The Pronk Pops Show 1394, February 7, 2020, Story 1: Solid January 2020 Jobs Report: 225,000 New Non-farm Payroll Jobs Created in January and Labor Participation Rate Increased to 63.4% with Over 729,000 New Participants in Labor Force! — Videos — Story 2: U.S. Federal Budgetary Deficits, The National Debt and The Big Four Federal Spending: Social Security, Medicare, Defense and Medicaid — Videos — Story 3: President Trump Answers Big Lie Media Mob Question on Way To North Carolina  — Trump Derangement Syndrome of REDS (Radical Extremist Democratic Socialists) in Congress — Videos

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Story 1: Solid January 2020 Jobs Report: 225,000 New Non-farm Payroll Jobs Created in January and Labor Participation Rate Increased to 63.4% with Over 729,000 New Participants in Labor Force! — Videos —

Alternate Unemployment Charts

The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.

The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

 

Public Commentary on Unemployment

Unemployment Data Series   subcription required(Subscription required.)  View  Download Excel CSV File   Last Updated: February 7th, 2020

The ShadowStats Alternate Unemployment Rate for January 2020 is 21.0%.

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

Watch five experts break down the January jobs report

Outstanding January job report exceeds expectations with 225K jobs added

Kudlow: The economy is booming and jobs are booming

US economy adds 225,000 jobs in January

Mnuchin: We need to grow the economy faster than government spending

U.S. National Debt Clock

https://www.usdebtclock.org/

Will our national debt doom America?

Keiser Report: Economic Ghouls and Predators (E1498)

Keiser Report: All Rescue Roads Lead to the Elite (E1492)

US budget deficit tops $1 trillion as government spending increasesUS budget deficit tops $1 trillion as government spending increases

]

U.S. CBO Doesn’t Expect Economic Growth to Solve Deficit ‘Problem’

Deficits & Debts: Crash Course Economics #9

Deficits and debt | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

63.4%: Labor Force Participation at Trump-Era High As Labor Force Grows by 574,000

By Susan Jones | February 7, 2020 | 8:03am EST

President Donald Trump never misses an opportunity to plug the strong employment picture for which he takes credit, and today he earned more bragging rights:

The Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics said the economy created 225,000 in January, well above estimates. BLS says notable job gains occurred in construction, in health care, and in transportation and warehousing.

The number of employed Americans dipped in January to 158,714,000 — down 89,000 from December’s record high.

The unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point to 3.6 percent in January.

But the labor force participation rate reached a Trump-era high of 63.4 percent, up from 63.2 percent in December, because the civilian labor force increased by 574,000 in January, after accounting for annual adjustments to population controls, BLS said.*

In January, the civilian non-institutional population in the United States was 259,502,000. That included all people 16 and older who did not live in an institution (such as a prison, nursing home or long-term care facility).

Of that civilian non-institutional population, 164,606,000 were participating in the labor force, meaning that they either had a job or were actively seeking one during the last month. This resulted in a labor force participation rate of 63.4 percent, the highest it’s been since June 2013.

The number of Americans counted as not in the labor force — meaning they did not have a job and were not looking for one — dropped by 442,000 in January (after population control adjustments). This number hovers around 95,000,000, partly because of retiring baby boomers.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.3 percent), adult women (3.2 percent), teenagers (12.2 percent), Whites (3.1 percent), Blacks (6.0 percent), Asians (3.0 percent), and Hispanics (4.3 percent) showed little or no change over the month.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for November was revised up by 5,000 from +256,000 to +261,000, and the change for December was revised up by 2,000 from +145,000 to +147,000. With these revisions, employment gains in November and December combined were 7,000 higher than previously reported.

In January, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 7 cents to $28.44. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 3.1 percent.

The current economic expansion, now in its 11th year, became the longest in U.S. history on July 1, 2019, beating the previous record that lasted from March 1991 through March 2001.

President Trump bragged about the economy Tuesday night in his State of the Union speech:

In just over two years since the election, we have launched an unprecedented economic boom — a boom that has rarely been seen before.  There’s been nothing like it.  We have created 5.3 million new jobs and, importantly, added 600,000 new manufacturing jobs — something which almost everyone said was impossible to do.  But the fact is, we are just getting started.

Wages are rising at the fastest pace in decades and growing for blue-collar workers, who I promised to fight for.  They’re growing faster than anyone else thought possible.  Nearly 5 million Americans have been lifted off food stamps. The U.S. economy is growing almost twice as fast today as when I took office.  And we are considered, far and away, the hottest economy anywhere in the world.  Not even close.

Unemployment has reached the lowest rate in over half a century. African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American unemployment have all reached their lowest levels ever recorded. Unemployment for Americans with disabilities has also reached an all-time low. More people are working now than at any time in the history of our country — 157 million people at work.

*(BLS explained that the January 2020 data includes updated population estimates developed by the Census Bureau’s household survey. “Each year,” BLS said, “the Census Bureau updates the estimates to reflect new information and assumptions about the growth of the population since the previous decennial census. The change in population reflected in the new estimates results from adjustments for net international migration, updated vital statistics, and estimation methodology improvements.”)

https://cnsnews.com/article/national/susan-jones/634-labor-force-participation-trump-era-high

 

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until		USDL-20-0180
8:30 a.m. (EST) Friday, February 7, 2020

Technical information: 
 Household data:	(202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:	(202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:		(202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


		        THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- JANUARY 2020


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 225,000 in January, and the unemployment rate
was little changed at 3.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.
Notable job gains occurred in construction, in health care, and in transportation and
warehousing. 

This news release presents statistics from two monthly surveys. The household survey
measures labor force status, including unemployment, by demographic characteristics.
The establishment survey measures nonfarm employment, hours, and earnings by industry.
For more information about the concepts and statistical methodology used in these two
surveys, see the Technical Note.
		 
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
| 									            |
|                Changes to The Employment Situation Data		            |
|									            |
|   Establishment survey data have been revised as a result of the annual           |
|   benchmarking process and the updating of seasonal adjustment factors. In        |
|   addition, several changes have been made to household survey data, including    |
|   the annual update of population estimates. See the notes at the end of the      |
|   news release for more information.                                              |
|___________________________________________________________________________________|


Household Survey Data

Both the unemployment rate, at 3.6 percent, and the number of unemployed persons, at
5.9 million, changed little in January. (See table A-1. For information about annual
population adjustments to the household survey estimates, see the note at the end of
the news release and tables B and C.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.3 percent), 
adult women (3.2 percent), teenagers (12.2 percent), Whites (3.1 percent), Blacks
(6.0 percent), Asians (3.0 percent), and Hispanics (4.3 percent) showed little or
no change over the month. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

Among the unemployed, the number of reentrants to the labor force increased by
183,000 in January to 1.8 million but was little changed over the year. (Reentrants
are persons who previously worked but were not in the labor force prior to beginning
their job search.) (See table A-11.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more), at 1.2 million,
was unchanged in January. These individuals accounted for 19.9 percent of the unemployed.
(See table A-12.)

After accounting for the annual adjustments to the population controls, the civilian
labor force rose by 574,000 in January, and the labor force participation rate edged 
up by 0.2 percentage point to 63.4 percent. The employment-population ratio, at 61.2
percent, changed little over the month but was up by 0.5 percentage point over the year.
(See table A-1. For additional information about the effects of the population adjustments,
see table C.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons, at 4.2 million, was
essentially unchanged in January. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time
employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or they were
unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.)

The number of persons marginally attached to the labor force, at 1.3 million, changed
little in January. These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available
for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted
as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey
for a variety of reasons, such as belief that no jobs are available for them (referred
to as discouraged workers), school attendance, or family responsibilities. Discouraged
workers numbered 337,000 in January, little changed over the month. (See Summary table A.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 225,000 in January, compared with an
average monthly gain of 175,000 in 2019. Notable job gains occurred in construction,
in health care, and in transportation and warehousing. (See table B-1. For information
about the annual benchmark process, see the note at the end of the news release and table A.)

In January, construction employment rose by 44,000. Most of the gain occurred in specialty
trade contractors, with increases in both the residential (+18,000) and nonresidential
(+17,000) components. Construction added an average of 12,000 jobs per month in 2019. 

Health care added 36,000 jobs in January, with gains in ambulatory health care services
(+23,000) and hospitals (+10,000). Health care has added 361,000 jobs over the past 12 months. 

Employment in transportation and warehousing increased by 28,000 in January. Job gains
occurred in couriers and messengers (+14,000) and in warehousing and storage (+6,000).
Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing has increased by 106,000. 

Employment in leisure and hospitality continued to trend up in January (+36,000). Over
the past 6 months, the industry has added 288,000 jobs. 

Employment continued on an upward trend in professional and business services in January
(+21,000), increasing by 390,000 over the past 12 months. 

Manufacturing employment changed little in January (-12,000) and has shown little movement,
on net, over the past 12 months. Motor vehicles and parts lost 11,000 jobs over the month. 

Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade, retail trade,
information, financial activities, and government, changed little over the month.

In January, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by
7 cents to $28.44. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by
3.1 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees
were $23.87 in January, little changed over the month (+3 cents). (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.3
hours in January. In manufacturing, the average workweek remained at 40.4 hours, while
overtime edged down 0.1 hour to 3.1 hours. The average workweek of private-sector production
and nonsupervisory employees edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.6 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for November was revised up by 5,000 from
+256,000 to +261,000, and the change for December was revised up by 2,000 from +145,000 to
+147,000. With these revisions, employment gains in November and December combined were
7,000 higher than previously reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports
received from businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from
the recalculation of seasonal factors. The annual benchmark process also contributed to the
November and December revisions.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 211,000 over the
last 3 months. 

_____________
The Employment Situation for February is scheduled to be released on
Friday, March 6, 2020, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).


 ____________________________________________________________________________________
|										     |
|                     Changes to Household Survey Data 				     |
|										     |
|   Effective with this news release, two not seasonally adjusted series previously  |
|   displayed in Summary table A--persons marginally attached to the labor force and |
|   discouraged workers--have been replaced with new seasonally adjusted series. The |
|   new seasonally adjusted series are available in the BLS online database back to  |
|   1994. Not seasonally adjusted data for persons marginally attached to the labor  |
|   force and for discouraged workers will continue to be published in table A-16.   |
|   These series are also available in the BLS online database back to 1994.         |
|                                                                                    |
|   Persons marginally attached to the labor force and discouraged workers are       |
|   inputs into three alternative measures of labor underutilization displayed in    |
|   table A-15. Effective with this news release, data for U-4, U-5, and U-6 in      |
|   table A-15 reflect the new seasonally adjusted series. Changes to historical     |
|   data were negligible. Revised data back to 1994 are available in the BLS online  |
|   database. Not seasonally adjusted series for the alternative measures are        |
|   unaffected.									     |
|										     |
|   Effective with data for January 2020, occupation estimates in table A-13         |
|   reflect the introduction of the 2018 Census occupation classification system     |
|   into the household survey. This occupation classification system is derived      |
|   from the 2018 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. Historical      |
|   data have not been revised. Beginning with data for January 2020, occupation     |
|   estimates are not strictly comparable with earlier years.                        |
|                                                                                    |
|   In addition, industry estimates in table A-14 reflect the introduction of the    |
|   2017 Census industry classification system, which is derived from the 2017       | 
|   North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The classification        |
|   changes are minor and do not involve re-classification of industries between     |
|   the broader industry sectors.                                                    |
|										     |
|   Beginning with data for January 2020, marital status estimates are not strictly  |
|   comparable with earlier years. Estimates of married persons now refer to those   |
|   in opposite-sex and same-sex marriages. Prior to January 2020, these estimates   |
|   referred only to those in opposite-sex marriages. Persons with a same-sex	     |
|   spouse were previously classified in other marital status categories, such as    |
|   "women who maintain families." These changes affect marital status estimates in  |
|   tables A-9 and A-10. (Note that not all marital status categories are presented  |
|   in these tables. BLS has not separately tabulated estimates for persons with an  |
|   opposite-sex spouse and persons with a same-sex spouse.) Historical data have    |
|   not been revised.						                     |
|____________________________________________________________________________________|


                     Revisions to Establishment Survey Data


In accordance with annual practice, the establishment survey data released today
have been benchmarked to reflect comprehensive counts of payroll jobs for March 2019.
These counts are derived principally from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages
(QCEW), which counts jobs covered by the Unemployment Insurance (UI) tax system. The
benchmark process results in revisions to not seasonally adjusted data from April 2018
forward. BLS revised seasonally adjusted data from January 2015 forward. In addition,
both seasonally adjusted and unadjusted data for some series incorporate other
revisions prior to 2015.  

The total nonfarm employment level for March 2019 was revised downward by 514,000
(-505,000 on a not seasonally adjusted basis), or -0.3 percent. The absolute average
benchmark revision over the past 10 years is 0.2 percent. 

The over-the-year change in total nonfarm employment for 2019 was revised from 
+2,108,000 to +2,096,000 (seasonally adjusted). Table A presents revised total nonfarm
employment data on a seasonally adjusted basis from January to December 2019.

All revised historical establishment survey data are available on the BLS website at
www.bls.gov/ces/data/home.htm. In addition, an article that discusses the benchmark
and post-benchmark revisions and other technical issues is available at
www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cesbmart.htm.


Table A. Revisions to total nonfarm employment, January to December 2019, seasonally
adjusted
(Numbers in thousands)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 |                                   |                                
                 |                Level              |      Over-the-month change     
                 |---------------------------------------------------------------------
 Year and month  |           |    As     |           |           |    As    |           
                 |    As     |previously | Difference|    As     |previously| Difference
                 |  revised  |published  |           |  revised  |published |           
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 |           |           |           |           |          |           
       2019      |           |           |           |           |          |           
                 |           |           |           |           |          |           
January......... |  150,134  |  150,587  |    -453   |    269    |    312   |   -43
February........ |  150,135  |  150,643  |    -508   |      1    |     56   |   -55
March........... |  150,282  |  150,796  |    -514   |    147    |    153   |    -6
April........... |  150,492  |  151,012  |    -520   |    210    |    216   |    -6
May............. |  150,577  |  151,074  |    -497   |     85    |     62   |    23
June............ |  150,759  |  151,252  |    -493   |    182    |    178   |     4
July............ |  150,953  |  151,418  |    -465   |    194    |    166   |    28
August.......... |  151,160  |  151,637  |    -477   |    207    |    219   |   -12
September....... |  151,368  |  151,830  |    -462   |    208    |    193   |    15
October......... |  151,553  |  151,982  |    -429   |    185    |    152   |    33
November........ |  151,814  |  152,238  |    -424   |    261    |    256   |     5
December(p)..... |  151,961  |  152,383  |    -422   |    147    |    145   |     2 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   (p) = preliminary.


                Adjustments to Population Estimates for the Household Survey


Effective with data for January 2020, updated population estimates were incorporated into
the household survey. Population estimates for the household survey are developed by the
U.S. Census Bureau. Each year, the Census Bureau updates the estimates to reflect new
information and assumptions about the growth of the population since the previous decennial
census. The change in population reflected in the new estimates results from adjustments
for net international migration, updated vital statistics, and estimation methodology
improvements. 

In accordance with usual practice, BLS will not revise the official household survey estimates
for December 2019 and earlier months. To show the impact of the population adjustments,
however, differences in selected December 2019 labor force series based on the old and new
population estimates are shown in table B.

The adjustments decreased the estimated size of the civilian noninstitutional population in
December by 811,000, the civilian labor force by 524,000, employment by 507,000, and
unemployment by 17,000. The number of persons not in the labor force was decreased by 287,000.
The total unemployment rate, employment-population ratio, and labor force participation rate
were unaffected.

Data users are cautioned that these annual population adjustments can affect the comparability
of household data series over time. Table C shows the effect of the introduction of new
population estimates on the comparison of selected labor force measures between December 2019
and January 2020. Additional information on the population adjustments and their effect on
national labor force estimates is available at
www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cps-pop-control-adjustments.pdf. 

