The Pronk Pops Show 1233, April 4, 2019, Story 1: Largest Raid Of A Business, CVE, In United States In Last Ten Years: Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Arrests 280 Illegal Alien Employees At Business In Allen For Administrative Immigration Violations — Did Not Arrest  Managers, Executives and Owners of Company Who Hired Illegal Aliens — Family Deported Together Stays Together — Videos — Story 2: Competitive Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Health Care vs Monopoly Socialized Government Health Care — Live Now or Die While Waiting — Videos — Story 3: U.S Weekly Jobless Claims Fall To Lowest Level in 50 Years (1969) — Videos

Posted on April 6, 2019. Filed under: 2020 Democrat Candidates, 2020 President Candidates, 2020 Republican Candidates, Addiction, American History, Barack H. Obama, Bernie Sander, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, Cartoons, Clinton Obama Democrat Criminal Conspiracy, Communications, Computers, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Culture, Deep State, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Drugs, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Former President Barack Obama, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Immigration, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Kamala Harris, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Medicare, Medicine, Mental Illness, Military Spending, National Interest, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Progressives, Public Corruption, Radio, Rand Paul, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Resources, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Security, Spying, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Surveillance/Spying, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, Trump Surveillance/Spying, Unemployment, United States Constitution, United States of America, United States Supreme Court, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1233 April 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1232 April 1, 2019 Part 2

Pronk Pops Show 1232 March 29, 2019 Part 1

Pronk Pops Show 1231 March 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1230 March 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1229 March 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1228 March 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1227 March 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1226 March 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1225 March 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1224 March 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1223 March 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1222 March 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1221 March 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1220 March 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1219 March 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1218 March 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1217 February 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1216 February 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1215 February 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1214 February 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1213 February 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1212 February 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1211 February 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1210 February 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1209 February 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1208 February 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1207 February 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1206 February 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1205 February 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1204 February 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1203 February 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1202 February 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1201 February 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1200 February 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1199 January 31, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1198 January 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1197 January 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1196 January 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1195 January 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1194 January 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1193 January 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1192 January 8, 2019

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Story 1: Story 1: Largest Raid Of Business CVE In United States In Last Ten Years: Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Arrests 280 Illegal Alien Employees At Business In Allen For Administrative Immigration Violations — Did Not Arrest  Managers, Executives and Owners of Company Who Hired Illegal Aliens — Family Deported Together Stays Together — Videos —

See the source image

ICE Arrests Hundreds In Texas In Largest Workplace Raid In Over A Decade

280 People Arrested On Immigration Violations In Allen

SURPRISE It’s ICE: Illegal Immigration Raid In Texas

ICE cracking down on employers hiring undocumented workers

Eye on America: Georgia law enforcement partners with federal agents in immigration crackdown

Eye on America: Georgia law enforcement partners with federal agents in immigration crackdown

On the ground with ICE agents enforcing Trump’s immigration crackdown

Local police departments partnering with ICE in Texas

Inside a raid on Texas home with 62 undocumented immigrants

ICE Enforcement In Action (2017) • Dallas & New York City

A day with ICE in the so-called “Sanctuary City…

Why Many Employers Prefer to Hire Illegal Aliens

The High Cost of Illegal Immigration

Top 10 US States With The Most Illegal Immigrants 2014

Form I-9 Breaking Down The List of Acceptable Documents

 

How to Fill Out the I-9 Form

5 Most Common Questions Regarding I-9 Forms

Form I-9 On-Demand Webinar

ICE arrests nearly 300 in Texas, the largest workplace raid since before the Obama administration

I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States. This includes citizens and noncitizens. Both employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. On the form, an employee must attest to his or her employment authorization. The employee must also present his or her employer with acceptable documents evidencing identity and employment authorization. The employer must examine the employment eligibility and identity document(s) an employee presents to determine whether the document(s) reasonably appear to be genuine and to relate to the employee and record the document information on the Form I-9. The list of acceptable documents can be found on the last page of the form. Employers must retain Form I-9 for a designated period and make it available for inspection by authorized government officers. NOTE: State agencies may use Form I-9. Also, some agricultural recruiters and referrers for a fee may be required to use Form I-9.

