The Pronk Pops Show 847, February 27, 2017, Story 1: Russian Reds Hack Oscars And The Real People’s Winner Is Hacksaw Ridge For Best Picture — Videos — Story 2: Mistakes Were Made — Obamacare, Income and Payroll Taxes Should Be Repealed and Replaced By Letting American People Choose Their Own Health Insurance and Pay A Fair Tax When They Buy New Goods and Services — Deadline May 1, 2017 — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 847: February 27, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 846: February 24, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 845: February 23, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 844: February 22, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 843: February 21, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 842: February 20, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 841: February 17, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 840: February 16, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 839: February 15, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 838: February 14, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 837: February 13, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 836: February 10, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 835: February 9, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 834: February 8, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 833: February 7, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 832: February 6, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 831: February 3, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 830: February 2, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 829: February 1, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 828: January 31, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 827: January 30, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 826: January 27, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 825: January 26, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 824: January 25, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 823: January 24, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 822: January 23, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 821: January 20, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 820: January 19, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 819: January 18, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 818: January 17, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 817: January 13, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 816: January 12, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 815: January 11, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 814: January 10, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 813: January 9, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 812: December 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 811: December 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 810: December 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 809: December 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 808: December 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 807: December 5, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 806: December 2, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 805: December 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 804: November 30, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 803: November 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 802: November 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 801: November 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 800: November 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 799: November 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 798: November 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 797: November 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 796: November 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 795: November 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 794: November 10, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 793: November 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 792: November 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 791: November 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 790: November 4, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 789: November 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 788: November 2, 2016

Story 1: Russian Reds Hack Oscars And The Real People’s Winner Is Hacksaw Ridge For Best Picture — Videos — 
 Image result for branco cartoons oscar awards academy mistakeImage result for hacksaw ridgeImage result for hacksaw ridgeImage result for cartoons 2017 academy awards mistake announce wrong pictureImage result for color photo of Harry Truman and Desmond Doss Medal of HonorImage result for color photo of Harry Truman and Desmond Doss Medal of HonorImage result for desmond doss

FEB. 26, 2017, 7:37 P.M.

‘Hacksaw Ridge’ wins film editing

 (Mark Rogers / Summit/Associated Press)
(Mark Rogers / Summit/Associated Press)

“Hacksaw Ridge” won the Oscar for film editing.

Other nominees include:

Joe Walker, “Arrival”

Jake Roberts, “Hell or High Water”

Tom Cross, “La La Land”

Nat Sanders and Joi McMillon, “Moonlight”

(Full) Oscar Mistake, Wrong Winner Announced for Best Picture Winner: La La Land & Moonlight

Hollywood and Fake News Alt-Left Media Are Disconnected From Main Street and Heartland America

HICKSAW RIDGE – THE CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR (REAL HERO)

Who Was Desmond Doss?

Desmond Doss

Hacksaw Ridge: The story of WWII veteran Desmond Doss

The True Story of Mel Gibsons Hacksaw Ridge

Hacksaw Ridge Best Scenes [HDRip]

Hacksaw Ridge Rescue Full Scene HD

Hacksaw Ridge – Final Battle Scene

How Big of a Corporate Scandal Is PwC Facing After Oscars Flub?

Eddy Chen/ABC
Jimmy Kimmel, Warren Beatty

Accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers has overseen the Academy’s ballot-counting process for 83 years.

For 82 years, accounting and consulting firm PwC has enjoyed a reputational boon from handling the balloting process at the Academy Awards.

Now its hard-won image as a dependable partner, in year 83, is under threat.

The company has apologized for a colossal mistake at the 89th Academy Awards on Sunday night when actors Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty wrongly announced the top Oscar went to La La Land, instead of Moonlight.

The presenters, it turned out, had been given the wrong envelope by tabulators PwC, in this case the one awarding Emma Stone for best actress for her role in La La Land. The representatives from PwC, formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers, eventually corrected the mistake on air but it’s not clear yet how the wrong envelope ended up in the hands of the Bonnie and Clyde stars.

Oscars: How the Wrong Envelope Triggered a Best Picture Fiasco

Whatever the reason, it’s been a cue for endless jokes and hilarity around the world.

For London-headquartered PwC, it’s anything but funny.

According to Nigel Currie, an independent London-based branding specialist with decades’ worth of industry experience, this mistake is “as bad a mess-up as you could imagine.”

“They had a pretty simple job to do and messed it up spectacularly,” he said. “They will be in deep crisis talks on how to deal with it.”

Oscars Name Wrong Best Picture Winner: A Play-by-Play of the Epic Mix-Up

Brands go to extraordinary lengths to protect their image and reputation and to be seen as good corporate citizens. History is littered by examples when a hard-won reputation nosedives — from sporting legends Tiger Woods and Lance Armstrong to business giants like BP following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster and Volkswagen after its emissions cheating scandal.

Crisis managers say PwC has no other option than to front-up immediately and explain exactly what happened to contain the damage to its reputation and brand and plot a way forward where there’s no repeat.

“There will certainly have to be accounting for this error,” said Jeremy Robinson-Leon, principal and chief operating officer at New York-based public relations firm Group Gordon. “The onus will be on PwC, assuming they stay as partners, to institute controls to ensure this doesn’t happen again.”

PwC, which originated in London over a century ago, was quick to apologize to the movies involved, Beatty, Dunaway and viewers, but has yet to fully explain what happened.

“The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and, when discovered, was immediately corrected,” it said in a statement. “We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.”

In fact, it took over two minutes on air, during which time the La La Land team gave three acceptance speeches, before PwC corrected the mistake on stage.

Oscars Name Wrong Best Picture Winner: A Play-by-Play of the Epic Mix-Up

PwC’s representatives were Brian Cullinan, a partner at the firm — and, according to his bio on the company’s website, a Matt Damon lookalike — and Martha Ruiz, the second woman to serve as a PwC Oscars tabulator.

Cullinan is the lead partner for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, including the annual balloting for the Oscars ceremony. He has been part of the balloting team since 2014.

Ruiz, a 19-year veteran at PwC who specializes in providing tax compliance and advisory services to entertainment clients in southern California, joined Cullinan as the Oscars balloting co-leader in 2015.

In a promotional video on the company’s website ahead of Sunday’s show, Cullinan said he and Ruiz are the only two who knew who the winners were on the night of the awards.

Oscars: 7 Things You Didn’t Know About the Envelope’s Surprising Journey

“There are 24 categories. We have the winners in sealed envelopes that we hold and maintain throughout the evening and hand those to the presenters before they walk out on stage,” he said.

According to Mike Davies, PwC’s director of global communications, both Cullinan and Ruiz would have had a briefcase on either side of the auditorium to hand out the envelope for the category to be announced. Each briefcase would have had one envelope of each category winner.

In his remarks before the show, Cullinan had said PwC’s relationship with the Academy Awards is testament to the firm’s reputation in the market for being “a firm of integrity, of accuracy and confidentiality and all of those things that are really key to the role we have with the Academy in counting these ballots.”

“But I think it’s really symbolic of how we’re thought of beyond this role and how our clients think of us and I think it’s something we take very seriously and take a lot of pride in.”

Robinson-Leon said it was important to remember that counting ballots is not PwC’s core business but that it will have to be serious about dealing with the aftermath of Sunday’s embarrassment and media fallout.

“This can happen once and there will be relative forgiveness but it can’t happen twice,” said Group Gordon’s Robinson-Leon. “If they were to do this again, that could have an impact on the brand. If this is an isolated incident, the long-term impact on the brand will be minimal.”

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/oscars-we-sincerely-apologize-moonlight-la-la-land-accounting-firm-says-980846

Why Hacksaw Ridge should win the best picture Oscar

Mel Gibson’s gore-laden war story is not just a crowdpleasing tale of American bravery, it’s a unique film about faith and suffering

This image released by Summit shows Andrew Garfield in a scene from "Hacksaw Ridge." The film was nominated for an Oscar for best picture on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. The 89th Academy Awards will take place on Feb. 26. (Mark Rogers/Summit via AP)
Non-lethal weapon … Andrew Garfield in Hacksaw Ridge. Photograph: Mark Rogers/A

It’s the age-old story: a solitary, unlikely individual is chosen by a higher power to transcend their limitations and achieve something impossible. Against all the odds, and despite the scorn of their peers, their deep beliefs allow them to do something others cannot. They endure, they prevail and, eventually, they go down in history, remembered with reverence and awe. They do not have a say, these chosen few, they must simply follow the call of duty. But they always prevail. And so it is that I today accept my own impossible burden: to write about why a Mel Gibson film should win the best picture Oscar.

For those of you who haven’t seen Hacksaw Ridge – which may include those opposed to individuals who make antisemitic remarks or engage in domestic abuse – let me set the thing up for you. Andrew Garfield plays Desmond Doss, a Seventh Day Adventist from Virginia. Hard-working Doss (the irony is lost on the Americans) is a patriot who volunteers to join the army after Pearl Harbor, but there’s a small complication: his religious beliefs prevent him from taking up arms.

As you might imagine, this doesn’t endear him to his superiors. Soon after reaching boot camp, Doss is forced into a court martial. It goes in his favour after a remarkable intervention by Doss’s alcoholic, wife-beating father who must, deep down, have a heart of gold. Roughly halfway into the film, Doss is reincorporated into the army and sent as a medic to the Japanese front.

