uniquely-abled students because he cares more about union bureaucrats than students and teachers. Learn more: rondesantis.com/education
  10. Stands With Disgraced “Coward of Broward” Sheriff Scott Israel Over School Safety. Gillum says he wants to keep our kids safe, but in reality he stands with the disgraced “Coward of Broward” Sheriff Scott Israel over school safety. Learn more: Sun Sentinel

###

http://www.florida.gop/10_reasons_andrew_gillum_is_too_radical_too_corrupt_for_florida

Andrew Gillum

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Andrew Gillum
Gillum.jpg
Mayor of Tallahassee
Assumed office
November 21, 2014
Preceded by John Marks
Member of the Tallahassee City Commission
for Seat 2
In office
February 2003 – November 2014
Preceded by John Paul Bailey
Succeeded by Curtis B. Richardson
Personal details
Born Andrew Demese Gillum
July 26, 1979 (age 39)
MiamiFlorida, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s)
Jai Howard (m. 2009)
Children 3
Education Florida A&M University (BA)
Website Official website

Andrew Demese Gillum (born July 26, 1979) is an American politician serving as Mayor of Tallahassee, Florida since 2014. He is the Democratic nominee for Governor of Florida in the 2018 election. He previously served on the Tallahassee City Commission from 2003 to 2014; first elected at age 23, he was the city’s youngest commissioner.[1]

In 2018, Gillum became the Florida Democratic Party‘s nominee for Governor of Florida when he won the Democratic primary election over a field of five other candidates including former U.S. Representative Gwen Grahamand former Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine. He will compete against Republican U.S. Representative Ron DeSantis in the general election.[2][3]

Gillum has been classified as a progressive, and is considered to be a politician in the mold of U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, the highest-ranking elected official to support his primary candidacy.[4][5][6]

Early life and education

Gillum was born in Miami and raised in Gainesville. He is the fifth of seven children born to Charles and Frances Gillum, a construction worker and school bus driver, respectively. In 1998 he graduated from Gainesville High School and was recognized by the Gainesville Sun as one of the city’s “Persons of the Year”. He then moved to Tallahassee to attend Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) to major in political science.[7]

Gillum served as President of the FAMU Student Government Association from 2001–2002, and was the first student member of FAMU Board of Trustees. He was recognized by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundationas “Emerging Leader for 2003”. Gillum was also a Board member of the Black Youth Vote Coalition, a program of the National Coalition of Black Civic Participation in Washington, D.C.. Gillum was elected to the Tallahassee City Commission prior to the completion of his college career.[8][7]

Political career

City of Tallahassee Commissioner

In 2003, at age 23, Gillum was elected to the Tallahassee City Commission for a one-year term, becoming the youngest person to be elected to the commission.[9] Gillum was a political science student at FAMU when he was elected.[7]

He was subsequently elected to a full four-year term, in 2004, garnering 72 percent of the vote, and was reelected in 2008 and again in 2012.[9]

Gillum served a one-year term as Mayor Pro Tem from November 10, 2004 through November 9, 2005. The joint body of City and County Commissioners, known as the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency, elected him to serve as their chairperson for a year (January 2005 through December 2005). Gillum has also served as lead commissioner for the Long Range Community Based Target Issue Committee.[10]

In 2005, Gillum was one of the commissioners who voted to give themselves a new retirement benefit through deferred compensation. The policy was later repealed by the commission after public outrage.[7]

City of Tallahassee projects

During his eleven years as a city commissioner Gillum championed a number of community enrichment projects.[10] The Digital Harmony Project is an initiative championed by Gillum with support from the City of Tallahassee, local businesses and technology partnerships. Digital Harmony won the Significant Achievement Award in the Web & e-Government Services category from the Public Technology Institute. For the first two years, it provided every incoming Nims Middle School sixth and seventh-grader with a new desktop computer, free internet access and online academic curriculum training on core subjects. The school holds ongoing training courses for parents and students on basic computer skills and school curriculum. This effort places 200 computers into the homes of Nims Middle School students.[11]

Gillum championed the opening of the first Tallahassee Teen Center, The Palmer Munroe Center, which serves as a safe haven for many area youth and operates a restorative justice program.[12] Restorative justice programs have shown significant success, compared to non-restorative measures, in improving victim and/or offender satisfaction, increasing offender compliance with restitution, and decreasing the recidivism of offenders.[13] Gillum stressed these results as some of the reasons for the great importance of the Palmer Munroe Center.[14]

Gillum supported the city’s development project of Cascades Park, located in downtown Tallahassee. The park was built in 2013 and doubles as a storm-water management facility, protecting local neighborhoods from flooding.[7]

Mayor of Tallahassee

Election

In April 2013, Andrew Gillum announced his intention to run for mayor of Tallahassee.[15] Gillum ran against three opponents: Larry Hendricks, Zach Richardson, and write-in candidate Evin Matthews.[16] In the August 26, 2014 nonpartisan primary, Gillum defeated Richardson and Hendricks; capturing 76 percent of the vote with 19,658 votes.[17] On August 27, 2014, write-in candidate Evin Matthews withdrew from the race, resulting in Gillum becoming mayor-elect.[18]

Tenure in office

Before taking office, Gillum met with various mayors to learn from their successes.[19] He also launched the Tallahassee Mayoral Fellows Program in partnership with Florida Agricultural And Mechanical University and Florida State University, allowing high-achieving graduate students to gain experience working in City government.[20] Gillum was sworn into Office on November 21, 2014.[21]

In January 2015, Gillum strongly supported the City of Tallahassee joining in the Ban the Box campaign; arguing that the initiative does not stop the city from conducting background checks, but rather gives applicants a fair shot at employment and reduces recidivism.[22]On January 28 the Tallahassee City Commission voted 3-2 to drop the box.[23]

On February 17, 2015 Gillum welcomed United States Secretary of TransportationAnthony Foxx, to Tallahassee to kick off the GROW AMERICA Express Tour.[24] Gillum also contributed to the DOT Fastlane Blog, in which he stressed the importance of long-term transportation investments for America’s mid-size cities.[25]

In an effort to overhaul how City Advisory Committees, a series of local advisory boards, operate in Tallahassee, Mayor Gillum released a survey in March 2015 to gain feedback into the city’s numerous boards and motivate citizens to get involved with local government.[26] Also in March 2015, Gillum participated in a conference call with other Florida mayors and United States Deputy Secretary of Commerce, Bruce Andrews; a call in which Gillum stated his support for Congress to pass trade promotion legislation that would bolster international trade, and stressed the importance for local governments of a leveled playing field.[27]

On March 27, 2015, Gillum held the Mayor’s Summit on Children,[28] a large conference in which business and community leaders came together to learn about the importance of investments in quality Early Childhood Education (ECE).[29] Speakers included Dr. Craig Ramey, distinguished research scholar of human development at Virginia Tech, who spoke about the importance of ECE to language development and the vocabulary gap that can form between those who receive quality ECE and those who do not; and Rob Grunewald, economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, who spoke about the importance of early learning to the long-term economic success of a community.

On the heels of the Summit on Children, Gillum launched four community-led task forces as part of his Family First Agenda; these task forces, which Gillum introduced at the Summit, examine: Improved Quality and Affordable Child Care, Family Friendly Workplaces and Culture, Greater Community Investments in Children and Families, and Resources and Training for Parents and Families.[30] Gillum stressed that investments in early childhood education have been proven to return six dollars for every one dollar invested; this is due to lowering community costs on those children as they grow older.[31]

In May 2015, Gillum launched a 1,000 Mentors Initiative, which aimed to recruit 1,000 men and women from diverse backgrounds to increase youth mentoring opportunities in Tallahassee, and help youth in need.[32] Also in May 2015, Gillum, in partnership with several local and national organizations, orchestrated the Tallahassee Future Leaders Academy (TFLA), a summer jobs program which employed over 100 youths throughout city government.[33] Gillum summarized the importance of a program like the TFLA in a July Op-ed, in which he highlighted how similar summer jobs programs from around the country have been shown to reduce arrests for violent crime, reduce youth mortality rates, and increase the likelihood of college attendance.[34]

In response to an increase in shootings Gillum and the Tallahassee Police Department, worked with community organizations to implement Operation Safe Neighborhoods in 2015.[35][36] This initiative called for an increase in law enforcement visibility and capacity; strengthening strategic partnerships and community programs/opportunities; and enhancing community engagement and response, through the implementation of a community watch program called, Neighbors on the Block.[37]

In October 2015, more than 400 strangers gathered around a 350-foot-long table in downtown Tallahassee to participate in the launch of The Longest Table, an annual initiative aiming to use the dinner table as a medium for generating meaningful conversation among people of diverse ethnic, religious, and political backgrounds. Organized by the Office of the Mayor and spearheaded by Community Engagement Director Jamie Van Pelt, the project won a $57,250 grant from the Knight Cities Challenge via the Knight Foundation.[38]

Corruption and misuse investigations

In February 2017, Gillum apologized after the Tallahassee Democrat reported that his government office had been used to send emails through web-based software purchased by NGP VAN, a company that provides technology to Democratic and progressive campaigns.[39] An investigation into the emails started after Paul Henry, a retired state trooper from Monticello, wrote State Attorney Jack Campbell in March to allege Gillum committed grand theft and official misconduct by paying for the software with city funds when he believed they served no public purpose. A Leon County grand jury cleared Gillum of any wrongdoing.[40]

During his mayoral campaign in 2014, Gillum faced allegations of misconduct after hiring private equity investor Adam Corey as the treasurer. Corey is an investor in The Edison, a restaurant that received taxpayer money from the city to help with the Cascades Park development project. During a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigation into the matter, city officials stated that Gillum’s vote did not constitute a conflict of interest[7] and Gillum cut ties with Corey.[41]

According to text messages uncovered by the Tampa Bay Times, Gillum accepted tickets to the Broadway musical Hamilton from his brother, Marcus Gillum, who got them through an undercover FBI agent conducting a corruption investigation. The agent was posing as a real estate developer.[42] Gillum responded to the Tampa Bay Times story, “These messages only confirm what we have said all along. We did go to see Hamilton. I did get my ticket to Hamilton from my brother. At the time, we believed that they were reserved by friends of Adam’s, Mike Miller. And when I got there after work, got my ticket, we went in there and saw it, assumed my brother paid for it, and so far as I know, that was the deal.”[42]

2018 gubernatorial election

Gillum announced his candidacy for governor in March 2017, and was the first to declare his intention to run as a Democrat.[43][44] Gillum won the Democratic nomination for governor in an upset victory over the expected winner, former congresswoman Gwen Graham, 34–31%. Gillum is the first black nominee for governor of Florida.[45] He will face Ron DeSantis in the general election.[46]

Political positions

Gillum has been widely described as a progressive[47] and, by some conservative sources, as a democratic socialist.[48] During the 2018 gubernatorial campaign, DeSantis said that Gillum had a “far left socialist platform”; PolitiFact rated this assertion as false, noting that Gillum’s platform is similar to those of other Democrats and within the mainstream of public opinion.[49]