Form 3; Supplement (if applicable): 1; Instructions 15

07/17/2017.

Do not file Form I-9 with USCIS or U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Employers must have a completed Form I-9 on file for each person on their payroll who is required to complete the form. Form I-9 must be retained and stored by the employer either for three years after the date of hire or for one year after employment is terminated, whichever is later. The form must be available for inspection by authorized U.S. Government officials from the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Labor, or Department of Justice.

$0

The Spanish version of Form I-9 may be filled out by employers and employees in Puerto Rico ONLY. Spanish-speaking employers and employees in the 50 states and other U.S. territories may print this for their reference, but may only complete the form in English to meet employment eligibility verification requirements.

To more easily complete Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, download the PDF directly to your computer. You should use the latest version of the free Adobe Reader. The Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari web browsers will prompt you to open or save the form.
To download the form from the Chrome web browser:

  1. Click the link to the Form I-9 you wish to download.
  2. Click the arrow that displays in the PDF file download box that will appear in the bottom left-hand corner.
  3. Select ‘Show in folder’ from the drop-down that appears.
  4. Open the form that appears in your Download folder.

For best results, ensure that you use the most current version of the browser of your choice.

 

Story 2: Competitive Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Health Care vs Monopoly Socialized Government Health Care — Live Now or Die While Waiting — Videos —

What’s Wrong with Government-Run Healthcare?

Government Can’t Fix Healthcare

Single-Payer Health Care: America Already Has It

The TRUTH About Universal Healthcare! (from a Canadian)

Why Is Healthcare So Expensive?

Republicans pump the brakes as Trump challenges Obamacare

Trump Delays Obamacare Replacement Vote Until After 2020 Election

 

Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2017

REPORT NUMBER P60-264
EDWARD R. BERCHICK, EMILY HOOD, AND JESSICA C. BARNETT

Introduction

This report presents statistics on health insurance coverage in the United States based on information collected in the 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements (CPS ASEC) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

Highlights

• In 2017, 8.8 percent of people, or 28.5 million, did not have health insurance at any point during the year as measured by the CPS ASEC. The uninsured rate and number of uninsured in 2017 were not statistically different from 2016 (8.8 percent or 28.1 million).

• The percentage of people with health insurance coverage for all or part of 2017 was 91.2 percent, not statistically different from the rate in 2016 (91.2 percent). Between 2016 and 2017, the number of people with health insurance coverage increased by 2.3 million, up to 294.6 million.

 In 2017, private health insurance coverage continued to be more prevalent than government coverage, at 67.2 percent and 37.7 percent, respectively. Of the subtypes of health insurance coverage, employer-based insurance was the most common, covering 56.0 percent of the population for some or all of the calendar year, followed by Medicaid (19.3 percent), Medicare (17.2 percent), direct-purchase coverage (16.0 percent), and military coverage (4.8 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the rate of Medicare coverage increased by 0.6 percentage points to cover 17.2 percent of people for part or all of 2017 (up from 16.7 percent in 2016).

• The military coverage rate increased by 0.2 percentage points to 4.8 percent during this time. Coverage rates for employment-based coverage, direct-purchase coverage, and Medicaid did not statistically change between 2016 and 2017.

• In 2017, the percentage of uninsured children under age 19 (5.4 percent) was not statistically different from the percentage in 2016.

• For children under age 19 in poverty, the uninsured rate (7.8 percent) was higher than for children not in poverty (4.9 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the uninsured rate did not statistically change for any race or Hispanic origin group.

• In 2017, non-Hispanic Whites had the lowest uninsured rate among race and Hispanic-origin groups (6.3 percent). The uninsured rates for Blacks and Asians were 10.6 percent and 7.3 percent, respectively. Hispanics had the highest uninsured rate (16.1 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage at the time of interview decreased in three states and increased in 14 states.

https://www.census.gov/library/publications/2018/demo/p60-264.html

Key Facts about the Uninsured Population

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) led to historic gains in health insurance coverage by extending Medicaid coverage to many low-income individuals and providing Marketplace subsidies for individuals below 400% of poverty. The number of uninsured nonelderly Americans decreased from over 44 million in 2013 (the year before the major coverage provisions went into effect) to just below 27 million in 2016. However, in 2017, the number of uninsured people increased by nearly 700,000 people, the first increase since implementation of the ACA. Ongoing efforts to alter the ACA or to make receipt of Medicaid contingent on work may further erode coverage gains seen under the ACA. This fact sheet describes how coverage has changed in recent years, examines the characteristics of the uninsured population, and summarizes the access and financial implications of not having coverage.