The second half of the film is almost all on the battlefield. Doss’s division is tasked with taking the eponymous ridge, a crucial patch of land that stands atop a cliff edge in Okinawa and is filled to the brim with Japanese soldiers for whom no act is too inhuman. After an extended battle scene of Saving Private Ryan proportions and laden with typically Gibsonian gore, Doss finds himself stranded at the top of the cliff with nothing but his faith to protect him. And so, in a narrative shift I couldn’t help but find incredibly moving, he sets about spending what may be his last hours on Earth hauling as many wounded comrades down the cliff face as possible.

Spoiler alert: they’re not his last hours. The real Doss became the first American to receive the Medal of Honor without having fired a shot.

In itself, Hacksaw Ridge is a tale of classic American heroism of the sort that that the Academy traditionally loves, and indeed it has been nominated for six Oscars. But the film is more than a simple derring-do second world war flick, even one as epic and meticulously made as Steven Spielberg’s (which earned 11 Oscar nominations and won five). It is a film that could not have been made by anyone other than Gibson.

Gibson’s religious beliefs have provoked their own controversies, but there’s no denying they give him a perspective shared by few other film-makers. Both The Passion of the Christ and Apocalypto explored faith with a visceral fascination and while it’s sublimated here through the prism of a war movie, it produces distinctive results.

Doss’s trial by boot camp is less Full Metal Jacket and more Stations of the Cross, as he is made to endure pain and humiliation in the name of his unyielding beliefs, gradually winning the grudging respect of his peers. This, in turn, sets up a situation whereby the climactic battle scene comes once the real fighting has finished and features very little violence, just Doss tearing back and forth to drag his fellow soldiers off their battlefield.

The story that Gibson wants to tell, of religious faith providing values and perspective that can be transformative even in the most constrained of circumstances, makes for a war movie that is ventures above and beyond its genre. On those grounds, members of this critical court martial, I present the case for it winning the best picture award.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/feb/24/why-hacksaw-ridge-should-win-the-best-picture-oscar

Academy Awards 2017: Complete list of Oscar winners and nominees

Calendar Staff

The 89th Academy Awards have come to an end, where “Moonlight” was awarded the best picture Oscar after it was erroneously awarded to “La La Land” in a moment of onstage confusion.

“La La Land” ended up with six Oscars including director and lead actress (Emma Stone).Casey Affleck took home the lead actor award for “Manchester By the Sea,” while “Moonlight’s” Mahershala Ali took home the trophy for supporting actor. Viola Davis won the supporting actress Oscar for her work in “Fences.”

Elsewhere, “O.J.: Made in America” was named the winner in the feature documentary category, while Iran’s “The Salesman” won the foreign-language film Oscar. The latter’s director, Asghar Farhadi, declined to attend the ceremony in the wake of the Trump administration’s travel ban.

Oscars 2017: Live updatesRed carpet photos | Best and worst fashionsNominee portraits | Winners room

The 2017 Oscars took place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles with Jimmy Kimmel hosting the telecast on ABC.

Here’s the complete list of nominees:

MORE: The card that changed everything at the 89th Oscars »

Picture 

Directing

  • Denis Villeneuve, “Arrival”
  • Mel Gibson, “Hacksaw Ridge” | Interview
  • WINNER: Damien Chazelle, “La La Land” | Video
  • Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight” | Video | Interview
  • Kenneth Lonergan, “Manchester by the Sea” | Video

Actor in a leading role

  • WINNER: Casey Affleck, “Manchester by the Sea” | Video
  • Andrew Garfield, “Hacksaw Ridge” | VideoInterview
  • Ryan Gosling, “La La Land” | Video
  • Viggo Mortensen, “Captain Fantastic” | Interview
  • Denzel Washington, “Fences”

Watch: Jimmy Kimmel’s opening monologue »

Actor in a supporting role

  • WINNER: Mahershala Ali, “Moonlight” | Video
  • Jeff Bridges, “Hell or High Water” | Video
  • Lucas Hedges, “Manchester by the Sea” | Interview
  • Dev Patel, “Lion” | Video | Interview
  • Michael Shannon, “Nocturnal Animals” | Video

Are the Oscars still #SoWhite? A look at the diversity among this year’s nominees »

Actress in a leading role:

  • WINNER: Emma Stone, “La La Land” | Video
  • Natalie Portman, “Jackie” | Video | Interview
  • Ruth Negga, “Loving” | Video
  • Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Isabelle Huppert, “Elle” | Interview

Actress in a supporting role

  • WINNER: Viola Davis, “Fences” | Interview
  • Naomie Harris, “Moonlight” | Video | Interview
  • Nicole Kidman, “Lion” | Video
  • Octavia Spencer, “Hidden Figures” | Video
  • Michelle Williams, “Manchester by the Sea” | Video

MORE: From ‘Moonlight’ to ‘Manchester,’ a critic marks his hypothetical Oscar ballot »

Adapted screenplay

  •  “Lion,” by Luke Davies
  •  “Arrival,” by Eric Heisserer | Interview
  •  WINNER: “Moonlight,” by Barry Jenkins | Interview
  •  “Hidden Figures,” by Theodore Melfi and Allison Schroeder Interview
  •  “Fences,” by August Wilson

Original screenplay

  •  WINNER: “Manchester by the Sea,” by Kenneth Lonergan
  •  “Hell or High Water,” by Taylor Sheridan | Interview
  •  “La La Land,” by Damien Chazelle | Interview
  •  “20th Century Women,” Mike Mills | Interview
  •  “The Lobster,” by Efthymis Filippou and Yorgos Lanthimos | Interview

Cinematography

  • Bradford Young, “Arrival” | Interview
  • WINNER: Linus Sandgren,“La La Land”
  • Greig Fraser, “Lion”
  • James Laxton, “Moonlight”
  • Rodrigo Prieto, “Silence”

Documentary feature

  • “Fire at Sea” | Review
  • “I am Not Your Negro” | Review
  • “Life, Animated” | Review
  • WINNER: “OJ: Made in America” | Review
  • “13th” | Review

Documentary short:

  • “Extremis”
  • “4.1 miles”
  • “Joe’s Violins”
  • “Watani: My Homeland”
  • WINNER: “The White Helmets”

Foreign language film:

  • “Toni Erdmann,” Germany | Interview | Review
  • WINNER: “The Salesman,” Iran | Review
  • “A Man Called Ove,” Sweden | Review
  • “Tanna,” Australia | Review
  • “Land of Mine,” Denmark | Review

MORE: Full statement from Asghar Farhadi who refused to go to the Oscars in protest »

Sound editing

  • WINNER: Sylvain Bellemare, “Arrival” | Interview
  • Wylie Stateman and Renée Tondelli, “Deepwater Horizon”
  • Robert Mackenzie and Andy Wright, “Hacksaw Ridge”
  • Ai-Ling Lee and Mildred Iatrou Morgan, “La La Land”
  • Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman, “Sully”

Sound mixing

  • Bernard Gariépy Strobl and Claude La Haye, “Arrival” | Interview
  • WINNER: Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright, Robert Mackenzie and Peter Grace, “Hacksaw Ridge”
  • Andy Nelson, Ai-Ling Lee and Steve A. Morrow, “La La Land”
  • David Parker, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart Wilson, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”
  • Gary Summers, Jeffrey J. Haboush and Mac Ruth, “13 Hours”

MORE: 21st time’s the charm as Kevin O’Connell snaps Oscars’ longest winless streak »

Original score

  • WINNER: Justin Hurwitz, “La La Land”
  • Mica Levi, “Jackie” | Interview
  • Nicholas Britell, “Moonlight”
  • Volker Bertelmann and Dustin O’Halloran, “Lion”
  • Thomas Newman, “Passengers”

Original song

  •  WINNER: “City of Stars” (“La La Land”) | Interview
  • “How Far I’ll Go” (“Moana”) | Interview
  • “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” (“La La Land”)
  • “The Empty Chair” (“Jim: The James Foley Story”)
  • “Can’t Stop the Feeling!” (“Trolls”) | Interview

 

Production design

  • Patrice Vermette, Paul Hotte, “Arrival”
  • Stuart Craig, Anna Pinnock, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” | Interview
  • Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh, “Hail, Caesar!”
  • WINNER: David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds-Wasco, “La La Land”
  • Guy Hendrix Dyas, Gene Serdena, “Passengers”

Visual effects:

  • Craig Hammack, Jason Snell, Jason Billington and Burt Dalton, “Deepwater Horizon” | Interview
  • Stephane Ceretti, Richard Bluff, Vincent Cirelli and Paul Corbould, “Doctor Strange” | Interview
  • WINNER: Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Dan Lemmon, “The Jungle Book” | Interview
  • Steve Emerson, Oliver Jones, Brian McLean and Brad Schiff, “Kubo and the Two Strings
  • John Knoll, Mohen Leo, Hal Hickel and Neil Corbould, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” | Interview

Makeup and hairstyling

  • Eva von Bahr and Love Larson, “A Man Called Ove” | Interview
  • Joel Harlow and Richard Alonzo, “Star Trek Beyond”
  • WINNER: Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson, “Suicide Squad”

