The Pronk Pops Show 366, November 7, 2014, Story 1: Only 214,000 Jobs Created in October Yet Unemployment Rate Falls to 5.8% With A Very Low Labor Participation Rate At 62.8% — 36 Year Low — Normal Would Be 66-67% Range — Big Government Leads To Low Growth and Higher Unemployment — Videos

Posted on November 7, 2014. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Benghazi, Blogroll, Budgetary Policy, Business, College, Communications, Consitutional Law, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Crime, Culture, Economics, Elections, Empires, Employment, European History, Fast and Furious, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Genocide, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, High Crimes, History, Illegal Immigration, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Impeachment, Insurance, Investments, IRS, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Immigration, Media, Monetary Policy, Oil, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Public Sector Unions, Radio, Regulation, Resources, Scandals, Security, Social Networking, Success, Tax Policy, Taxes, Technology, Terror, Terrorism, Unemployment, Unions, United States Constitution, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Weapons, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 366: November 7, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 365: November 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 364: November 5, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 363: November 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 362: November 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 361: October 31, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 360: October 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 359: October 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 358: October 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 357: October 27, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 356: October 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 355: October 23, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 354: October 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 353: October 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 352: October 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 351: October 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 350: October 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 349: October 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 348: October 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 347: October 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 346: October 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 345: October 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 344: October 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 343: October 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 342: October 2, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 341: October 1, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 340: September 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 339: September 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 338: September 26, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 337: September 25, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 336: September 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 335: September 23 2014

Pronk Pops Show 334: September 22 2014

Pronk Pops Show 333: September 19 2014

Pronk Pops Show 332: September 18 2014

Pronk Pops Show 331: September 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 330: September 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 329: September 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 328: September 12, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 327: September 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 326: September 10, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 325: September 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 324: September 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 323: September 5, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 322: September 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 321: September 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 320: August 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 319: August 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 318: August 27, 2014 

Pronk Pops Show 317: August 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 316: August 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 315: August 18, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 314: August 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 313: August 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 312: August 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 311: August 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 310: August 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 309: August 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 308: August 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 307: August 1, 2014

Story 1: Only 214,000 Jobs Created in October Yet Unemployment Rate Falls to 5.8% With A Very Low Labor Participation Rate At 62.8% — 36 Year Low — Normal Would Be 66-67% Range — Big Government Leads To Low Growth and Higher Unemployment — Videos

labor-force-participation-rate-obama-unemploymenlabor_force_participation_rate

civilian-labor-force-participation-rate

part1202121_big

Labor-Force-Participation-Rate1

labor-participation-rate-1979-2013

U.S. Labor Participation Rate – Graph of Reagan vs obama

Labor participation rate is down to unprecedented levels

Manipulated Unemployment Rate Drops As The Economic Collapse Accelerates

JEC Chair Brady discusses the importance of declining labor force participation rate

Explaining Labor Participation Rates

Labor Secretary Perez: Paid Leave Would Boost Labor Force Participation

Plosser: Labor Participation Rate Down Since 2002

Labor Secretary Dismisses Historical Drop in Labor Participation Rate

Labor Participation Rate Drops To 36 Year Low- Record 92.6 Million Amerikan Not In Labor Force

Vice Chairman Brady Questions Commissioner Hall about Labor Force Participation Rate at JEC Hearing

Uploaded on Apr 1, 2011

At a Joint Economic Committee Hearing on the Employment Situation, Representative Kevin Brady, Vice Chairman, questions Witness Dr. Keith Hall, Commissioner, Bureau of Labor Statistics about the Labor Force Participation Rate in the March Employment Report.

Hot News| Unemployment drops, Americans not happy#1| November 7, 2014

Labor Department reports employers added 214,000 jobs in October

Unemployment and the Unemployment Rate

Types of Unemployment

Big Government vs. Small Government

What We Believe, Part 1: Small Government and Free Enterprise

What We Believe, Part 2: The Problem with Elitism

What We Believe, Part 3: Wealth Creation

What We Believe, Part 6: Immigration

 

MARC FABER Gives His Predictions on Stock Market Collapse, Gold, US Dollar ECON

Home Depot Hacking, Jobs Report, Cargo Backlog – Today’s Investor News

U.S. Oil Slides to 3-year Low as Saudi Discount Adds to Woes

Gasoline Prices: Why Are They Going Down Now?

What’s behind the sudden drop in US gas prices?