Summary: Key Facts about the Uninsured Population
How many people are uninsured?
In the past, gaps in the public insurance system and lack of access to affordable private coverage left millions without health insurance. Beginning in 2014, the ACA expanded coverage to millions of previously uninsured people through the expansion of Medicaid and the establishment of Health Insurance Marketplaces. Data show substantial gains in public and private insurance coverage and historic decreases in the number of uninsured people under the ACA, with nearly 20 million gaining coverage. However, for the first time since the implementation of the ACA, the number of uninsured increased by more than half a million in 2017.Why do people remain uninsured?
Even under the ACA, many uninsured people cite the high cost of insurance as the main reason they lack coverage. In 2017, 45% of uninsured adults said that they remained uninsured because the cost of coverage was too high. Many people do not have access to coverage through a job, and some people, particularly poor adults in states that did not expand Medicaid, remain ineligible for financial assistance for coverage. Some people who are eligible for financial assistance under the ACA may not know they can get help, and undocumented immigrants are ineligible for Medicaid or Marketplace coverage.Who remains uninsured?
Most uninsured people are in low-income families and have at least one worker in the family. Reflecting the more limited availability of public coverage in some states, adults are more likely to be uninsured than children. People of color are at higher risk of being uninsured than non-Hispanic Whites.How does not having coverage affect health care access?
People without insurance coverage have worse access to care than people who are insured. One in five uninsured adults in 2017 went without needed medical care due to cost. Studies repeatedly demonstrate that the uninsured are less likely than those with insurance to receive preventive care and services for major health conditions and chronic diseases.What are the financial implications of being uninsured?
The uninsured often face unaffordable medical bills when they do seek care. In 2017, uninsured nonelderly adults were over twice as likely as their insured counterparts to have had problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months. These bills can quickly translate into medical debt since most of the uninsured have low or moderate incomes and have little, if any, savings.

How many people are uninsured?

In the past, gaps in the public insurance system and lack of access to affordable private coverage left millions without health insurance, and the number of uninsured Americans grew over time, particularly during periods of economic downturns. By 2013, more than 44 million people lacked coverage. Under the ACA, as of 2014, Medicaid coverage has been expanded to nearly all adults with incomes at or below 138% of poverty in states that have expanded their programs, and tax credits are available for people who purchase coverage through a health insurance marketplace. Millions of people have enrolled in these new coverage options, and the uninsured rate dropped to a historic low. Coverage gains were particularly large among low-income adults living in states that expanded Medicaid. Still, millions of people—27.4 million nonelderly individuals in 2017—remain without coverage.1

Key Details:
  • The number of uninsured, and the share of the nonelderly population that was uninsured, rose from 44.2 million (17.1%) to 46.5 million (17.8%) between 2008 and 2010 as the country faced an economic recession (Figure 1). As early provisions of the ACA went into effect in 2010, and as the economy improved, the number of uninsured people and uninsured rate began to drop. When the major ACA coverage provisions went into effect in 2014, the number of uninsured and uninsured rate dropped dramatically and continued to fall through 2016, when just below 27 million people (10% of the nonelderly population) lacked coverage.