Costume design

  • Mary Zophres, “La La Land”
  • Madeline Fontaine, “Jackie” | Interview
  • Consolata Boyle, “Florence Foster Jenkins”
  • WINNER: Colleen Atwood, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” | Interview
  • Joanna Johnston, “Allied” | Interview

Film editing

  • Joe Walker, “Arrival”
  • WINNER: John Gilbert, “Hacksaw Ridge”
  • Jake Roberts, “Hell or High Water”
  • Tom Cross, “La La Land”
  • Nat Sanders and Joi McMillon, “Moonlight” | Interview

Live-action short

  • “Ennemis intérieurs,” Selim Azzazi
  • “La femme et le TGV,” Timo von Gunten
  • “Silent Nights,” Aske Bang, Kim Magnusson
  • WINNER: “Sing,” Kristof Deák, Anna Udvardy
  • “Timecode,” Juanjo Gimenez

Animated short film

  • “Blind Vaysha”
  • “Borrowed Time”
  • “Pear Cider and Cigarettes”
  • “Pearl”
  • WINNER: “Piper”

Animated feature film

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-mn-oscars-2017-nominees-winners-list-20170123-story.html

Film Review: ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

'Hacksaw Ridge' Review: Mel Gibson's War

COURTESY IMGLOBAL

SEPTEMBER 4, 2016 | 04:30AM PT

Mel Gibson has made a movie about a pacifist who served nobly during WWII. It’s a testament to his filmmaking chops, and also an act of atonement that may succeed in bringing Gibson back.

Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge” is a brutally effective, bristlingly idiosyncratic combat saga — the true story of a man of peace caught up in the inferno of World War II. It’s the first movie Gibson has directed since “Apocalypto,” 10 years ago (a film he’d already shot before the scandals that engulfed him), and this November, when it opens with a good chance of becoming a player during awards season, it will likely prove to be the first film in a decade that can mark his re-entry into the heart of the industry. Yet to say that “Hacksaw Ridge” finally leaves the Gibson scandals behind isn’t quite right; it has been made in their shadow. On some not-so-hard-to-read level, the film is conceived and presented as an act of atonement.

It should be obvious by now that the question of whether we can separate a popular actor or filmmaker’s off-screen life from his on-screen art doesn’t have a one-size-fits-all answer. Every instance is different. In the case of Mel Gibson, what we saw a number of years ago — first in his anti-Semitic comments, then in leaked recordings of his phone conversations — wasn’t simply “objectionable” thoughts, but a rage that suggested he had a temperament of emotional violence. It was one that reverberated through his two most prominent films as a director: “The Passion of the Christ,” a sensational and, in many quarters, unfairly disdained religious psychodrama that was a serious attempt to grapple with the stakes of Christ’s sacrifice, and “Apocalypto,” a fanciful but mesmerizing Mayan adventure steeped to the bone in the ambiguous allure of blood and death.

Like those two movies, “Hacksaw Ridge” is the work of a director possessed by the reality of violence as an unholy yet unavoidable truth. The film takes its title from a patch of battleground on the Japanese island of Okinawa, at the top of a 100-foot cliff, that’s all mud and branches and bunkers and foxholes, and where the fight, when it arrives (one hour into the movie), is a gruesome cataclysm of terror. Against the nonstop clatter of machine-gun fire, bombs and grenades explode with a relentless random force, blowing off limbs and blasting bodies in two, and fire is everywhere, erupting from the explosions and the tips of flame-throwers. Bullets rip through helmets and chests, and half-dead soldiers sprawl on the ground, their guts hanging out like hamburger.

Yet at the center of this modern hell of machine-tooled chaos and pain, there is Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield), a soldier who refuses to carry a gun because it is against his values. He’s a conscientious objector who acts as a medic. But because he’s every bit as devoted to serving in the war as he is to never once firing a bullet, he isn’t just caring for soldiers. He’s on the front lines, in the thick of the thick of it, without a weapon to protect him, and the film exalts not just his courage but his whole withdrawal from violence.

There really was a Desmond Doss, and the film sticks close to the facts of his story. Yet there’s still something very programmatic about “Hacksaw Ridge.” It immerses you in the violent madness of war — and, at the same time, it roots its drama in the impeccable valor of a man who, by his own grace, refuses to have anything to do with war. You could argue that Gibson, as a filmmaker, is having his bloody cake and eating it too, but the less cynical (and more accurate) way to put it might be that “Hacksaw Ridge” is a ritual of renunciation. The film stands on its own (if you’d never heard of Mel Gibson, it would work just fine), yet there’s no point in denying that it also works on the level of Gibsonian optics — that it speaks, on some political-metaphorical level, to the troubles that have defined him and that he’s now making a bid to transcend.

Will audiences, and the powers of Hollywood, finally meet him halfway? One reason the likely answer is “yes” is that “Hacksaw Ridge,” unlike such landmarks of combat cinema as “Saving Private Ryan,” “Platoon,” or “Full Metal Jacket,” isn’t simply a devastating war film. It is also a carefully carpentered drama of moral struggle that, for its first hour, feels like it could have been made in the 1950s. It’s a movie that spells out its themes with a kind of homespun user-friendly clarity. We see Desmond as a boy, growing up in a small town on the edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia with a drunken abusive father (Hugo Weaving) and a mother (Rachel Griffiths) he’s driven to protect. Early on, Desmond gets into a fight with his brother and hits him in the head with a brick, and that incident, which leaves him reeling in sorrow, is the film’s version of one of those “Freudian” events that, in an old Hollywood movie, form the cornerstone of a person’s character.

It all seems a bit pat, but once Desmond grows up and Andrew Garfield starts playing him, the actor, all lanky charm and aw-shucks modesty, wins us over to seeing Desmond as country boy of captivating conviction. He knows nothing about girls, yet he woos a lovely local nurse (Teresa Palmer) with a fumbling sincerity that melts her resistance. And when the war arrives, he enlists, just like his brother, because he feels he has no choice not to. He’s a Seventh Day Adventist scarred by violence in his family; all of this plays a role in his pacifism, and his patriotism. That difficult dad of his is portrayed by Hugo Weaving as a haunted, complex man: a slovenly lush who tries to keep his family in line with the belt, and even the pistol, but also a decorated veteran of World War I who is desperate to keep his sons alive.

The film revs up its old-fashioned pulse when it lands at boot camp, where Desmond proves a contradiction that no one there — not his fellow soldiers, let alone the officers — can begin to fathom. He’s an eager, good-guy recruit who refuses to pick up a rifle even for target practice; they assume (wrongly) that he must be a coward. For a while, the film is strikingly reminiscent of the legendary Parris Island boot-camp sequence in “Full Metal Jacket,” only this is WWII, so it’s less nihilistic, with Vince Vaughn, as the drill sergeant, tossing off the wholesome version of the usual hazing insult zingers; he looks at Desmond and barks, “I have seen stalks of corn with better physiques.” (Hence Desmond’s Army nickname: Cornstalk.) “Hacksaw Ridge” often feels like an old studio-system platoon movie, but when Desmond’s pacifism becomes a political issue within the Army, it turns into a turbulent ethical melodrama — one can almost imagine it as a military courtroom drama directed by Otto Preminger and starring Montgomery Clift.

The question is whether the Army will allow Desmond, on his own terms, to remain a soldier — a conscientious objector who nevertheless wants to go to war. In a sense, the dramatic issue is a tad hazy, since Desmond announces, from the outset, that he wants to be a medic. Why can’t he just become one? But one of the strengths of “Hacksaw Ridge” is that it never caricatures the military brass’s objections to his plan. On the battlefront without a weapon, Desmond could conceivably be placing his fellow soldiers in harm’s way. His desire is noble, but it doesn’t fit in with Army regulations (and the Army, of course, is all about regulations). So he’s threatened with a court martial. The way this is finally resolved is quietly moving, not to mention just.

And then … the hell of war. It’s 1945, and the soldiers from Desmond’s platoon join forces with other troops to take Hacksaw Ridge, a crucial stretch — it looks like a Japanese version of the land above Normandy beach — that can lead them, potentially, to a victory in Okinawa, and the beginning of the end of the war. Gibson’s staging of the horror of combat generates enough shock and awe to earn comparison to the famous opening sequence of “Saving Private Ryan,” although it must be said that he borrows a lot from (and never matches) Spielberg’s virtuosity. Yet Gibson creates a blistering cinematic battleground all his own. Each time the fight breaks out again, it’s so relentless that you wonder how anyone could survive it.

The real story that “Hacksaw Ridge” is telling, of course, is Desmond’s, and Gibson stages it in straightforward anecdotes of compassion under fire, though without necessarily finding anything revelatory in the sight of a courageous medic administering to his fellow soldiers (and, at certain points, even to wounded Japanese), tying their blown-off limbs with tourniquets, giving them shots of morphine between murmured words of hope, and dragging them to safety. In a sense, the real drama is a nobility that won’t speak its name: It’s the depth of Desmond’s fearlessness, and his love for his soldier brothers, which we believe in, thanks to Garfield’s reverent performance, but which doesn’t create a combat drama that’s either scary or exciting enough to rival the classic war movies of our time. This isn’t a great one; it’s just a good one (which is nothing to sneeze at).