Population controls for veterans, which are derived from a Department of Veterans Affairs' 
population model and are updated periodically, have also been updated with the release of
data for January 2020. Historical data have not been revised.
Table B. Effect of the updated population controls on December 2019 estimates by sex, race, and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, not seasonally adjusted
(Numbers in thousands)
Category Total Men Women White Black or
African
Ameri-
can
Asian Hispanic or
Latino
ethnicity

Civilian noninstitutional population

-811 -403 -408 -461 -59 -273 -323

Civilian labor force

-524 -289 -235 -297 -41 -171 -219

Participation rate

0 0 0 0 0 0 -0.1

Employed

-507 -279 -227 -287 -39 -167 -210

Employment-population ratio

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Unemployed

-17 -10 -9 -10 -2 -4 -9

Unemployment rate

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Not in labor force

-287 -115 -172 -164 -18 -102 -104

NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. Estimates for the above race groups (White, Black or African American, and Asian) do not sum to totals because data are not presented for all races. Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race.

Table C. December 2019-January 2020 changes in selected labor force measures, with adjustments for population control effects
(Numbers in thousands)
Category Dec.-Jan.
change, as
published
2020
population
control effect
Dec.-Jan. change, after
removing the
population control
effect(1)

Civilian noninstitutional population

-679 -811 132

Civilian labor force

50 -524 574

Participation rate

0.2 0 0.2

Employed

-89 -507 418

Employment-population ratio

0.2 0 0.2

Unemployed

139 -17 156

Unemployment rate

0.1 0 0.1

Not in labor force

-729 -287 -442

(1) This Dec.-Jan. change is calculated by subtracting the population control effect from the over-the-month change in the published seasonally adjusted estimates.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

 

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Jan.
2019
Nov.
2019
Dec.
2019
Jan.
2020
Change from:
Dec.
2019-
Jan.
2020

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

258,239 260,020 260,181 259,502

Civilian labor force

163,142 164,347 164,556 164,606

Participation rate

63.2 63.2 63.2 63.4

Employed

156,627 158,536 158,803 158,714

Employment-population ratio

60.7 61.0 61.0 61.2

Unemployed

6,516 5,811 5,753 5,892

Unemployment rate

4.0 3.5 3.5 3.6

Not in labor force

95,097 95,673 95,625 94,896

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

4.0 3.5 3.5 3.6

Adult men (20 years and over)

3.7 3.2 3.1 3.3

Adult women (20 years and over)

3.6 3.2 3.2 3.2

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

12.9 12.0 12.6 12.2

White

3.5 3.2 3.2 3.1

Black or African American

6.8 5.6 5.9 6.0

Asian

3.1 2.6 2.5 3.0

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

4.8 4.2 4.2 4.3

Total, 25 years and over

3.2 2.9 2.8 2.9

Less than a high school diploma

5.7 5.3 5.2 5.5

High school graduates, no college

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8

Some college or associate degree

3.4 2.9 2.7 2.8

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.4 2.0 1.9 2.0

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,060 2,804 2,686 2,665

Job leavers

816 776 829 836

Reentrants

1,944 1,663 1,655 1,838

New entrants

607 581 551 557

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,319 2,026 2,065 2,059

5 to 14 weeks

1,999 1,753 1,730 1,755

15 to 26 weeks

898 865 812 887

27 weeks and over

1,259 1,219 1,186 1,166

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

5,105 4,288 4,148 4,182

Slack work or business conditions

3,402 2,634 2,657 2,655

Could only find part-time work

1,413 1,259 1,215 1,294

Part time for noneconomic reasons

20,984 21,532 21,586 22,154

Persons not in the labor force

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,498 1,244 1,230 1,342

Discouraged workers

418 316 289 337

– December – January changes in household data are not shown due to the introduction of updated population controls.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Jan.
2019
Nov.
2019
Dec.
2019(P)
Jan.
2020(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

269 261 147 225

Total private

258 247 142 206

Goods-producing

75 45 -5 32

Mining and logging

5 -11 -11 0

Construction

50 -2 11 44

Manufacturing

20 58 -5 -12

Durable goods(1)

21 45 -1 -11

Motor vehicles and parts

-0.3 40.5 1.3 -10.6

Nondurable goods

-1 13 -4 -1

Private service-providing

183 202 147 174

Wholesale trade

6.3 3.0 9.5 8.4

Retail trade

-7.9 -13.9 44.9 -8.3

Transportation and warehousing

46.8 22.6 3.9 28.3

Utilities

0.1 1.0 0.7 -1.4

Information

-11 9 8 5

Financial activities

11 12 5 -1

Professional and business services(1)

-2 37 14 21

Temporary help services

-28.2 2.6 5.9 -1.5

Education and health services(1)

56 73 22 72

Health care and social assistance

37.6 56.7 25.0 47.2

Leisure and hospitality

81 43 36 36

Other services

3 16 3 14

Government

11 14 5 19

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

195 218 198 211

Total private

188 211 193 198

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.7 50.0 50.0 50.0

Total private women employees

48.3 48.6 48.7 48.7

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.2 82.2 82.2

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.5 34.3 34.3 34.3

Average hourly earnings

$27.58 $28.34 $28.37 $28.44

Average weekly earnings

$951.51 $972.06 $973.09 $975.49

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

110.5 111.2 111.3 111.5

Over-the-month percent change

0.2 -0.1 0.1 0.2

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

145.8 150.7 151.0 151.6

Over-the-month percent change

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.4

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

62.2 63.4 55.6 59.7

Manufacturing (76 industries)

59.2 61.8 46.1 46.7

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2019 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

Story 2: U.S. Federal Budgetary Deficits, The National Debt and The Big Four Federal Spending: Social Security, Medicare, Defense and Medicaid — Videos

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Aug 25, 2015

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The Pronk Pops Show 1250, May 3, 2019, Story 1: Average Jobs Report With 263,000 New Jobs Created With 3.6% Unemployment Rate (Lowest Since December 1969) However Labor Participation Rate Dropped By .2% to 62.8% With 646,000 Monthly Increase of Number of Americans Not In Labor to Record High of Force 96,223,000 — Another Day In Paradise Videos — Story 2: Vice President Pence Wants Fed To Reduce Targeted Federal Funds Rate — A Far Better Idea is For Federal Government To Cut Spending and Balance The Budget? — Videos –Story 3: Could A Change of Regime in Venezuela Could Cut Gasoline Prices? — Videos — Story 4: Catherine Herridge Interviews President Trump Goes on Offensive Taking No Prisoners — Videos 

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Story 1: Average Jobs Report With 263,000 New Jobs Created With 3.6% Unemployment Rate (Lowest Since December 1969) However Labor Participation Rate Dropped By .2% to 62.8% With 646,000 Monthly Increase of Number of Americans Not In Labor to Record High of Force 96,223,000 — Another Day In Paradise Videos —

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While the U.S. economy has largely recovered from the Great Recession, there are still nearly three million Americans—one in three unemployed workers and more than four in ten in New Jersey—who have been unemployed for more than six months. Dr. Van Horn explains the causes and consequences of long-term unemployment and highlight innovative, cost-effective solutions that Rutgers University and a broad coalition of employers, non-profit organizations, and volunteers are putting into practice to help the unemployed get back to work. Carl Van Horn is Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy and the founding Director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (www.heldrich.rutgers.edu). He is also a member of the graduate faculties of the Department of Political Science, the Graduate School of Education, and the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

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Civilian Labor Force Level

162,470,000

 

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155352(1) 155483 156028 155369 155684 155707 156007 156130 156040 156417 156494 156332
2015 157053(1) 156663 156626 157017 157616 157014 157008 157165 156745 157188 157502 158080
2016 158371(1) 158705 159079 158891 158700 158899 159150 159582 159810 159768 159629 159779
2017 159693(1) 159854 160036 160169 159910 160124 160383 160706 161190 160436 160626 160636
2018 161123(1) 161900 161646 161551 161667 162129 162209 161802 162055 162694 162821 163240
2019 163229(1) 163184 162960 162470
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employment Level

156,645,000

 

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138438(1) 138581 138751 139297 139241 139141 139179 139438 139396 139119 139044 139301
2011 139250(1) 139394 139639 139586 139624 139384 139524 139942 140183 140368 140826 140902
2012 141584(1) 141858 142036 141899 142206 142391 142292 142291 143044 143431 143333 143330
2013 143292(1) 143362 143316 143635 143882 143999 144264 144326 144418 143537 144479 144778
2014 145150(1) 145134 145648 145667 145825 146247 146399 146530 146778 147427 147404 147615
2015 148150(1) 148053 148122 148491 148802 148765 148815 149175 148853 149270 149506 150164
2016 150622(1) 150934 151146 150963 151074 151104 151450 151766 151877 151949 152150 152276
2017 152128(1) 152417 152958 153150 152920 153176 153456 153591 154399 153847 153945 154065
2018 154482(1) 155213 155160 155216 155539 155592 155964 155604 156069 156582 156803 156945
2019 156694(1) 156949 156748 156645
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Unemployment Level

5,824,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 15046 15113 15202 15325 14849 14474 14512 14648 14579 14516 15081 14348
2011 14013 13820 13737 13957 13855 13962 13763 13818 13948 13594 13302 13093
2012 12797 12813 12713 12646 12660 12692 12656 12471 12115 12124 12005 12298
2013 12471 11950 11689 11760 11654 11751 11335 11279 11270 11136 10787 10404
2014 10202 10349 10380 9702 9859 9460 9608 9599 9262 8990 9090 8717
2015 8903 8610 8504 8526 8814 8249 8194 7990 7892 7918 7995 7916
2016 7749 7771 7932 7928 7626 7795 7700 7817 7933 7819 7480 7503
2017 7565 7437 7078 7019 6991 6948 6927 7115 6791 6588 6682 6572
2018 6641 6687 6486 6335 6128 6537 6245 6197 5986 6112 6018 6294
2019 6535 6235 6211 5824

U-3 Unemployment Rate

3.6%

 

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.2 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.1 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.6 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.1 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.8 4.9 4.8 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.7 4.7
2017 4.7 4.7 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.2 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.0 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.9
2019 4.0 3.8 3.8 3.6

 

U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.3%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.6 12.6 12.3 12.2 12.0 12.1 12.0 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 10.0 9.9
2016 9.8 9.7 9.8 9.7 9.9 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.2
2017 9.3 9.1 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 7.9 7.8 7.7 7.8 7.5 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.6
2019 8.1 7.3 7.3 7.3

 

Labor Participation Rate

62.8%

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

 

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.7 62.9 62.6 62.6 62.6 62.4 62.5 62.6 62.7
2016 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.7 62.8 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.9 62.9 63.1
2019 63.2 63.2 63.0 62.8

 

Not in Labor Force

96,223,000

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91563 91603 91230 92070 91938 92107 92016 92099 92406 92240 92350 92695
2015 92671 93237 93454 93249 92839 93649 93868 93931 94580 94353 94245 93856
2016 94026 93872 93689 94077 94475 94498 94470 94272 94281 94553 94911 94963
2017 94389 94392 94378 94419 94857 94833 94769 94651 94372 95330 95323 95473
2018 95657 95033 95451 95721 95787 95513 95633 96264 96235 95821 95886 95649
2019 95010 95208 95577 96223

 

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until	      USDL-19-0731
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, May 3, 2019

Technical information: 
 Household data:	(202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:	(202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:	        (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

	
                 THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- APRIL 2019


Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 263,000 in April, and the
unemployment rate declined to 3.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics reported today. Notable job gains occurred in professional
and business services, construction, health care, and social assistance.

This news release presents statistics from two monthly surveys. The
household survey measures labor force status, including unemployment,
by demographic characteristics. The establishment survey measures nonfarm
employment, hours, and earnings by industry. For more information about
the concepts and statistical methodology used in these two surveys, see
the Technical Note.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to 3.6 percent in
April, the lowest rate since December 1969. Over the month, the number
of unemployed persons decreased by 387,000 to 5.8 million. (See table
A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates declined in April
for adult men (3.4 percent), adult women (3.1 percent), Whites (3.1
percent), Asians (2.2 percent), and Hispanics (4.2 percent). The jobless
rates for teenagers (13.0 percent) and Blacks (6.7 percent) showed little
or no change. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

Among the unemployed, the number of job losers and persons who completed
temporary jobs declined by 186,000 over the month to 2.7 million. (See
table A-11.)

In April, the number of persons unemployed less than 5 weeks declined by
222,000 to 1.9 million. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless
for 27 weeks or more) was little changed at 1.2 million in April and
accounted for 21.1 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to
62.8 percent in April but was unchanged from a year earlier. The employment-
population ratio was unchanged at 60.6 percent in April and has been either
60.6 percent or 60.7 percent since October 2018. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes
referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 4.7
million in April. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time
employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or
because they were unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.)

In April, 1.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force,
little different from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.)
These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for
work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were
not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4
weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 454,000 discouraged workers in
April, about unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.)
Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they
believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 963,000 persons
marginally attached to the labor force in April had not searched for work for
reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 263,000 in April, compared with
an average monthly gain of 213,000 over the prior 12 months. In April, notable
jobs gains occurred in professional and business services, construction,
health care, and social assistance. (See table B-1.)

Professional and business services added 76,000 jobs in April. Within the
industry, employment gains occurred in administrative and support services
(+53,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+14,000). Over
the past 12 months, professional and business services has added 535,000 jobs.

In April, construction employment rose by 33,000, with gains in nonresidential
specialty trade contractors (+22,000) and in heavy and civil engineering
construction (+10,000). Construction has added 256,000 jobs over the past 12
months.
 
Employment in health care grew by 27,000 in April and 404,000 over the past
12 months. In April, job growth occurred in ambulatory health care services
(+17,000), hospitals (+8,000), and community care facilities for the elderly
(+7,000).

Social assistance added 26,000 jobs over the month, with all of the gain in
individual and family services.

Financial activities employment continued to trend up in April (+12,000). The
industry has added 110,000 jobs over the past 12 months, with almost three-
fourths of the growth in real estate and rental and leasing. 

Manufacturing employment changed little for the third month in a row (+4,000
in April). In the 12 months prior to February, the industry had added an
average of 22,000 jobs per month. 

Employment in retail trade changed little in April (-12,000). Job losses
occurred in general merchandise stores (-9,000), while motor vehicle and
parts dealers added 8,000 jobs.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade,
transportation and warehousing, information, leisure and hospitality, and
government, showed little change over the month.