Number of Uninsured and Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population, 2008-2017

Figure 1: Number of Uninsured and Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population, 2008-2017

Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2013-2016

Figure 2: Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2013-2016

  • Coverage gains from 2013 to 2016 were particularly large among groups targeted by the ACA, including adults and poor and low-income individuals. The uninsured rate among nonelderly adults, who are more likely than children to be uninsured, dropped 8.4 percentage points from 20.6% in 2013 to 12.2% in 2016, a 41% decline.2 In addition, between 2013 and 2016, the uninsured rate declined substantially for poor and near-poor nonelderly individuals (Figure 2). People of color, who had higher uninsured rates than non-Hispanic Whites prior to 2014, had larger coverage gains from 2013 to 2016 than non-Hispanic Whites. Though uninsured rates dropped across all states, they dropped more in states that chose to expand Medicaid, decreasing by 7.2 percentage points from 2013 to 2016 compared to a 6.1 percentage point drop in non-expansion states.3
  • In 2017, the uninsured rate reversed course and, for the first time since the passage of the ACA, rose significantly to 10.2%. Changes in the uninsured rate in the set of states that expanded Medicaid were essentially flat overall, declining by less than 0.1 percentage points, but patterns varied by states (Appendix Table A) and by demographic group (Figure 3). In contrast, the uninsured rate in states that did not expand Medicaid increased both overall (rising by 0.6 percentage points) and for most groups (Figure 3). The largest increases in the uninsured rates in non-expansion states were among non-Hispanic Blacks and those living above poverty (Figure 3). Again, changes in coverage from 2016-2017 varied within the set of states that have not expanded Medicaid (Appendix A).

Figure 3: Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics and Expansion Status, 2016-2017

Why do people remain uninsured?

Most of the nonelderly in the United States obtain health insurance through an employer, but not all workers are offered employer-sponsored coverage or, if offered, can afford their share of the premiums. Medicaid covers many low-income individuals, and financial assistance for Marketplace coverage is available for many moderate-income people. However, Medicaid eligibility for adults remains limited in some states, and few people can afford to purchase coverage without financial assistance. Some people who are eligible for coverage under the ACA may not know they can get help, and others may still find the cost of coverage prohibitive.

Key Details:
  • Cost still poses a major barrier to coverage for the uninsured. In 2017, 45% of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were uninsured because the cost is too high, making it the most common reason cited for being uninsured (Figure 4). Though financial assistance is available to many of the remaining uninsured under the ACA,4 not everyone who is uninsured is eligible for free or subsidized coverage. In addition, some uninsured who are eligible for help may not be aware of coverage options or may face barriers to enrollment.5 Outreach and enrollment assistance was key to facilitating both initial and ongoing enrollment in ACA coverage, but these programs face challenges due to funding cuts and high demand.6,7

    Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Uninsured Nonelderly Adults, 2017

    Figure 4: Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Uninsured Nonelderly Adults, 2017

  • Access to health coverage changes as a person’s situation changes. In 2017, 22% of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were uninsured because the person who carried the health coverage in their family lost their job or changed employers (Figure 4). More than one in ten were uninsured because of a marital status change, the death of a spouse or parent, or loss of eligibility due to age or leaving school (11%), and some lost Medicaid because of a new job/increase in income or the plan stopping after pregnancy (11%).8
  • As indicated above, not all workers have access to coverage through their job. In 2017, 71% of nonelderly uninsured workers worked for an employer that did not offer health benefits to the worker.9 Moreover, nine out of ten uninsured workers who do not take up an offer of employer-sponsored coverage report cost as the main reason for declining (90%).10 From 2008 to 2018, total premiums for family coverage increased by 55%, and the worker’s share increased by 65%, outpacing wage growth.11
  • Medicaid and CHIP are available for low-income children, but eligibility for adults is more limited. As of November 2018, 37 states including DC adopted Medicaid expansion eligibility for adults under the ACA.12,13 However, in states that have not expanded Medicaid, eligibility for adults remains limited, with median eligibility level for parents at just 43% of poverty and adults without dependent children ineligible in most cases.14 Millions of poor uninsured adults fall in a “coverage gap” because they earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to qualify for Marketplace premium tax credits.15
  • Undocumented immigrants are ineligible for Medicaid or Marketplace coverage.16 While lawfully-present immigrants under 400% of poverty are eligible for Marketplace tax credits, only those who have passed a five-year waiting period after receiving qualified immigration status can qualify for Medicaid.

Who remains uninsured?

Most remaining uninsured people are in working families, are in families with low incomes, and are nonelderly adults.17 Reflecting income and the availability of public coverage, people who live in the South or West are more likely to be uninsured. Most who remain uninsured have been without coverage for long periods of time. (See Appendix Table B for detailed data on the uninsured population.)