Desmond devises a way to save lives by tying a rope around the soldiers’ bodies and lowering them down the vertical stone cliff that borders Hacksaw Ridge, and using that technique he rescues a great many of them. Desmond Doss, who saved 75 men at Hacksaw Ridge, became the first conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor, and Gibson has made a movie that’s a fitting tribute to him (at the end, he features touching footage of the real Doss). But one surprise, given the drama of pacifism-versus-war that the movie has set up, is that there’s never a single scene in which Desmond has to consider violating his principles and picking up a weapon in order to save himself or somebody else. A scene like that would have brought the two sides of “Hacksaw Ridge,” the violent and the pacifist — and, implicitly, the two sides of Mel Gibson — crashing together. But that would have been a different movie. One that, in the end, was a little less safe.

Film Review: ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

Reviewed at Venice Film Festival, Sept. 4, 2016. Running time: 131 MIN.

Production

A Summit Entertainment release of a Cross Creek Pictures, IM Global, Icon Productions, AI-Film, Pandemonium Films, Permut Presentations, Windy Hill Pictures, Vendian Entertainment, Demarest Media, Kilburn Media production. Producers: William Mechanic, David Permut, Terry Benedict, Paul Currie, Bruce Davey, William D. Johnson, Tyler Thompson, Brian Oliver. Executive producers: Michael Bassick, David S. Greathouse, Mark C. Manuel, Ted O’Neal, Buddy Patrick, Suzanne Warren, Christopher Woodrow.

Crew

Director: Mel Gibson. Screenplay: Robert Schenkkan, Andrew Knight. Camera (color, widescreen): Simon Duggan. Editor: John Gilbert.

With

Andrew Garfield, Sam Worthington, Luke Bracey, Teresa Palmer, Hugo Weaving, Rachel Griffiths, Vince Vaughn.

http://variety.com/2016/film/reviews/hacksaw-ridge-review-venice-film-review-mel-gibson-1201851851/

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The Pronk Pops Show 842, February 20, 2017: Story 1: President Trump Appoints New National Security Adviser — Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster — Story 2: The Leaker in The White House Revealed — Videos — Story 3: Trump Hunt For Clinton and Obama Partisan Moles In The Secret Surveillance and Spying State and Deep-State Leakers — Non-interventionist Trump For Restoring The American Republic Vs. Interventionist Political Elitist Establishment For Expanding The American Empire — American People Vs. American Elitists –Videos

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Story 1: President Trump Appoints New National Security Adviser — Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster — Videos

Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, President Trump, and Keith

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Trump appoints Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster his new national security adviser

David Jackson and Tom Vanden Brook , USA TODAY

President Trump said Monday that Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster — a noted writer and intellectual who headed up a unit dedicated to anticipating future military challenges — will be his new national security adviser, replacing the dismissed Michael Flynn.

“You’re going to do a great job,” Trump told McMaster as he made the announcement at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla.

Trump also announced that Keith Kellogg — who had been the acting national security in the week since Flynn was fired — would be McMaster’s chief of staff.

McMaster, described by Trump as “a man of tremendous talent and tremendous experience,” is the director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center, an internal think tank that looks at future threats and how to deal with them. He is also Deputy Commanding General, Futures, at the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command.

Thanking Trump for the appointment that does not require Senate confirmation, McMaster told reporters that “I would just like to say what a privilege it is to be able to continue serving our nation. I’m grateful to you for that opportunity, and I look forward to joining the national security team and doing everything that I can to advance and protect the interests of the American people.”

Kellogg also thanked Trump, and said he is “very honored and privileged to serve alongside with H.R. McMaster, … He’s a great statesman, a great Sargent.”

McMaster, viewed as one of the Army’s leading intellects, holds a doctoral degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He is a decorated combat veteran whose innovative leadership in counterinsurgency helped secure the restive city of Tal Afar in Iraq from Sunni insurgents in 2005.

McMaster, a protege of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, is also a noted author.

His 1997 book on the Vietnam War — Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam — has been required reading for many national security officials.

McMaster has been calling for a larger and better-equipped Army to face growing threats to national security. The Army, until plans were announced recently to grow the ranks, has been shedding soldiers.

The new national security adviser warned the Senate in testimony last year that the Army had shrunk its ranks too far and lacked the new weaponry it needed to keep pace with U.S. enemies. It been “outranged and outgunned by many potential adversaries,” he told a panel of the Armed Services Committee in April.

Advanced weapons mean the Army’s main armored vehicles, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle and Abrams tank, “will soon be obsolete,” he said. The Army has no plans to replace either vehicle.

The selection of McMaster as national security adviser drew good reviews from lawmakers, particularly Republicans.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, has criticized aspects of Trump’s tenure, but said he gives the president “great credit for this decision, as well as his national security Cabinet choices. I could not imagine a better, more capable national security team than the one we have right now.”

In announcing the McMaster appointment, Trump also suggested that another finalist for the national security adviser’s job, former U.N. ambassador John Bolton, would eventually be hired for a different position.

“We’ll be asking him to work with us in a somewhat different capacity,” Trump said of Bolton. “Knows a lot. He had a good number of ideas that I must tell you I agree very much with”

The moves come a week after Trump asked for Flynn’s resignation for lying about the substance of a conversation he had with the Russian ambassador to the United States.

Flynn’s firing took place amid a series of investigations into possible contacts between Trump associates and Russia, which has been accused of interfering in last year’s presidential election by hacking Democrats close to presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. Flynn spoke to the Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, about sanctions the Obama administration placed on Russia after investigators had determined the scope of the Russian interference in the U.S. election.

In the wake of Flynn’s removal, McMaster takes over a National Security Council that still has many unfilled jobs and a reputation for chaotic management.

The president initially offered the job to Vice Admiral Robert Harward, but he turned it down late last week amid reports that he might not be able to pick his own aides.

White House spokesperson Sarah Sanders said that, in naming his new national security adviser, Trump “gave full authority for McMaster to hire whatever staff he sees fit.”

Unlike previous administrations, the influential principals committee of Trump’s NSC includes counselor and strategist Stephen Bannon, a move that has drawn criticism.

Read more:

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After a weekend of job interviews, Trump said of McMaster: “He is highly respected by everyone in the military and we’re very honored to have him.”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/02/20/donald-trump-hr-mcmaster-michael-flynn-national-security-adviser/98165152/

H. R. McMaster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
H. R. McMaster
H.R. McMaster ARCIC 2014.jpg
26th National Security Advisor
Assumed office
February 20, 2017
President Donald Trump
Deputy K. T. McFarland
Preceded by Michael T. Flynn
Personal details
Born Herbert Raymond McMaster
July 24, 1962 (age 54)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Spouse(s) Kathleen Trotter (1985–present)
Awards Army Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit (2)
Bronze Star (2)
Purple Heart Medal
Defense Meritorious Service Medal (2)
Army Meritorious Service Medal (5)
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Army Commendation Medal (4)
Army Achievement Medal (4)
Military service
Nickname(s) The Iconoclast General
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 1984–present
Rank Army-USA-OF-08.svgLieutenant general
Commands Eagle Troop, 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment
1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment
3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment
Concept Development and Experimentation Directorate, Army Capabilities Integration Center
Joint Anti-Corruption Task Force (Shafafiyat), International Security Assistance Force
Maneuver Center of Excellence
Army Capabilities Integration Center
Battles/wars Persian Gulf War
Battle of 73 Easting
War on Terror
Iraq War
War in Afghanistan

Herbert Raymond “H. R.” McMaster (born July 24, 1962) is a Lieutenant General in the United States Army, author, and the 26th and current United States National Security Advisor. His current assignment is Director, Army Capabilities Integration Center and Deputy Commanding General, Futures, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. His previous assignment was commander of the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Ft. Benning, Georgia. McMaster previously served as Director of Combined Joint Interagency Task Force-Shafafiyat (CJIATF-Shafafiyat) (Transparency) at ISAF (International Security Assistance Force) Headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan. He is known for his roles in the Gulf War, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

Early life

McMaster was born in Philadelphia in 1962.[1] He went to high school at Valley Forge Military Academy, graduating in 1980. He earned a commission as a second lieutenant upon graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1984. McMaster earned Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees in American history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). His thesis was critical of American strategy in the Vietnam War, which was further detailed in his 1997 book Dereliction of Duty.[2]

Dereliction of Duty (book)

Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, The Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that Led to Vietnam is a book written by McMaster that explores the military’s role in the policies of the Vietnam War. The book was written as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at UNC. It harshly criticized high-ranking officers of that era, arguing that they inadequately challenged Defense SecretaryRobert McNamara and PresidentLyndon Johnson on their Vietnam strategy. The book was widely read in Pentagon circles and included in military reading lists.

The book examines McNamara and Johnson’s staff, alongside the military and particularly the Joint Chiefs of Staff, failure to provide a successful plan of action either to pacify a Viet Cong insurgency or to decisively defeat the North Vietnamese Army. McMaster also details why military actions intended to indicate “resolve” or to “communicate” ultimately failed when trying to accomplish sparsely detailed, confusing, and conflicting military objectives.

Career

Company grade officer

His first assignment after commissioning was to the 2nd Armored Division at Fort Hood, where he served in a variety of platoon and company level leadership assignments with 1st Battalion 66th Armor Regiment. In 1989, McMaster was assigned to the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment at Warner Barracks in Bamberg, Germany, where he served until 1992, including deployment to Operation Desert Storm.