In April, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm
payrolls rose by 6 cents to $27.77. Over the year, average hourly earnings
have increased by 3.2 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector
production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $23.31 in
April. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased
by 0.1 hour to 34.4 hours in April. In manufacturing, both the workweek and
overtime were unchanged (40.7 hours and 3.4 hours, respectively). The average
workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm
payrolls held at 33.7 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for February was revised up
from +33,000 to +56,000, and the change for March was revised down from
+196,000 to +189,000. With these revisions, employment gains in February and
March combined were 16,000 more than previously reported. (Monthly revisions
result from additional reports received from businesses and government agencies
since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal
factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 169,000 per month over the
last 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for May is scheduled to be released on Friday,
June 7, 2019, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

 

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Apr.
2018
Feb.
2019
Mar.
2019
Apr.
2019
Change from:
Mar.
2019-
Apr.
2019

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

257,272 258,392 258,537 258,693 156

Civilian labor force

161,551 163,184 162,960 162,470 -490

Participation rate

62.8 63.2 63.0 62.8 -0.2

Employed

155,216 156,949 156,748 156,645 -103

Employment-population ratio

60.3 60.7 60.6 60.6 0.0

Unemployed

6,335 6,235 6,211 5,824 -387

Unemployment rate

3.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 -0.2

Not in labor force

95,721 95,208 95,577 96,223 646

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

3.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 -0.2

Adult men (20 years and over)

3.7 3.5 3.6 3.4 -0.2

Adult women (20 years and over)

3.5 3.4 3.3 3.1 -0.2

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.0 13.4 12.8 13.0 0.2

White

3.5 3.3 3.4 3.1 -0.3

Black or African American

6.5 7.0 6.7 6.7 0.0

Asian

2.8 3.1 3.1 2.2 -0.9

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

4.8 4.3 4.7 4.2 -0.5

Total, 25 years and over

3.3 3.1 3.1 2.9 -0.2

Less than a high school diploma

5.8 5.3 5.9 5.4 -0.5

High school graduates, no college

4.3 3.8 3.7 3.5 -0.2

Some college or associate degree

3.4 3.2 3.4 3.1 -0.3

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.1 2.2 2.0 2.1 0.1

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

2,965 2,857 2,837 2,651 -186

Job leavers

812 840 779 737 -42

Reentrants

2,001 1,905 2,007 1,926 -81

New entrants

615 623 614 530 -84

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,121 2,194 2,126 1,904 -222

5 to 14 weeks

1,975 1,810 1,815 1,842 27

15 to 26 weeks

1,018 942 950 854 -96

27 weeks and over

1,311 1,271 1,305 1,230 -75

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

4,952 4,310 4,499 4,654 155

Slack work or business conditions

2,990 2,792 2,909 2,891 -18

Could only find part-time work

1,564 1,347 1,329 1,446 117

Part time for noneconomic reasons

21,295 21,153 21,297 21,322 25

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,362 1,424 1,357 1,417

Discouraged workers

408 428 412 454

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Apr.
2018
Feb.
2019
Mar.
2019(P)
Apr.
2019(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

196 56 189 263

Total private

184 46 179 236

Goods-producing

60 -19 21 34

Mining and logging

9 -4 1 -3

Construction

29 -23 20 33

Manufacturing

22 8 0 4

Durable goods(1)

17 5 -5 0

Motor vehicles and parts

-0.5 1.5 -6.3 -1.5

Nondurable goods

5 3 5 4

Private service-providing

124 65 158 202

Wholesale trade

-13.4 12.5 -0.1 9.9

Retail trade

3.7 -13.7 -15.7 -12.0

Transportation and warehousing

6.6 -6.3 2.4 11.1

Utilities

1.4 -1.3 1.3 -3.2

Information

5 -7 7 -1

Financial activities

4 5 13 12

Professional and business services(1)

62 54 24 76

Temporary help services

12.8 7.0 -5.8 17.9

Education and health services(1)

24 19 69 62

Health care and social assistance

20.6 35.8 64.6 52.6

Leisure and hospitality

18 -1 37 34

Other services

13 4 20 14

Government

12 10 10 27

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

236 198 186 169

Total private

220 189 174 154

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.6 49.8 49.8 49.8

Total private women employees

48.2 48.4 48.4 48.4

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.5 34.4 34.5 34.4

Average hourly earnings

$26.90 $27.66 $27.71 $27.77

Average weekly earnings

$928.05 $951.50 $956.00 $955.29

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

109.2 110.6 111.1 111.0

Over-the-month percent change

0.2 -0.3 0.5 -0.1

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

140.4 146.3 147.2 147.3

Over-the-month percent change

0.4 0.1 0.6 0.1

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

64.7 58.1 59.7 60.1

Manufacturing (76 industries)

63.8 52.6 53.9 48.0

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2018 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

Story 2: Vice President Pence Wants Federal Reserve To Reduce Targeted Federal Funds Rate and Focus Just On Inflation — Yes The Fed Should Just Focus On Inflation But  A Far Better Idea is For The Trump Administration To Focus on Downsizing The Federal Government By  Closing 8 Federal Departments, Cut Spendingof Remaining Departments and Balance The Budget! — Impossible Dream — What Good Is Dreaming It If You Don’t Actually Do It! — Videos –

VP Pence: The Fed should consider lowering interest rates because of low inflation

Milton Friedman – Money and Inflation

Causes of Inflation

Measuring Inflation

Why Governments Create Inflation

Costs of Inflation: Price Confusion and Money Illusion

Changes in Velocity

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Honda Advert: Impossible Dream II 2010

Current U.S. Inflation Rate Statistics and News

Explanation and the Monthly Inflation Rate Statistics Since January 2007

The current inflation rate was 0.4 percent in March, according to the Consumer Price Index Summary. That’s bordering deflation. Rising gas prices offset decreases in other categories.

Gas prices increased by 6.5 percent due to rising oil prices. They contribute 70 percent of gas prices. The Energy Information Administration’s oil price forecast rose to $65 a barrel for 2019.

The prices of used cars and trucks fell 0.4 percent, while new vehicle prices rose 0.4 percent. Transportation services remained flat.

In the last 12 months, the cost of health care services rose 2.3 percent. Drug prices fell 0.6 percent during that time. Health care costs have risen more slowly since Obamacare took effect in 2014. Before that, prices rose 7 to 8 percent a year.

Current Core Inflation Rate

The core inflation rate was 2.0 percent year over year. The core rate eliminates the impact of oil and food prices. High oil prices will increase the prices of fertilizer and transportation costs. That will create high food prices

The core rate was exactly at the Federal Reserve’s 2 percent inflation target. Despite that, it’s unlikely that the Federal Open Market Committee would continue raising the fed funds rate in 2019. Its goal is to keep the rate at 2.5 percent in 2019. The Fed last raised the rate to 2.5 percent at its December 19, 2018, FOMC meeting.

In January 2012,  the Fed switched to the Personal Consumption Expenditures. The Fed considers it to be more reflective of true underlying inflation trends. Its core inflation rate was 1.8 percent year over year as of January 2019. That’s from the most recent release from the Personal Income and Outlays report.

How the Current Inflation Rate Affects You

The inflation rate is an important economic indicator. It tells you how fast prices are changing in the current phase of the business cycle.

It’s measured by the Consumer Price Index which is reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics each month.

Moderate inflation is actually good for economic growth. When consumers expect prices to rise, they are more likely to buy now, rather than wait. This increases demand.  As pointed out by former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke inflation is usually driven by expectations of inflation. This means that, if people and investors think prices will go up, they will buy things now, increasing demand and actually driving the prices further up. In other words, inflation is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

The Federal Open Market Committee reviews the core inflation rate when it decides at its eight FOMC meetings whether to raise the fed funds rate. The core rate removes the volatile effects of gas, food, and oil prices. The Federal Reserve sets a target rate of 2 percent for the core rate. When the rate is lower than the target, the Fed may use expansionary monetary policy. It will lower the fed funds rate to boost economic growth. That’s done to prevent any possible recession.

When the rate is higher than the 2 percent target, the Fed uses contractionary monetary policy. It raises rates to keep prices from rising faster than your paycheck. Some critics worry that higher interest rates would weaken consumer demand. That would slow economic growth, reducing its ability to create jobs.

Some people worry that inflation will skyrocket, causing hyperinflation. They are concerned that price increases could be like that seen during the Weimar Republic in Germany. When that happens, gold bugs can cause a rally in the precious metal as a hedge. But to have hyperinflation, prices must rise 50 percent a month.

    • 01

       2018: 1.9 Percent. 2.2 Percent Core Inflation.

      woman grocery shopping
      Photo by Tassii/Getty Images

      January: Up 0.5 percent. The cause was an increase in gas prices. That offset a drop in used vehicles.

      Gasoline, fuel oil, and natural gas prices drop in the spring. That’s when refineries finish their maintenance and reopen for the summer driving season. Expect inflation to remain even less of a threat.

      February: Up 0.5 percent. Despite a drop in gasoline prices, prices increased in energy services, especially piped gas. Prices also rose in apparel and transportation.

      March: Up 0.2 percent. Gas prices fell because OPEC and U.S. shale oil producers continued to flood the market with supply. Lower gas prices offset slightly rising prices in shelter, food, and transportation. The cost of medical care services rose 0.5 percent. That’s still less of an increase than before Obamacare.

      April: Up 0.4 percentHigh gas prices offset mild price decreases in vehicles, prescription drugs, and transportation.

      May: Up 0.4 percent.  Higher gas prices offset a decline in used car and truck prices. Gas prices are volatile since they’re based upon commodities trading. They rise in the spring in anticipation of higher demand from summer vacationers.

      June: Up 0.1 percent. Higher gas prices offset declines in electricity, piped gas, and apparel.

      July: No increase.  Higher used cars and truck prices were offset by lower gas and drug prices.

      August: Up 0.1 percent. Higher gas prices were almost offset by a drop in apparel and drug prices.

      September: Up 0.1 percent. Used car and truck sales and gas prices fell.

      October: Up 0.3 percent. Prices of gas and used vehicles rose.

      November: Prices were flat. Rising car prices offset falling gas prices.

      December: Prices were flat.  Prices of used vehicles, drugs, and transportation fell along with gas prices.

    • 02

       2017: 2.1 Percent. 1.8 Percent Core Inflation.

      groceries-dad.jpg
      Photo: Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

      January: Up 0.6 percent due to a 7.8 percent increase in gas prices. That offset a 0.4 percent drop in used vehicles. Healthy inflation made it more likely the Fed would end its expansive monetary policy in the near future. The confirmation of a strong economy is good for the stock market.

      February: Up 0.3 percent. Upticks in transportation services and clothing barely offset declines in gas  and vehicle prices. Health care supplies fell.

      March: Up 0.1 percent.  Price drops  in almost every category. Gas prices dropped.

      April: Up 0.3 percent. Increase in gas prices offset deflation in almost every other category including health care.

      May: Up 0.1 percent. Gas prices drove it, but prices also fell in cars, apparel, and medical care services.

      June: Up 0.1 percent.  Prices fell for almost every category. But they were offset by increases in health care, transportation services, shelter, and apparel.

      Many people had worried that higher interest rates would suppress the housing market. The BLS reports on rent prices as a proxy for housing prices. This means it can miss some extreme jumps in price if rentals don’t keep up with housing prices. This happened in 2005, which is one reason the Fed missed that asset bubble.

      July: Down 0.1 percent. Medical care commodities rose. That was almost offset by a drop in new and used vehicle prices.

      August: Up 0.3 percent. Gas prices rose.

      September: Up 0.5 percent. Gas prices rose thanks to shortages caused by Hurricane Harvey.

      October: Down 0.1 percent. Cause was a drop in gas prices. That helped boost Halloween sales. Low inflation allowed the FOMC to end Quantitative Easing. It announced it would no longer buy new Treasurys as its holdings expired.

      November: No price increase. Gas prices rebounded.

      December: Down 0.1 percent.

    • 03

       2016: 2.1 Percent. 2.2 Percent Core Inflation.

      January: Up 0.2 percent. Prices fell in gasoline, home heating oil, and electricity.

      February: Up 0.1 percent. Gas prices fell.

      March: Up 0.4 percent. Gas prices rose while apparel prices fell as the dollar weakened.

      April: Up 0.5 percent. Gas prices rose while auto prices fell.

      May: Up 0.4 percent. Used car and truck prices fell while gas prices rose.

      June: Up 0.3 percent. Gas prices rose.

      July: Down 0.2 percent. Declines in gas prices were almost offset by mild increases in the cost of health care.

      August Up 0.1 percent.  Falling auto and gas prices were more than offset by rising health care costs.

      September: Up 0.2 percent. A huge rise in gas prices. It offset price drops in restaurants, new and used vehicles, and apparel. The cost of medical care services was flat.

      October: Up 02. percent. Gas prices skyrocketed. Slightly lower prices in restaurants, used vehicles, and transportation services offset the spike.

      November: Up 0.1 percent. Gasoline prices rose while medical care commodities fell.

      December: No price increase. Gas prices and transportation services rose.

BLS Inflation Calculator

The BLS inflation calculator quickly shows how inflation eats away at your purchasing power. For example, a 2.5 percent inflation rate means that something that cost $100 last year now costs $102.50. It also means you need a 2.5 percent raise just to stay even. Not to make you feel bad, but if you were celebrating your hard-earned 3.5 percent raise, thanks to inflation it is really only worth 1.0 percent in additional buying power.

Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)

 

What Is Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)?

Personal consumption expenditures (PCE), or the PCE Index, measures price changes in consumer goods and services. Expenditures included in the index are actual U.S. household expenditures. Data that pertains to services, durables and non-durables are measured by the index. Similar to the consumer price index(CPI), the PCE is part of the personal income report issued by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the Department of Commerce.

Personal Consumption Expenditures

 

Understanding Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)

The PCE is often considered predictable, and many analysts prefer to use the CPI because of its ability to determine economic stability using the fixed basket of goods.

The PCE index can reveal household buying and shopping habits. For example, sharp price increases may cause shoppers to buy less, which would be reflected in a change in the index. PCE reveals the elasticity of demand; when demand for a good or service is elastic, people cut back even if the price goes up slightly, and when demand is inelastic, people continue to buy the same amount despite big price increases.

 

Inflation

When gauging inflation and the overall economic stability of the United States, the Federal Reserve prefers to use the PCE Index. The CPI is the most well-known economic indicator, and the PCE is largely forgotten. However, the Federal Reserve prefers the PCE index when reviewing economic conditions and fiscal policy, inflation, and employment.

The PCE is preferred because it is composed of a broad range of expenditures. While the CPI helps to depict shifts or changes in consumer expenditures, it only reveals changes in those expenditures that fall within the pre-established fixed basket. The PCE, on the other hand, includes a broad range of household expenses. The PCE is also weighted by data acquired through business surveys, which tend to be more reliable than the consumer surveys used by the CPI.

In addition, the PCE uses a formula that allows for changes in consumer behavior and changes occurring in the short term, which are adjustments not made in the CPI formula. These factors result in a more comprehensive metric for measuring inflation. The Federal Reserve depends on the nuances that the PCE reveals because even minimal inflation is considered an indicator of a growing and healthy economy.

 

Durables Versus Non-Durables

The PCE is broken down into two categories: goods and services. Goods are then further broken down into durables and non-durables. Durable goods are items that last a household for more than three years and typically carry a larger price tag. Examples of durable goods include cars, televisions, refrigerators, furniture and other similar items. Non-durable goods are considered “transitory,” meaning that their life expectancy is typically less than three years. These items are also typically less costly and include products such as makeup, gasoline, and clothing.

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/pce.asp

Vice President Pence says the Fed should cut interest rates, reconsider its dual mandate policy

  
  • “I think it might be time for us to consider lowering interest rates,” Pence tells CNBC’s Eamon Javers.
  • Pence’s comments fall squarely in line with the rest of President Trump’s confidantes.

He also raised the idea that the Fed perhaps should focus on a single mandate to make monetary policy, instead of its current dual mandate of inflation and full employment. Pence added, however, that a single mandate for the Fed focusing on inflation is not something he and Trump have talked about.

“Back when I was in Congress we had a whole debate about the dual mandate of the Federal Reserve and it might be time for us to consider that again,” Pence said. “By just looking at inflation you make clear … this is exactly the time, not only to not raise interest rates, but we ought to consider cutting them.”

He suggested that the Fed “just focus again on monetary policy and recognize their job is to essentially manage that and watch inflation.”

Trump is also looking to fill two vacant seats on the Federal Reserve board. But so far the nominees Trump has seriously considered have withdrawn. Conservative pundit Stephen Moore was the latest to step back from Fed consideration on Thursday, following the same path as Herman Cain, who withdrew last month.

“I think the president is very interested in bringing fresh ideas to the Federal Reserve board,” Pence said. “What the president’s really looking for is people that understand the dynamic approach to this economy that he’s been putting into practice.”

Pence added that the president is looking for nominees “who are as fiercely committed to the free market as he is.”

“We’re seeing jobs being created all over the country … [and that] should be an encouragement to every American and also to people that operate our monetary policies,” Pence said.

Correction: An earlier version misstated which of the Fed’s two mandates that Pence suggested should be prioritized. He suggested it should be inflation.

 

Story 3: Could A Change of Regime in Venezuela Could Cut Gasoline Prices? — Videos

 

$5 gas? California gas prices soar as national average approaches $3

Gas prices can vary widely depending on when you fill up. USA TODAY

Brace yourself, Californians.

The statewide average price of gasoline has soared over $4 per gallon in recent weeks – and now at least four stations there are charging more than $5, according to fuel-savings app GasBuddy.

That comes as the national average price of gas continues its customary spring climb as Memorial Day approaches.

The national average hit $2.90 on Friday, up 20 cents from a month ago and 8 cents more than a year ago, according to AAA.

California is a big reason for the spike in the national average. The state’s average price of $4.09 is up 44 cents from a month ago and 46 cents from a year ago, according to AAA.

On the state’s east side, Mono County is averaging $4.85, according to AAA. GasBuddy reports that two stations in that county are charging more than $5.

In the San Francisco area, prices are averaging $4.21. In the Los Angeles-Long Beach region, prices are averaging $4.12.

No wonder hybrid and electric vehicles are popular in California.

What’s the best day to fill up?: Try Monday mornings (and never on Friday afternoons)

Summer gas prices: Don’t fill up in these states on your road trip

Refinery outages, increased taxes and the national uptick in gas prices have fueled California’s surge, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, which tracks real-time data from more than 150,000 gas stations throughout the country.

“California’s right on the cusp of hitting a peak,” he said.

Nationally, the average is “knocking on the doorstep” of hitting $3 for the first time since October 2014, though it’s likely to fall short, DeHaan said

In California, it’s bad, but not as bad as it could be. The state’s record high average was $4.65 at one point in 2012, according to GasBuddy. The national record high was $4.11 in July 2008, according to AAA.