Gillum supports the replacement of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement with the U.S. Department of Justice. He seeks to expand Medicaid to cover “…700,000 people, who right now don’t have access to health care”.[50] He supports the removal of Confederate monuments.[51] Gillum wants to raise the Florida corporate tax rate to 7.75 percent, up from the current 5.5 percent, which he said would generate $1 billion in revenue which would be used on education funding.[52] Gillum supports a $15 minimum wage.[53]He is endorsed by Bernie Sanders and has received financial support from Tom Steyer and George Soros.[54][55] Gillum has called for the impeachment of Donald Trump.[56] Gillum accepts the scientific consensus on climate change, and has warned that climate change causes sea level rise with adverse effects for Florida.[57][58] He opposed the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, and said that he would as Florida governor work with other states in a state-based climate alliance.[59]

Gillum opposes Florida’s Stand-your-ground law.[53] Gillum is in favor of a 2018 ballot proposition, Amendment 4, to restore the voting rights of most individuals who have completed felony convictions (excluding individuals guilty of murder or sexual offenses).[60][53] Gillum said, “Floridians who have paid their debts deserve a second chance and they should have a voice in our state’s future. Our current system for rights restoration is a relic of Jim Crow that we should end for good.”[61]

Professional career

As former National Director of the Young Elected Officials Network with People for the American Way Foundation, Gillum spearheaded a program that seeks to unite elected officials age 35 and under in a network which supports them with leadership and personal development training and public policy support. With Gillum at the helm, in May 2006, the program evolved into a national network that links young elected officials across the country and helps identify solutions to the challenges facing our communities and states. Gillum also served as Field Organizer and statewide Director of the “Arrive With 5” program, which “encourages young people to become active participants in the electoral process by asking them not only to pledge to vote but also to turn out other voters on or before election day”.[62] He organized the largest “Arrive With 5” get-out-the-vote campaign in Florida’s history. He also worked as Deputy Political Director with the Florida Democratic Party. He currently serves as Director of Youth Leadership Programs with People For the American Way Foundation.[63] According to hacked emails of John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s campaign chief, Gillum’s name appeared on an early list of contenders for Hillary Clinton’s running mate in the 2016 Presidential election.[64]

Honors and accolades

Gillum has received various honors and accolades. While attending FAMU, Gillum was recognized by the National Center for Policy Alternatives in Washington, D.C. as the country’s top student leader in 2001.[65] In 2004, he was named to Ebony magazine’s “Fast Track 30 Leaders Who Are 30 and Under.”[66] In 2007, Gillum was recognized as an Emerging Leader of the month by IMPACT and subsequently became their inaugural Emerging Leader of the Year during the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference in September 2007.[67] Gillum was named as a “2010 Emerging Leader” by Essence Magazine.[68]

As part of Florida A&M University’s 2012 125th Anniversary Quasiquicentennial Celebration, Gillum was honored as an Outstanding Alumnus, along with 124 other FAMU alumni.[69] Also in 2012, Gillum was named as one of “50 Young Progressive Activists Who Are Changing America,” by the Huffington Post.[70] In 2014, Gillum was named as one of the 40 Under 40 by the Washington Post political blog “The Fix.”[71]

Personal life

On May 24, 2009 Gillum married R. Jai Howard, a fellow FAMU graduate.[72] Gillum and R. Jai have three children.[8][73]

Electoral history

Tallahassee City Commission, 2003–2012

2003 Nonpartisan Primary,
Tallahassee City Commission Seat 2[74]
Candidate Votes %
Mayo Woodward 7,627 29.1
Andrew D. Gillum 6,662 25.4
Bob Henderson 6,439 24.5
Norma Parrish 4,090 15.6
Jack Traylor 1,013 3.9
Joshua Hicks 414 1.6
Total votes 26,245
2003 Nonpartisan Runoff,
Tallahassee City Commission Seat 2[75]
Candidate Votes %
Andrew D. Gillum 16,119 56.9
Mayo Woodward 12,206 43.1
Total votes 28,325
2004 Nonpartisan Primary,
Tallahassee City Commission Seat 2[76]
Candidate Votes %
Andrew D. Gillum 22,040 72.0
Allen Turnage 4,670 15.3
D.J. Johnson 3,903 12.8
Total votes 30,613
2008 Election,
Tallahassee City Commission Seat 2[77]
Candidate Votes %
Andrew D. Gillum Unopposed
2012 Nonpartisan Primary,
Tallahassee City Commission Seat 2[78]
Candidate Votes %
Andrew D. Gillum 20,329 72.2
Nick Halley 3,321 11.8
David (Bubba) Riddle 2,738 9.7
Jacob S. Eaton 1,769 6.3
Total votes 28,157

Mayor of Tallahassee, 2014

2014 Nonpartisan Primary,
Mayor of Tallahassee[79]
Candidate Votes %
Andrew D. Gillum 19,805 75.7
Zack Richardson 3,705 14.2
Larry Hendricks 2,661 10.2
Total votes 26,171

References …

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Gillum

Story 2: Blue Wave Slip Sliding Away — Videos

Paul Simon – Slip slidin’ away

Simon & Garfunkel – Slip Slidin’ Away (from The Concert in Central Park)

Slip Slidin’ Away
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
I know a man, he came from my home town
He wore his passion for his woman like a thorny crown
He said “Delores, I live in fear
My love for you is so overpowering
I’m afraid that I will disappear”
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
I know a woman, became a wife
These are the very words she uses to describe her life
She said “A good day ain’t got not rain”
She said “A bad day’s when I lie in bed
And I think of things that might have been”
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
And I know a father who had a son
He longed to tell him all the reasons for the things he had done
He came a long way just to explain
He kissed his boy as he lay sleeping
Then he turned around and he headed home again
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
God only knows, God makes his plan
The information’s unavailable to the mortal man
We’re working our jobs, collect our pay
Believe we’re gliding down the highway
When in fact we’re slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
Slip slidin’ away
You know the nearer your destination
The more you’re slip slidin’ away
Songwriters: Paul Simon
Slip Slidin’ Away lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Blue Wave Or Wave Goodbye? Where Democrats Stand Ahead Of The Election | MTP Daily | MSNBC

Democrat Blue Wave Is Failing, Republicans Gain In Midterm Polls

The two factors that could prevent a midterm blue wave

Are Democrats over-confident of taking control of Congress in “blue wave”?

Tucker: The collapse of the Democrats

Should Democrats Be Ready for a Blue Wave in Midterms? – ENN 2018-09-12

How Democrats are battling Trump ahead of the 2018 midterms | The Dispatch

 

Senate slipping away as Dems fight to preserve blue wave

yesterday

A voter arrives as a worker walks past during early voting at a polling place in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

NEW YORK (AP) — In the closing stretch of the 2018 campaign, the question is no longer the size of the Democratic wave. It’s whether there will be a wave at all.

Top operatives in both political parties concede that Democrats’ narrow path to the Senate majority has essentially disappeared, a casualty of surging Republican enthusiasm across GOP strongholds. At the same time, leading Democrats now fear the battle for the House majority will be decided by just a handful of seats.

While the trend may be troubling for Democrats, the evolving political landscape remains unsettled two weeks before Election Day, even with millions of votes already cast across 20 states.

There are signs that the Democrats’ position in the expanding House battlefield may actually be improving. Yet Republican candidates locked in tight races from New York to Nevada find themselves in stronger-than-expected positions because of a bump in President Donald Trump’s popularity, the aftermath of a divisive Supreme Court fight and the sudden focus on a caravan of Latin American migrants making an arduous trek toward the U.S. border.

Democrats say they never assumed it would be easy.

“It’s still much closer than people think, with a surprise or two in the wings,” New York’s Chuck Schumer, the top Senate Democrat, told The Associated Press.

The midterm elections will decide whether Republicans maintain control of Congress for the final two years of Trump’s first term. Even if Democrats lose the Senate and win the House, they could block much of Trump’s agenda and use subpoena power to investigate his many scandals. Some in the party’s far-left wing have also vowed to impeach the president, while others promise to roll back the Republican tax overhaul and expand health care coverage for all Americans.

Democrats have enjoyed an overwhelming enthusiasm advantage for much of the Trump era. They hope an explosion of early voting across states like Florida, Texas and Nevada is further proof of their enthusiasm gap.

Public and private polling, however, suggests the GOP is getting more excited as Nov. 6 approaches.

“Republican enthusiasm doesn’t quite equal the white-hot enthusiasm of Democratic voters, but the Kavanaugh hearings got it pretty close,” said GOP consultant Whit Ayres.

He also attributes the party’s strong position on an unusual Senate map. Democrats are defending 26 seats of the 35 seats in play, including 10 in states that Trump carried in 2016. Ayres calls it “maybe the most Republican-leaning map of our lifetimes.”

He expects the GOP to maintain the Senate majority, perhaps adding a seat or two to its current 51-49 edge. Others have begun to envision the GOP picking up as many as four or five new seats.

Democrats, meanwhile, have effectively protected their Senate candidates in states across the Midwest — Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin — that helped give Trump the presidency in 2016. They are increasingly pessimistic about picking up any seats, however.

The Tennessee Senate contest, in particular, has shifted sharply in Republican Rep. Marsha Blackburn’s direction in recent weeks, while Democratic pickup opportunities in Arizona and Nevada are now considered toss-ups. In a measure of the deep uncertainty that has defined the Trump era, only one Democratic incumbent — North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp — is seen as most in danger of losing.

After Heitkamp, Democrats facing the greatest risk of defeat are Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, and perhaps Bill Nelson of Florida. Texas Democratic Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke has shattered fundraising records and developed a national following, but polls have consistently given Republican Sen. Ted Cruz a significant lead against him.

In the race for the House, both sides acknowledge the prospect of a wipeout-style wave is shrinking.

It’s not that Democrats won’t be able to wrestle the House majority. But Republican lawmakers are increasingly optimistic, in part because of Trump’s recent performance as the GOP’s campaigner in chief.

Republicans say the often-volatile president has been surprisingly on-message during his campaign events, touting the strong economy and doubling down on the Kavanaugh fight to promote his efforts to fill courts with conservative jurists. And while Trump has been criticized by members of his own party for his handling of the case of the death of a Saudi journalist working for The Washington Post, operatives say the matter appears to be having little impact on voters.

On a conference call last week, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., urged rank-and-file lawmakers to pony up extra cash and help for tough races. They see hopeful signs in Iowa, Florida and Kansas.

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., emerged from the call saying it’s going to be a “dogfight” to the finish.

There are signs, however, that Democrats are expanding the House battlefield as Election Day approaches.

Republicans in recent days have pumped new money into House districts held by Republicans in Florida, Georgia, Virginia and New York, suggesting they’re on the defensive. Already, Democrats invested in nearly 80 races, including more than a dozen legitimate pickup opportunities in districts Trump carried by at least 9 points.

Democrats need a net gain of 23 seats to claim the House majority.

The massive battlefield remains a problem for Republicans, who have struggled to match Democratic fundraising and face several first-time candidates not yet tainted by Washington.

Still, Dan Sena, the executive director of the House Democrats campaign arm, recently predicted Democrats would win the majority by only two seats.

The Republican shift is not playing out as planned.

The GOP hoped its tax cuts would fuel their midterm message. After they proved unpopular, Republicans largely abandoned their most significant policy achievement in the Trump era in favor of a more familiar message of anger and fear.

The super PAC aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan, which is expected to spend $100 million before Election Day — most of it on attack ads — highlighted the shifting landscape in a memo to donors.