MARC FABER on OIL PRICES – Oil Prices Wont Go Below $70 For A Long Time

U.S. wage growth needed before Fed will raise rates – Decision Economics

Optimistic jobs report October

November Small Biz Jobs Report a Mixed Bag | NFIB

US Dollar Collapse and the Rise of China – Peter Schiff‬‬

JIM ROGERS – Sell Everything & Run For Your Lives

Consumer Sentiment in U.S. Increases to a Seven-Year High

Consumer confidence in the U.S. unexpectedly rose in October to the highest level in seven years, showing a brightening in Americans’ moods as gas prices drop and the labor market gains traction.

The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan preliminary sentiment index for this month increased to 86.4, the strongest since July 2007, from a final reading of 84.6 in September. The median projection in a Bloomberg survey of 67 economists called for 84.

Job gains on pace for their strongest year since 1999 and cheaper gas prices are keeping households upbeat about economic expansion amid the weakening in Europe and emerging nations. Faster wage increases and more broad-based improvement in the labor market would help further spur the consumer spending that makes up about 70 percent of the economy.

“An improving job market and lower energy costs are going to offset a lot of what’s happening,” said Joseph LaVorgna, chief U.S. economist of Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. in New York, who projected the index would rise to 86.

Estimates in the Bloomberg survey ranged from 81 to 87. The index averaged 89 in the five years before December 2007, when the last recession began, and 64.2 in the 18-month contraction that followed.
Shares Rally

 

 

 

sgs-emp

 

Employment Level

147,283,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

employment level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138451(1) 138599 138752 139309 139247 139148 139179 139427 139393 139111 139030 139266
2011 139287(1) 139422 139655 139622 139653 139409 139524 139904 140154 140335 140747 140836
2012 141677(1) 141943 142079 141963 142257 142432 142272 142204 142947 143369 143233 143212
2013 143384(1) 143464 143393 143676 143919 144075 144285 144179 144270 143485 144443 144586
2014 145224(1) 145266 145742 145669 145814 146221 146352 146368 146600 147283
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 

Civilian Labor Force Level

156,278,000




Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

civilian labor force level
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153404(1) 153720 153964 154642 154106 153631 153706 154087 153971 153631 154127 153639
2011 153198(1) 153280 153403 153566 153526 153379 153309 153724 154059 153940 154072 153927
2012 154328(1) 154826 154811 154565 154946 155134 154970 154669 155018 155507 155279 155485
2013 155699(1) 155511 155099 155359 155609 155822 155693 155435 155473 154625 155284 154937
2014 155460(1) 155724 156227 155421 155613 155694 156023 155959 155862 156278
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Civilian Labor Participation Rate

62.8%

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
civilian labor participation rate
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.9 63.8 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.7 63.6 63.6
2013 63.6 63.5 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.5 63.4 63.2 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.8
2014 63.0 63.0 63.2 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.8

 

Unemployment Level

 

8,995,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 14953 15121 15212 15333 14858 14483 14527 14660 14578 14520 15097 14373
2011 13910 13858 13748 13944 13873 13971 13785 13820 13905 13604 13326 13090
2012 12650 12883 12732 12603 12689 12702 12698 12464 12070 12138 12045 12273
2013 12315 12047 11706 11683 11690 11747 11408 11256 11203 11140 10841 10351
2014 10236 10459 10486 9753 9799 9474 9671 9591 9262 8995

Unemployment Rate U-3

5.8%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

unemployment_rate_U_3


2014

 

Year
2000
2001

Employment-Population Ratio

59.2%

Series Id:           LNS12300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment-Population Ratio
Labor force status:  Employment-population ratio
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

employment_population_level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 64.6 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.4 64.5 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.3 64.4
2001 64.4 64.3 64.3 64.0 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.2 63.5 63.2 63.0 62.9
2002 62.7 63.0 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.7 63.0 62.7 62.5 62.4
2003 62.5 62.5 62.4 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.1 62.1 62.0 62.1 62.3 62.2
2004 62.3 62.3 62.2 62.3 62.3 62.4 62.5 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.5 62.4
2005 62.4 62.4 62.4 62.7 62.8 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.7 62.8
2006 62.9 63.0 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.3 63.3 63.4
2007 63.3 63.3 63.3 63.0 63.0 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7
2008 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7 62.5 62.4 62.2 62.0 61.9 61.7 61.4 61.0
2009 60.6 60.3 59.9 59.8 59.6 59.4 59.3 59.1 58.7 58.5 58.6 58.3
2010 58.5 58.5 58.5 58.7 58.6 58.5 58.5 58.6 58.5 58.3 58.2 58.3
2011 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.2 58.2 58.3 58.4 58.4 58.5 58.5
2012 58.5 58.5 58.6 58.5 58.6 58.6 58.5 58.4 58.6 58.8 58.7 58.6
2013 58.6 58.6 58.5 58.6 58.7 58.7 58.7 58.6 58.6 58.2 58.6 58.6
2014 58.8 58.8 58.9 58.9 58.9 59.0 59.0 59.0 59.0 59.2