Looking to save? Think carefully about when you fill up.

Nationally, Monday is the cheapest day to get fuel, while Friday is the most expensive, according to a recent GasBuddy study.

In California, Monday is the best, and Sunday is the worst.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/05/03/gas-prices/3661261002/

Story 4: Catherine Herridge Interviews President Trump — Goes on Offensive Taking No Prisoners — Videos 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1168, November 2, 2018, Story 1: Jobs Report — U.S. Economy Added 250,000 Jobs — Real Wages Up 3.1% and Capital Spending Growth — Civilian Labor Participation Rate Up .2% Going in Right Direction — Getting Better– All The Time — Videos — Story 2: Federal Reserve Will Be Increasing Fed Funds Target Rate by .25% In December 2018 — No Real Surprise — Videos — Story 3: President Trump’s Job Approval Rising — Hits 51% — Top Three Concerns of American People — The Economy, Illegal Immigration and Obamacare — Videos

Posted on November 4, 2018. Filed under: Addiction, American History, Banking System, Barack H. Obama, Bill Clinton, Blogroll, Books, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, College, Congress, Corruption, Countries, Deep State, Defense Spending, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Eating, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Former President Barack Obama, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Housing, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Insurance, Investments, Labor Economics, Language, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Medicare, Monetary Policy, National Interest, Networking, News, Obama, Obesity, Overweight, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Progressives, Public Corruption, Public Relations, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Security, Spying, Success, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP_, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Terrorism, Trade Policy, Trump Surveillance/Spying, Unemployment, United States Constitution, United States of America, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1168 November 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1167 November 1, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1166 October 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1165 October 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1164 October 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1163 October 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1162 October 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1161 October 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1160 October 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1159 October 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1158 October 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1157 October 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1156 October 15, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1155 October 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1154 October 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1153 October 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1152 October 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1151 October 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1150 October 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1149, October 1, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1148, September 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1147, September 27, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1146, September 25, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1145, September 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1144, September 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1143, September 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1142, September 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1141, September 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1140, September 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1139, September 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1138, September 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1137, September 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1136, September 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1135, September 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1134, September 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1133, August 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1132, August 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1131, August 27, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1130, August 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1129, August 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1128, August 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1127, August 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1126, August 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1125, August 15, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1124, August 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1123, August 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1122, August 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1121, August 8, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1120, August 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1119, August 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1118, August 1, 2018

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Story 1: November 2018 Jobs Report — U.S. Economy Added 250,000 Jobs With 3.7% U-3 Unemployment Rate  — Real Wages Up 3.1% and Capital Spending Growth — Civilian Labor Participation Rate Up .2% Going in Right Direction Up! — Getting Better– All The Time — Videos 

The Beatles – Getting Better

Getting Better
It’s getting better all the time
I used to get mad at my school (No, I can’t complain)
The teachers who taught me weren’t cool (No, I can’t complain)
You’re holding me down
Turning me round
Filling me up with your rules
I’ve got to admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
I have to admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Me used to be angry young man
Me hiding me head in the sand
You gave me the word, I finally heard
I’m doing the best that I can
I’ve got to admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
I have to admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Getting so much better all the time!
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
I used to be cruel to my woman
I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved
Man, I was mean but I’m changing my scene
And I’m doing the best that I can (ooh)
I admit it’s getting better (Better)
A little better all the time (It can’t get no worse)
Yes, I admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine
Getting so much better all the time!
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
It’s getting better all the time
Better, better, better
Getting so much better all the time!
Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney
Getting Better lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Trump celebrates strong jobs report at rally

Job growth powers ahead

Economy adds 250K jobs in October

Santelli Exchange: Lazear on the jobs report

Jim Cramer on October jobs report: We have to move fast

CEA’s Hassett on China Trade, Jobs Report, Debt and Deficit

What does October’s banner jobs report tell us about where the economy is headed?

A Deep Dive Into the U.S. October Jobs Report

How Wall Street Views the October Jobs Report

What the markets want from the jobs report

What Is 3%? Jim Cramer on the Jobs Report

Alan Greenspan: Tightest labor market I’ve ever seen

Greenspan: We are in uncharted territory

Alan Greenspan: We have to deal with entitlements

Greenspan: The financial community doesn’t care about bookkeeping, they’re going to confront inflation

Defining the Unemployment Rate

Is Unemployment Undercounted?

Labor Force Participation

Cyclical Unemployment

Frictional Unemployment

Structural Unemployment

Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve

Monetary Policy: The Best Case Scenario

Milton Friedman: Inflation vs Unemployment

Milton Friedman – Stimulus and Inflation

Milton Friedman – Money and Inflation (Q&A)

Responsibility to the Poor

Milton Friedman: There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

TAKE IT TO THE LIMITS: Milton Friedman on Libertarianism

156,562,000: Record Employment for 12th Time Under Trump

By Susan Jones | November 2, 2018 | 8:41 AM EDT

A sign of the times in an Illinois shop window. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – The economy is the second most important issue for registered voters as the midterm election nears, a new Gallup Poll says. And there was very good economic news on Friday, as the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics rolled out the October employment report — the final one before next week’s midterm election.

The number of employed Americans has never been higher. The 156,562,000 Americans employed in October is the twefth record set under President Donald Trump.

In October, the number of employed men age 20 and up — 80,405,000 — set the 12th record since Trump took office; and likewise, for the 12th time, the number of employed women age 20 and up set a record, reaching 70,909,000 in October.

The unemployment rate held at 3.7 percent, the same as September, which is the lowest it’s been in decades — since the end of 1969. And the Hispanic unemployment rate, 4.4 percent, has never been lower.

The unemployment rate for African-Americans, 6.2 percent, remained near the all-time low of 5.9 percent set in May.

On top of those numbers, the economy added a whopping 250,000 jobs last month. After revisions, job gains have averaged 218,000 over the past 3 months.

(“Wow!” Trump tweeted on Friday morning. “The U.S. added 250,000 Jobs in October – and this was despite the hurricanes. Unemployment at 3.7%. Wages UP! These are incredible numbers. Keep it going, Vote Republican!”)

The number of Americans not in the labor force dipped to 95.8 million, down from last month’s record high; and the labor force participation rate increased two-tenths of a point to 62.9 percent, a move in the right direction.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent), adult women (3.4 percent), teenagers (11.9 percent), Whites (3.3 percent), Blacks (6.2 percent), and Asians (3.2 percent) showed little or no change in October.

In October, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 5 cents to $27.30. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 83 cents, or 3.1 percent.

In October, the nation’s civilian noninstitutionalized population, consisting of all people age 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution, reached 258,514,000. Of those, 162,637,000 participated in the labor force by either holding a job or actively seeking one.

The 162,637,000 who participated in the labor force equaled 62.9 percent of the 258,514,000 civilian noninstitutionalized population, the same as August.

The higher the participation rate, the better, but economists expect this percentage to remain stagnant and decline in the years ahead as an increasing number of baby boomers retire.

President Trump highlghted the booming economy at his rally in Missouri yesterday, telling voters that next week’s election “will decide whether we build on an extraordinary prosperity,” or whether Democrats “will wipe it all away.”

“The unemployment rate just fell to the lowest level in over 50 years,” the president said. “More Americans are working now than any time in history. Think of that…So today, right now, we have more Americans working than at any time, any time in the history of our country. That’s pretty good,” he said. “That’s pretty good!”

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Alternate Unemployment Charts

The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.

The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

 

Public Commentary on Unemployment

Unemployment Data Series   subcription required(Subscription required.)  View  Download Excel CSV File   Last Updated: November 2nd, 2018

The ShadowStats Alternate Unemployment Rate for October 2018 is 21.2%.

Republishing our charts:  Permission, Restrictions and Instructions (includes important requirements for successful hot-linking)

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Civilian Labor Force Level

162,637,000

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155357(1) 155526 156108 155404 155564 155742 156011 156124 156019 156383 156455 156301
2015 157063(1) 156734 156754 157051 157449 157071 157035 157132 156700 157138 157435 158043
2016 158387(1) 158811 159253 158919 158512 158976 159207 159514 159734 159700 159544 159736
2017 159718(1) 159997 160235 160181 159729 160214 160467 160598 161082 160371 160533 160597
2018 161115(1) 161921 161763 161527 161539 162140 162245 161776 161926 162637
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Labor Force Participation Rate

62.9%




Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.6 62.3 62.5 62.5 62.7
2016 62.8 62.9 63.0 62.8 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.7 62.7 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.9

Unemployment Level

6,075,000

 

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 15046 15113 15202 15325 14849 14474 14512 14648 14579 14516 15081 14348
2011 14013 13820 13737 13957 13855 13962 13763 13818 13948 13594 13302 13093
2012 12797 12813 12713 12646 12660 12692 12656 12471 12115 12124 12005 12298
2013 12471 11950 11689 11760 11654 11751 11335 11279 11270 11136 10787 10404
2014 10235 10365 10435 9724 9740 9474 9610 9602 9266 8972 9064 8704
2015 8951 8634 8578 8546 8662 8265 8206 7996 7891 7884 7948 7907
2016 7811 7806 8024 7942 7465 7812 7723 7827 7919 7761 7419 7502
2017 7642 7486 7171 7021 6837 6964 6956 7127 6759 6524 6616 6576
2018 6684 6706 6585 6346 6065 6564 6280 6234 5964 6075

Not in Labor Force

95,877,000

 

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91557 91559 91150 92036 92058 92072 92012 92105 92428 92274 92390 92726
2015 92660 93165 93326 93214 93006 93592 93841 93963 94625 94403 94312 93893
2016 94010 93766 93515 94049 94662 94421 94413 94340 94357 94621 94996 95006
2017 94364 94248 94179 94407 95038 94743 94684 94759 94480 95395 95416 95512
2018 95665 95012 95335 95745 95915 95502 95598 96290 96364 95877

U-3 Unemployment Rate

3.7%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.3 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.6 4.7
2017 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.1 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.7

 U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.4 %

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.7 9.8 9.8 9.8 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.3 9.1
2017 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.8 7.5 7.4 7.5 7.4

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until            USDL-18-1739
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, November 2, 2018

Technical information:
 Household data:     (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data: (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:        (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                        THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- OCTOBER 2018


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 250,000 in October, and the unemployment rate
was unchanged at 3.7 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job
gains occurred in health care, in manufacturing, in construction, and in transportation
and warehousing.

   __________________________________________________________________________________
  |                                                                                  |
  |                               Hurricane Michael                                  |
  |                                                                                  |
  | Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle on October 10, 2018,    |
  | during the reference periods for both the establishment and household surveys.   |
  | Hurricane Michael had no discernible effect on the national employment and       |
  | unemployment estimates for October, and response rates for the two surveys were  |
  | within normal ranges. For information on how severe weather can affect employment|
  | and hours data, see Question 8 in the Frequently Asked Questions section of this |
  | news release.                                                                    |
  |                                                                                  |
  | BLS will release the state estimates of employment and unemployment on           |
  | November 16, 2018, at 10:00 a.m. (EST).                                          |
  |__________________________________________________________________________________|


Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate remained at 3.7 percent in October, and the number of unemployed
persons was little changed at 6.1 million. Over the year, the unemployment rate and
the number of unemployed persons declined by 0.4 percentage point and 449,000,
respectively. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent),
adult women (3.4 percent), teenagers (11.9 percent), Whites (3.3 percent), Blacks
(6.2 percent), Asians (3.2 percent), and Hispanics (4.4 percent) showed little or no
change in October. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially
unchanged at 1.4 million in October and accounted for 22.5 percent of the unemployed.
(See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate increased by 0.2 percentage point to 62.9 percent in
October but has shown little change over the year. The employment-population ratio
edged up by 0.2 percentage point to 60.6 percent in October and has increased by 0.4
percentage point over the year. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as
involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 4.6 million in October.
These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part
time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time jobs.
(See table A-8.)

In October, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little
changed from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were
not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job
sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had
not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 506,000 discouraged workers in October, about
unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers
are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available
for them. The remaining 984,000 persons marginally attached to the labor force in
October had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family
responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 250,000 in October, following an average
monthly gain of 211,000 over the prior 12 months. In October, job growth occurred in
health care, in manufacturing, in construction, and in transportation and warehousing.
(See table B-1.)

Health care added 36,000 jobs in October. Within the industry, employment growth
occurred in hospitals (+13,000) and in nursing and residential care facilities
(+8,000). Employment in ambulatory health care services continued to trend up
(+14,000). Over the past 12 months, health care employment grew by 323,000.

In October, employment in manufacturing increased by 32,000. Most of the increase
occurred in durable goods manufacturing, with a gain in transportation equipment
(+10,000). Manufacturing has added 296,000 jobs over the year, largely in durable
goods industries.

Construction employment rose by 30,000 in October, with nearly half of the gain
occurring among residential specialty trade contractors (+14,000). Over the year,
construction has added 330,000 jobs.

Transportation and warehousing added 25,000 jobs in October. Within the industry,
employment growth occurred in couriers and messengers (+8,000) and in warehousing
and storage (+8,000). Over the year, employment in transportation and warehousing
has increased by 184,000.

Employment in leisure and hospitality edged up in October (+42,000). Employment was
unchanged in September, likely reflecting the impact of Hurricane Florence. The
average gain for the 2 months combined (+21,000) was the same as the average monthly
gain in the industry for the 12-month period prior to September.

In October, employment in professional and business services continued to trend up
(+35,000). Over the year, the industry has added 516,000 jobs.

Employment in mining also continued to trend up over the month (+5,000). The industry
has added 65,000 jobs over the year, with most of the gain in support activities for
mining.

Employment in other major industries--including wholesale trade, retail trade,
information, financial activities, and government--showed little change over the
month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.1
hour to 34.5 hours in October. In manufacturing, the workweek edged down by 0.1 hour
to 40.8 hours, and overtime was unchanged at 3.5 hours. The average workweek for
production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls, at 33.7 hours,
was unchanged over the month. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In October, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls
rose by 5 cents to $27.30. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by
83 cents, or 3.1 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and
nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $22.89 in October. (See tables B-3
and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for September was revised down from
+134,000 to +118,000, and the change for August was revised up from +270,000 to
+286,000. The downward revision in September offset the upward revision in August.
(Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and
government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation
of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 218,000 over the
past 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for November is scheduled to be released on Friday,
December 7, 2018, at 8:30 a.m. (EST).