“The polling momentum that began with the Supreme Court confirmation hearings has continued, and the environment has continued to improve,” wrote Corry Bliss, executive director of the Congressional Leadership Fund. Still, he wrote, “20 races that will decide the majority remain a coin-flip.”

___

Beaumont reported from Des Moines, Iowa. Mascaro reported from Washington. AP writers Alan Fram and Julie Pace in Washington contributed to this report.

https://apnews.com/d97c666cf6fa4a42a7cadc9b9ac742de

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Will ‘all Trump, all the time’ help the GOP in the midterms?

KEN THOMAS

Associated Press
President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally for Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, at Houston Toyota Center, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is betting that his ubiquitous role in the midterm elections — all Trump, all the time — will pay off for Republicans trying to hang onto their perilous majorities in Congress.

Trump’s campaign said Tuesday it will spend more than $20 million on the November elections, including $6 million in national TV and digital ads beginning Oct. 29, and the president will be holding at least 10 more of his signature rallies through the election. Since July 5, Trump has held 20 of his “Make America Great Again” rallies around the country and is staging three more this week in Wisconsin, North Carolina and Illinois.

With two weeks until the election, the White House is battling against history as it tries to defend a lengthy slate of seats held by congressional Republicans. Democrats need to flip 23 House seats to win back the majority, a target that falls in line with the typical losses of about two dozen seats for a first-term president in midterm elections. Republicans are playing on a friendly Senate campaign terrain but can ill afford any mistakes with a narrow 51-49 majority.

Here’s a look at midterm campaign activities Tuesday:

___

ABRAMS-FLAG BURNING

The campaign of Georgia Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Stacey Abrams defended her involvement in burning the state flag — featuring a prominent Confederate symbol at the time — during a college protest more than two decades ago.

The issue surfaced ahead of Abrams’ Tuesday night debate against her Republican opponent, Brian Kemp.

Abrams’ role in the protest emerged after The New York Times published a story citing a June 1992 Atlanta Journal-Constitution article. A photo caption identifies Abrams as a woman standing with her arms crossed, watching three other protesters burn the flag.

Kemp, Georgia’s secretary of state, faces Abrams, the former state House minority leader, in one of the nation’s most competitive races for governor. Abrams is trying to become the nation’s first black female governor.

Abrams’ spokeswoman Abigail Collazo said Abrams was involved in a “permitted, peaceful protest against the Confederate emblem in the flag” while a student at Spelman College in Atlanta in 1992.

The Confederate battle flag was added to Georgia’s state flag in 1956 as a rebuke of the growing civil rights movement. Decades later, political pressure to remove what many considered to be a symbol of white supremacy grew as Atlanta drew international attention by hosting the Olympics in 1996. The Confederate symbol was phased out of the flag in 2001.

___

BIDEN-FLORIDA

Former Vice President Joe Biden campaigned for a second day in Florida, making a quick visit to a Tallahassee coffee shop before heading to a rally at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Biden urged students and others milling around the shop to vote for Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson over his Republican opponent, Rick Scott, and stopped for several selfies with the crowd that surrounded him.

“For many of you, this is your first vote, but I tell you: Whether you’re your age or my age, this is an election that is bigger than politics,” Biden said, citing President Donald Trump’s comments after an anti-Nazi demonstrator was killed at a violent white nationalist rally last year in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“This is much bigger than any single issue. It’s about decency; it’s about respect,” Biden said.

Before departing, Biden was asked about the prospect of running for president in 2020. “We’ll see,” he said as the car began to pull away.

___

WALKER-IMMIGRATION

Republican Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin asserted in a new campaign ad Tuesday that Tony Evers, his Democratic challenger, wants “special treatment for illegals,” bringing immigration to the forefront ahead of a rally with President Donald Trump.

Walker’s ad is based on comments Evers made during a debate Friday. Evers voiced support for allowing in-state tuition for students who were children when their parents brought them into the U.S. without legal permission. Evers also said he supported allowing workers who are here illegally to obtain driver’s licenses to get to and from work.

Walker opposes allowing people here illegally to get driver’s licenses. Walker’s ad ends with the narrator saying, “Tony Evers: Special treatment for illegals, higher taxes for you.”

Evers’ campaign spokesman Sam Lau accused Walker of fearmongering. “This is a sad, desperate attempt by a career politician to mimic Donald Trump to save his political career,” Lau said.

Polls show the race between Walker and Evers to be a toss-up.

___

HARRIS-IOWA

Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris of California was cheered by hundreds of University of Iowa students and party activists in Democratic-heavy Iowa City during a rally to promote early voting.

Harris, who is weighing a 2020 campaign for president, referenced the explosive confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

“Everybody watched the Kavanaugh hearings,” said Harris, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. “Well, elections matter. When you win elections, you get the power. So, let’s take back the power.”

Harris spent part of Monday and Tuesday campaigning for Deidre DeJear, who is running for secretary of state and is Iowa’s first black nominee for statewide office from a major political party.

___

STRONG ENDORSEMENT?

President Donald Trump’s “Strong Endorsement” of Rep. Erik Paulsen, R-Minn., drew a wary reaction from the congressman, who has distanced himself from Trump as he tries to keep his suburban Minneapolis seat.

Trump praised Paulsen late Monday on Twitter for cutting taxes and regulations and urged voters to “Keep Erik in Congress, he has my Strong Endorsement!”

Paulsen said he didn’t seek Trump’s endorsement and said in a statement, “Rather than endorse my campaign, I wish the President would endorse my position to protect the Boundary Waters, Minnesota’s Yellowstone.”

Paulsen was referring to his vote last year against reversing the Obama administration’s moratorium on new mining leases and prospecting in an area of the Superior National Forest near Ely that’s upstream from the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

Paulsen is facing a stiff challenge from Democrat Dean Phillips in Minnesota’s 3rd District, which Hillary Clinton carried by 9 percentage points in 2016. Paulsen avoided Trump’s recent rally in Rochester and has said he wrote in Florida Sen. Marco Rubio’s name in the 2016 election rather than vote for Trump.

Phillips’ campaign seized on Trump’s endorsement, referring to it as the president’s “seal of approval.”

___

GEORGIA DEBATE

In the first debate of their race for Georgia governor, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp sparred over claims of voter suppression and people who are in the country illegally being encouraged to cast ballots.

Abrams said that Kemp’s record as Georgia’s secretary of state “causes great concern” and pointed to the release of voter data under Kemp’s watch and the state’s “exact match” voter registration system. She said Kemp has made it harder for legal citizens to cast ballots.

Kemp said those characterizations were “totally untrue.” He fired back, citing a recent video clip in which Abrams seems to say that “undocumented” immigrants were part of her coalition.

“Why are you encouraging people to break the law to vote for you?” Kemp asked.

Abrams said that Kemp was twisting her words and her record of making it easier for legal citizens to vote.

___

Associated Press writers Ben Nadler in Atlanta, Gary Fineout in Tallahassee, Fla., Scott Bauer in Madison, Wis., Thomas Beaumont in Iowa City, Iowa, and Steve Karnowski in Minneapolis contributed to this report.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-time-help-gop-midterms-204647756–election.html

By PATRICIA COHEN and SYDNEY EMBER
a person wearing a black shirt: Kristen Donnelly, a registered independent, at her home in Yardley, Pa., early this month.© Corey Perrine for The New York Times Kristen Donnelly, a registered independent, at her home in Yardley, Pa., early this month.

 Sitting at her pumpkin-decorated dining room table, Kristen Donnelly ticked off her top political concerns: pay equity for women, gun control and anti-immigrant sentiment. (Her husband of five years has a green card.)

As for the president? “I would never vote for Trump,” Ms. Donnelly declared.

An independent, and co-chair of the local chamber’s Women in Business committee, Ms. Donnelly, 35, is the kind of educated, affluent suburban woman whom Democrats are counting on to fuel a “blue wave” in November’s elections and sweep away the Republican majority in the House of Representatives.

Except that Ms. Donnelly plans to vote for Brian Fitzpatrick, the Republican congressman who represents Pennsylvania’s closely contested first district, north of Philadelphia.

“He’s definitely on the moderate side,” Ms. Donnelly said, praising his support for the nuclear family, the police department and “the idea that America as a nation is good, and that we can continue to protect the American experiment as it stands.”

a building that has a sign on the side of a road: Lost in the talk about a Democratic “blue wave” against President Trump and Republicans is the fact that, for many Americans, daily life is good and the economy is working. In Virginia, Minn., where a tight House race is unfolding, opposition to abortion rights, trade deals and environmental regulations are the biggest concerns for some voters.© Jenn Ackerman for The New York Times Lost in the talk about a Democratic “blue wave” against President Trump and Republicans is the fact that, for many Americans, daily life is good and the economy is working. In Virginia, Minn., where a tight House race is unfolding, opposition to abortion rights, trade deals and environmental regulations are the biggest concerns for some voters.With two weeks until the election, Republican leaders and President Trump are increasingly bullish about Republican voters and moderate independents rallying behind the party’s candidates rather than taking a chance on a Democratic challenger or a Democratic-controlled House. A healthy economy, Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation fight and, most recently, Mr. Trump’s ominous warnings and baseless charges about a migrant caravan threatening the border have energized supporters at rallies and candidate forums.

While Democrats remain favored to pick up House seats in the Nov. 6 midterms, which historically produce losses for a president’s party, many of the 70 most competitive House races are now exceptionally close. Polls show a majority of registered voters lean Democratic, and Mr. Trump’s favorability ratings dragged along the low 40s before rising in recent weeks. Democratic turnout could continue to break records — yet it could also be concentrated in predictable Democratic strongholds rather than crucial swing districts.

Lost in all the talk about a Democratic blue wave is a set of sober reality checks — from the quantifiable to the emotional — that may help Republicans reduce their losses, and possibly even retain their 23-seat majority.

In many neighborhoods with key House races, daily life is pretty good. Unemployment is at a five-decade low. Confidence is spilling over among consumers and businesses. The economy is on track to grow at its fastest pace in years.

Those developments benefit people whom Democrats have targeted, too: Women in upscale, right-of-center, white suburbs where Hillary Clinton edged out a victory; Trump voters in struggling rural and industrial areas with deep Democratic roots; and minorities in racially diverse metro areas.

While the president looms large over this election, drawing out both opponents and supporters, local issues like school funding or mining are in the forefront of some races. In others, Republican incumbents’ blend of personality and policy positions has won over independents and moderates.

In recent months, The New York Times interviewed dozens of voters in battleground House districts, and spoke at length with three of them about the nuances of the races in their areas, how politics affected their lives, and their views and concerns about the midterms. These voters have a history of crossing party lines in their districts — one in Pennsylvania, one in Minnesota and one in California — and discussed what would ultimately persuade them to vote Democrat or Republican.

Ms. Donnelly in Bucks County, for instance, noted Mr. Fitzpatrick’s independent streak. “I have had personal interactions where I’ve told him he’s dead wrong,” she said, “and he’s been very respectful.”

His reputation as a moderate and his constituent record have helped Mr. Fitzpatrick pick up endorsements from the State Education Association, the local police and firefighters union and the state’s AFL-CIO. “If you’re for us, we’re for you,” said Rick Bloomingdale, the organization’s president.

Poll results have been mixed. A recent New York Times/Siena College poll showed Scott Wallace, the Democratic challenger, leading. A recent survey by the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute, put Mr. Fitzpatrick in front by 4 percentage points among likely voters.