Key Details:
  • In 2017, over three quarters of the uninsured (77%) had at least one full-time worker in their family, and an additional 10% had a part-time worker in their family (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017

Figure 5: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017

  • Individuals below poverty18 are at the highest risk of being uninsured. In total, more than eight in ten of the uninsured were in families with incomes below 400% of poverty in 2017 (Figure 5).
  • While a plurality (41%) of the uninsured are non-Hispanic Whites, people of color are at higher risk of being uninsured than Whites. People of color make up 42% of the nonelderly U.S. population19 but account for over half of the total nonelderly uninsured population (Figure 5). Hispanics and Blacks have significantly higher uninsured rates (19% and 11%, respectively) than Whites (7%) (Figure 6).20

Figure 6: Uninsured Rates Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2017

  • Most (86%) of the uninsured are nonelderly adults. The uninsured rate among children was just 5% in 2017, less than half the rate among nonelderly adults (12%),21 largely due to broader availability of Medicaid/CHIP for children than for adults.
  • Most of the uninsured (75%) are U.S. citizens, and 25% are non-citizens.22 Uninsured non-citizens include both lawfully present and undocumented immigrants. Undocumented immigrants are ineligible for federally funded health coverage, but legal immigrants can qualify for subsidies in the Marketplaces and those who have been in the country for more than five years are eligible for Medicaid.23
  • Uninsured rates vary by state and by region, with individuals living in non-expansion states being the most likely to be uninsured (Figure 6). Thirteen of the eighteen states with the highest uninsured rates in 2017 were non-expansion states as of that year (Figure 7 and Appendix A). Economic conditions, availability of employer-sponsored coverage, and demographics are other factors contributing to variation in uninsured rates across states.

    Figure 7:

    Figure 7: Uninsured Rates Among the Nonelderly by State, 2017

  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of the nonelderly adults uninsured in 2017 have been without coverage for more than a year.24 People who have been without coverage for long periods may be particularly hard to reach in outreach and enrollment efforts.

How does not having coverage affect health care access?

Health insurance makes a difference in whether and when people get necessary medical care, where they get their care, and ultimately, how healthy they are. Uninsured adults are far more likely than those with insurance to postpone health care or forgo it altogether. The consequences can be severe, particularly when preventable conditions or chronic diseases go undetected.

Key Details:
  • Studies repeatedly demonstrate that the uninsured are less likely than those with insurance to receive preventive care and services for major health conditions and chronic diseases.2526 One in five (20%) nonelderly adults without coverage say that they went without care in the past year because of cost compared to 3% of adults with private coverage and 8% of adults with public coverage. Part of the reason for poor access among the uninsured is that many (50%) do not have a regular place to go when they are sick or need medical advice (Figure 8).

    Figure 8: Barriers to Health Care Among Nonelderly Adults by Insurance Status, 2017

  • Because of the cost of care, many uninsured people do not obtain the treatments their health care providers recommend for them. In 2017, uninsured nonelderly adults were more than three times as likely as adults with private coverage to say that they postponed or did not get a needed prescription drug due to cost (19% vs. 6%).27 And while insured and uninsured people who are injured or newly diagnosed with a chronic condition receive similar plans for follow-up care, people without health coverage are less likely than those with coverage to obtain all the recommended services.28
  • Because people without health coverage are less likely than those with insurance to have regular outpatient care, they are more likely to be hospitalized for avoidable health problems and to experience declines in their overall health. When they are hospitalized, uninsured people receive fewer diagnostic and therapeutic services and also have higher mortality rates than those with insurance.29,30,31,32
  • Research demonstrates that gaining health insurance improves access to health care considerably and diminishes the adverse effects of having been uninsured. A seminal study of a Medicaid expansion in Oregon found that uninsured adults who gained Medicaid coverage were more likely to receive care than their counterparts who did not gain coverage.33 A comprehensive review of research on the effects of the ACA Medicaid expansion finds that expansion led to positive effects on access to care, utilization of services, the affordability of care, and financial security among the low-income population.34
  • Public hospitals, community clinics and health centers, and local providers that serve disadvantaged communities provide a crucial health care safety net for uninsured people. However, safety net providers have limited resources and service capacity, and not all uninsured people have geographic access to a safety net provider.35,36 High uninsured rates also contribute to rural hospital closures, leaving individuals living in rural areas at an even greater disadvantage to accessing care.37

What are the financial implications of being uninsured?