The PDF version of the news release

News release charts

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Oct.
2017
Aug.
2018
Sept.
2018
Oct.
2018
Change from:
Sept.
2018-
Oct.
2018

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

255,766 258,066 258,290 258,514 224

Civilian labor force

160,371 161,776 161,926 162,637 711

Participation rate

62.7 62.7 62.7 62.9 0.2

Employed

153,846 155,542 155,962 156,562 600

Employment-population ratio

60.2 60.3 60.4 60.6 0.2

Unemployed

6,524 6,234 5,964 6,075 111

Unemployment rate

4.1 3.9 3.7 3.7 0.0

Not in labor force

95,395 96,290 96,364 95,877 -487

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

4.1 3.9 3.7 3.7 0.0

Adult men (20 years and over)

3.8 3.5 3.4 3.5 0.1

Adult women (20 years and over)

3.6 3.6 3.3 3.4 0.1

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.7 12.8 12.8 11.9 -0.9

White

3.5 3.4 3.3 3.3 0.0

Black or African American

7.3 6.3 6.0 6.2 0.2

Asian

3.0 3.0 3.5 3.2 -0.3

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 -0.1

Total, 25 years and over

3.3 3.2 3.0 3.1 0.1

Less than a high school diploma

6.1 5.7 5.5 6.0 0.5

High school graduates, no college

4.3 3.9 3.7 4.0 0.3

Some college or associate degree

3.6 3.5 3.2 3.0 -0.2

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.0 2.1 2.0 2.0 0.0

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,214 2,875 2,796 2,850 54

Job leavers

731 862 730 726 -4

Reentrants

2,001 1,846 1,877 1,906 29

New entrants

626 584 586 606 20

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,128 2,208 2,065 2,057 -8

5 to 14 weeks

1,943 1,720 1,720 1,821 101

15 to 26 weeks

856 923 861 856 -5

27 weeks and over

1,645 1,332 1,384 1,373 -11

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

4,880 4,379 4,642 4,621 -21

Slack work or business conditions

2,960 2,551 2,782 2,816 34

Could only find part-time work

1,615 1,365 1,447 1,436 -11

Part time for noneconomic reasons

20,897 21,781 21,464 21,512 48

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,535 1,443 1,577 1,491

Discouraged workers

524 434 383 506

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Oct.
2017
Aug.
2018
Sept.
2018(P)
Oct.
2018(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

271 286 118 250

Total private

277 267 121 246

Goods-producing

38 49 42 67

Mining and logging

1 7 4 5

Construction

17 31 20 30

Manufacturing

20 11 18 32

Durable goods(1)

10 11 14 21

Motor vehicles and parts

-1.6 2.7 1.0 6.8

Nondurable goods

10 0 4 11

Private service-providing

239 218 79 179

Wholesale trade

7.5 20.6 3.3 9.1

Retail trade

6.5 9.1 -32.4 2.4

Transportation and warehousing

13.7 23.1 20.8 24.8

Utilities

0.0 0.9 0.1 1.2

Information

0 -4 -4 7

Financial activities

9 9 15 7

Professional and business services(1)

60 54 46 35

Temporary help services

19.8 10.8 7.6 3.3

Education and health services(1)

15 67 26 44

Health care and social assistance

35.7 52.5 34.9 46.7

Leisure and hospitality

110 30 0 42

Other services

17 8 4 7

Government

-6 19 -3 4

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

169 220 190 218

Total private

167 199 175 211

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.7 49.7 49.7

Total private women employees

48.1 48.3 48.3 48.3

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.5 34.4 34.5

Average hourly earnings

$26.47 $27.17 $27.25 $27.30

Average weekly earnings

$910.57 $937.37 $937.40 $941.85

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

107.8 110.0 109.7 110.3

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.3 -0.3 0.5

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

136.5 142.8 143.0 143.9

Over-the-month percent change

0.4 0.6 0.1 0.6

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

63.2 64.5 60.7 65.7

Manufacturing (76 industries)

63.8 56.6 65.1 62.5

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2017 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

The Beatles – Hey Jude

Hey Jude
Hey Jude, don’t make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better
Hey Jude, don’t be afraid
You were made to go out and get her
The minute you let her under your skin
Then you begin to make it better
And anytime you feel the pain, hey Jude, refrain
Don’t carry the world upon your shoulders
For well you know that it’s a fool who plays it cool
By making his world a little colder
Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah
Hey Jude, don’t let me down
You have found her, now go and get her
Remember to let her into your heart
Then you can start to make it better
So let it out and let it in, hey Jude, begin
You’re waiting for someone to perform with
And don’t you know that it’s just you, hey Jude, you’ll do
The movement you need is on your shoulder
Nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah nah yeah
Hey Jude, don’t make it bad
Take a sad song and make it better
Remember to let her under your skin
Then you’ll begin to make it
Better better better better better better, oh
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Nah nah nah nah nah nah, nah nah nah, hey Jude
Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney
Hey Jude lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

 

Getting Better

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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“Getting Better”
Getting Better - The Beatles (sheet music).jpg

Original UK sheet music for the song
Song by the Beatles
from the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
Released 26 May 1967[1]
Recorded 9 March 1967
Genre
Length 2:47
Label ParlophoneCapitolEMI
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin

Getting Better” is a song written mainly by Paul McCartney, with lyrical contributions from John Lennon (credited to Lennon–McCartney).[3] It was recorded by the Beatles for the 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Composition

The song, which has been said to be musically reminiscent of the hit single “Penny Lane,”[4] moves forward by way of regular chords, produced by Lennon’s guitar, McCartney’s electric piano,[verification needed] and George Martin, who struck the strings of a pianet with a mallet. These heavily accented and repetitive lines cause the song to sound as if it is based on a drone. Lead guitarist George Harrison adds an Indian tanpura part to the final verse, which further accentuates this impact.

McCartney’s bassline, in counterpoint to this droning, was described by music critic Ian MacDonald as “dreamy” and “well thought out as a part of the production by McCartney”.[5] It was recorded after the main track was completed, as were many of the bass lines on Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.[6] Starting out in the verse with a pedal on the root note (G) that leaps two octaves, McCartney moves to a marching quarter-note (walking) bass line for the first (and only the first) chorus. In stark contrast, all subsequent choruses are played using a fluid, swing feel, full of anticipated notes that propel the song forward despite the quarter-note droning of the guitar and keyboard.

The song’s title and music suggest optimism, but some of the song’s lyrics have a more negative tone. In this sense, it reflects the contrasting personas of the two songwriters. In response to McCartney’s line, “It’s getting better all the time”, Lennon replies, “Can’t get no worse!”[7] In a December 1983 interview, McCartney praised this contribution as an example of things he “couldn’t ever have done [him]self”.[8]

Referring to the lyric “I used to be cruel to my woman/I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved/Man I was mean but I’m changing my scene/And I’m doing the best that I can”, Lennon admitted that he had done things in relationships in the past that he was not proud of.[9]

In a 1980 interview in Playboy with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Lennon, when asked about the song, said that the song’s lyrics came personally from his own experience abusing women in relationships in the past. He states: “It is a diary form of writing. All that ‘I used to be cruel to my woman / I beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved’ was me. I used to be cruel to my woman, and physically—any woman. I was a hitter. I couldn’t express myself and I hit. I fought men and I hit women. That is why I am always on about peace, you see. It is the most violent people who go for love and peace. Everything’s the opposite. But I sincerely believe in love and peace. I am a violent man who has learned not to be violent and regrets his violence. I will have to be a lot older before I can face in public how I treated women as a youngster.”

According to the author Hunter Davies and music critic Ian MacDonald, the initial idea for the song’s title came from a phrase often spoken by Jimmie Nicol, the group’s stand-in drummer for the Australian leg of a 1964 tour.[3][5]

Lennon on the roof

One of the recording sessions for “Getting Better” is infamous for an incident involving Lennon. During the 21 March 1967 session in which producer George Martin added a piano solo to “Lovely Rita“, Lennon complained that he did not feel well and could not focus.[10][11]He had accidentally taken LSD when he meant to take an upper.[12] Unaware of the mistake, Martin took him up to the roof of Abbey Road Studios for some fresh air, and returned to Studio Two where McCartney and Harrison were waiting. They knew why Lennon was not well, and upon hearing where Lennon was, rushed to the roof to retrieve him and prevent a possible accident.[11][13][14]

Personnel

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[4]

Live performances

Paul McCartney performed the song live for the first time by any Beatle on his 2002 Driving World Tour. He later reprised the song on his 2003 Back in the World Tour.[citation needed]

Cover versions

Notes

  1. Jump up^ Everett 1999, p. 123. “In the United Kingdom Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…was rush-released six days ahead of its official date, June 1.”
  2. Jump up^ Unterberger 2009.
  3. Jump up to:a b Miles 1997, pp. 312–313.
  4. Jump up to:a b MacDonald 2005, p. 241.
  5. Jump up to:a b MacDonald 2005, p. 200.
  6. Jump up^ MacDonald 2005.
  7. Jump up^ Miles 1997, p. 314.
  8. Jump up^ “December 1983 interview”. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  9. Jump up^http://www.recmusicbeatles.com/public/files/bbs/jl_yo.playboy/lennon4.html
  10. Jump up^ Spitz 2005, pp. 670–671.
  11. Jump up to:a b Lewisohn 1988, p. 104.
  12. Jump up^ Miles 1997, p. 382.
  13. Jump up^ The Beatles 2000, p. 242.
  14. Jump up^ Emerick & Massey 2006, p. 172–173.
  15. Jump up^ http://www.beatlesebooks.com/getting-better

References

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Getting_Better

 

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The latest figures include 37% who Strongly Approve of the president is performing and 40% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -3. (See trends)

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Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentariesare available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/political_updates/prez_track_nov02

Trump, Economy Top Voter Concerns

Thursday, October 25, 2018

President Trump and the economy are the major concerns for voters going into the midterm congressional elections.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 30% of Likely U.S. Voters view Trump as the most important issue to their vote in the upcoming elections. The economy is most important for 22%, followed by 15% who rank illegal immigration that way and 14% who say the same of Obamacare. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

(Want a free daily email update? If it’s in the news, it’s in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 23-24, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/october_2018/trump_economy_top_voter_concerns

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The Pronk Pops Show 1137, September 7, 2018, Story 1: U-3 Unemployment Rate 3.9% and Labor Participation Rate 62.7% with 201,000 Jobs Created in August 2018 — Well Below 66-67% Labor Participation Rate in Clinton and Bush Administrations — Boom Lite — Videos — Story 2: President Trump’s Plan B for Building U.S./Mexican Wall By Military with Defense Appropriations — Plan B for Betrayal of Trump Voters Expecting The Wall To Be Built By 2020 — Requires At Least $25 Billion In Congressional Appropriations To Complete Wall By 2020 — Completion Date is The Twelfth of Never — You Have Been Conned —  Videos — Story 3: Trump Campaigning in Sioux Falls, South Dakota For F Rated Republicans According To Conservative Review Scorecard — Videos

Posted on September 10, 2018. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Communications, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Culture, Defense Spending, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Drugs, Economics, Education, Empires, Employment, Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Spending, Health, History, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Impeachment, Independence, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Mexico, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Polls, Presidential Appointments, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Rule of Law, Second Amendment, Senator Jeff Sessions, Social Networking, Spying, Surveillance/Spying, Trump Surveillance/Spying, United States Constitution, United States of America, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

 

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See the source image

See the source image

 

Story 1: U-3 Unemployment Rate 3.9 Percent and Labor Participation Rate 62.7 Percent with 201,000 Jobs Created in August 2018 — Well Below 66-67 Percent Labor Participation Rate in Clinton and Bush Administration — Boom Lite — Videos

Job growth surges in August

NEC’s Kudlow on Jobs Report, China Trade, White House Op-Ed

U.S. adds 201,000 jobs in August

Defining the Unemployment Rate

Frictional Unemployment

Cyclical Unemployment

Structural Unemployment

Labor Force Participation

Information and Incentives

For millions, underemployment is a new normal

US job growth surges with largest wage growth since 2009 – 247 news

What to expect from the monthly U.S. jobs report

Unemployment rate and labor force participation rate

Unemployment and the Unemployment Rate

John Williams – Fed Flirting With Massive Sell-off in Dollar

John Williams – 2007 Crisis: The Fed Saved the Banks, Not the Economy

Unemployment Game Show – Are you Officially Unemployed? | Mint Personal Finance Software

Generations X, Y, and Z: Which One Are You?

Millennials in the Workforce, A Generation of Weakness – Simon Sinek

After Skool

Published on Jan 5, 2017

Why Can’t Young People Find Jobs?

Why Millennials Aren’t Getting Jobs | Archives | CNBC

Published on Aug 12, 2014

The job market is soft for recent college graduates, and experts say millennials themselves are part of the problem.

Millennials now the largest living generation

Published on Apr 26, 2016

Baby Boomers have long been the generation that defined how Americans spend, save and borrow money. Now Millennials have taken over as the largest living generational group. Will the selfie generation redefine America’s relationship with money?

Baby Boomers vs. Millennials

Jordan Peterson’s Most Shocking Message!

Jordan Peterson’s Warning to America! (2018)

A Shocking Revelation for America!

Not In Labor Force

96,290,000

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91557 91559 91150 92036 92058 92072 92012 92105 92428 92274 92390 92726
2015 92660 93165 93326 93214 93006 93592 93841 93963 94625 94403 94312 93893
2016 94010 93766 93515 94049 94662 94421 94413 94340 94357 94621 94996 95006
2017 94364 94248 94179 94407 95038 94743 94684 94759 94480 95395 95416 95512
2018 95665 95012 95335 95745 95915 95502 95598 96290

 

 

Civilian Labor Force Level

161,776,000

 

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

 

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155357(1) 155526 156108 155404 155564 155742 156011 156124 156019 156383 156455 156301
2015 157063(1) 156734 156754 157051 157449 157071 157035 157132 156700 157138 157435 158043
2016 158387(1) 158811 159253 158919 158512 158976 159207 159514 159734 159700 159544 159736
2017 159718(1) 159997 160235 160181 159729 160214 160467 160598 161082 160371 160533 160597
2018 161115(1) 161921 161763 161527 161539 162140 162245 161776
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Employment Level

155,542,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138438(1) 138581 138751 139297 139241 139141 139179 139438 139396 139119 139044 139301
2011 139250(1) 139394 139639 139586 139624 139384 139524 139942 140183 140368 140826 140902
2012 141584(1) 141858 142036 141899 142206 142391 142292 142291 143044 143431 143333 143330
2013 143292(1) 143362 143316 143635 143882 143999 144264 144326 144418 143537 144479 144778
2014 145122(1) 145161 145673 145680 145825 146267 146401 146522 146752 147411 147391 147597
2015 148113(1) 148100 148175 148505 148788 148806 148830 149136 148810 149254 149486 150135
2016 150576(1) 151005 151229 150978 151048 151164 151484 151687 151815 151939 152126 152233
2017 152076(1) 152511 153064 153161 152892 153250 153511 153471 154324 153846 153917 154021
2018 154430(1) 155215 155178 155181 155474 155576 155965 155542
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 

Employment Population Ratio

60.3%

 

Series Id:           LNS12300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment-Population Ratio
Labor force status:  Employment-population ratio
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 64.6 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.4 64.5 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.2 64.3 64.4
2001 64.4 64.3 64.3 64.0 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.2 63.5 63.2 63.0 62.9
2002 62.7 63.0 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.7 63.0 62.7 62.5 62.4
2003 62.5 62.5 62.4 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.1 62.1 62.0 62.1 62.3 62.2
2004 62.3 62.3 62.2 62.3 62.3 62.4 62.5 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.5 62.4
2005 62.4 62.4 62.4 62.7 62.8 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.7 62.8
2006 62.9 63.0 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.0 63.1 63.1 63.3 63.3 63.4
2007 63.3 63.3 63.3 63.0 63.0 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7 62.9 62.7
2008 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7 62.5 62.4 62.2 62.0 61.9 61.7 61.4 61.0
2009 60.6 60.3 59.9 59.8 59.6 59.4 59.3 59.1 58.7 58.5 58.6 58.3
2010 58.5 58.5 58.5 58.7 58.6 58.5 58.5 58.6 58.5 58.3 58.2 58.3
2011 58.3 58.4 58.4 58.4 58.3 58.2 58.2 58.3 58.4 58.4 58.6 58.6
2012 58.4 58.5 58.5 58.4 58.5 58.6 58.5 58.4 58.7 58.8 58.7 58.7
2013 58.6 58.6 58.5 58.6 58.6 58.6 58.7 58.7 58.7 58.3 58.6 58.7
2014 58.8 58.7 58.9 58.9 58.9 59.0 59.0 59.0 59.1 59.3 59.2 59.3
2015 59.3 59.3 59.3 59.3 59.4 59.4 59.3 59.4 59.2 59.3 59.4 59.6
2016 59.7 59.8 59.8 59.7 59.7 59.7 59.7 59.8 59.7 59.7 59.8 59.8
2017 59.9 60.0 60.2 60.2 60.0 60.1 60.2 60.1 60.4 60.2 60.1 60.1
2018 60.1 60.4 60.4 60.3 60.4 60.4 60.5 60.3

Unemployment Level

6,234,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 15046 15113 15202 15325 14849 14474 14512 14648 14579 14516 15081 14348
2011 14013 13820 13737 13957 13855 13962 13763 13818 13948 13594 13302 13093
2012 12797 12813 12713 12646 12660 12692 12656 12471 12115 12124 12005 12298
2013 12471 11950 11689 11760 11654 11751 11335 11279 11270 11136 10787 10404
2014 10235 10365 10435 9724 9740 9474 9610 9602 9266 8972 9064 8704
2015 8951 8634 8578 8546 8662 8265 8206 7996 7891 7884 7948 7907
2016 7811 7806 8024 7942 7465 7812 7723 7827 7919 7761 7419 7502
2017 7642 7486 7171 7021 6837 6964 6956 7127 6759 6524 6616 6576
2018 6684 6706 6585 6346 6065 6564 6280 6234

U-3 Unemployment Rate

3.9%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.3 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.6 4.7
2017 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.1 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9

Not in Labor Force

96,290,000

 

 

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91557 91559 91150 92036 92058 92072 92012 92105 92428 92274 92390 92726
2015 92660 93165 93326 93214 93006 93592 93841 93963 94625 94403 94312 93893
2016 94010 93766 93515 94049 94662 94421 94413 94340 94357 94621 94996 95006
2017 94364 94248 94179 94407 95038 94743 94684 94759 94480 95395 95416 95512
2018 95665 95012 95335 95745 95915 95502 95598 96290

 

U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.4%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.7 9.8 9.8 9.8 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.3 9.1
2017 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.8 7.5 7.4

 


 

 

Unemployment Rate by Year Since 1929 Compared to Inflation and GDP

U.S. Unemployment Rate History

The unemployment rate by year is the percent of unemployed in the labor force. It tracks the health of the country’s economy. Unemployment rises during recessions and falls during prosperity. It also declined during the five U.S. wars, especially World War II. It rose again in the recessions that follow wars.