 

Unmployment Rate -16-19 Years Old

18.6%

Series Id:           LNS14000012
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - 16-19 yrs.
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 to 19 years

teenage_unemployment_rate


 

Black or African American Unemployment Rate

 

10.9%

 



Series Id:           LNS14000006
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - Black or African American
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Race:                Black or African American

Black_unemployment_rate


 

 

 

Employment Level Part-Time for Economic Reasons

 

7,027,ooo

Series Id:                      LNS12032194
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:                   (Seas) Employment Level - Part-Time for Economic Reasons, All Industries
Labor force status:             Employed
Type of data:                   Number in thousands
Age:                            16 years and over
Hours at work:                  1 to 34 hours
Reasons work not as scheduled:  Economic reasons
Worker status/schedules:        At work part time

Part_Time_Employment_Level

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 3208 3167 3231 3186 3283 3209 3144 3211 3217 3179 3467 3243
2001 3332 3296 3280 3289 3439 3792 3556 3380 4233 4437 4317 4393
2002 4112 4289 4101 4199 4103 4048 4145 4301 4329 4314 4329 4321
2003 4607 4844 4652 4798 4570 4592 4648 4419 4882 4813 4862 4750
2004 4705 4549 4742 4568 4588 4443 4449 4474 4487 4820 4547 4427
2005 4389 4250 4388 4278 4315 4432 4400 4491 4675 4269 4219 4115
2006 4123 4174 3972 3900 4111 4318 4303 4195 4115 4352 4190 4187
2007 4279 4220 4253 4313 4473 4342 4410 4576 4521 4325 4494 4618
2008 4846 4902 4904 5220 5286 5540 5930 5851 6148 6690 7311 8029
2009 8046 8796 9145 8908 9113 9024 8891 9029 8847 8979 9114 9098
2010 8500 8904 9216 9181 8833 8607 8547 8829 9199 8870 8880 8941
2011 8440 8403 8635 8664 8583 8486 8342 8820 9068 8675 8457 8177
2012 8228 8133 7780 7913 8138 8154 8163 8045 8572 8231 8164 7929
2013 7983 7991 7663 7929 7917 8194 8180 7898 7914 8016 7723 7771
2014 7257 7186 7411 7465 7269 7544 7511 7277 7103 7027

 

 

Total Unemployment Rate U-6

 

11.5%

 

total_unemployment_rate_U_6

 

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.2 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.1 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 16.0 16.1 16.3 15.9 15.6 15.2
2012 15.1 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.8 14.8 14.9 14.7 14.7 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.4 14.3 13.8 13.9 13.8 14.2 13.9 13.6 13.6 13.7 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.6 12.7 12.3 12.2 12.1 12.2 12.0 11.8 11.5

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed until              USDL-14-2037
8:30 a.m. (EST) Friday, November 7, 2014

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- OCTOBER 2014


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 214,000 in October, and the unemployment 
rate edged down to 5.8 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. 
Employment increased in food services and drinking places, retail trade, and 
health care. 

Household Survey Data

Both the unemployment rate (5.8 percent) and the number of unemployed persons 
(9.0 million) edged down in October. Since the beginning of the year, the 
unemployment rate and the number of unemployed persons have declined by 0.8 
percentage point and 1.2 million, respectively. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for whites declined to 4.8 
percent in October. The rates for adult men (5.1 percent), adult women (5.4 
percent), teenagers (18.6 percent), blacks (10.9 percent), and Hispanics (6.8 
percent) changed little over the month. The jobless rate for Asians was 5.0 percent 
(not seasonally adjusted), little changed from a year earlier. (See tables A-1, A-2, 
and A-3.)