“When you look at the underlying political environment in this district, you would expect the Democrat to be ahead,” Patrick Murray, the institute’s director, said. “But Fitzpatrick has been able to overcome this with a solid reputation among his constituents.”

Ms. Donnelly said she is willing to give Mr. Fitzpatrick the benefit of the doubt because “he has earned my trust.”

In Minnesota, voters don’t publicly declare any party affiliation, but for many years preferences were easy to discern in the state’s northeastern Eighth Congressional District, where the economy is powered by the mining, agricultural, timber, tourist and shipping industries. For 67 of the past 69 years, a candidate from the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party has represented this predominantly white, union stronghold in Congress.

So when the Republican candidate Pete Stauber first asked Larry Cuffe, the mayor of the small town of Virginia, for his support at the town’s Land of Loon festival last summer, Mr. Cuffe turned him down. “I was already committed to Rick Nolan,” the Democratic incumbent, he said.

Then in February, Mr. Nolan dropped out of the race. Within hours, Mr. Cuffe, 65, said he was on the phone, telling Mr. Stauber: “I’m behind you 100 percent.” Three other mayors in nearby towns also threw Mr. Stauber their support.

For Mr. Cuffe, a former sheriff and U.P.S. delivery man, the switch wasn’t hard, and not just because he knew Mr. Stauber as a police lieutenant in Duluth, or remembered him playing hockey with the Detroit Red Wings.

Like many of his friends and neighbors, Mr. Cuffe voted for Barack Obama and Bill Clinton,but had been drifting away from the Democratic Party.

Trade deals that Democratic administrations had championed brought in cheap foreign steel that led to the closing of a local taconite plant and strings of shuttered storefronts. Environmentalists in the party battled the timber and mining concerns that provide many of the struggling region’s best-paid jobs. “It’s our way of life,” Mr. Cuffe said.

He and others throughout the Iron Range were won over in 2016 by Mr. Trump’s outspoken hostility to existing trade deals, support of mining and America First appeals. They helped him become the first Republican presidential candidate since Herbert Hoover to win the district. Mr. Nolan, elected by a wide margin in 2012, hung onto his seat by just 2,010 votes.

Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence have visited several times recently, to give Mr. Stauber a boost and show their 16-point margin victory there was not a black swan event. The president has also helped shore up support by deciding to end a comprehensive federal environmental review of mining in the region.

At a labor picnic to support Democratic candidates, Mr. Cuffe wore a blue “Go PolyMet” cap, the name of a long-disputed copper-nickel mine that would be the first of its kind in the state. The $650 million project on the edge of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness promises to bring jobs, but also environmental risks.

Both Mr. Stauber and Joe Radinovich, the Democrat who locked up the nomination in August, support PolyMet.

Mr. Cuffe said that if he had not already promised Mr. Stauber his support, “I would have considered voting for Radinovich.”

Still, he noted: “Mining is the big issue, and I don’t see that in the Democratic platform.”

Local issues play less of a role in Orange County, Calif., where candidates are courting minority voters.

Once a synonym for conservatism, this wealthy overwhelmingly white region is now one-fifth Asian and one-third Latino. The shift has given Democrats hope of winning one or more of the four congressional seats held by Republicans in the county.

Sal Rasheed, who lives with his wife and three children in the 45th Congressional District, is part of that demographic transformation. Mr. Rasheed, a 46-year-old immigrant from South Asia, has been in Southern California for 30 years, 15 of them in Orange County.

Although blacks, Latinos, Asians and other minorities have long been a cornerstone of the Democratic base, they have traditionally low turnout rates. This season, however, party organizers are hoping that Mr. Trump’s derogatory comments about some immigrants and African Americans will spur more people than usual to go to the polls.

Mr. Rasheed is like many voters — white and nonwhite — whose interest in a purring economy and tax cuts overshadows other concerns. There is “more money coming to my account,” he said. A manager at an insurance company, Mr. Rasheed added that his firm is hiring more workers and recently increased its contribution to retirement accounts.

Formerly a Democrat, Mr. Rasheed said he is now registered as No Party Preference, California’s equivalent of an independent. He voted for Mr. Trump. “People are ignoring a lot of stuff that comes from Trump’s mouth,” he said. “They are feeling good about everything else.”

In 2016, Mimi Walters, the Republican incumbent, won by more than 17 percentage points. Ms. Clinton carried the district by more than five.

Now Mr. Rasheed is planning to vote for Ms. Walters, who was one of a dozen Republican representatives in California to vote for the tax bill. Her opponent, Katie Porter maintains the tax law hurts middle-class families.

Other Republicans who represent sizable minority constituents — like Will Hurd in Texas’s predominantly Hispanic 23rd district — have underscored their independence from the president on immigration while trumpeting the “supercharged economy.”

The distinction is not that important to Mr. Rasheed. He is not particularly disturbed by the White House’s efforts to keep out people from Muslim countries and Latin America.

“As a legal immigrant who stood in line,” Mr. Rasheed said, “it sort of breaks my heart that there are so many immigrants here who are jumping line.”

As Ms. Donnelly, who has a Ph.D. in sociology and an affection for the Hallmark channel, likes to say, everyone is more complicated than they’re given credit for. She taps her cherry-red fingernails on the table. When she slips off a shoe, Cerulean blue toenails peek out.

Before making a final decision, she plans to sit down with the latest voter guide and “go through it with a fine-tooth comb.”

“I own a uterus and, therefore, I must vote,” Ms. Donnelly quipped, “but I refuse to be a one-party voter.”

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/what-could-hold-back-a-democratic-wave-economy-confidence-independence/ar-BBOM067

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1156, October 16, 2019, Breaking News — Story 1: Deficit Spending Redux — Hits $779 billion for Fiscal Year 2018 — Videos — Story 2: President Trump Talked With King of Saudi Arabia — Denies Any Knowledge of Jamal Khashoggi Disappearance and Death — Trump Suggests Rogue Killers — Who Knows? — The Shadow Knows — Videos — Story 3: Trump Triumph on 60 Minutes — “I’m President and You are Not.” — Videos — Story 4: Kids, What Time Is It? It is Howdy Dowdy Time — Princess Summer-Fall-Winter-Spring — Elizabeth Warren aka Princess Pocahontas — Killing Identity Politics — Who Cares? — Lying Lunatic Leftist Losers — Videos —

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Story 2: President Trump Talked With King of Saudi Arabia — Denies Any Knowledge of Jamal Khashoggi Disappearance and Death — Trump Suggests Rogue Killers — Who Knows? — The Shadow Knows — Videos —

The Shadow Knows

Jamal Khashoggi: Trump suggests ‘rogue killers’ to blame – BBC News

Former CIA acting director on possible punishment in Saudi missing journalist case

Trump administration takes closer look at case of Saudi Arabian journalist

Jamal Khashoggi, Mohammed bin Salman and the media | The Listening Post (Lead)

From Saudi royal court to exile: Why MBS wants to silence Jamal Khashoggi

#Khashoggi

The crown prince and his circle could not stomach that journalist Khashoggi was honest, spoke his mind and could not be bought

David Hearst's picture
Thursday 11 October 2018 14:27 UTC

Topics:

Jamal Khashoggi is a friend of mine, so what I am about to write lacks objectivity.

In the many conversations we have had together, and for a long time after he fell out with the new regime in Riyadh under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Khashoggi actively eschewed the label “Saudi dissident”. He regarded himself as a loyalist, a son of the establishment, a journalist and foreign policy veteran who not so long ago was inside the benighted circle of the royal court. On occasions, he travelled with them.

Undying enmity

I can cite many examples of Khashoggi parting company with Western liberal critics of the kingdom. He supported – initially, at least – the Saudi-led war on Yemen. In common with many Sunni Arab analysts, he thought that Iran had overextended its reach into the Sunni Arab world and that it was time for Saudi Arabia to push back.

He defended capital punishment. He supported a crackdown on corruption – if he could be convinced that it was genuine. He supported, too, attempts to diversify and privatise an oil-dependent economy.

But Khashoggi adhered to one principle that the small circle around Mohammed bin Salman could not stomach, a quality that earned him their undying enmity. Khashoggi was honest. He could not be bought. He spoke his mind and was clear about what he was saying.

Khashoggi’s criticism of his country was nuanced and for that reason alone I would consider him a real reformer and true democrat

He thought that there was only one path on which the kingdom should be headed in the 21st Century – that is of a slowly opening democracy headed by a gradually retreating constitutional monarchy.

He feared the crown prince would eventually bankrupt the country as a result of his vanity projects to raise new gleaming cities in the sand – cities that would remain empty. He recognised that MBS was popular with the youth, but calculated that popularity would last up to the point where they had to open their wallets. The Saudi journalist paid heed to reports of capital flight.

The reckless crown prince

Khashoggi’s criticism of his own country was nuanced and for that reason alone I would consider him a real reformer and true democrat. That he should – by now – have been detained for over 24 hours in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul speaks volumes about the character and intentions of those running the show in Riyadh.

Missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s Turkish fiancee Hatice (L) and her friends wait in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, on 3 October 2018 (AFP)

It dispels the well-funded PR myth that has ensnared journalists like Thomas Friedman of the New York Times and Jamal’s colleague on the Washington Post, David Ignatius, who have praised Mohammed bin Salman as a reformer. Ignatius wrote that the Saudi crown prince was giving his country “shock therapy”. I did not think his paper supported the practise of lobotomy.

Mohammed bin Salman is shocking all right, but he is no therapist. He is vindictive. He bears grudges. He is supremely wilful. He has absolutely no respect for another country’s sovereignty, territory, courts or media. He is reckless. That he should have staged this stunt in Istanbul, on Turkish soil, is a measure of how reckless the Saudi crown prince and the narrow circle around him are.

That Mohammed bin Salman should have staged this stunt in Istanbul, on Turkish soil, is a measure of how reckless the Saudi crown prince and the narrow circle around him are

Relations between Saudi Arabia and Turkey have steadily deteriorated since the coup attempt against the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan two years ago. It was clear which side the Saudi state-run media was on during the night of the coup. They ran wall-to-wall coverage, with all commentators saying either that Erdogan was dead or that he had fled the country.

That Erdogan had survived that night was truly bad news for Riyadh.

It took 16 hours for the Saudi state news service to realise that the coup had not succeeded and issue a statement expressing “the kingdom’s welcome that things are returned to normal led by his Excellency President Tayyip Erdogan and his elected government and in line with the constitutional legitimacy and the will of the Turkish people”.

A delicate time

Those memories are still raw, especially in the Turkish presidency. That Mohammed bin Salman should risk sending Saudi relations with Turkey to a new low by seizing a high-profile journalist on Erdogan’s home turf, is another indication of how unstable the next ruler of the kingdom is.

Istanbul is home to virtually the entire gamut of the Egyptian opposition, secular and Islamist (AFP)

As Riyadh knows only too well, it got very little for the $300m it paid, much of it in cash, to Iraqi politicians of different confessions who were contesting the recent election. It also knows that Turkey and Iran are in high-level talks – as is the Hashd el Shabi (also known as the Popular Mobilisation Units) and Sunni groups in Iraq – about a new security accommodation in areas that are traditionally Sunni.