During the Gulf War in 1991 he was a captain commanding Eagle Troop of the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment at the Battle of 73 Easting.[3] During that battle, though significantly outnumbered and encountering the enemy by surprise as McMaster’s lead tank crested a dip in the terrain, the nine tanks of Eagle Troop destroyed over eighty Iraqi Republican Guard tanks and other vehicles without loss, due to the Abrams tank being state-of-the-art armored technology while the Iraqi equipment included grossly outdated T-62s and -72s of the Soviet era as well as similarly dated Type 69s of Chinese manufacture.[4]

McMaster was awarded the Silver Star. The battle features in several books about Desert Storm and is widely referred to in US Army training exercises. It also receives coverage in Tom Clancy‘s 1994 popular non-fiction book Armored Cav.[4] McMaster served as a military history professor at West Point from 1994 to 1996, teaching among other things the battles in which he fought. He graduated from the United States Army Command and General Staff College in 1999.[5]

Field grade officer

From 1999 to 2002, McMaster commanded 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, and then took a series of staff positions at U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM), including planning and operations roles in Iraq.

In his next job, as lieutenant colonel and later colonel, McMaster worked on the staff of USCENTCOM as executive officer to Deputy Commander Lieutenant GeneralJohn Abizaid. When Abizaid received four-star rank and became Central Command’s head, McMaster served as Director, Commander’s Advisory Group (CAG), described as the command’s brain trust.

In 2003 McMaster completed an Army War College research fellowship at Stanford University’sHoover Institution.

In 2004, he was assigned to command the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment (3rd ACR). Shortly after McMaster took command the regiment deployed for its second tour in Iraq and was assigned the mission of securing the city of Tal Afar. That mission culminated in September with Operation Restoring Rights and the defeat of the city’s insurgent strongholds. President Bush praised this success, and the PBS show Frontline broadcast a documentary in February 2006 featuring interviews with McMaster. CBS’ 60 Minutes produced a similar segment in July,[6] and the operation was the subject of an article in the April 10, 2006, issue of The New Yorker.

Author Tim Harford has written that the pioneering tactics employed by 3rd ACR led to the first success in overcoming the Iraqi insurgency. Prior to 2005, tactics included staying out of dangerous urban areas except on patrols, with US forces returning to their bases each night. These patrols had little success in turning back the insurgency because local Iraqis who feared retaliation would very rarely assist in identifying them to US forces. McMaster deployed his soldiers into Tal Afar on a permanent basis, and once the local population grew confident that they weren’t going to withdraw nightly, the citizens began providing information on the insurgents, enabling US forces to target and defeat them.[4][7]

McMaster passed command of the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment on June 29, 2006 and joined the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, as a Senior Research Associate with a mandate described as “conduct[ing] research to identify opportunities for improved multi-national cooperation and political-military integration in the areas of counterinsurgency, counter-terrorism, and state building”, and to devise “better tactics to battle terrorism.”[8]

From August 2007 to August 2008 McMaster was part of an “elite team of officers advising US commander” General David Petraeus on counterinsurgency operations while Petraeus directed revision of the Army’s Counterinsurgency Field Manual during his command of the Combined Arms Center.[9] Petraeus and most of his team were stationed in Fort Leavenworth at the time but McMaster collaborated remotely, according to senior team member John Nagl.[4][7]

General officer

McMaster was passed over for promotion to Brigadier General in 2006 and 2007, despite his reputation as one of “the most celebrated soldiers of the Iraq War.”[10] Though the Army’s rationale for whether a given officer is selected or not selected is not made public, McMaster’s initial non-selection attracted media attention.[11][12][13] However, in late 2007, Secretary of the ArmyPete Geren requested General David Petraeus to return from Iraq to take charge of the promotion board as a way to ensure that the best performers in combat received every consideration for advancement, resulting in McMaster’s selection along with other Colonels who had been identified as innovative thinkers.[4][14] McMaster’s name was subsequently released on the promotion list for Brigadier General in 2008.[15]

In August 2008, McMaster assumed duties as Director, Concept Development and Experimentation (later renamed Concept Development and Learning), in the Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC) at Fort Monroe, Virginia, part of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command. In this position McMaster was involved in preparing doctrine to guide the Army over the next ten to twenty years. He was promoted on June 29, 2009.[16][17]

In July 2010 he was selected to be the J-5, Deputy to the Commander for Planning, at ISAF (International Security Assistance Forces) Headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan. Additionally, McMaster directed a joint anti-corruption task force (CJIATF-Shafafiyat) at ISAF Headquarters.

In 2011, Army Chief of Staff General Martin Dempsey remarked that McMaster was “probably our best Brigadier General.”[18]

McMaster as commander of the Maneuver Center of Excellence in 2012.

McMaster was nominated for Major General on January 23, 2012. In April 2012 he was announced as the next commander of the Army’s Maneuver Center of Excellence (MCoE) at Ft. Benning.[19] On June 13, 2012, McMaster assumed command of the MCoE and was promoted to Major General in a ceremony at Ft. Benning [20] with a date of rank of August 2, 2012.

On February 18, 2014, Defense SecretaryChuck Hagel announced the nominations of four officers for promotion to Lieutenant General, including McMaster, who was selected to become Deputy Commander of the Training and Doctrine Command and Director of TRADOC’s Army Capabilities Integration Center.[21]

In April 2014, McMaster made Times list of the 100 most influential people in the world. He was hailed as “the architect of the future U.S. Army” in the accompanying piece written by retired Lt. Gen. Dave Barno, who commanded U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005. “Major General Herbert Raymond McMaster might be the 21st century Army’s pre-eminent warrior-thinker,” Barno wrote, commenting on McMaster’s “impressive command and unconventional exploits in the second Iraq war.”[22] Barno also stated, “Recently tapped for his third star, H.R. is also the rarest of soldiers—one who has repeatedly bucked the system and survived to join its senior ranks.”[23] Retired Army Gen. Jack Keane, a former Army vice chief, commented “It is heartening to see the Army reward such an extraordinary general officer who is a thought leader and innovator while also demonstrating sheer brilliance as a wartime brigade commander.”[24]

In July 2014 McMaster was promoted to Lieutenant General and began his duties at the Army Capabilities Integration Center.[25]

National Security Advisor

On February 20, 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump named McMaster to serve as his National Security Advisor following the resignation of Michael T. Flynn on February 13.[26][27][28]

Decorations and badges

U.S. military decorations
Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg Army Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star ribbon.svg Silver Star
US Defense Superior Service Medal ribbon.svg Defense Superior Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Legion of Merit with Oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Bronze Star with Oak leaf cluster
Purple Heart BAR.svg Purple Heart
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Defense Meritorious Service Medal with Oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Meritorious Service Medal with four Oak leaf clusters
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Army Commendation Medal with three Oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Army Achievement Medal with three Oak leaf clusters
U.S. service (campaign) medals and service and training ribbons
Bronze star

National Defense Service Medal with one service star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star

Southwest Asia Service Medal with three service stars
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg Afghanistan Campaign Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star

Iraq Campaign Medal with two service stars
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary ribbon.svg Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal ribbon.svg Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Army Service Ribbon.svg Army Service Ribbon
Army Overseas Service Ribbon
Foreign decorations
NATO Medal Active Endeavour ribbon bar.svg NATO Medal
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia) ribbon.svg Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia)
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait) ribbon.svg Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)
U.S. badges, patches and tabs
Combat Action Badge.svg Combat Action Badge
US Army Airborne basic parachutist badge.gif Parachutist Badge
Ranger Tab.svg Ranger Tab
USA - 3rd Calvary DUI.png 3d Armored Cavalry Regimentdistinctive unit insignia
3dACRSSI.PNG 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment combat service identification badge
Former War Time Service (SSI-FWTS)
Multi-National Force-Iraq ShoulderSIeeveInsignia.jpg Multi-National Force – Iraq combat service identification badge
Former War Time Service (SSI-FWTS)
USFOR-A Shoulder Insignia.jpg United States Forces – Afghanistan combat service identification badge
Former War Time Service (SSI-FWTS)
TRADOC patch.svg United States Army Training and Doctrine Command shoulder sleeve insignia
U.S. orders
StetsonHatFortHoodArmy.jpg Order of the SpurCavalry Hat and Spurs (Gold)