The highest rate of U.S. unemployment was 24.9 percent in 1933. That was during the Great Depression.

Unemployment was more than 14 percent from 1931 to 1940. Unemployment remained in the single digits until 1982 when it reached 10.8 percent. The annual unemployment rate reached 9.9 percent in 2009, during the Great Recession.

The lowest unemployment rate was 1.2 percent in 1944. You may think that unemployment can’t get too low, but it can. Even in a healthy economy, there should always be a natural rate of unemployment. That’s because people move before they get a new job, they are getting retrained for a better job, or they have just started looking for work and are waiting until they find just the right job. Even when the unemployment rate is 4 percent, it’s difficult for companies to expand because they have a hard time finding good workers.

Unemployment swings coincide with the business cycle. Slow growth causes high unemployment.. As gross domestic product declines, businesses lay off workers.

In return, jobless workers have less to spend.  Lower consumer spending reduces business revenue. That forces companies to cut more payroll to reduce their costs. This downward cycle is devastating.

Keep in mind that the unemployment rate is a lagging indicator. This means it continues to worsen even after economic growth improves.

Companies hesitant about hiring workers back until they are sure growth is on a stable upward trend.

When the unemployment rate reaches 6 percent, the government steps in. The Federal Reserve uses expansionary monetary policy and lowers the federal funds rate. If unemployment continues, the Congress uses fiscal policy. It can directly create jobs for public works projects. It can also stimulate demand by providing extended unemployment benefits. Find out more about unemployment solutions.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has measured unemployment since 1929. That’s why the table below shows the unemployment rate for every year since the stock market crash of 1929. Comparing unemployment by year to fiscal and monetary policies provides a complete picture of what works and what doesn’t.

U.S. Unemployment Rate by Year Compared to GDP Growth Rate, Inflation, and Major Events

Year Unemployment Rate (December) GDP Growth Inflation (December Year-over-Year) What Happened
1929 3.2% NA 0.6% Market crash
1930 8.7% -8.5% -6.4% Smoot-Hawley
1931 15.9% -6.4% -9.3% Dust Bowl
1932 23.6% -12.9% -10.3% Hoover’s tax hikes
1933 24.9% -1.2% 0.8% FDR’s New Deal
1934 21.7% 10.8% 1.5% Depression eased thanks to New Deal.
1935 20.1% 8.9% 3.0%
1936 16.9% 12.9% 1.4%
1937 14.3% 5.1% 2.9% Spending cuts
1938 19.0% -3.3% -2.8% FLSA starts min wage
1939 17.2% 8.0% 0% Drought ended
1940 14.6% 8.8% 0.7% U.S. draft
1941 9.9% 17.7% 9.9% Pearl Harbor
1942 4.7% 18.9% 9.0% Defense tripled
1943 1.9% 17.0% 3.0% Germany surrendered
1944 1.2% 8.0% 2.3% Bretton Woods
1945 1.9% -1.0% 2.2% War ends. Min wage $.40
1946 3.9% -11.6% 18.1% Employment Act
1947 3.9% -1.1% 8.8% Marshall Plan
1948 4.0% 4.1% 3.0% Truman reelected
1949 6.6% -0.6% -2.1% Fair DealNATO
1950 4.3% 8.7% 5.9% Korean War. Min wage $.75
1951 3.1% 8.0% 6.0% Expansion
1952 2.7% 4.1% 0.8% Expansion
1953 4.5% 4.7% 0.7% Korean War ended
1954 5.0% -0.6% -0.7% Dow returned to 1929 level
1955 4.2% 7.1% 0.4% Unemployment fell
1956 4.2% 2.1% 3.0% Min wage $1.00
1957 5.2% 2.1% 2.9% Recession
1958 6.2% -0.7% 1.8%
1959 5.3% 6.9% 1.7% Expansion.
1960 6.6% 2.6% 1.4% Recession.
1961 6.0% 2.6% 0.7% JFK. Min wage $1.15
1962 5.5% 6.1% 1.3% Cuban Missile Crisis
1963 5.5% 4.4% 1.6% LBJ. Min wage $1.25
1964 5.0% 5.8% 1.0% Tax cut
1965 4.0% 6.5% 1.9% Vietnam War
1966 3.8% 6.6% 3.5% Expansion
1967 3.8% 2.7% 3.0% Min wage $1.40
1968 3.4% 4.9% 4.7% Min wage $1.60
1969 3.5% 3.1% 6.2% Nixon took office
1970 6.1% 0.2% 5.6% Recession
1971 6.0% 3.3% 3.3% Emergency Employment Act. Wage-price controls
1972 5.2% 5.3% 3.4% Stagflation.
1973 4.9% 5.6% 8.7% CETAGold standard, Vietnam War ended
1974 7.2% -0.5% 12.3% Watergate. Min wage $2.00
1975 8.2% -0.2% 6.9% Recession ended.
1976 7.8% 5.4% 4.9% Expansion.
1977 6.4% 4.6% 6.7% Carter took office.
1978 6.0% 5.5% 9.0% Fed raised rate to 20% to stop inflation
1979 6.0% 3.2% 13.3%
1980 7.2% -0.3% 12.5% Recession
1981 8.5% 2.5% 8.9% Reagan tax cuts. Min wage $3.35
1982 10.8% -1.8% 3.8% Job ActGarn-St.Germain Act.
1983 8.3% 4.6% 3.8% Reagan increased military spending
1984 7.3% 7.2% 3.9%
1985 7.0% 4.2% 3.8% Expansion
1986 6.6% 3.5% 1.1% Tax cuts
1987 5.7% 3.5% 4.4% Black Monday
1988 5.3% 4.2% 4.4% Fed raised rate
1989 5.4% 3.7% 4.6% S&L Crisis
1990 6.3% 1.9% 6.1% Recession
1991 7.3% -0.1% 3.1% Desert Storm. Min wage $4.25
1992 7.4% 3.5% 2.9% NAFTA drafted
1993 6.5% 2.8% 2.7% Balanced Budget Act
1994 5.5% 4.0% 2.7% School to Work Act
1995 5.6% 2.7% 2.5% Expansion
1996 5.4% 3.8% 3.3% Welfare reform
1997 4.7% 4.4% 1.7% Min wage $5.85
1998 4.4% 4.5% 1.6% LTCM crisis
1999 4.0% 4.8% 2.7% Euro. Serbian airstrike
2000 3.9% 4.1% 3.4% NASDAQ hit record high.
2001 5.7% 1.0% 1.6% Bush tax cuts9/11 attacks
2002 6.0% 1.7% 2.4% War on Terror
2003 5.7% 2.9% 1.9% JGTRRA
2004 5.4% 3.8% 3.3% Expansion.
2005 4.9% 3.5% 3.4% Bankruptcy ActKatrina
2006 4.4% 2.9% 2.5% Expansion.
2007 5.0% 1.9% 4.1% EU became #1 economy.
2008 7.3% -0.1% 0.1% Min. wage = $6.55/ hour. Financial crisis
2009 9.9% -2.5% 2.7% ARRA. Min wage $7.25. Jobless benefits extended
2010 9.3% 2.6% 1.5% Obama tax cuts. Iraq War ended
2011 8.5% 1.6% 3.0% 26 months of job losses by July. Debt ceiling crisis.
2012 7.9% 2.2% 1.7% QE10-year rate at 200-year lowFiscal cliff.
2013 6.7% 1.8% 1.5% Stocks up 30%. Long term=50% of unemployed.
2014 5.6% 2.5% 0.8% Unemployment at 2007 levels.
2015  5.0% 2.9% 0.7% Natural rate
2016 4.7% 1.6% 2.1% Presidential race
2017 4.1% 2.2% 2.1% Dollar weakened

Resources for Table

More History

https://www.thebalance.com/unemployment-rate-by-year-3305506

Natural Rate of Unemployment, Its Components, and Recent Trends

Why zero unemployment isn’t as good as it sounds

will-work-unemploy.jpg

The natural rate of unemployment is a combination of frictional, structural, and surplus unemployment. Even a healthy economy will have this level of unemployment because workers are always coming and going, looking for better jobs. This jobless status, until they find that new job, is the natural rate of unemployment.

The Federal Reserve estimates this rate to be between 4.5 percent and 5.0 percent. Both fiscal and monetary policymakers use that rate as the goal of full employment. They use 2 percent as the target inflation rate. They also consider the ideal GDP growth rate to be between 2 percent and 3 percent. They must try to balance these three goals when setting interest rates. The Fed encourages Congress to consider all three goals when setting tax rates or spending levels.

 

Three Components of the Natural Rate of Unemployment

Even in a healthy economy, there is some level of unemployment for three reasons.

  1.  Frictional Unemployment – Some workers are in between jobs. Examples are new graduates looking for their first job. Others are workers who move to a new town without lining up another position. Some people quit abruptly, knowing they’ll get a better job shortly. Still, others might decide to leave the workforce for personal reasons such as retirement, pregnancy or sickness. They drop out of the labor force. When they return and start looking again, the BEA counts them as unemployed.
  2.  Structural Unemployment – As the economy evolves, there is an unavoidable mismatch between workers’ job skills and employers’ needs. It happens when workers are displaced by technology, as when robots take over manufacturing jobs. It also occurs when factories move to cheaper locations. That’s what happened after the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed. When baby boomers reached their 30s and had fewer children, there was less need for daycare workers. Structural unemployment remains until workers receive new training.
  1. Surplus Unemployment – This occurs whenever the government intervenes with minimum wage laws or wage/price controls. It can also happen with unions. Why? Employers must pay the mandated wage while keeping within their payroll budget. The only way to do this is to let some workers go. It’s the consequence of an unfunded mandate.

Also, there are six dangerous of types of unemployment. They are cyclicallong-termreal, seasonal, classical, and underemployment.

 

Why You Don’t Want Zero Unemployment

The only way an economy could have a zero percent unemployment rate is if it is severely overheated. Even then, wages would probably rise before unemployment fell to absolute zero.

The United States has never experienced zero unemployment. The lowest rate was 2.5 percent in May and June 1953. It occurred because the economy overheated during to the Korean War. When this bubble burst, it kicked off the recession of 1953.

 

Why the Recession Didn’t Raise the Natural Unemployment Rate

The financial crisis of 2008 wiped out a staggering 8.3 million jobs. The unemployment rate rose from 4.7 percent to 10.1 percent at its peak in 2009. This considerable loss meant that many of the unemployed stayed that way for six months or more. Long-term unemployment made it even more difficult for them to get back to work. Their skills and experience became outdated, leading to structural unemployment.

Does this mean that the recession would leave, as its legacy, a higher natural rate of unemployment? Research done by the Cleveland Federal Reserve said yes, this could be the case. That’s because job turnover slowed. Throughout the recession, those with jobs were less likely to leave them. In fact, by 2011, the separation rate was as low as it was during the boom before the recession.

The reasons were different though. During the boom, people didn’t leave jobs because they liked them and received good wages. Employers had a difficult time finding new employees, so they made sure the workers were happy. During the recession, workers were afraid to leave and look for better employment. They put up with long hours and no raises to keep their jobs.

The natural rate of unemployment typically rises after a recession. Frictional unemployment increases since workers can finally quit their jobs, confident they can find a better one now that the recession is over. Structural unemployment rises when workers have been unemployed for so long their skills no longer match the needs of businesses.

Between 2009 and 2012, the natural rate of unemployment rose from 4.9 percent to 5.5 percent. That was higher than during the recession itself. Researchers grew concerned that the length and depth of the recession meant the natural rate would remain elevated. But by 2014, it had fallen to 4.8 percent. (Source: “Natural Rate of Unemployment,” St. Louis Federal Reserve, March 22, 2017.)​

https://www.thebalance.com/natural-rate-of-unemployment-definition-and-trends-3305950

 

Alternate Unemployment Charts

The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.

The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

 

Public Commentary on Unemployment

Unemployment Data Series   subcription required(Subscription required.)  View  Download Excel CSV File   Last Updated: September 7th, 2018

The ShadowStats Alternate Unemployment Rate for August 2018 is 21.2%.

Republishing our charts:  Permission, Restrictions and Instructions (includes important requirements for successful hot-linking)

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until            USDL-18-1412
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, September 7, 2018

Technical information:
 Household data:      (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:  (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:        (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                       THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- AUGUST 2018


Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 201,000 in August, and the unemployment
rate was unchanged at 3.9 percent,the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.
Job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care, wholesale trade,
transportation and warehousing, and mining.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate remained at 3.9 percent in August, and the number of unemployed
persons, at 6.2 million, changed little. (See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent),
adult women (3.6 percent), teenagers (12.8 percent), Whites (3.4 percent), Blacks
(6.3 percent), Asians (3.0 percent), and Hispanics (4.7 percent) showed little or no
change in August. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was little
changed in August at 1.3 million and accounted for 21.5 percent of the unemployed.
Over the year, the number of long-term unemployed has declined by 403,000. (See
table A-12.)

Both the labor force participation rate, at 62.7 percent, and the employment-population
ratio, at 60.3 percent, declined by 0.2 percentage point in August. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as
involuntary part-time workers), at 4.4 million, changed little over the month but was
down by 830,000 over the year. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time
employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or they were
unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.)

In August, 1.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little
different from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals
were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a
job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they
had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 434,000 discouraged workers in August,
essentially unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.)
Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe
no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.0 million persons marginally attached
to the labor force in August had not searched for work for reasons such as school
attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 201,000 in August, in line with the
average monthly gain of 196,000 over the prior 12 months. Over the month, employment
increased in professional and business services, health care, wholesale trade,
transportation and warehousing, and mining. (See table B-1.)

Professional and business services added 53,000 jobs in August and 519,000 jobs over
the year.

In August, health care employment rose by 33,000, with job gains in ambulatory health
care services (+21,000) and hospitals (+8,000). Health care has added 301,000 jobs over
the year.

Wholesale trade employment increased by 22,000 in August and by 99,000 over the year.
Durable goods wholesalers added 14,000 jobs over the month and accounted for about
two-thirds of the over-the-year job gain in wholesale trade. 

Employment in transportation and warehousing rose by 20,000 in August and by 173,000
over the past 12 months. Within the industry, couriers and messengers added 4,000 jobs
in August.

Mining employment increased by 6,000 in August, after showing little change in July.
Since a recent trough in October 2016, the industry has added 104,000 jobs, almost
entirely in support activities for mining.

Employment in construction continued to trend up in August (+23,000) and has increased
by 297,000 over the year.

Manufacturing employment changed little in August (-3,000). Over the year, employment
in the industry was up by 254,000, with more than three-fourths of the gain in the
durable goods component.