This is the first time in many years that Iraq’s Shia factions are genuinely divided and that a political deal that does not run so fully along sectarian lines is achievable. This is a delicate time for Saudi-Turkish relations. It is not in Riyadh’s interest to upset the apple cart as publicly and clumsily as it appears to have done at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Turkish intelligence are convinced that Khashoggi remains inside the building and have surrounded it. Saudi officials have strongly denied any involvement in his disappearance and say that he left the consulate soon after arriving.

It is essential that Turkey secures Khashoggi’s safe release for reasons that go beyond the man himself, and a threadbare bilateral relationship.

Turkey: A safe haven

Apart from being home to millions of Syrian refugees, Turkey houses thousands of political exiles from all over the Arab world.

Istanbul is home to virtually the entire gamut of the Egyptian opposition, secular and Islamist. It is where British-born militants are kept in prison. There is a lot going on in Istanbul, and more than one Western government would prefer to keep it that way.

If Turkey allowed abductions by foreign governments to take place on its soil, its own internal security would rapidly deteriorate. It would also lose the substantial leverage it has in the Middle East by providing safe haven for a number of Sunni opposition groups.

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Saudi’s losing gambler: The raw truth about Mohammed bin Salman

How much pressure the US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is willing to apply with his counterpart, the Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubeir, over Khashoggi (who has residency in the US and is a Washington Post columnist) is as yet unclear. The White House is no lover of the Washington Post or press freedom.

US President Donald Trump regularly insults and humiliates King Salman of Saudi Arabia to force him to pay even more for his own security than he already has done.

The regime in Saudi Arabia swallows these insults from Trump, while going to the opposite extreme with what it considers lesser nations like Canada, because it knows it has no other option.

Khashoggi was the first to warn Saudis of the dangers of getting into bed with Trump. In fact, this was the reason he fell out with the Saudi regime in the first place, and this was long before the Arab Islamic American summit held in Riyadh last May and the announcement of lucrative arms deals. It is indeed too late for Riyadh to heed the journalist’s words, and so they have gone to desperate lengths to silence him.

For more than one reason, they should not be allowed to succeed.

– David Hearst is editor-in-chief of Middle East Eye. He was chief foreign leader writer of The Guardian, former Associate Foreign Editor, European Editor, Moscow Bureau Chief, European Correspondent, and Ireland Correspondent. He joined The Guardian from The Scotsman, where he was education correspondent.

The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.

Photo: Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi speaks at an event hosted by Middle East Monitor in London on 29 September 2018 (Reuters)

This article is available in French on Middle East Eye French edition.

https://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/son-establishment-enemy-why-mohammed-bin-salman-wants-silence-jamal-khashoggi-1430306018

What the media aren’t telling you about Jamal Khashoggi

The dissident’s fate says a lot about Saudi Arabia and the rise of the mobster state

As someone who spent three decades working closely with intelligence services in the Arab world and the West, the Saudi dissident and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi knew he was taking a huge risk in entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week to try to obtain a document certifying he had divorced his ex-wife.

A one-time regime insider turned critic of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — the de facto head of the Saudi kingdom which tolerates no criticism whatsoever — Khashoggi had been living in Washington for the previous year in self-imposed exile amid a crackdown on independent voices in his homeland.

He had become the darling of western commentators on the Middle East. With almost two million Twitter followers, he was the most famous political pundit in the Arab world and a regular guest on the major TV news networks in Britain and the United States. Would the Saudis dare to cause him harm? It turns out that the answer to that question was ‘You betcha.’

Following uneventful visits to the consulate and, earlier, the Saudi embassy in Washington, Khashoggi was lured into a murderous plan so brazen, so barbaric, that it would seem far-fetched as a subplot in a John le Carré novel. He went inside the Istanbul consulate, but failed to emerge. Turkish police and intelligence officials claimed that a team of 15 hitmen carrying Saudi diplomatic passports arrived the same morning on two private jets. Their convoy of limousines arrived at the consulate building shortly before Khashoggi did.

Their not-so-secret mission? To torture, then execute, Khashoggi, and videotape the ghastly act for whoever had given the order for his merciless dispatch. Khashoggi’s body, Turkish officials say, was dismembered and packed into boxes before being whisked away in a black van with darkened windows. The assassins fled the country.

Saudi denials were swift. The ambassador to Washington said reports that Saudi authorities had killed Khashoggi were ‘absolutely false’. But under the circumstances — with his fiancée waiting for him, and no security cameras finding any trace of his leaving the embassy — the world is left wondering if bin Salman directed this murder. When another Saudi official chimed in that ‘with no body, there is no crime’, it was unclear whether he was being ironic. Is this great reforming prince, with aims the West applauds, using brutal methods to dispose of his enemies? What we have learned so far is far from encouraging. A Turkish newspaper close to the government this week published the photographs and names of the alleged Saudi hitmen, and claims to have identified three of them as members of bin Salman’s personal protection team.

There are also reports in the American media that all surveillance footage was removed from the consulate building, and that all local Turkish employees there were suddenly given the day off. According to the New York Times, among the assassination team was the kingdom’s top forensic expert, who brought a bone saw to dismember Khashoggi’s body. None of this has yet been independently verified, but a very dark narrative is emerging.

In many respects, bin Salman’s regime has been revolutionary: he has let women drive, sided with Israel against Iran and curtailed the religious police. When Boris Johnson was foreign secretary, he said that bin Salman was the best thing to happen to the region in at least a decade, that the style of government of this 33-year-old prince was utterly different. But the cruelty and the bloodletting have not stopped. Saudi Arabia still carries out many public beheadings and other draconian corporal punishments. It continues to wage a war in Yemen which has killed at least 10,000 civilians.

Princes and businessmen caught up in a corruption crackdown are reported to have been tortured; Shia demonstrators have been mowed down in the streets and had their villages reduced to rubble; social media activists have been sentenced to thousands of lashes; families of overseas-based activists have been arbitrarily arrested. In an attempt to justify this, bin Salman said this week he was ‘trying to get rid of extremism and terrorism without civil war, without stopping the country from growing, with continuous progress in all elements,’ adding: ‘So if there is a small price in that area, it’s better than paying a big debt to do that move.’

The fate of Khashoggi has at least provoked global outrage, but it’s for all the wrong reasons. We are told he was a liberal, Saudi progressive voice fighting for freedom and democracy, and a martyr who paid the ultimate price for telling the truth to power. This is not just wrong, but distracts us from understanding what the incident tells us about the internal power dynamics of a kingdom going through an unprecedented period of upheaval. It is also the story of how one man got entangled in a Saudi ruling family that operates like the Mafia. Once you join, it’s for life, and if you try to leave, you become disposable.

In truth, Khashoggi never had much time for western-style pluralistic democracy. In the 1970s he joined the Muslim Brotherhood, which exists to rid the Islamic world of western influence. He was a political Islamist until the end, recently praising the Muslim Brotherhood in the Washington Post. He championed the ‘moderate’ Islamist opposition in Syria, whose crimes against humanity are a matter of record. Khashoggi frequently sugarcoated his Islamist beliefs with constant references to freedom and democracy. But he never hid that he was in favour of a Muslim Brotherhood arc throughout the Middle East. His recurring plea to bin Salman in his columns was to embrace not western-style democracy, but the rise of political Islam which the Arab Spring had inadvertently given rise to. For Khashoggi, secularism was the enemy.

He had been a journalist in the 1980s and 1990s, but then became more of a player than a spectator. Before working with a succession of Saudi princes, he edited Saudi newspapers. The exclusive remit a Saudi government–appointed newspaper editor has is to ensure nothing remotely resembling honest journalism makes it into the pages. Khashoggi put the money in the bank — making a handsome living was always his top priority. Actions, anyway, speak louder than words.

It was Yasin Aktay — a former MP for Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development party (AKP) — whom Khashoggi told his fiancée to call if he did not emerge from the consulate. The AKP is, in effect, the Turkish branch of the Muslim Brotherhood. His most trusted friend, then, was an adviser to President Erdogan, who is fast becoming known as the most vicious persecutor of journalists on earth. Khashoggi never meaningfully criticised Erdogan. So we ought not to see this as the assassination of a liberal reformer.

Khashoggi had this undeserved status in the West because of the publicity surrounding his sacking as editor of the Saudi daily Al Watan back in 2003. (I broke the news of his removal for Reuters. I’d worked alongside Khashoggi at the Saudi daily Arab News during the preceding years.) He was dismissed because he allowed a columnist to criticise an Islamist thinker considered to be the founding father of Wahhabism. Thus, overnight, Khashoggi became known as a liberal progressive.

The Muslim Brotherhood, though, has always been at odds with the Wahhabi movement. Khashoggi and his fellow travellers believe in imposing Islamic rule by engaging in the democratic process. The Wahhabis loathe democracy as a western invention. Instead, they choose to live life as it supposedly existed during the time of the Muslim prophet. In the final analysis, though, they are different means to achieving the same goal: Islamist theocracy. This matters because, although bin Salman has rejected Wahhabism — to the delight of the West — he continues to view the Muslim Brotherhood as the main threat most likely to derail his vision for a new Saudi Arabia. Most of the Islamic clerics in Saudi Arabia who have been imprisoned over the past two years — Khashoggi’s friends — have historic ties to the Muslim Brotherhood. Khashoggi had therefore emerged as a de facto leader of the Saudi branch. Due to his profile and influence, he was the biggest political threat to bin Salman’s rule outside of the royal family.

Worse, from the royals’ point of view, was that Khashoggi had dirt on Saudi links to al Qaeda before the 9/11 attacks. He had befriended Osama bin Laden in the 1980s and 1990s in Afghanistan and Sudan while championing his jihad against the Soviets in dispatches. At that same time, he was employed by the Saudi intelligence services to try to persuade bin Laden to make peace with the Saudi royal family. The result? Khashoggi was the only non-royal Saudi who had the beef on the royals’ intimate dealing with al Qaeda in the lead-up to the 9/11 attacks. That would have been crucial if he had escalated his campaign to undermine the crown prince.

Like the Saudi royals, Khashoggi dissociated himself from bin Laden after 9/11 (which Khashoggi and I watched unfold together in the Arab News office in Jeddah). But he then teamed up as an adviser to the Saudi ambassador to London and then Washington, Prince Turki Al Faisal. The latter had been Saudi intelligence chief from 1977 until just ten days before the 9/11 attacks, when he inexplicably resigned. Once again, by working alongside Prince Turki during the latter’s ambassadorial stints, as he had while reporting on bin Laden, Khashoggi mixed with British, US and Saudi intelligence officials. In short, he was uniquely able to acquire invaluable inside information.

The Saudis, too, may have worried that Khashoggi had become a US asset. In Washington in 2005, a senior Pentagon official told me of a ridiculous plan they had to take ‘the Saudi out of Arabia’ (as was the rage post-9/11). It involved establishing a council of selected Saudi figures in Mecca to govern the country under US auspices after the US took control of the oil. He named three Saudis the Pentagon team were in regular contact with regarding the project. One of them was Khashoggi. A fantasy, certainly, but it shows how highly he was regarded by those imagining a different Saudi Arabia.

Perhaps it was for this and other reasons — and working according to the dictum of keeping your enemies closer — that a few weeks ago, according to a friend of Khashoggi, bin Salman had made a traditional tribal offer of reconciliation — offering him a place as an adviser if he returned to the kingdom. Khashoggi had declined because of ‘moral and religious’ principles. And that may have been the fatal snub, not least because Khashoggi had earlier this year established a new political party in the US called Democracy for the Arab World Now, which would support Islamist gains in democratic elections throughout the region. Bin Salman’s nightmare of a Khashoggi-led Islamist political opposition was about to become a reality.