Notes and citations

  1. Jump up^ Lucey, Catherine (February 20, 2017). “PRES. TRUMP PICKS PHILADELPHIA NATIVE ARMY LT. GEN. H.R. MCMASTER AS NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER”. Associated Press. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  2. Jump up^ Spector, Ronald (July 20, 1997). “Cooking Up a Quagmire”. New York Times. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  3. Jump up^ “M1a1 Abrams Tanks in action Iraq-73 Easting”.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Tim Harford (2011). Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure. Little, Brown. pp. 46–56 , 61 ,72–74 , 77–78. ISBN 1-4087-0152-9.
  5. Jump up^ WLA: War, Literature & the Arts, Volume 11. Colorado Springs, CO: U.S. Air Force Academy. 1999. p. 230.
  6. Jump up^ “Tal Afar: Al Qaeda’s Town”. CBS News.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b Tim Harford (May 23, 2011). “Lessons from war’s factory floor”. The Financial Times. Retrieved August 2, 2011.
  8. Jump up^ International Institute for Strategic Studies – H.R. McMaster. Retrieved 2007-09-02.
  9. Jump up^ Tisdall, Simon. Military chiefs give US six months to win Iraq War. The Guardian. 2007-02-28. Retrieved 2007-09-02.
  10. Jump up^ Kaplan, Fred (August 26, 2007), “Challenging the Generals”, New York Times, retrieved September 2, 2007
  11. Jump up^ “Col. McMaster”. CBS News.
  12. Jump up^ Fred Kaplan, Slate.com, Annual General Meeting: Finally, the Army is Promoting the Right Officers, August 4, 2008
  13. Jump up^ Blake Hounshell, Foreign Policy magazine, McMaster Gets His Star, July 16, 2008
  14. Jump up^ Ann Scott Tyson, “Army’s Next Crop of Generals Forged in Counterinsurgency”, Washington Post, May 15, 2008
  15. Jump up^ U.S. Department of Defense, General Officer Announcements, July 15, 2008
  16. Jump up^ U.S. Department of Defense News Release General Officer Announcements, July 15, 2008
  17. Jump up^ Hoover Institution, H.R. McMaster promoted to brigadier general in the U.S. Army, August 15, 2009
  18. Jump up^ Ricks, Thomas E. (July 27, 2011). “Dempsey on Two Big Lessons of Iraq: Think More and Train Leaders Better”. Foreign Policy.
  19. Jump up^ U.S. Army News Release, McMaster Tapped for Promotion, Command of Benning, April 4, 2012
  20. Jump up^ “McMaster to Take Reins at Maneuver Center”. Army Times. June 11, 2012.
  21. Jump up^ “4 Generals Nominated for Third Star”. Army Times. February 18, 2014.
  22. Jump up^ Army Times, Gen. McMaster makes Time’s ‘100 most influential’, April 25, 2014
  23. Jump up^ Barno, Dave (April 23, 2014). “Major General Herbert Raymond McMaster”. Time. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  24. Jump up^ Bill Gertz, Washington Free Beacon, Iconoclast Army General to Get Third Star: Army Maj. Gen. H.R. McMaster Receives Promotion, February 18, 2014
  25. Jump up^ Amy L. Haviland, U.S. Army, McMaster to Lead Development of Future Force, July 16, 2014
  26. Jump up^ “Sean Spicer on Twitter”.
  27. Jump up^ “Trump Selects Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as National Security Adviser”. Fox News. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  28. Jump up^ “Trump Names Lt Gen HR McMaster as National Security Adviser”. BBC News. February 20, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2017.

Further reading

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._R._McMaster

Story 2: The Leaker in The White House Revealed — Videos — 

Image result for katie walsh whitehouse deputy chief of staff

“They will SUFFER” Donald Trump THREATENS leakers behind Flynn scandal

Published on Feb 16, 2017

Trump: Leakers will ‘pay a big price’. “We’re going to find the leakers and they’re going to pay a big price,” he told reporters in the Roosevelt Room during a meeting with Republican lawmakers on CNN.

President Donald Trump on Thursday pledged to punish people who leaked damaging information about the inner workings of the White House, including former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s conversations with Russia.

The foreboding comments come one day after Trump blamed “criminal” leaks from the intelligence community for Flynn’s ouster.

“From intelligence, papers are being leaked, things are being leaked by hackers; it’s criminal action. It’s a criminal act, and it’s been going on for a long time before me, but now it’s really going on,” Trump said Wednesday during a joint news conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
“People are trying to cover up for a terrible loss that the Democrats had under Hillary Clinton,” he added.

Trump’s aides, however, have said the president demanded Flynn’s resignation because the top aide lost the president’s trust by misleading senior officials about his talks with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

Trump, who praised WikiLeaks during the presidential campaign, has also been angered at leaked accounts of his phone calls with the leaders of Russia, Australia and Mexico.

The Washington Post revealed Trump called a bilateral agreement on refugees brokered by President Obama “the worst deal ever” in a call with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and told his counterpart their conversation was “the worst call by far” of those he had had with other world leaders, before cutting the conversation short.

BOMBSHELL – White House Spy Caught, 1511

Published on Feb 19, 2017

Good Sunday evening to you, I’m Still reporting from Washington.
Earlier today, a site called GotNews broke a story that the White House Deputy Chief of Staff, Katie Walsh, who works directly for Rense Priebus, has been the source of several leaks to The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other MSM outlets.
According to a confidential GotNews source close to the president:
“Everyone knows not to talk to her in the White House unless you want to see it in the press. The only question is whether or not she’s doing it at the behest of [White House Chief of Staff] Reince Priebus or if she’s doing it to advance herself in DC media circles.”
GotNews says that Walsh is close to Maggie Habberman, a reporter for The New York Times.
“Walsh would have significant access as she controls the president’s schedule. There’s also reportedly a trove of e-mails where Katie Walsh and Reince Priebus discuss how to rid themselves of Trump, according to a former #NeverTrump consultant.”
But ole Mr. Trump, he’s a smart one. He and his staff have been feeding Walsh fake information in order to discover the extent of her network.
“Walsh was a #NeverTrump Republican during the campaign. Neither Walsh nor her family were supporters during the campaign, says a source from Walsh’s hometown of St. Louis.”
It remains to be seen whether criminal charges will be persued against Walsh.
Tonight, the Gateway Pundit is quoting GotNews founder, Charles Johnson saying that he will not reveal his sources, but insisted that they are:
“100% reliable, I’m unwilling to reveal the primary White House sources, but Walsh was behind the leaks.”
I’m still reporting from Washington. Good evening.

Trump’s Press Conference MELTDOWN

Sinking Trump Ship Plagued By Leaks, Possibly Moles…

Treason: White House Deputy Chief Of Staff Guilty Of Trump Leaks !

Trump Announced Three Senior White House Staffers

Published on Jan 4, 2017

On Wednesday, Donald Trump has announced three senior White House staff appointments, naming Katie Walsh as deputy chief of staff, Rick Dearborn as deputy chief of staff for legislative, intergovernmental affairs and implementation, and Joe Hagin as deputy chief of staff for operations.. The announcement brings on three experienced Washington hands below chief of staff Reince Priebus, chief strategist Steve Bannon and senior counselor Kellyanne Conway. In a statement, Priebus said, “The President-elect’s bold vision to make America great again demands a team of doers who can hit the ground running on day one.” More senior staffing announcements are being expected to be announced soon.

‘A lot of gossip’: White House looks into leaks of Trump’s calls with global leaders

Published on Feb 10, 2017

Officials in the White House are looking into leaks about President Donald Trump’s phone calls with foreign heads of state, including Russian President Vladimir Putin, calling them ‘very concerning.’
RT’s Gayane Chichakyan talks on the matter.

Reince Priebus & Katie Walsh, Source of Trump Leaks to NYTimes & MSM

REPORT: White House Deputy Chief of Staff and #NeverTrumper Source of LEAKS

Katie Walsh: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

BREAKING: @Reince’s Gal & @WhiteHouse Chief of Staff @KMWalsh_GOP Is Source Of Trump Leaks To @NYTimes & Others

White House Deputy Chief of Staff and #NeverTrump RepublicanKatie Walsh has been identified as the source behind a bunch of leaks from the Trump administration to The New York Times and other media outlets, according to multiple sources in the White House, media, donor community, and pro-Trump 501(c)4 political group.

“Everyone knows not to talk to her in the White House unless you want to see it in the press,” says a source close to the president. “The only question is whether or not she’s doing it at the behest of [White House Chief of Staff] Reince Priebus or if she’s doing it to advance herself in DC media circles.”

One source in particular stands out: Walsh is close to Maggie Haberman, a New York Times reporter who wrote fawning pro-Republican National Committee stories during the presidential election. Walsh has also planted stories in The Washington Post and Politico.

Walsh is referred to as “Madame President” in the White House, says a senior aide. “It isn’t a compliment.”

You won’t hear this stuff from the lying mainstream media. Keep the GotNews mission alive: donate at GotNews.com/donate or send tips to editor@gotnews.com. If you’d like to join our research team, contact editor@gotnews.com.

Walsh would have significant access as she controls the president’s schedule. There’s also reportedly a trove of e-mails where Katie Walsh and Reince Priebus discuss how to rid themselves of Trump, according to a former #NeverTrump consultant.

“The president and his allies have been deliberately feeding her fake information in order to find her network,” says a source close to the president’s family. “It’s been going well.”

Walsh was a #NeverTrump Republican during the campaign. Neither Walsh nor her family were supporters during the campaign, says a source from Walsh’s hometown of St. Louis.

A White House investigation is planned into Walsh, who couldn’t be reached for comment.

Stay tuned for more.

Our researchers shut down Facebook’s biased left-wing trending news team. They discovered never before seen footage of a young Barack Obama whining about white privilege in Kenya. They debunked and destroyed Hillary Clinton’s narco baby mama Alicia Machado, who quit giving interviews because of us. If you’d like to hire our research team, email us at editor@gotnews.com.