The uninsured often face unaffordable medical bills when they do seek care. These bills can quickly translate into medical debt since most of the uninsured have low or moderate incomes and have little, if any, savings.38

Key Details:
  • Those without insurance for an entire year pay for one-fourth of their care out-of-pocket.39 In addition, hospitals frequently charge uninsured patients much higher rates than those paid by private health insurers and public programs.40,41
  • Medical bills can put great strain on the uninsured and threaten their financial well-being. In 2017, nonelderly uninsured adults were over twice as likely as those with insurance to have problems paying medical bills (29% vs. 14%; Figure 9) with nearly two thirds of uninsured who had medical bill problems unable to pay their medical bills at all (65%).42 Uninsured adults are also more likely to face negative consequences due to medical bills, such as using up savings, having difficulty paying for necessities, borrowing money, or having medical bills sent to collection.43
  • Uninsured nonelderly adults are also much more likely than their insured counterparts to lack confidence in their ability to afford usual medical costs and major medical expenses or emergencies. Uninsured nonelderly adults are over twice as likely as insured adults to worry about being able to pay costs for normal health care (61% vs. 27%; Figure 9). Furthermore, over three quarters of uninsured nonelderly adults (76%) say they are very or somewhat worried about paying medical bills if they get sick or have an accident, compared to 45% of insured adults.
  • Lacking insurance coverage puts people at risk of medical debt. In 2017, three in ten (31%) of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were paying off at least one medical bill over time (Figure 9). Nearly three in five consumers (59%) reported being contacted regarding a collection for medical bills in the United States.44 More than half (53%) of uninsured people said they had problems paying household medical bills in the past year and are more likely to be in medical debt than people with insurance.45

    Figure 9: Problems Paying Medical Bills by Insurance Status, 2017

  • Though the uninsured are typically billed for medical services they use, when they cannot pay these bills, the costs may become bad debt or uncompensated care for providers. State, federal, and private funds defray some but not all of these costs. With the expansion of coverage under the ACA, providers are seeing reductions in uncompensated care costs, particularly in states that expanded Medicaid.46
  • Research suggests that gaining health coverage improves the affordability of care and financial security among the low-income population. Multiple studies of the ACA have found larger declines in trouble paying medical bills in expansion states relative to non-expansion states. A separate study found that, among those residing in areas with high shares of low-income, uninsured individuals, Medicaid expansion significantly reduced the number of unpaid bills and the amount of debt sent to third-party collection agencies.47

Conclusion

Millions of people gained coverage under the ACA, but recent trends in insurance coverage indicate that coverage gains may be eroding. In 2017, 27.4 million people lacked health coverage, up slightly from 2016. Ongoing debate about altering the ACA or limiting Medicaid to populations traditionally served by the program could lead to further loss of coverage. On the other hand, if additional states opt to expand Medicaid as allowed under the ACA, there may be additional coverage gains as low-income individuals gain access to affordable coverage. Going without coverage can have serious health consequences for the uninsured because they receive less preventive care, and delayed care often results in serious illness or other health problems. Being uninsured also can have serious financial consequences. The outcome of ongoing debate over health coverage policy in the United States has substantial implications for people’s coverage, access, and overall health and well-being.