The West has been fawning over bin Salman. But how now to overlook what seems to be a brazen Mafia-style murder? ‘I don’t like hearing about it,’ Donald Trump said. ‘Nobody knows anything about it, but there’s some pretty bad stories going around. I do not like it.’ Well, there are plenty more stories where that came from, stories about a ruthless prince whose opponents have a habit of disappearing. The fate of Khashoggi is the latest sign of what’s really happening inside Saudi Arabia. For how much longer will our leaders look the other way?

This article was originally published in The Spectator magazine.

https://spectator.us/2018/10/jamal-khashoggi/

FEATURED: Jamal Khashoggi- A Global Muslim Brotherhood Operative Writing For The Washington Post?

Global media has been widely reporting on the alleged disappearance of Saudi national and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, often describing him in terms such as “a dissident-journalist critical of the oil-rich kingdom.” As the BBC recently reported:

Jamal Khashoggi, a well-known journalist and critic of the Saudi government, walked into the country’s consulate in Istanbul last week to obtain some documents and has not been seen since.

Generally but not always overlooked in the media coverage are Khashoggi’s ties to the Global Muslim Brotherhood

1. What is the Global Muslim Brotherhood?

Most observers are familiar with the pan-Islamic organization known as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. Founded in 1928 by Egyptian schoolteacher Hassan El-Banna, the Egyptian Brotherhood has been a wellspring of Islamism and political Islam since it(…)

“>Global Muslim Brotherhood. For example, British author and journalist John R. Bradley reports that Khashoggi joined the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1970’s:

October 11, 2018  In truth, Khashoggi never had much time for western-style pluralistic democracy. In the 1970s he joined the Muslim Brotherhood, which exists to rid the Islamic world of western influence. He was a political Islamist until the end, recently praising the Muslim Brotherhood in the Washington Post. He championed the ‘moderate’ Islamist opposition in Syria, whose crimes against humanity are a matter of record. Khashoggi frequently sugarcoated his Islamist beliefs with constant references to freedom and democracy. But he never hid that he was in favour of a Muslim Brotherhood arc throughout the Middle East. His recurring plea to bin Salman in his columns was to embrace not western-style democracy, but the rise of political Islam which the Arab Spring had inadvertently given rise to. For Khashoggi, secularism was the enemy.

Washington Post writer David Ignatius, who says he knew Khashoggi for 15 years, also reports that Khashoggi joined the Muslim Brotherhood at some unspecified time, likely while in the US for his education:

October 7, 2018  Khashoggi was passionate for reform of an Arab Muslim world that he considered corrupt and dishonest. He grew up in Medina, the son of a Saudi who owned a small textile shop. He went to the United States for college, attending Indiana State University. He also embraced Islam, joining the Muslim Brotherhood and, in the late 1970s, befriending the young Osama bin Laden, whom he tried to turn against violence.

Interesting is Khashoggi’s attendance at Indiana State University confirmed in a local media report which says he was an undergraduate student at Indiana State from 1977-1982, and was awarded a degree in business administration on May 7, 1983. According to a report by the GMBDW author, at the same time Khashoggi was attending university in Indiana, the state was the hub of the newly developing complex of organizations that would become the US Muslim Brotherhood. For example, the report notes a key meeting held in early 1977 described as follows:

As the Muslim Student Association

No entry yet. You can still search for Muslim Student Association

“>Muslim Student Association (MSA) reached its mid-teens it began preparing for an expanded role in the service of Islam. It called an historic meeting of a cross-section of Islamic workers, in Plainfield, Indiana, in early 1397/1977. This meeting set up a task force to recommend a new organizational structure to respond to the increasing challenges and responsibilities emerging in the growing North American Muslim communities. The task force concluded that the new environment would be best served by establishing a broader umbrella organization called “ISNA.”

ISNA, the Islamic Society of North America, emerged out of the early US Muslim Brotherhood infrastructure and documents discovered in the course of the the terrorism trial of the Holy Land Foundation

No entry yet. You can still search for Holy Land Foundation

“>Holy Land Foundation

confirmed that the organization was part of the U.S. Muslim Brotherhood. ISNA was named as a Holy Land unindicted co-conspirator as a result of what the US Justice Department called the organization’s “intimate relationship with the Muslim Brotherhood, the Palestine Committee, and the defendants in this case.” Although not confirmed, it would seem more than possible that a Muslim student active in Indiana would have been interacting with the complex of US Brotherhood organizations rapidly developing at that time. Khashoggi is also known to have close relations with Saudi businessman Prince Al Waleed Bin Talal who appointed him to run the ill-fated Al Arab television station in Bahrain in 2015. As frequently reported by the GMBDW, Prince Talal is known to have made donations to both the ISNA and to the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR), also part of the US Muslim Brotherhood.

Not all reporting characterizes Khashoggi as a Muslim Brotherhood “member” although it should be remembered that membership is a nebulous concept when discussing the Global Muslim Brotherhood. The independent Turkish news portal Ahval claims that while Khashoggi was not a  Brotherhood member he was “someone close to their ideas”:

October 10, 2018  Khashoggi is not a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, but someone close to their ideas, according to his friends, … “I cannot say he was an official member of the Muslim Brotherhood. Maybe he was at the beginning, but he had close ties. The leaders of the movement in Egypt and Tunisia were Jamal’s friends. After the Arab spring, he wanted political Islam to come to power. But he was not an Islamist,” Ahmed Zaki, from BBC Arabic said.

As for Khashoggi himself, Islamist media reported in 2017 that he denied that being a member of the Muslim Brotherhood although he characterized Brotherhood thought as “noble”:

September 11, 2017 Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi has denied that he is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. The writer, who has been banned from publication by the Saudi authorities for the past 9 months, pointed out that the Brotherhood allegation is directed at anyone believing in change, reform or the Arab Spring. Responding on Twitter to another user who asked who was behind the accusations directed at him, Khashoggi said: “For a while now, I have found that anyone who believes in reform, change, the Arab Spring, and freedom, and those who are proud of their religion and their country is labelled as being part of the Muslim Brotherhood. It seems that the Brotherhood’s school of thought is noble.”

However at the same time, and in another interview, Khashoggi gave a somewhat disingenuous denial of Brotherhood membership, stating that he was not “officially a member” but did not mind being referred to as such:

September 13, 2017 Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi confirmed the news stating that he was suspended from writing for Al-Hayat newspaper, based on a decision by Al-Hayat publisher Khalid bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, and the recommendation of Fahd bin Khalid Al Saud.Commenting on the news, Khashoggi said in a tweet that “the decision of suspension was indeed made by the publisher. I spoke with his Highness a little while ago, we agreed to reject the dissemination of the culture of hatred, and disagreed with regards to the Muslim Brotherhood. I have much appreciation for him.” Khashoggi, who currently resides in Washington, has criticized the arrests of preachers, including Salman al-Awda and Awad al-Qarni, who are affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood, adding that belonging to the Muslim Brotherhood “is not a charge,” further noting that he “does not feel offended if someone says I am [part of]the Brotherhood, although I am not officially a member.”

Consistent with ties to the Global Muslim Brotherhood is Khashoggi’s friendship with Azzam Tamimi, a UK activist for Hamas and a leader in the UK Muslim Brotherhood. According to an Associated Press report, the two hd been involved in setting up “pro-democracy” projects since 1992:

Khashoggi had incorporated his democracy advocacy group, DAWN, in January in Delaware, said Khaled Saffuri, another friend. The group was still in the planning stages, and Khashoggi was working on it quietly, likely concerned it could cause trouble for associates, including activists in the Gulf, Saffuri said. The project was expected to reach out to journalists and lobby for change, representing both Islamists and liberals, said another friend, Azzam Tamimi

According to a Washington Report on Middle East Affairs article, Azzam Tamimi was born in 1955 and he was seven when his family moved from Hebron to Kuwait. After high school graduation, he moved to England and the University of Westminster, London. First studying pure science, he changed to(…)

“>Azzam Tamimi

, a prominent Palestinian-British activist and TV presenter. … Tamimi said he and Khashoggi had set up a similar pro-democracy project together in 1992 when they first met. It was called Friends of Democracy in Algeria, he said, and followed the botched elections in Algeria, which the government annulled to avert an imminent Islamist victory.

Although described as a “democracy advocacy group” it should be noted that in reality, as described in an ABC News report, DAWN was in fact a stalking horse for the inclusion of “Sunni Political Islam” in Middle Eastern governments, presumably including Saudi Arabia. Another self-described Islamic Democracy group is the US-based Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy

The Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy (CSID) was founded in 1998 in what appears to have been a cooperative effort among the US Muslim Brotherhood, the US State Department and Georgetown University academic Dr. John Esposito who served during the 1990’s as a State Department “foreign(…)

“>Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy

(CSID) where Khashoggi gave the keynote address in April 2018 and were he reportedly:

applauded the efforts made by organizations like CSID in advocating for democracy and freedom of speech and helping save the Middle East from drowning in dark ages of dictatorship.

Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy (CSID) was founded in 1998 in what appears to have been a cooperative effort among the US Muslim Brotherhood, the US State Department and Georgetown University academic Dr. John Esposito who served during the 1990’s as a State Department “foreign affairs analyst” and who has at least a dozen past or present affiliations with global Muslim Brotherhood/Hamas

The Hamas charter says that it is “one of the wings of the Muslim Brothers in Palestine” and soon after Hamas took over the Gaza strip, Muslim Brotherhood representatives traveled to Gaza from Egypt through the newly-opened border to review Hamas military formations.  A Hamas journalist(…)

“>Hamas

organizations. From its inception, CSID has argued that the U.S. government should support Islamist movements in foreign countries and has received financial support from the U.S. State Department, the National Endowment for Democracy and the United States Institute of Peace.

It should also be noted that the British journalist John R. Bradley, has reported that Khashoggi instructed his fiancée to contact former Turkish MP and AK Party leader Yasin Aktay in case he failed to come out of the consulate. Aktay is known to be a close advisor to Muslim Brotherhood supporter and Turkish President Erdogan and the AK Party is an Islamist party close to the Global Muslim Brotherhood.

The evidence offered above strongly suggests that Jamal Khashoggi was not only a long-time member of the Muslim Brotherhood and close to the Global Muslim Brotherhood but was, in fact, actively supporting Brotherhood-related projects as recently as April of this year as evidenced by his key note address on behalf of the CSID. The GMBDW wished to state in the clearest terms that none of the above should be taken as support for any violence that may or may not have been committed against Mr. Khashoggi by any party. The evidence does however raise serious questions about how such an individual came to be associated with the Washington Post and why he is generally fêted as a “pro-democracy reformer” by so much of the global media. Perhaps much of that media is not aware that the Muslim Brotherhood is often categorized by academics as a “reformist movement.”

While it would seem unlikely and/or unusual that such a prominent journalist would be a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, the GMBDW has long reported on the example of Waddah Khanfar, the former General Manager of Al Jazeera who is tied to both the Global Muslim Brotherhood and to Hamas as well as currently serving as a trustee of the US-based International Crisis Group.