In October, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or 
more) was little changed at 2.9 million. These individuals accounted for 32.0 
percent of the unemployed. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term 
unemployed has declined by 1.1 million. (See table A-12.)

The civilian labor force participation rate was little changed at 62.8 percent 
in October and has been essentially flat since April. The employment-population 
ratio increased to 59.2 percent in October. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes 
referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was about unchanged in October 
at 7.0 million. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, 
were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they 
were unable to find a full-time job. (See table A-8.)

In October, 2.2 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, 
little changed from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) 
These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for 
work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not 
counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks 
preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 770,000 discouraged workers in 
October, essentially unchanged from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally 
adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work 
because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.4 million 
persons marginally attached to the labor force in October had not searched for 
work for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See 
table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 214,000 in October, in line with 
the average monthly gain of 222,000 over the prior 12 months. In October, job 
growth occurred in food services and drinking places, retail trade, and health 
care. (See table B-1.)

Food services and drinking places added 42,000 jobs in October, compared 
with an average gain of 26,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Employment in retail trade rose by 27,000 in October. Within the industry, 
employment grew in general merchandise stores (+12,000) and automobile dealers 
(+4,000). Retail trade has added 249,000 jobs over the past year. 

Health care added 25,000 jobs in October, about in line with the prior 12-month 
average gain of 21,000 jobs per month. In October, employment rose in ambulatory 
health care services (+19,000). 

Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up over 
the month (+37,000).  Over the prior 12 months, job gains averaged 56,000 per 
month. In October, employment continued to trend up in temporary help services 
(+15,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+7,000). 

In October, manufacturing employment continued on an upward trend (+15,000). 
Within the industry, job gains occurred in machinery (+5,000), furniture and 
related products (+4,000), and semiconductors and electronic components (+2,000). 
Over the year, manufacturing has added 170,000 jobs, largely in durable goods.

Employment also continued to trend up in transportation and warehousing (+13,000) 
and construction (+12,000). 

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, wholesale 
trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change 
over the month.

In October, the average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls 
edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.6 hours. The manufacturing workweek was unchanged at 
40.8 hours, and factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.4 hours. The average 
workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls 
edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

Average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 3 
cents to $24.57 in October. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 
2.0 percent. In October, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and 
nonsupervisory employees increased by 4 cents to $20.70. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for August was revised from 
+180,000 to +203,000, and the change for September was revised from +248,000 
to +256,000. With these revisions, employment gains in August and September 
combined were 31,000 more than previously reported.

_____________
The Employment Situation for November is scheduled to be released on Friday, 
December 5, 2014, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).



 

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

[Numbers in thousands]

Category Oct.
2013
Aug.
2014
Sept.
2014
Oct.
2014
Change from:
Sept.
2014-
Oct.
2014

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

246,381 248,229 248,446 248,657 211

Civilian labor force

154,625 155,959 155,862 156,278 416

Participation rate

62.8 62.8 62.7 62.8 0.1

Employed

143,485 146,368 146,600 147,283 683

Employment-population ratio

58.2 59.0 59.0 59.2 0.2

Unemployed

11,140 9,591 9,262 8,995 -267

Unemployment rate

7.2 6.1 5.9 5.8 -0.1

Not in labor force

91,756 92,269 92,584 92,378 -206

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

7.2 6.1 5.9 5.8 -0.1

Adult men (20 years and over)

6.9 5.7 5.3 5.1 -0.2

Adult women (20 years and over)

6.4 5.7 5.5 5.4 -0.1

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

22.0 19.6 20.0 18.6 -1.4

White

6.3 5.3 5.1 4.8 -0.3

Black or African American

13.0 11.4 11.0 10.9 -0.1

Asian (not seasonally adjusted)