Like our scoops? You won’t hear this stuff from the lying mainstream media. Keep the GotNews mission alive: send tips to editor@gotnews.com or donate at GotNews.com/donate.

http://gotnews.com/breaking-reinces-gal-whitehouse-chief-staff-kmwalsh_gop-source-trump-leaks-nytimes-others/

Katie Walsh (politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Katie Walsh
White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Implementation
Assumed office
January 20, 2017
President Donald Trump
Preceded by Kristie Canegallo (Policy Implementation)
Personal details
Born 1984/1985 (age 32–33)[1]
St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
Political party Republican
Education George Washington University(BA)

Katie Walsh is an American political operative and the current White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Implementation in the administration of Donald Trump.

She also currently serves as the Chief of Staff for the Republican National Committee. Walsh joined the RNC as Deputy Finance Director in January 2013 and became Finance Director in June of that year. In her previous role as Deputy Finance Director for the National Republican Senatorial Committee, she worked with United States Senate campaigns across the country to implement comprehensive fundraising and campaign strategies. Her past experience also includes serving as Midwest Regional Finance Director for the McCain-Palin campaign in 2008 and working for Friends of Fred Thompson, at the Ashcroft Group, and as a field representative for Missourians for Matt Blunt.[2]

Early life and education

Walsh was born an only child in St. Louis, Missouri.[3] She credits her early interest in politics to her mother, who she said worked on a county executive race in Missouri when she was seven or eight. Her early political involvement came in high school when she worked as an intern for then-Senator John Ashcroft‘s unsuccessful 2000 reelection campaign. She attended Visitation Academy of St. Louis, a private, all-girls, Roman Catholic high school, and graduated in 2003. She was a field representative for Matt Blunt‘s 2004 campaign for Governor of Missouri.[4][5] She also worked as an administrative assistant for the consulting firm Ashcroft Group.[5]

Walsh graduated from George Washington University with degrees in marketing and finance in 2007.[1]

Career

2008 presidential election

Walsh was hired in 2007 as an assistant to the finance director for Fred Thompson‘s brief presidential campaign.[6] After Thompson dropped out of the race, she joined the presidential campaign of John McCain as Midwest regional finance director.[6][5]

National Republican Senatorial Committee

Walsh then worked as deputy finance director for the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC),[4] implementing fundraising and political strategies for Senate campaigns during the 2010 and 2012 election cycles.[5]

Republican National Committee

Walsh was hired as deputy finance director for the Republican National Committee (RNC) in January 2013 and rose to finance director that June.[6][1] At the RNC, Walsh was known as “rainmaker”,[4] breaking records by raising over $200 million during the 2014 election cycle.[1]

Walsh was named chief of staff of the RNC in early 2015,[6] serving under chair Reince Priebus. She was critical of the RNC’s practice of sharing voter information with the Koch Brothers, saying “I think it’s very dangerous and wrong to allow a group of very strong, well-financed individuals who have no accountability to anyone to have control over who gets access to the data when, why and how.”[7] During the 2016 election cycle, Walsh was an architect of the RNC’s get out the vote and voter identification operations.[4] She focused on using the RNC’s data collection from the previous four years. She told CNN that the RNC intended to look to polls less often in favor of “predictive modeling,” which tracks voters’ likelihood of voting for Republican candidates. In November 2016, she said, “The beauty of predictive modeling is you’re watching an electorate voter-by-voter over a long period of time … You’re watching their movement, you’re watching what they care about, you’re watching what they respond to to [sic] and there are a lot of upsides to this.” She went on to say that the RNC was also focusing on get out the vote efforts for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.[citation needed]

Donald Trump presidential transition team

Walsh was a member of Donald Trump‘s presidential transition team. The transition team was a group of around 100 aides, policy experts, government affairs officials, and former government officials who were tasked with vetting, interviewing, and recommending individuals for top cabinet and staff roles in Trump’s administration. She was part of the Leadership staff.[8]

Trump administration

Walsh was named White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Implementation in the administration of Donald Trump. She oversees senior staff and manages scheduling and the Office of Public Liaison.[1]

Walsh reportedly has guarded access to the Oval Office on behalf of Trump administration chief of Staff Reince Priebus. In February 2017, as Trump called homeland security advisor Tom Bossert into the office, Walsh “spotted him entering the Oval Office and sprinted down the hallway to alert her boss, Mr. Priebus,” The Wall Street Journal reported.”[9] Katie Walsh has been identified as the source behind a bunch of leaks from the Trump administration “[10]

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Roberts, Kayleigh (January 23, 2017). “Who Is Katie Walsh? 8 Things You Need to Know About the RNC Superstar Turned Trump Staffer”. Cosmopolitan.
  2. Jump up^ “Katie Walsh”. gop.com.
  3. Jump up^ Morrow, Brendan (January 4, 2017). “Katie Walsh: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know”. Heavy.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Raasch, Chuck (January 6, 2017). “St. Louis native Katie Walsh will be deputy chief of staff in Trump White House”. St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Graves, Lucia (March 27, 2015). “Katie Walsh: The RNC’s Rainmaker”. The Atlantic.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Dickson, Rebecca (May 25, 2016). “RNC’s Katie Walsh: A behind-the-scenes leader”. The Hill.
  7. Jump up^ Ward, Jon (June 11, 2015). “The Koch brothers and the Republican Party go to war — with each other”. Yahoo News.
  8. Jump up^ “Trump adds vice chairs to transition team, including several women”. Politico. November 29, 2016. Retrieved February 1, 2017.
  9. Jump up^ “Mike Flynn is first casualty of turmoil in Trump administration,” The Wall Street Journal, February 14, 2017, retrieved February 17, 2017.
  10. Jump up^ “iNFOWARS.COM”,”] ‘iNFOWARS.COM, February 19, 2017, retrieved February 17, 2017.

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katie_Walsh_(politician)

Story 3: Trump’s Hunt For Clinton and Obama Partisan Moles In The Secret Surveillance and Spying State and Deep-State Leakers — Non-interventionist Trump For Restoring The American Republic Vs. Interventionist Political Elitist Establishment For Expanding The American Empire — American People Vs. American Elitists –Videos

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Dr. Steve Pieczenik – Trump vs The Deep State

Is The Intelligence Community At War With Trump?

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SR 1433 – Why the CIA, Dems and Deep State Hate Trump

NSA Whistleblower: Everyone in US under virtual surveillance, all info stored, no matter the post

NSA Whistleblower William Binney: The Future of FREEDOM

People Who Control America ? Mind Blowing Documentary HQ

Will Smith || Enemy Of The State 1998

Op-Ed

Was the American deep state, panicked by Trump, revealing itself?

“The intelligence agencies are pretty hard to roll,” a former top CIA official told me last week. “These guys are trained to manipulate people and overthrow governments, and they’re rather good at it.”

But no, this wasn’t the deep state seizing power. We’re not there yet.

In a country controlled by the deep state, members of the armed forces and intelligence agencies can overthrow presidents they don’t like; that’s what happened in Egypt in 2013. They hold veto power over major decisions. They often run large parts of the economy, or at least enough government contracts to make their families rich. And they’re rarely held accountable for their actions. They act with impunity.

U.S. intelligence agencies, on the other hand, are restrained by law. Sometimes they overstep, but eventually they are reined in. The officials who leaked the details of Flynn’s conversations knew that Trump would order the FBI to track them down. They put themselves at risk.

Trump’s problem isn’t the deep state; it’s the broad state. He’s facing pushback not only from intelligence agencies, but from civilian bureaucracies, too.

When his White House staff drafted an executive order to reopen CIA “black sites” and reintroduce torture, it leaked – and the decision was promptly put on ice.

When they drafted another order to repeal protections for LGBT federal employees, that leaked too – and the president’s daughter and son-in-law blocked the idea.

When Trump banned travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries, the attorneys general of several states sued, and federal courts blocked the order’s enforcement.

There have been less-dramatic forms of defiance, too. Bureaucrats in the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency have signed petitions protesting the new administration’s policies.

In a different category, Trump’s own Cabinet appears to harbor a modest dose of dissent: Defense Secretary James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson sound distinctly less enthusiastic than their boss about cooperating with Vladimir Putin.

Just about every segment of the federal government has struggled against White House actions it didn’t like, and when you add up all those varieties of resistance, it begins to look almost like a Resistance. But — and this is crucial — there’s no central power organizing or directing the fight.

It’s not unusual for a new Republican administration to encounter recalcitrant bureaucrats in domestic agencies like the EPA, or for a Democratic president to clash with hawks in national security agencies. In 2009, for example, President Obama believed the Pentagon tried to force him to send more troops to Afghanistan than he wanted.

But Trump and his chief theoretician, Stephen K. Bannon, have taken aim at both sides: not only Democratic bureaucrats, but also much of the Republican establishment. The bureaucratic resistance they’ve met has been unusually bipartisan.

The result, especially in the wake of Flynn’s ouster, has been chaos. The National Security Council is leaderless and understaffed. Domestic agencies are gripped by uncertainty, too, a state that induces self-protective bureaucrats to move even more slowly than usual.

“The main danger in a Trump presidency is not that it will be too strong, but that it will be too weak,” Jack Goldsmith, an assistant attorney general under President George W. Bush, argued last week. “The U.S. government cannot work well … without a minimally staffed, well-organized, energetic, competent executive branch.  Right now we don’t have such an executive branch.”

We may still be heading for several kinds of trouble: an international crisis with an unready NSC, a constitutional crisis if Trump ignores a court order he dislikes. But a shadow government? It’s a peril to guard against, to be sure – but it’s far from the biggest danger we face.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-mcmanus-deep-state-20170219-story.html

There Is No American ‘Deep State’

By David A. Graham

Experts on Turkish politics say the use of that term misunderstands what it means in Turkey—and the ways that such allegations can be used to enable political repression.