We should also add that this is by no means the only example of the Washington Post showing astonishingly bad judgment with respect to the Global Muslim Brotherhood. In February 2017, we reported on the Post’s shoddy work with respect to an article purporting to fact check recent series of claims about long-time Hilary Clinton aide Huma Abedin. As we wrote at that time:

The GMBDW only hopes, and our hopes are perpetually dashed, that the mainstream media in the US would once again assume its rightful role as the guardian of the public interest with respect to the topic.

It would seem our hopes are to be dashed once again.

https://www.globalmbwatch.com/2018/10/14/jamal-khashoggi-a-global-muslim-brotherhood-operative-writing-for-the-washington-post/

 

 

BREAKING: CNN Reports Saudis Preparing to Admit Jamal Khashoggi Was Killed in ‘Interrogation Gone Wrong’

CNN reported on Monday that Saudi Arabia is preparing a report in which they will admit that Jamal Khashoggi, the Washington Postcolumnist who went missing earlier this month, was killed in an “interrogation gone wrong.”

Khashoggi, a prominent Saudi dissident, went missing after walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2. Turkish officials said they have proof he was murdered and dismembered by a team of Saudi agents, a charge the Saudi government vehemently denied.

Per two sources who spoke to CNN, however, the Saudis are preparing a report admitting that they intended to abduct and bring Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia, but that he was inadvertently killed in the process. The report is intended, per CNN, to absolve the Saudi government of responsibility for the murder by claiming the operation was not cleared.

Damon added that the Saudis’ report is still being prepared, and could change.

Earlier on Monday, President Donald Trump said he spoke with Saudi King Salman, who “firmly denied any knowledge” of the murder of Khashoggi. Trump also said Salman suggested those responsible for his death could be “rogue killers.”

The Saudis had previously insisted that Khashoggi left the consulate soon after arriving.

This story is developing…

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/breaking-cnn-reports-saudis-preparing-to-admit-missing-journalist-was-killed-in-interrogation-gone-wrong/

Story 3: Trump Triumph on 60 Minutes — Videos

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3 takeaways from Pres. Trump’s interview on ’60 Minutes’

President Donald Trump’s ’60 Minutes’ Interview: Climate Change, Russia And Brett Kavanaugh | TODAY

‘60 Minutes’ Was Outmatched by Trump (Column)

The President talked over Lesley Stahl in a relentless blast of rhetoric that seemed more rally than interview

On Oct. 14, CBS’s “60 Minutes” aired an interview with President Donald Trump — rare for its status as having appeared outside of Fox News or conservative media. Appearing the same weekend as First Lady Melania Trump’s appearance on “20/20,” this would seem to represent a new level of media blitzing on the part of an administration that’s already seen its head get plenty of free promotion during rallies broadcast on cable news. And, like Melania Trump’s utterly-on-message, relentlessly forward-moving TV interview, the President’s interview had effectively the same impact as a rally; it allowed him to bulldoze his chief enemy, the media, while airing his own points at ceaseless length. The lesson the media has evidently not learned yet is not to be sitting right there when he does it.Lesley Stahl’s interview with Trump was an undeniable get; he’d been scarce on mainstream media since around the time he appeared on tape with NBC’s Lester Holt and indicated he’d fired former FBI Director James Comey in part due to the Russia investigation. But the interview seemed governed by two motives, both of which played into the hands of a media-savvy President whose refusal to play by typical rules of engagement has been at the center of his rise.

First, Stahl seemed to want to conduct a definitive interview with Trump summarizing his presidency so far. In so doing, she skittered across the map of global and domestic issues, seeming to touch on every topic under the sun, from the ultra-current — the fate of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi — to the more long-range. Questions about, say, North Korea, tariffs on China, climate change, and NATO were met with long bursts of Trumpian verbiage, spilling out so fast they seemed barely able to be edited. What fell away in editing, or what was barely allowed to happen in the time allotted, were many follow-ups.

And when follow-up questions did happen, they seemed to fall into the interview’s second trap: Trying to crack the code of Donald Trump, human being. “I wish you could go to Greenland,” Stahl mused in the brief portion of the interview dealing with climate change, “watch these huge chunks of ice just falling into the ocean, raising the sea levels.” Trump shouted her down, predictably unmoved by Stahl’s evident passion about a story imbued with dread. He won every segment of the interview because he was utterly unable to brook doubt — and, at this point, a broadcast dealing with a president who cannot face facts must be armed with real facts of their own. Stahl asked Trump about “the scientists who say [the effects of climate change are] worse than ever,” but was unprepared to cite one; knowing, now, that the human factor will not work on Trump, a broadcaster should be prepared to cite hard facts in a face-off with the President.

Not, of course, that those facts will change his mind or even elicit an unexpected answer from the Commander-in-Chief. But it felt like a missed opportunity that both so many ardent Trump fans and so many in the hazy middle tuned into an interview with the President and found so much of what was put to him phrased in loose, conversational terms. If he won’t deal with the realities of climate change (presented in this interview only in anecdotal terms of ice and hurricanes and in data, never explained, from “NOAA and NASA,” and not the recent, catastrophic United Nations report) or of abandoning NATO, the broadcaster should rush in to fill the gap. Instead, facts like these ones seemed to be assumed on the part of the viewership at home, and the silences were filled by Trump, who explained away why orthodoxies were wrong while Stahl struggled to break into his monologues. The one moment Stahl meaningfully challenged Trump was on his alliance with North Korea’s Kim Jong-un — presenting the President with a “resume” of his conversation partner’s misdeeds in his own country — but even then, the format demanded she move forward after Trump said the pair shared “a good energy.” Her next question was, verbatim, “China.” And Trump free-associated there, too.

By pushing through questions and by capitalizing on an interview approach seeking to synthesize his entire presidency into two segments of television, Trump effectively converted “60 Minutes” into a short rally. There are those who will see his rants as worthy, and those who will loathe them; whatever unity can be made to exist by the President exists only within those camps. That “60 Minutes” went looking for something greater is more proof than viewers needed that their approach to the President left them outmatched.

Lesley Stahl

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Lesley Stahl
Lesley Stahl.jpg

Lesley Stahl at the LBJ Presidential Library in 2010
Born Lesley Rene Stahl
December 16, 1941(age 76)
Lynn, Massachusetts,
U.S.
Residence New York City, New York, U.S.
Alma mater Wheaton College
Occupation News reporter
Years active 1972–present
Notable credit(s) 60 Minutes (1991–present)
Spouse(s) Jeffrey Gordon (1964–1967; divorced)

Aaron Latham (m. 1977)
Children 1

Lesley Rene Stahl[1] (born December 16, 1941) is an American television journalist.

She has spent most of her career with CBS News, having been affiliated with that network since 1972; since 1991, she has reported for CBS’ 60 Minutes.

Personal life

Stahl was born to a wealthy Jewish family[2] in Lynn, Massachusetts, and was raised in Swampscott, Massachusetts. She is the daughter of Dorothy J. (née Tishler), and Louis E. Stahl, a food company executive.[1][2][3] In 1977, Stahl married author Aaron Latham. They have one child, Taylor Stahl Latham. The couple currently lives in New York City.

Career

Stahl and her family with PresidentRonald Reagan in 1986

An honors graduate of Wheaton College who majored in history,[4] Stahl began her television broadcasting career at Boston’s original Channel 5, WHDH-TV, as a producer and on-air reporter.[5] She joined CBS News in 1972, and became a correspondent in 1974. “I was born on my 30th birthday,” Stahl would later write about the experience. “Everything up till then was prenatal.”[6] Stahl credits her CBS News hire to the Federal Communication Commission‘s 1972 inclusion of women in its affirmative action mandate: “the television networks were scouring the country for women and blacks with any news experience at all. A friend in New York had called to tell me about a memo floating around CBS News mandating that ‘the next reporter we hire will be a woman.'”[7] According to Stahl, Connie Chung and Bernard Shaw were “the two other ‘affirmative action babies’ in what became known as the Class of ’72.”[8] Stahl reflected in an interview on her early days at CBS how, on the night of the ’72 Nixon-McGovern election returns, she found her on-air studio chair marked with masking tape, not with her name as with her colleagues, but with “Female.” Stahl was the mentor of CBS news producer Susan Zirinsky.[9]

Stahl’s prominence grew after she covered Watergate. “I found an apartment in the Watergate complex, moved all my stuff from Boston, and didn’t miss a day of work. … June 1972. Most of the reporters in our bureau were on the road, covering the presidential campaign. Thus, I was sent out to cover the arrest of some men who had broken into one of the buildings in the Watergate complex. That CBS let me, the newest hire, hold on to Watergate as an assignment was a measure of how unimportant the story seemed: … I was the only television reporter covering the early court appearances. When the five Watergate burglars asked for a bail reduction, I got my first scoop. Unlike my competitors, I was able to identify them. The next time the cameraman listened when I said, ‘Roll! That’s them!’ And so CBS was the only network to get pictures of the burglars. I was a hero at the bureau.” [10]

She went on to become White House correspondent during the presidencies of Jimmy CarterRonald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. At the Republican Convention of 1980, she broke the news on CBS that Reagan’s negotiations with ex-President Gerald Ford had broken down and the answer to the question of who would be vice-presidential nominee was: “It’s Bush! Yes, it’s Bush!” George H. W. Bush had been standing perhaps not far away, largely off by himself, looking discouraged because he was sure he wasn’t going to be chosen.

Stahl was the moderator of Face the Nation between September 1983 and May 1991. In addition, she hosted 48 Hours Investigates from 2002 to 2004. In 2002, Stahl made headlines when Al Gore appeared on 60 Minutes and revealed for the first time that he would not run for president again in 2004. When Katie Couric was hired, CBS News asked Stahl to reduce her salary by $500,000 to accommodate Couric’s salary, bringing her salary down to $1.8 million.[11][12] In October 2007 Nicolas SarkozyPresident of France, stood up and walked away from an interview with Stahl because she asked him about his relationship with his soon-to-be estranged wife, Cécilia.

In 1998, she appeared on the NBC sitcom Frasier, playing herself in the episode “Desperately Seeking Closure”. In 2014, she served as a correspondent for Years of Living Dangerously, a documentary show about climate change.[13]

Stahl has written two books, the first of which, Reporting Live, was published in 1999:

I had decided by August 1989, in my 48th year, that I had already had the best day of my life. … Then we went to Rwanda to see the mountain gorillasDian Fossey‘s gorillas in the mist. … After two and a half hours … there they were: two baby gorillas frolicking like any four-year-olds. We snapped and stared. We were right there, in their lives, in the middle of their open-air house. And then the silverback, the patriarch, seemed to welcome us, as three females kept grooming him. … We spent one hour in their world, watching them tumble and wrestle, nurse their babies, swing in the trees, forage for food—vines, leaves, berries— … so close that a female reached out to touch me. When I went to reciprocate, the guide hit my arm with a stick. “Non, madame. C’est inderdit.” … What I decided that day with the gorillas in Rwanda was that the best day of your life may not have happened yet. No matter what you think.[14]

Her second book, Becoming Grandma: The Joys and Science of the New Grandparenting, which chronicles her own experiences with her grandchildren, was published in 2016.

Lesley Stahl hosting the 67th Annual Peabody Awards

She received a Doctorate of Humane Letters honoris causa from Colgate University in 2008[15] and a Doctorate of Humane Letters honoris causa from Loyola College in Maryland in 2008.