5.2 4.5 4.3 5.0

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

9.0 7.5 6.9 6.8 -0.1

Total, 25 years and over

6.0 5.1 4.7 4.7 0.0

Less than a high school diploma

10.8 9.1 8.4 7.9 -0.5

High school graduates, no college

7.3 6.2 5.3 5.7 0.4

Some college or associate degree

6.3 5.4 5.4 4.8 -0.6

Bachelor’s degree and higher

3.8 3.2 2.9 3.1 0.2

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

6,162 4,836 4,530 4,358 -172

Job leavers

842 860 829 794 -35

Reentrants

3,104 2,845 2,809 2,871 62

New entrants

1,217 1,066 1,105 1,063 -42

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,794 2,609 2,383 2,473 90

5 to 14 weeks

2,636 2,449 2,508 2,312 -196

15 to 26 weeks

1,777 1,486 1,416 1,417 1

27 weeks and over

4,047 2,963 2,954 2,916 -38

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

8,016 7,277 7,103 7,027 -76

Slack work or business conditions

5,025 4,261 4,162 4,214 52

Could only find part-time work

2,585 2,587 2,562 2,447 -115

Part time for noneconomic reasons

18,755 19,526 19,561 19,769 208

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

2,283 2,141 2,226 2,192

Discouraged workers

815 775 698 770

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Oct.
2013
Aug.
2014
Sept.
2014(p)
Oct.
2014(p)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

237 203 256 214

Total private

247 200 244 209

Goods-producing

38 22 36 28

Mining and logging

5 2 8 1

Construction

15 17 19 12

Manufacturing

18 3 9 15

Durable goods(1)

13 4 9 14

Motor vehicles and parts

4.6 -6.0 1.4 0.6

Nondurable goods

5 -1 0 1

Private service-providing(1)

209 178 208 181

Wholesale trade

-1.8 5.7 5.1 8.5

Retail trade

41.9 -3.9 34.0 27.1

Transportation and warehousing

4.8 11.4 5.2 13.3

Information

6 14 13 -4

Financial activities

7 12 12 3

Professional and business services(1)

53 49 55 37

Temporary help services

4.0 20.6 17.8 15.1

Education and health services(1)

31 50 43 41

Health care and social assistance

24.4 39.9 24.6 27.2

Leisure and hospitality

65 26 48 52

Other services

3 11 -5 3

Government

-10 3 12 5

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES(2)
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.4 49.4 49.4

Total private women employees

48.0 47.9 47.9 47.9

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.6 82.6 82.6 82.6

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.5 34.5 34.6

Average hourly earnings

$24.09 $24.54 $24.54 $24.57

Average weekly earnings

$828.70 $846.63 $846.63 $850.12

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

99.1 101.2 101.4 101.9

Over-the-month percent change

0.0 0.2 0.2 0.5

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

113.9 118.5 118.7 119.4

Over-the-month percent change

0.1 0.5 0.2 0.6

HOURS AND EARNINGS
PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

33.6 33.8 33.7 33.8

Average hourly earnings

$20.25 $20.67 $20.66 $20.70

Average weekly earnings

$680.40 $698.65 $696.24 $699.66

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2002=100)(3)

106.6 109.2 109.0 109.5

Over-the-month percent change

0.3 0.5 -0.2 0.5

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2002=100)(4)

144.2 150.8 150.5 151.5

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.7 -0.2 0.7

DIFFUSION INDEX(5)
(Over 1-month span)

Total private (264 industries)

63.4 64.2 60.4 62.3

Manufacturing (81 industries)

55.6 57.4 53.1 58.6

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(p) Preliminary

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The Pronk Pops Show 128, September 12, 2013, Segment 0: Former Communist KGB Lt. Colonel Putin Pleas for International Collectivism Not American Individual Exceptionalism — Obama Agrees! — Part 1– Videos

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Segment 0: Former Communist KGB Lt. Colonel Putin Pleas for International Collectivism Not American Individual Exceptionalism — Obama Agrees! —  Videos

Collectivism

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Collectivist in Chief

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Background Articles and Videos

What We Believe, Part 1: Small Government and Free Enterprise

What We Believe, Part 2: The Problem with Elitism

What We Believe, Part 3: Wealth Creation

What We Believe, Part 4: Natural Law

What We Believe, Part 5: Gun Rights

What We Believe, Part 6: Immigration

What We Believe, Part 7: American Exceptionalism

Why Obama Is Snubbing Putin | WSJ Opinion

A Plea for Caution From Russia

What Putin Has to Say to Americans About Syria

By VLADIMIR V. PUTIN

MOSCOW — RECENT events surrounding Syria have prompted me to speak directly to the American people and their political leaders. It is important to do so at a time of insufficient communication between our societies.

Relations between us have passed through different stages. We stood against each other during the cold war. But we were also allies once, and defeated the Nazis together. The universal international organization — the United Nations — was then established to prevent such devastation from ever happening again.

The United Nations’ founders understood that decisions affecting war and peace should happen only by consensus, and with America’s consent the veto by Security Council permanent members was enshrined in the United Nations Charter. The profound wisdom of this has underpinned the stability of international relations for decades.