Over the last week, the idea of a “deep state” in the United States has become a hot concept in American politics. The idea is not new, but a combination of leaks about President Trump and speculation that bureaucrats might try to slow-walk or undermine his agenda have given it fresh currency. A story in Friday’s New York Times, for example, reports, “As Leaks Multiply, Fears of a ‘Deep State’ in America.”It’s an idea that I touched on in discussing the leaks. While there are various examples of activity that has been labeled as originating from a “deep state,” from Latin America to Egypt, the most prominent example is Turkey, where state institutions contain a core of diehard adherents to the secular nationalism of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, which is increasingly being eroded by the government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Turkey has seen a series of coups, stretching back to 1960, as well as other activity attributed to a deep state.

It’s tempting to view the leaks about General Michael Flynn and other matters as a push to undermine the Trump presidency, though well short of coup, and therefore to compare it to the Turkish deep state. Some progressives have expressed a hope that bureaucracy might serve as a check on Trump, though they have generally avoided calling this a deep state. But Trump’s defenders, both in Congress and on the fringe right, have employed the term, as have centrist observers and leftist critics of the national-security state. Trump has not yet used the phrase, but it seems like only a matter of time before it pops up in some late-night or early-morning tweet.

But experts on Turkey are not so quick to follow suit. They see a couple of problems with the analogy. First, it’s not a precise application of the term; it portrays any sort of resistance to the regime as a “deep state,” failing to isolate what truly makes the shadowy structures in places like Turkey different. Second, a review of Turkish politics over the last decade shows the dangers in allowing a deep state to become a real menace in the mind of the public.

“Be careful playing with the deep-state idea, because it can so easily get out of control that it becomes a monster that helps whoever’s in charge curb freedom and intimidate dissidents, because it’s such a nebulous concept,” said Soner Cagaptay, who directs the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “You don’t have to prove that it exists. Once [the notion is] out there, and the public starts to believe it, anybody can be attached to it.”

It’s all well and good to argue that there are similarities between the Turkish deep state and American resistance to Trump. There are even some shared elements, like the presence of a corps of career government employees who see themselves as the last line of defense for longstanding national values against an insurgent president seeking to tear them down. It’s also interesting that members of the military have seemed wary of Trump, warning of the importance of NATO and pushing back on reported plans to bring back torture—just as the military is the bastion of secularism in Turkey. As Cagaptay puts it, Turkey has historically had three checks on government power, two democratic (the courts and the media) and a third undemocratic: the military.

These superficial similarities threaten to overshadow some of the deeper differences, though. Zeynep Tufekci, a Turkish sociologist and writer at the University of North Carolina, tweeted a string of criticisms about the analogy Friday morning. “Permanent bureaucracy and/or non-electoral institutions diverging with the electoral branch [is] not that uncommon even in liberal democracies,” she wrote. “In the Turkey case, that’s not what it means. There was a shadowy, cross-institution occasionally *armed* network conducting killings, etc. So, if people are going to call non electoral institutions stepping up leaking stuff, fine. But it is not ‘deep state’ like in Turkey.”

Omer Taspinar, who teaches at the National Defense University, took a similar position. “The Deep State was a kind of criminal organization,” he said. “It was not the judiciary, the civil society, the media, or the bureaucrats trying to engage in checks and balances against a legitimately elected government. What we’re witnessing in the U.S., it’s basically the institutional channels.”

The Turkish deep state, historically, was willing to use violence to achieve its ends, and held close ties to organized crime. The resistance against Trump has involved leaking of government information—something that is sometimes criminal, and occasionally prosecuted, but is meaningfully different from killing or beating opponents.

The fact that the deep state in Turkey was known for lawlessness and criminality meant that it was disliked by a wide range of factions there, from liberals to the religious, more conservative factions that the military repeatedly slapped down as they gained power. That began to change with the rise of Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Erdogan had previously been banned from government for violating rules against Islamist politics, but he returned in a more moderate guise, becoming prime minister in 2003. (He became president in 2014.) Erdogan learned to use the idea of deep state as a cudgel against it.

“It became such common currency that it allowed Erdogan’s AKP government to cripple Turkey’s democratic checks and balances, including media and courts, many of whose members Erdogan connected to this alleged deep state and then locked up during a set of trials collectively known as Ergenekon,” said Cagaptay, who writes about Erdogan’s power grab in a forthcoming book The New Sultan.

Those trials began in 2008. Erdogan started small: He first arrested “people who looked like they were bad apples: Former military officials, connected to loan sharks, and everybody applauded that,” Cagaptay said. Then the investigation expanded. The murder of a prominent journalist was pinned on the deep state; then a large portion of Turkey’s active-duty generals and admirals were accused.

“The Ergenekon case was the pivotal moment in Erdogan’s undermining of Turkish democracy, because he used it then to go after courts and media, intellectuals, business people, pretty much anybody who did not support his political agenda,” Cagaptay said. By the time a Turkish court overturned all 275 Ergenekon convictions in 2016, it didn’t matter: The damage to institutions was done, and Erdogan had consolidated his grip on power.

That’s the danger of the deep-state analogy, and the danger of trying to operate a deep state: It is liable to facilitate its own destruction. It can place some real restraints on a government, up to a point. But if a leader can convince the public that it exists and is a real threat, he can manipulate that threat into empowering himself, undercutting the values that the deep state had pretended to safeguard. And it is a perfect foil for a demagogue.

“I think Erdogan’s agenda was not eliminating it, it was taking it over,” Cagaptay said. “Turkey has not become more liberal, more free after 15 years of Erdogan. Ironically, Turkey has become not more free after the elimination of the deep state. It has become less free.”

Cagaptay, like Tufekci and Taspinar, argued the American analogy was a bad one. But even if that is true, allegations of a deep state could be an effective foil for Trump, just as they have been for Erdogan.

“It’s such a catchy concept, because it helps explain so much,” Cagaptay said. “If you want to explain inefficiency, it’s not inefficiency but it’s a deep state. Why did the U.S. government fail in a certain policy? Oh, it’s because the deep state wanted it to fail, not because it was bad execution, or bad policy, or combination of both.”

These are all good reasons to hesitate before labeling resistance to Trump, whether in the form of bureaucratic obstruction or leaks to the press, as the work of an American deep state. There is the important caveat that if the national-security state truly were plotting to topple a duly elected president, in the manner of past Turkish coups, that would be as serious a danger to the republic as anything that Trump could do. Unfortunately, it is the practice of the national-security state, like the deep state, to work in darkness and obscurity, but there is also no evidence yet to support such a vast conspiracy—and recalling how Erdogan used lack of evidence as proof of nefarious behavior, it’s important to move cautiously in assigning motives.

The tale of Erdogan and the deep state may have a great deal to teach Americans about the deep state, but it might also teach some lessons about Trump. Consider the trio of checks and balances on the Turkish government: the media, the courts, and the deep state. Trump spent large portions of his bizarre, rambling press conference on Thursday railing against both the media and the courts, working to undermine their credibility and influence as a check on his policies, an echo of the way Erdogan has railed against them in Turkey. The U.S. may not have a real deep state, but that doesn’t mean the U.S. president can’t borrow his tactics from countries that do.

https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/02/why-its-dangerous-to-talk-about-a-deep-state/517221/

Deep state in the United States

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Some notable figures in the United States have for decades expressed concerns about the existence of a “deep state” or state within a state, which they suspect exerts influence and control over public policy, regardless of which political party controls the country’s democratic institutions.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

“Deep state” has historically been associated with countries like Turkey, where sophisticated shadow governments allegedly control or influence key aspects of state policy, but the term has gained attention in the United States as the Trump administration has struggled to control its bureaucracy in the face of leaks from the intelligence community.[11]

According to Philip Giraldi, the nexus of power is centered on the military–industrial complex, intelligence community, and Wall Street,[12] while Bill Moyers points to plutocrats and oligarchs.[13] Professor Peter Dale Scott also mentions “big oil” and the media as key players,[14] while David Talbot focuses on national security officials, especially Allen Dulles.[15] Mike Lofgren, an ex-Washington staffer who has written a book on the issue, includes Silicon Valley, along with “key elements of government” and Wall Street, but emphasizes the non-conspiratorial nature of the “state”.[16][17]

Political scientist Michael J. Glennon believes that this trend is the result of policy being made by government bureaucracies instead of by elected officials.[6]

“Deep state” debate during the Trump presidency

Under the Trump administration, the term “deep state” has been used in the media and among some political figures to refer to intelligence officials and executive branch bureaucrats guiding policy through leaking or other means of internal dissent,[18][19][20][11] especially after intelligence leaks to The Washington Post and The New York Times precipitated the resignation of Michael Flynn, then Trump’s National Security Advisor.[21] The term’s conspiratorial undertone[22] has made it popular on conservative news outlets sympathetic to the Trump administration, especially Breitbart News,[23] but it has also been referenced in more mainstream outlets like The Chicago Tribune,[18] Fox Business,[19] The Washington Post,[20] The Atlantic, The New York Times,[24] and elsewhere.

See also

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_state_in_the_United_States

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