Employment showed little change over the month in other major industries, including
retail trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and
government.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at
34.5 hours in August. In manufacturing, the workweek held steady at 41.0 hours, and
overtime was unchanged at 3.5 hours. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was 33.8 hours for the fifth
consecutive month. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In August, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose
by 10 cents to $27.16. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 77
cents, or 2.9 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and
nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $22.73 in August. (See tables B-3
and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for June was revised down from +248,000
to +208,000, and the change for July was revised down from +157,000 to +147,000. With
these revisions, employment gains in June and July combined were 50,000 less than
previously reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from
businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from the
recalculation of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 185,000
per month over the last 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for September is scheduled to be released on Friday,
October 5, 2018, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



The PDF version of the news release

News release charts

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

Table of Contents

https://pronkpops.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post-new.php

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Aug.
2017
June
2018
July
2018
Aug.
2018
Change from:
July
2018-
Aug.
2018

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

255,357 257,642 257,843 258,066 223

Civilian labor force

160,598 162,140 162,245 161,776 -469

Participation rate

62.9 62.9 62.9 62.7 -0.2

Employed

153,471 155,576 155,965 155,542 -423

Employment-population ratio

60.1 60.4 60.5 60.3 -0.2

Unemployed

7,127 6,564 6,280 6,234 -46

Unemployment rate

4.4 4.0 3.9 3.9 0.0

Not in labor force

94,759 95,502 95,598 96,290 692

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

4.4 4.0 3.9 3.9 0.0

Adult men (20 years and over)

4.1 3.7 3.4 3.5 0.1

Adult women (20 years and over)

4.0 3.7 3.7 3.6 -0.1

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.8 12.6 13.1 12.8 -0.3

White

3.8 3.5 3.4 3.4 0.0

Black or African American

7.6 6.5 6.6 6.3 -0.3

Asian

3.9 3.2 3.1 3.0 -0.1

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

5.1 4.6 4.5 4.7 0.2

Total, 25 years and over

3.7 3.3 3.2 3.2 0.0

Less than a high school diploma

6.2 5.5 5.1 5.7 0.6

High school graduates, no college

5.0 4.2 4.0 3.9 -0.1

Some college or associate degree

3.8 3.3 3.2 3.5 0.3

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1 -0.1

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,497 3,065 3,017 2,875 -142

Job leavers

790 811 844 862 18

Reentrants

2,137 2,086 1,799 1,846 47

New entrants

653 578 591 584 -7

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,221 2,227 2,091 2,208 117

5 to 14 weeks

1,996 1,882 1,820 1,720 -100

15 to 26 weeks

1,067 836 971 923 -48

27 weeks and over

1,735 1,478 1,435 1,332 -103

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

5,209 4,743 4,567 4,379 -188

Slack work or business conditions

3,232 3,042 2,877 2,551 -326

Could only find part-time work

1,631 1,447 1,431 1,365 -66

Part time for noneconomic reasons

21,468 21,304 21,532 21,781 249

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,548 1,437 1,498 1,443

Discouraged workers

448 359 512 434

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Aug.
2017
June
2018
July
2018(P)
Aug.
2018(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

221 208 147 201

Total private

208 192 153 204

Goods-producing

75 36 36 26

Mining and logging

8 7 0 6

Construction

28 8 18 23

Manufacturing

39 21 18 -3

Durable goods(1)

31 19 16 -4

Motor vehicles and parts

23.1 4.8 -3.5 -4.9

Nondurable goods

8 2 2 1

Private service-providing

133 156 117 178

Wholesale trade

3.6 12.7 10.8 22.4

Retail trade

3.9 -41.8 4.1 -5.9

Transportation and warehousing

12.4 15.0 6.6 20.2

Utilities

-0.2 -0.4 -3.1 0.3

Information

-1 -2 -1 -6

Financial activities

15 12 2 11

Professional and business services(1)

42 47 37 53

Temporary help services

5.3 -6.5 10.9 10.0

Education and health services(1)

48 67 41 53

Health care and social assistance

15.8 29.4 35.4 40.7

Leisure and hospitality

4 28 32 17

Other services

5 18 -12 13

Government

13 16 -6 -3

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

217 217 208 185

Total private

205 209 202 183

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.7 49.7 49.7

Total private women employees

48.1 48.3 48.3 48.3

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.6 34.5 34.5

Average hourly earnings

$26.39 $26.99 $27.06 $27.16

Average weekly earnings

$907.82 $933.85 $933.57 $937.02

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

107.6 109.9 109.7 109.9

Over-the-month percent change

0.2 0.5 -0.2 0.2

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

135.7 141.8 142.0 142.7

Over-the-month percent change

0.3 0.6 0.1 0.5

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

64.3 64.1 59.5 60.7

Manufacturing (76 industries)

71.7 65.8 61.2 52.6

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2017 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

Six Living Generations in America.

The Six Living Generations In America

Dr. Jill Novak, University of Phoenix, Texas A&M University.

In America, there are six living generations, which are six fairly distinct groups of people. As a generalization each generation has different likes, dislikes, and attributes. They have had collective experiences as they aged and therefore have similar ideals. A person’s birth date may not always be indicative of their generational characteristics, but as a common group they have similarities.

The six living generations

GI Generation

GI Generation.

  • Born 1901-1926.
  • Children of the WWI generation & fighters in WWII & young in the Great Depression…all leading to strong models of teamwork to overcome and progress.
  • Their Depression was The Great One; their war was The Big One; their prosperity was the legendary Happy Days.
  • They saved the world and then built a nation.
  • They are the assertive and energetic do’ers.
  • Excellent team players.
  • Community-minded.
  • Strongly interested in personal morality and near-absolute standards of right and wrong.
  • Strong sense of personal civic duty, which means they vote.
  • Marriage is for life, divorce and having children out of wedlock were not accepted.
  • Strong loyalty to jobs, groups, schools, etc.
  • There was no “retirement” you worked until your died or couldn’t work anymore.
  • The labor-union-spawning generation.
  • “Use it up, fix it up, make it do, or do without.”
  • Avoid debt…save and buy with cash.
  • Age of radio and air flight; they were the generation that remembers life without airplanes, radio, and TV.
  • Most of them grew up without modern conveniences like refrigerators, electricity and air conditioning.
  • Sometimes called The Greatest Generation.

Mature / Silents

Mature/Silents.

  • Born 1927- 1945.
  • Went through their formative years during an era of suffocating conformity, but also during the postwar happiness: Peace! Jobs! Suburbs! Television! Rock ‘n Roll! Cars! Playboy Magazine!
  • Korean and Vietnam War generation.
  • The First Hopeful Drumbeats of Civil Rights!
  • Pre-feminism women; women stayed home generally to raise children, if they worked it was only certain jobs like teacher, nurse or secretary.
  • Men pledged loyalty to the corporation, once you got a job, you generally kept it for life.
  • The richest, most free-spending retirees in history.
  • Marriage is for life, divorce and having children out of wedlock were not accepted.
  • In grade school, the gravest teacher complaints were about passing notes and chewing gum in class.
  • They are avid readers, especially newspapers.
  • “Retirement” means to sit in a rocking chair and live your final days in peace.
  • The Big-Band/Swing music generation.
  • Strong sense of trans-generational common values and near-absolute truths.
  • Disciplined, self-sacrificing, & cautious.

Baby Boomer

Baby Boomers

Baby boomers are the demographic of people who were born just after the Second World War; this would give the baby boomer generation an approximate date of between 1946 and 1964 .  World war two ended in a 1945, and as a rule of thumb baby boomers are the children who are born as the war ended, as families settled down again. More >>

  • Born between 1946 and 1964. Two sub-sets:
  • 1. the save-the-world revolutionaries of the ’60s and ’70s;
  • and 2. the party-hardy career climbers (Yuppies) of the ’70s/’80s.
  • The “me” generation.
  • “Rock and roll” music generation.
  • Ushered in the free love and societal “non-violent” protests which triggered violence.
  • Self righteous & self-centered.
  • Buy it now and use credit.
  • Too busy for much neighborly involvement yet strong desires to reset or change the common values for the good of all.
  • Even though their mothers were generally housewives, responsible for all child rearing, women of this generation began working outside the home in record numbers, thereby changing the entire nation as this was the first generation to have their own children raised in a two-income household where mom was not omnipresent.
  • The first TV generation.
  • The first divorce generation, where divorce was beginning to be accepted as a tolerable reality.
  • Began accepting homosexuals.
  • Optimistic, driven, team-oriented.
  • Envision technology and innovation as requiring a learning process.
  • Tend to be more positive about authority, hierarchal structure and tradition.
  • One of the largest generations in history with 77 million people.
  • Their aging will change America almost incomprehensibly; they are the first generation to use the word “retirement” to mean being able to enjoy life after the children have left home. Instead of sitting in a rocking chair, they go skydiving, exercise and take up hobbies, which increases their longevity.
  • The American Youth Culture that began with them is now ending with them and their activism is beginning to re-emerge.

Generation X

Generation X.

  • Born between 1965 and 1980*
  • The “latch-key kids” grew up street-smart but isolated, often with divorced or career-driven parents. Latch-Key came from the house key kids wore around their neck, because they would go home from school to an empty house.
  • Entrepreneurial.
  • Very individualistic.
  • Government and big business mean little to them.
  • Want to save the neighborhood, not the world
  • Feel misunderstood by other generations
  • Cynical of many major institutions, which failed their parents, or them, during their formative years and are therefore eager to make marriage work and “be there” for their children
  • Don’t “feel” like a generation, but they are
  • Raised in the transition phase of written based knowledge to digital knowledge archives; most remember being in school without computers and then after the introduction of computers in middle school or high school
  • Desire a chance to learn, explore and make a contribution
  • Tend to commit to self rather than an organization or specific career. This generation averages 7 career changes in their lifetime, it was not normal to work for a company for life, unlike previous generations.
  • Society and thus individuals are envisioned as disposable.
  • AIDS begins to spread and is first lethal infectious disease in the history of any culture on earth which was not subjected to any quarantine.
  • Beginning obsession of individual rights prevailing over the common good, especially if it is applicable to any type of minority group.
  • Raised by the career and money conscious Boomers amidst the societal disappointment over governmental authority and the Vietnam war.
  • School problems were about drugs.
  • Late to marry (after cohabitation) and quick to divorce…many single parents.
  • Into labels and brand names.
  • Want what they want and want it now but struggling to buy, and most are deeply in credit card debt.
  • It is has been researched that they may be conversationally shallow because relating consists of shared time watching video movies, instead of previous generations.
  • Short on loyalty & wary of commitment; all values are relative…must tolerate all peoples.
  • Self-absorbed and suspicious of all organization.
  • Survivors as individuals.
  • Cautious, skeptical, unimpressed with authority, self-reliant.

Generation Y

Generation Y/Millennium.

  • Born between 1981* and 2000*.
  • Aka “The 9/11 Generation” “Echo Boomers” America’s next great generation brings a sharp departure from Generation X.
  • They are nurtured by omnipresent parents, optimistic, and focused.
  • Respect authority.
  • Falling crime rates. Falling teen pregnancy rates. But with school safety problems; they have to live with the thought that they could be shot at school, they learned early that the world is not a safe place.
  • They schedule everything.
  • They feel enormous academic pressure.
  • They feel like a generation and have great expectations for themselves.
  • Prefer digital literacy as they grew up in a digital environment. Have never known a world without computers! They get all their information and most of their socialization from the Internet.
  • Prefer to work in teams.
  • With unlimited access to information tend to be assertive with strong views.
  • Envision the world as a 24/7 place; want fast and immediate processing.
  • They have been told over and over again that they are special, and they expect the world to treat them that way.
  • They do not live to work, they prefer a more relaxed work environment with a lot of hand holding and accolades.

Generation Z

Generation Z/Boomlets.

  • Born after 2001*
  • In 2006 there were a record number of births in the US and 49% of those born were Hispanic, this will change the American melting pot in terms of behavior and culture. The number of births in 2006 far outnumbered the start of the baby boom generation, and they will easily be a larger generation.
  • Since the early 1700’s the most common last name in the US was ‘Smith’ but not anymore, now it is Rodriguez.
  • There are two age groups right now:
  • (a) Tweens.
  • (a1) Age 8-12 years old.
  • (a2) There will be an estimated 29 million tweens by 2009.
  • (a3) $51 billion is spent by tweens every year with an additional $170 billion spent by their parents and family members directly for them.
  • (b)Toddler/Elementary school age.
  • 61 percent of children 8-17 have televisions in their rooms.
  • 35 percent have video games.
  • 14 percent have a DVD player.
  • 4 million will have their own cell phones. They have never known a world without computers and cell phones.
  • Have Eco-fatigue: they are actually tired of hearing about the environment and the many ways we have to save it.
  • With the advent of computers and web based learning, children leave behind toys at younger and younger age. It’s called KGOY-kids growing older younger, and many companies have suffered because of it, most recognizable is Mattel, the maker of Barbie dolls. In the 1990’s the average age of a child in their target market was 10 years old, and in 2000 it dropped to 3 years old. As children reach the age of four and five, old enough to play on the computer, they become less interested in toys and begin to desire electronics such as cell phones and video games.
  • They are Savvy consumers and they know what they want and how to get it and they are over saturated with brands.

References.

deMesa, A. (2008). Marketing and tweens. Retrieved on February 21, 2008.

Elegant, S. (5 November 2007). China’s me generation. Time Magazine.

Generational Generalities. (2005). America’s generations. Retrieved November 6, 2007.

Generational Imperative. (2006). Meet Americas 5 living generations. Retrieved on November 6, 2007.

Marketing Vox. (2008). Generation Z. Retrieved on February 14, 2008.

Parents. (December 2007). Check out this news. Parents Magazine, p.166.

This is only a guideline, remember that everyone is different and not everyone fits into this analysis, but for the most part you can generalize their behavior. As a marketer, it is important to know how to effectively communicate and market to these diverse generations. In understanding consumer behavior, you can create the right promotion, tailoring it specifically for each group’s needs and therefore effectively sell products and services.

The dates for GI, Mature, and Baby Boomer and the beginning of Gen X are set and do not change, the dates for the end of Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z fluctuate depending on what source you are using.

Similar topics include:

Internal Influences – Personality

Internal Influences – Motivation

Internal Influences – Memory

Internal Influences – Lifestyle and Attitude

Internal Influences – Learning

Internal Influences – Emotion and Perception

Story 2: President Trump’s Plan B for Building U.S./Mexican Wall By Military with Defense Appropriations — Plan B for Betrayal of Trump Voters Expecting The Wall To Be Built By 2020 — Requires At Least $25 Billion In Congressional Appropriations To Complete Wall By 2020 — Completion Date is The Twelfth of Never — You Have Been Conned —  Videos

Trump Rolls Out a BRILLIANT Plan – The Military Will Build His Wall!

Should the military help build the border wall?

Should We Build the Wall? We Asked Trump Supporters.

Trump’s Budget: Builds Up Military, Builds Wall

Johnny Mathis – The Twelfth Of Never

Trump says he could use the MILITARY to build his wall if Congress won’t fund it through Homeland Security’s budget – and he won’t rule out another government shutdown to get his way

  • DailyMail.com asked the president on Air Force One if he was considering using the Army Corps of Engineers to build his border wall
  • Congress has been stingy with a Homeland Security budget for the project, providing barely $3 billion and leaving another $25 billion unfunded
  • Pentagon officials say the Corps of Engineers is suited to perform the work and Trump has boasted about budget increases he has won for the Pentagon 
  • Trump says: ‘We have two options: We have military, we have homeland security’
  • He also said he won’t take a government shutdown off the table if Democrats on Capitol Hill keep playing hardball because of immigration politics
  • He believes a shutdown would be strategically and politically smart
  • But many Republican lawmakers are counseling patience because they fear being blamed for a shutdown in the final month of re-elecion campaigns 

President Donald Trump said Friday that he’s considering using military resources to finish construction of his long-promised border wall instead of relying on Congress to fund the project through the Homeland Security Department’s budget.

He also wouldn’t eliminate the possibility of a government shutdown if Democrats continue to confound his efforts to appropriate money for the project on the U.S.-Mexico border.

‘We have two options,’ he told DailyMail.com aboard Air Force One as he flew from Billings, Montana to Fargo, North Dakota. ‘We have military, we have homeland security.’

He was asked specifically about using the Army Corps of Engineers as a taxpayer-funded construction crew.

President Donald Trump said Friday that he’s considering using military resources to finish construction of his long-promised border wall, as he spoke to the press on Air Force One, above on Friday

‘We have two options,’ he told DailyMail.com aboard Air Force One as he flew from Billings, Montana to Fargo, North Dakota. ‘We have military, we have homeland security’

Trump said he would prefer to fund the ambitious construction ‘the old-fashioned way – get it from Congress – but I have other options if I have to.’

He’s seeking about $25 billion.

The possibility of diverting Pentagon funding and assets to build a border wall is a hole card the president is holding but has never directly acknowledged before.

Two Defense Department officials told DailyMail.com in August that the Army Corps of Engineers could take on the task.

‘They build levees that hold back massive walls of water,’ one said of the agency. ‘They can build one to hold back drugs and human traffickers.’

The White House appears headed for another confrontation with Congress over an increase in funding for the project after securing $1.6 billion for 2007 and the same amount for this year.

A senior White House official said Thursday that the money was ‘basically a down-payment on the thing’.

The possibility looms that the president will refuse to sign the next federal budget, due September 30, if lawmakers don’t go along with more installments. That would trigger a government shutdown.