No one wants the United Nations to suffer the fate of the League of Nations, which collapsed because it lacked real leverage. This is possible if influential countries bypass the United Nations and take military action without Security Council authorization.

The potential strike by the United States against Syria, despite strong opposition from many countries and major political and religious leaders, including the pope, will result in more innocent victims and escalation, potentially spreading the conflict far beyond Syria’s borders. A strike would increase violence and unleash a new wave of terrorism. It could undermine multilateral efforts to resolve the Iranian nuclear problem and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and further destabilize the Middle East and North Africa. It could throw the entire system of international law and order out of balance.

Syria is not witnessing a battle for democracy, but an armed conflict between government and opposition in a multireligious country. There are few champions of democracy in Syria. But there are more than enough Qaeda fighters and extremists of all stripes battling the government. The United States State Department has designated Al Nusra Front and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, fighting with the opposition, as terrorist organizations. This internal conflict, fueled by foreign weapons supplied to the opposition, is one of the bloodiest in the world.

Mercenaries from Arab countries fighting there, and hundreds of militants from Western countries and even Russia, are an issue of our deep concern. Might they not return to our countries with experience acquired in Syria? After all, after fighting in Libya, extremists moved on to Mali. This threatens us all.

From the outset, Russia has advocated peaceful dialogue enabling Syrians to develop a compromise plan for their own future. We are not protecting the Syrian government, but international law. We need to use the United Nations Security Council and believe that preserving law and order in today’s complex and turbulent world is one of the few ways to keep international relations from sliding into chaos. The law is still the law, and we must follow it whether we like it or not. Under current international law, force is permitted only in self-defense or by the decision of the Security Council. Anything else is unacceptable under the United Nations Charter and would constitute an act of aggression.

No one doubts that poison gas was used in Syria. But there is every reason to believe it was used not by the Syrian Army, but by opposition forces, to provoke intervention by their powerful foreign patrons, who would be siding with the fundamentalists. Reports that militants are preparing another attack — this time against Israel — cannot be ignored.

It is alarming that military intervention in internal conflicts in foreign countries has become commonplace for the United States. Is it in America’s long-term interest? I doubt it. Millions around the world increasingly see America not as a model of democracy but as relying solely on brute force, cobbling coalitions together under the slogan “you’re either with us or against us.”

But force has proved ineffective and pointless. Afghanistan is reeling, and no one can say what will happen after international forces withdraw. Libya is divided into tribes and clans. In Iraq the civil war continues, with dozens killed each day. In the United States, many draw an analogy between Iraq and Syria, and ask why their government would want to repeat recent mistakes.

No matter how targeted the strikes or how sophisticated the weapons, civilian casualties are inevitable, including the elderly and children, whom the strikes are meant to protect.

The world reacts by asking: if you cannot count on international law, then you must find other ways to ensure your security. Thus a growing number of countries seek to acquire weapons of mass destruction. This is logical: if you have the bomb, no one will touch you. We are left with talk of the need to strengthen nonproliferation, when in reality this is being eroded.

We must stop using the language of force and return to the path of civilized diplomatic and political settlement.

A new opportunity to avoid military action has emerged in the past few days. The United States, Russia and all members of the international community must take advantage of the Syrian government’s willingness to place its chemical arsenal under international control for subsequent destruction. Judging by the statements of President Obama, the United States sees this as an alternative to military action.

I welcome the president’s interest in continuing the dialogue with Russia on Syria. We must work together to keep this hope alive, as we agreed to at the Group of 8 meeting in Lough Erne in Northern Ireland in June, and steer the discussion back toward negotiations.

If we can avoid force against Syria, this will improve the atmosphere in international affairs and strengthen mutual trust. It will be our shared success and open the door to cooperation on other critical issues.

My working and personal relationship with President Obama is marked by growing trust. I appreciate this. I carefully studied his address to the nation on Tuesday. And I would rather disagree with a case he made on American exceptionalism, stating that the United States’ policy is “what makes America different. It’s what makes us exceptional.” It is extremely dangerous to encourage people to see themselves as exceptional, whatever the motivation. There are big countries and small countries, rich and poor, those with long democratic traditions and those still finding their way to democracy. Their policies differ, too. We are all different, but when we ask for the Lord’s blessings, we must not forget that God created us equal.

Vladimir V. Putin is the president of Russia.

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