Lesley Stahl was a founding member in 2008, along with Liz SmithMary Wells Lawrence, and Joni Evans, of wowOwow.com, a website for “women over 40” to talk about culture, politics, and gossip.[16] By the end of 2010 it had merged into PureWow, a Web site aimed at younger women.

She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.[17]

Stahl is on the Board of Selectors of Jefferson Awards for Public Service.[18]

Career timeline

Bibliography

  • Stahl, Lesley (1999). Reporting Live. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 978-0-684-82930-2.
  • Stahl, Lesley (2016). Becoming grandma : the joys and science of the new grandparenting. Blue Rider Press. ISBN 978-0-399-16815-4.

See also

References …

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesley_Stahl

 

 

Story 4: Kids, What Time Is It? It is Howdy Dowdy Time — Princess Summer-Fall-Winter-Spring — Tone Deaf Elizabeth Warren aka Princess Pocahontas is 99.999% White — Killing Identity Politics — Who Cares? — Lying Lunatic Leftist Losers — Videos —

Trump reacts to Elizabeth Warren releasing DNA test results

Elizabeth Warren releases DNA test results

[youtube3=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2Ao3M3wlZE]

Elizabeth Warren’s family story

Howdy Doody -Yell Howdy Doody -Judy Tyler

Howdy Doody Time with Princesss Summer-Fall-Winter-Spring

Scott Adams – Elizabeth Warren’s DNA Test, Khashoggi, and Climate Change

Liawatha Fauxcahontas Elizabeth Warren: 0.0976% Native American and 100% Pure Bovine Egesta

Couldn’t Be More Tone Deaf’: Tomi Takes on Hillary’s Latest Attack on ‘Deplorables’

Is it time for Hillary to withdraw from the public eye?

[ARCHIVES] ANDY KAUFMAN INTERVIEWING HOWDY DOODY

Warren releases results of DNA test

Senator Elizabeth Warren has released a DNA test that provides “strong evidence’’ she had a Native American in her family tree dating back 6 to 10 generations, an unprecedented move by one of the top possible contenders for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president.

Warren, whose claims to Native American blood have been mocked by President Trump and other Republicans, provided the test results to the Globe on Sunday in an effort to defuse questions about her ancestry that have persisted for years. She planned an elaborate rollout Monday of the results as she aimed for widespread attention.

The analysis of Warren’s DNA was done by Carlos D. Bustamante, a Stanford University professor and expert in the field who won a 2010 MacArthur fellowship, also known as a genius grant, for his work on tracking population migration via DNA analysis.

He concluded that “the vast majority” of Warren’s ancestry is European, but he added that “the results strongly support the existence of an unadmixed Native American ancestor.”

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Bustamante calculated that Warren’s pure Native American ancestor appears in her family tree “in the range of 6-10 generations ago.” That timing fits Warren’s family lore, passed down during her Oklahoma upbringing, that her great-great-great-grandmother, O.C. Sarah Smith, was at least partially Native American.

RELATED: Ethnicity not a factor in Elizabeth Warren’s rise in law

Smith was born in the late 1700s. She identified as white in historical documents, though at the time Indians faced discrimination, and Smith would have had strong incentives to call herself white if possible.

The inherent imprecision of the six-page DNA analysis could provide fodder for Warren’s critics. If O.C. Sarah Smith were fully Native American, that would make Warren up to 1/32nd native. But the generational range based on the ancestor that the report identified suggests she’s between 1/64th and 1/1,024th Native American. The report notes there could be missed ancestors.

Undergoing the test and releasing the results reveal how seriously Warren is taking the attacks from Trump, who has been able to effectively caricature and diminish his national foes via nicknames and conspiracy theories. Trump pushed then President Barack Obama into releasing the long form of his birth certificate to prove what most knew was already true: He was born in America.

The move is also another indication of how seriously Warren is considering running for president. And while it’s unclear whether the test will convince Trump and his die-hard supporters, Warren will be able to point to it with other, more open-minded voters. Once Obama produced his birth certificate in 2011, the racist “birther’’ movement, which thrived on the Internet and was stoked by Trump, largely evaporated.

Warren is seeking reelection in Massachusetts and is expected to easily win a second term. She has said that she will take a “hard look” at running for the Democratic nomination for president once the midterm elections are over. She’s already released 10 years worth of her tax returns and made her personnel files available to The Boston Globe, showing that ethnicity was not a factor in her rise in law.

By taking a DNA test, Warren is showing that if she runs for president, she plans to be a very different candidate than Hillary Clinton was. The 2016 Democratic nominee for president chafed at releasing personal information and was dogged throughout her campaign by her use of a private server while she was secretary of state.

RELATED: Elizabeth Warren’s Native American problem goes beyond politics

Warren provided a sample of her DNA to a private lab in Georgia in August, according to one of the senator’s aides. The data from that test was sent to Bustamante and his team for analysis. Warren received the report last week.

Warren didn’t use a commercial service, but Bustamante is on the scientific advisory board for Ancestry, which provides commercial DNA tests. He’s also consulted on a project for 23andMe, another major DNA testing company.

Warren said she was committed to releasing the report regardless of the results. However, Warren’s aides would not say whether she or any of her three siblings had previously done a commercial DNA test that would have provided them with some assurance about Bustamante’s analysis.

There were five parts of Warren’s DNA that signaled she had a Native American ancestor, according to the report. The largest piece of Native American DNA was found on her 10th chromosome, according to the report. Each human has 23 pairs of chromosomes.

“It really stood out,” said Bustamante in an interview. “We found five segments, and that long segment was pretty significant. It tells us about one ancestor, and we can’t rule out more ancestors.”

He added: “We are confident it is not an error.”

Detecting DNA for Native Americans is particularly tricky because there is an absence of Native American DNA available for comparison. This is in part because Native American leaders have asked tribal members not to participate in genetic databases.

“The tribes have felt they have been exploited,” explained Lawrence Brody, a senior investigator with the Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch at the National Institutes of Health. “The amount of genetic data that is available from Native Americans is sparse.”

To make up for the dearth of Native American DNA, Bustamante used samples from Mexico, Peru, and Colombia to stand in for Native American. That’s because scientists believe that the groups Americans refer to as Native American came to this land via the Bering Strait about 12,000 years ago and settled in what’s now America but also migrated further south. His report explained that the use of reference populations whose genetic material has been fully sequenced was designed “for maximal accuracy.”

RELATED: Warren defends heritage claims

Bustamante said he can tease out the markers that these South Americans would have in common with Native Americans on the North American continent.

Bustamante also compared Warren’s DNA to white populations in Utah and Great Britain to determine if the amounts of Native American markers in Warren’s sample were significant or just background noise.

Warren has 12 times more Native American blood than a white person from Great Britain and 10 times more than a white person from Utah, the report found.

Warren has come under blistering attacks from Trump for making claims of Native American heritage. His taunts of her as “Pocahontas” have become part of his standard rally monologue.

Earlier this month at rally in Iowa, Trump said he hoped Warren would run for president because it would allow him to find out “whether or not she has Indian blood.”

In July, during a rally in Montana, Trump imagined debating Warren during the 2020 presidential election and said that he’d try to make her take a DNA test by throwing it at her onstage. “We have to do it gently, because we’re in the #MeToo generation, so we have to be very gentle,” Trump said.

He also offered to provide $1 million to her charity of choice if she takes the test.

Warren’s Senate campaign has used clips from Trump and his spokeswoman Sarah Sanders attacking her for making the Native American claims in a slickly produced video it planned to distribute Monday morning. It includes a scene of Warren and her three older brothers discussing the issue.

There’s even footage of Warren calling Bustamante to get the results of her DNA test.

“The president likes to call my mom a liar. What do the facts say?” asks Warren, sitting at a desk by behind a Macintosh laptop.

“The facts suggest that you absolutely have Native American ancestry in your pedigree,” replies Bustamante, who was also captured on film by Warren’s team.

Bustamante is considered one of the leading DNA analysts in the world. When several DNA experts were asked by the Globe, earlier this year, how they’d recommend Warren go about taking a DNA test, his name came up repeatedly.

He has never donated to Warren’s campaigns. (A different California professor with the same name donated $200 to Obama in 2008, federal records show.)

Questions over Warren’s ethnicity have dogged her since her 2012 Senate campaign. That’s when GOP operatives found archival stories in the Harvard Crimson of a Harvard Law School spokesman referring to her as a Native American as a way to show the school had a diverse faculty.

During her academic career as a law professor, she had her ethnicity changed from white to Native American at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she taught from 1987 to 1995, and at Harvard University Law School, where she was a tenured faculty member starting in 1995. (She was a visiting professor at Harvard during the 1992-1993 academic year.)

In an interview with the Globe published last month, Warren explained that she identified herself as Native American in the late 1980s and early 1990s as many of the matriarchs of her family were dying and she began to feel that her family stories and history were becoming lost.

Ivy League universities, like the ones where Warren taught, were under great pressure to show they had diverse staffs.

The University of Pennsylvania filled out a document explaining why it hired a white woman over minority candidates — clear evidence it didn’t view her as a Native American addition. And the Globe interviewed 31 Harvard Law School faculty members who voted on her appointment there, and all said her heritage was not a factor.

Correction: Due to a math error, a story about Elizabeth Warren misstated the ancestry percentage of a potential 6th to 10th generation relative. The generational range based on the ancestor that the report identified suggests she’s between 1/64th and 1/1,024th Native American.

Annie Linskey can be reached at annie.linskey@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @annielinskey.

Characters

Puppet characters[

Besides Howdy Doody, the other characters in this show are:

  • Heidi Doody – Introduced as a stranger who saved Buffalo Bob’s life in Africa, she was adopted as Howdy’s sister.
  • Phineas T. Bluster – The resident skinflint, mayor of Doodyville and nemesis of Howdy; one of the Bluster triplets.
  • Petey Bluster – Phineas’s nephew.
  • Don Jose Bluster – The South American Bluster brother.
  • Hector Hamhock Bluster – A rarely seen Bluster brother
  • Princess Summer Fall Winter Spring – Introduced as a puppet, then played by actress Judy Tyler, who had appeared opposite Elvis Presley in the 1957 film Jailhouse Rock. After she was killed in a car accident on July 3, 1957, at the age of 24, the character was portrayed by a marionette.
  • Dilly Dally – Howdy’s naive boyhood friend.
  • Inspector John J. Fadoozle – “America’s No. 1 private eye” whose character was revealed as the mysterious “Mr. X” who used the pseudonym to run against Howdy for the office of President of All the Boys and Girls of America; children could vote by using ballots that were attached to the wrappers of loaves of Wonder Bread, a major sponsor of the show.
  • Chief Thunderthud and Chief Featherman – Two of several Native American characters used to emphasize the show’s western theme.
  • J. Cornelius Cobb – The shopkeeper played by Nick Nicholson, who had a strong dislike for clowns.
  • Sandra the Witch
  • Capt. Windy Scuttlebut
  • Flub-a-Dub – A combination of eight animals. He had a duck‘s bill, a cat‘s whiskers, a spaniel‘s ears, a giraffe‘s neck, a dachshund‘s body, a seal‘s flippers, a pig‘s tail, and an elephant‘s memory.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howdy_Doody#Characters_and_story

Did Elizabeth Warren Just Kill Identity Politics?

If the Massachusetts senator is now a person of color then the term has no meaning.