‘If it were up – I don’t want to say “up to me,” because it is up to me – I would do it,’ he said aboard Air Force One, ‘because I think it’s a great political issue.’

But he said some Republicans in Congress, facing tough re-election fights, have counseled more patience.

‘They have races, they’re doing well, they’re up,’ Trump explained. ‘And you know, the way they look at it: might be good, might be bad.’

Typically the party in power, in this case the GOP, would shoulder most of the blame for interrupted government services. National security and military operations wouldn’t be affected.

Trump said he would prefer to fund the ambitious construction ‘the old-fashioned way – get it from Congress – but I have other options if I have to.’ he is pictured above speaking with the press on Air Force One on Friday

The Army Corps of Engineers are seen above in this file photo repairing damage to the middle breakwater caused by Hurricane Marie in Long Beach, California, in January 2015

Thursday night in Billings, he told a Fox News Channel interviewer that ‘we need Republicans elected in the midterms’.

‘We are getting the wall done. But I’ve had so many people, good people, great people – they would rather not do [it] before [November]. They’d rather do it right after the election.’

Trump said he still wants to persuade Congress – preferably one reinforced with more Republicans – to write the checks he wants.

Politically speaking, I’d rather get it through Congress. If we don’t, I’m looking at that option very seriously,’ he said aboard Air Force One on Friday, referring to the Defense Department.

In Sioux Falls, South Dakota on Friday evening the president assured a crowd of about 600 supporters that ‘we’re building the wall!’

‘It works so easily!’ he said. ‘They say walls don’t work? Tell Israel.’

Border Patrol agents confer next to the U.S-Mexico border fence, as seen from a helicopter on May 11, 2017 in San Diego, California

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6144837/Trump-says-use-MILITARY-build-wall-Congress-wont-fund-DHS.html

 

Story 3: Trump Campaigning in Sioux Falls, South Dakota For F Rated Republicans According To Conservative Review Scorecard — Videos

FULL TRUMP SPEECH: President Trump In Sioux Falls, South Dakota

President Donald J. Trump Speaks at Denny Sanford Convention Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota at a Joint Fundraising Committee Reception

South Dakota Conservative Review Liberty Scorecard

https://www.conservativereview.com/scorecard/

 

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1120, August 6, 2018, Story 1: U-3 Unemployment Rate Falls To 3.9 Percent While Labor Participation Rate Stuck at 62.9 Percent Far Below 66-67 Percent Rate In Clinton and Bush Administration — 157,000 Jobs Created in July — Not In Labor Force Increased to 95,598,000 —  Need Consistently 300,000 Per Month For Three Years or 4 Percent Real GDP Growth Rate To Raise Labor Participation Rate Back To Acceptable 66-67% Range — Videos — Story 2: Alex Jones and Infowars Banned or Suspended or Terminated: Censorship by Facebook, YouTube, Spotify, Twitter, Apple and Others — Leftist Attempt to Censor Free Speech — Let American People Decide What They Want to Watch and Listen —  Videos — Story 3: Big Lie Media’s Fake News and Junk Journalism are Enemies of the People and The American People Know It — Videos

Posted on August 6, 2018. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, Communications, Computers, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Culture, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Eating, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Impeachment, Investments, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Mental Illness, News, Obesity, Overweight, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Progressives, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Senate, Social Networking, Success, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, Unemployment, Unions, United States of America, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

 

 Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1120, August 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1119, August 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1118, August 1, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1117, July 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1116, July 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1115, July 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1114, July 25, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1113, July 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1112, July 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1111, July 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1110, July 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1109, July 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1108, July 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1107, July 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1106, July 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1105, July 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1104, July 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1103, July 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1102, JUly 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1101, July 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1100, June 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1099, June 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1098, June 25, 2018 

Pronk Pops Show 1097, June 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1096, June 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1095, June 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1094, June 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1093, June 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1092, June 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1091, June 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1090, June 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1089, June 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1088, June 6, 2018 

Pronk Pops Show 1087, June 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1086, May 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1085, May 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1084, May 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1083, May 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1082, May 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1081, May 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1080, May 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1079, May 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1078, May 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1077, May 15, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1076, May 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1075, May 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1073, May 8, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1072, May 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1071, May 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1070, May 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1069, May 2, 2018

 

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Story 1: U-3 Unemployment Rate Falls To 3.9 Percent While Labor Participation Rate Stuck at 62.9 Percent Far Below 66-67 Percent Rate In Clinton and Bush Administration — 157,000 Jobs Created in July — Not In Labor Force Increased to 95,598,000 —  Need Consistently 300,000 Per Month For Three Years or 4 Percent Real GDP Growth Rate To Raise Labor Participation Rate Back To Acceptable 66-67% Range — Videos

Alternate Unemployment Charts

The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.

The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

 

Public Commentary on Unemployment

 

The ShadowStats Alternate Unemployment Rate for July 2018 is 21.3%.

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Republishing our charts:  Permission, Restrictions and Instructions (includes important requirements for successful hot-linking)

Larry Kudlow on July jobs report: This was a strong number

US economy adds 157K jobs in July

Unemployment Rate Falls To 3.9 Percent As Hiring Slows

Unemployment rate falls to 3.9% as labor market strengthens

Nightly Business Report – August 3, 2018

Defining the Unemployment Rate

Labor Force Participation

What is Gross Domestic Product (GDP)?

Nominal vs. Real GDP

Measuring Inflation

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Civilian Labor Force Level

162,245,000

 

 

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155357(1) 155526 156108 155404 155564 155742 156011 156124 156019 156383 156455 156301
2015 157063(1) 156734 156754 157051 157449 157071 157035 157132 156700 157138 157435 158043
2016 158387(1) 158811 159253 158919 158512 158976 159207 159514 159734 159700 159544 159736
2017 159718(1) 159997 160235 160181 159729 160214 160467 160598 161082 160371 160533 160597
2018 161115(1) 161921 161763 161527 161539 162140 162245
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 Employment Level

155,965,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138438(1) 138581 138751 139297 139241 139141 139179 139438 139396 139119 139044 139301
2011 139250(1) 139394 139639 139586 139624 139384 139524 139942 140183 140368 140826 140902
2012 141584(1) 141858 142036 141899 142206 142391 142292 142291 143044 143431 143333 143330
2013 143292(1) 143362 143316 143635 143882 143999 144264 144326 144418 143537 144479 144778
2014 145122(1) 145161 145673 145680 145825 146267 146401 146522 146752 147411 147391 147597
2015 148113(1) 148100 148175 148505 148788 148806 148830 149136 148810 149254 149486 150135
2016 150576(1) 151005 151229 150978 151048 151164 151484 151687 151815 151939 152126 152233
2017 152076(1) 152511 153064 153161 152892 153250 153511 153471 154324 153846 153917 154021
2018 154430(1) 155215 155178 155181 155474 155576 155965
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Not in Labor Force

95,598,000

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91557 91559 91150 92036 92058 92072 92012 92105 92428 92274 92390 92726
2015 92660 93165 93326 93214 93006 93592 93841 93963 94625 94403 94312 93893
2016 94010 93766 93515 94049 94662 94421 94413 94340 94357 94621 94996 95006
2017 94364 94248 94179 94407 95038 94743 94684 94759 94480 95395 95416 95512
2018 95665 95012 95335 95745 95915 95502 95598

Civilian Labor Force Participation Rate

62.9%

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.6 62.3 62.5 62.5 62.7
2016 62.8 62.9 63.0 62.8 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.7 62.7 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.9 62.9  

 

 U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.8%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.7 9.8 9.8 9.8 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.3 9.1
2017 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.8 7.6 7.8 7.5


Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until                  USDL-18-1240
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, August 3, 2018

Technical information:
 Household data:       (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:   (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- JULY 2018


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 157,000 in July, and the unemployment rate edged down 
to 3.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment increased in 
professional and business services, in manufacturing, and in health care and social assistance. 

Household Survey Data

In July, the unemployment rate edged down by 0.1 percentage point to 3.9 percent, following an 
increase in June. The number of unemployed persons declined by 284,000 to 6.3 million in July. 
Both measures were down over the year, by 0.4 percentage point and 676,000, respectively. 
(See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.4 percent) and Whites 
(3.4 percent) declined in July. The jobless rates for adult women (3.7 percent), teenagers 
(13.1 percent), Blacks (6.6 percent), Asians (3.1 percent), and Hispanics (4.5 percent) showed 
little or no change over the month. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

Among the unemployed, the number of reentrants to the labor force decreased by 287,000 in July 
to 1.8 million, following an increase in June. (Reentrants are persons who previously worked 
but were not in the labor force prior to beginning their job search.) (See table A-11.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially 
unchanged at 1.4 million in July and accounted for 22.7 percent of the unemployed. (See table 
A-12.)

The labor force participation rate, at 62.9 percent in July, was unchanged over the month and 
over the year. The employment-population ratio, at 60.5 percent, was little changed in July but 
has increased by 0.3 percentage point over the year. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as 
involuntary part-time workers) was little changed in July, at 4.6 million, but was down by 
669,000 over the year. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were 
working part time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time 
jobs. (See table A-8.)

In July, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little different from 
a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor 
force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 
months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 
weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 512,000 discouraged workers in July, little changed 
from a year earlier. Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because 
they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.0 million persons marginally 
attached to the labor force in July had not searched for work for reasons such as school 
attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 157,000 in July, compared with an average monthly 
gain of 203,000 over the prior 12 months. In July, job gains occurred in professional and 
business services, in manufacturing, and in health care and social assistance. (See table B-1.)

Employment in professional and business services increased by 51,000 in July and has risen by
518,000 over the year. Over the month, employment edged up in temporary help services (+28,000) 
and in computer systems design and related services (+8,000).

Manufacturing added 37,000 jobs in July, with most of the gain in the durable goods component. 
Employment rose in transportation equipment (+13,000), machinery (+6,000), and electronic 
instruments (+2,000). Over the past 12 months, manufacturing has added 327,000 jobs.

In July, employment in health care and social assistance rose by 34,000. Health care employment 
continued to trend up over the month (+17,000) and has increased by 286,000 over the year. 
Hospitals added 7,000 jobs over the month. Within social assistance, individual and family 
services added 16,000 jobs in July and 77,000 jobs over the year.

Employment in food services and drinking places continued to trend up over the month (+26,000). 
Over the year, the industry has added 203,000 jobs. 

Construction employment continued to trend up in July (+19,000) and has increased by 308,000 
over the year.

In July, employment in retail trade changed little (+7,000). Job gains occurred in general 
merchandise stores (+14,000), clothing and clothing accessories stores (+10,000), and food and 
beverage stores (+8,000). These employment gains were offset by a decline of 32,000 in sporting 
goods, hobby, book, and music stores, reflecting job losses in hobby, toy, and game stores. 

Employment showed little or no change over the month in other major industries, including 
mining, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, 
and government.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour to 
34.5 hours in July, following an increase of 0.1 hour in June. In manufacturing, both the 
workweek and overtime were unchanged in July, at 40.9 hours and 3.5 hours, respectively. The 
average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls 
remained at 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In July, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 7 cents 
to $27.05. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 71 cents, or 2.7 percent. 
Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 
3 cents to $22.65 in July. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for May was revised up from +244,000 to
+268,000, and the change for June was revised up from +213,000 to +248,000. With these 
revisions, employment gains in May and June combined were 59,000 more than previously 
reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and 
government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of 
seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 224,000 per month over the 
last 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for August is scheduled to be released on Friday, September 7, 2018, 
at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).


 _______________________________________________________________________________________
|                                                                                       |
|    2018 Preliminary Benchmark Revision to the Establishment Survey Data will be       |
|                            Released on August 22, 2018                                |
|                                                                                       |
|Each year, the establishment survey estimates are benchmarked to comprehensive counts  |
|of employment from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) for the month   |
|of March. These counts are derived from state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records  |
|that nearly all employers are required to file. On August 22, 2018, at 10:00 a.m.      |
|(EDT), the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) will release the preliminary estimate of   |
|the upcoming annual benchmark revision. This is the same day the first-quarter 2018    |
|data from QCEW will be issued. Preliminary benchmark revisions for all major industry  |
|sectors, as well as total nonfarm and total private levels, will be available on the   |
|BLS website at www.bls.gov/web/empsit/cesprelbmk.htm. The final benchmark revision     |
|will be issued with the publication of the January 2019 Employment Situation news      |
|release in February 2019.                                                              |
|_______________________________________________________________________________________|



The PDF version of the news release

News release charts

Supplemental Files Table of Contents

Table of Contents

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category July
2017
May
2018
June
2018
July
2018
Change from:
June
2018-
July
2018

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

255,151 257,454 257,642 257,843 201

Civilian labor force

160,467 161,539 162,140 162,245 105

Participation rate

62.9 62.7 62.9 62.9 0.0

Employed

153,511 155,474 155,576 155,965 389

Employment-population ratio

60.2 60.4 60.4 60.5 0.1

Unemployed

6,956 6,065 6,564 6,280 -284

Unemployment rate

4.3 3.8 4.0 3.9 -0.1

Not in labor force

94,684 95,915 95,502 95,598 96

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

4.3 3.8 4.0 3.9 -0.1

Adult men (20 years and over)

4.0 3.5 3.7 3.4 -0.3

Adult women (20 years and over)

4.0 3.3 3.7 3.7 0.0

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.3 12.8 12.6 13.1 0.5

White

3.7 3.5 3.5 3.4 -0.1

Black or African American

7.4 5.9 6.5 6.6 0.1

Asian

3.8 2.1 3.2 3.1 -0.1

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

5.1 4.9 4.6 4.5 -0.1

Total, 25 years and over

3.6 3.0 3.3 3.2 -0.1

Less than a high school diploma

7.0 5.4 5.5 5.1 -0.4

High school graduates, no college

4.5 3.9 4.2 4.0 -0.2

Some college or associate degree

3.7 3.2 3.3 3.2 -0.1

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.3 2.0 2.3 2.2 -0.1

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,357 2,854 3,065 3,017 -48

Job leavers

760 852 811 844 33

Reentrants

2,086 1,882 2,086 1,799 -287

New entrants

697 571 578 591 13

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,135 2,034 2,227 2,091 -136

5 to 14 weeks

2,006 1,945 1,882 1,820 -62

15 to 26 weeks

1,022 977 836 971 135

27 weeks and over

1,757 1,189 1,478 1,435 -43

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

5,236 4,948 4,743 4,567 -176

Slack work or business conditions

3,148 3,004 3,042 2,877 -165

Could only find part-time work

1,734 1,480 1,447 1,431 -16

Part time for noneconomic reasons

21,311 21,095 21,304 21,532 228

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,629 1,455 1,437 1,498

Discouraged workers

536 378 359 512

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category July
2017
May
2018
June
2018(P)
July
2018(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

190 268 248 157

Total private

188 260 234 170

Goods-producing

-8 56 52 52

Mining and logging

2 3 6 -4

Construction

-6 30 13 19

Manufacturing

-4 23 33 37

Durable goods(1)

-12 14 30 32

Motor vehicles and parts

-24.6 -6.8 11.1 5.9

Nondurable goods

8 9 3 5

Private service-providing

196 204 182 118

Wholesale trade

6.6 9.0 8.0 12.3

Retail trade

-1.0 29.1 -20.2 7.1

Transportation and warehousing

3.7 15.8 18.9 -1.3

Utilities

-0.7 -1.7 -0.3 -2.8

Information

-3 3 1 0

Financial activities

13 12 10 -5

Professional and business services(1)

53 49 43 51

Temporary help services

13.1 -0.7 -7.5 27.9

Education and health services(1)

57 42 69 22

Health care and social assistance

48.9 35.9 37.2 33.5

Leisure and hospitality

63 35 34 40

Other services

5 11 18 -5

Government

2 8 14 -13

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

195 199 230 224

Total private

191 196 223 221

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.6 49.7 49.7

Total private women employees

48.1 48.2 48.3 48.3

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.5 34.6 34.5

Average hourly earnings

$26.34 $26.94 $26.98 $27.05

Average weekly earnings

$906.10 $929.43 $933.51 $933.23

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

107.4 109.4 110.0 109.8

Over-the-month percent change

0.1 0.2 0.5 -0.2

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

135.3 141.0 141.8 142.0

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.6 0.6 0.1

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

64.5 70.2 67.4 64.0

Manufacturing (76 industries)

60.5 69.1 67.8 65.1

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2017 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

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