Appendix Table A: Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly by State, 2013-2017
2013
Uninsured Rate
2016
Uninsured Rate
2017
Uninsured Rate
Change in
Uninsured Rate
2013-2017
Change in Number of Uninsured
2013-2017
Change in
Uninsured Rate
2016-2017
Change in Number of Uninsured
2016-2017
US Total 16.8% 10.0% 10.2% -6.6% -17,037,000 0.2% 684,800
Expansion States 15.1% 7.7% 7.6% -7.4% -12,070,200 0.0% 4,400
Alaska 20.5% 16.0% 15.5% -4.9% -32,900 -0.5% -4,900
Arizona 20.4% 11.9% 12.0% -8.4% -435,600 0.1% 11,600
Arkansas 19.0% 9.5% 9.6% -9.5% -230,300 0.1% 2,400
California 19.4% 8.4% 8.2% -11.2% -3,619,900 -0.2% -48,700
Colorado 15.8% 8.7% 8.6% -7.2% -306,600 -0.1% -3,400
Connecticut 10.9% 5.7% 6.6% -4.3% -129,900 0.9% 25,600
Delaware 11.8% 6.8% 6.6% -5.2% -38,600 -0.1% -1,000
District of Columbia 7.2% 4.5% 4.1% -3.1% -15,000 -0.4% -1,900
Hawaii 8.2% 4.1% 4.5% -3.7% -41,800 0.4% 3,200
Illinois 14.5% 7.5% 7.9% -6.6% -739,500 0.4% 37,400
Indiana 16.3% 9.4% 9.8% -6.5% -358,700 0.4% 23,300
Iowa 10.3% 4.8% 5.2% -5.1% -129,900 0.4% 9,400
Kentucky 16.8% 6.0% 6.4% -10.4% -380,900 0.4% 14,700
Louisiana 19.2% 11.9% 9.7% -9.6% -375,800 -2.2% -85,600
Maryland 11.5% 7.0% 7.1% -4.4% -220,500 0.1% 6,100
Massachusetts 4.4% 2.9% 3.2% -1.2% -63,200 0.3% 18,900
Michigan 12.9% 6.3% 6.1% -6.9% -571,800 -0.2% -19,400
Minnesota 9.6% 4.9% 5.2% -4.3% -194,900 0.3% 15,000
Montana 19.9% 10.1% 11.0% -8.9% -72,700 0.8% 7,200
Nevada 23.5% 12.8% 12.9% -10.6% -235,000 0.1% 6,100
New Hampshire 12.8% 7.6% 6.8% -6.0% -66,400 -0.8% -9,000
New Jersey 15.4% 8.9% 8.9% -6.5% -488,200 0.0% -1,000
New Mexico 22.3% 10.7% 10.7% -11.6% -205,600 0.1% 1,500
New York 12.5% 7.0% 6.7% -5.8% -961,800 -0.3% -58,600
North Dakota 12.0% 9.1% 8.7% -3.3% -17,500 -0.4% -2,700
Ohio 12.9% 6.6% 6.9% -6.0% -579,800 0.3% 29,100
Oregon 17.5% 7.3% 8.1% -9.4% -296,500 0.8% 28,900
Pennsylvania 11.5% 7.0% 6.6% -4.8% -508,400 -0.3% -35,400
Rhode Island 14.1% 5.0% 5.3% -8.7% -74,700 0.3% 2,900
Vermont 8.3% 4.4% 5.1% -3.2% -17,100 0.7% 3,300
Washington 16.2% 6.9% 7.1% -9.2% -519,300 0.2% 15,800
West Virginia 16.3% 6.0% 7.1% -9.2% -141,400 1.1% 13,600
Non-Expansion States 19.6% 13.8% 14.3% -5.3% -4,966,700 0.6% 680,400
Alabama 16.0% 10.9% 11.3% -4.7% -191,700 0.4% 16,200
Florida 24.4% 15.3% 15.9% -8.5% -1,179,400 0.6% 133,400
Georgia 21.2% 14.8% 15.4% -5.9% -466,400 0.6% 62,800
Idaho 18.6% 12.1% 12.6% -6.0% -73,400 0.6% 10,900
Kansas 14.3% 9.8% 10.0% -4.3% -106,200 0.2% 4,500
Maine 13.4% 9.7% 9.8% -3.7% -41,500 0.0% -200
Mississippi 19.7% 13.8% 14.3% -5.5% -144,000 0.5% 9,200
Missouri 15.3% 10.6% 10.8% -4.5% -228,800 0.2% 6,100
Nebraska 12.4% 10.3% 10.0% -2.4% -35,300 -0.3% -4,500
North Carolina 18.2% 12.3% 12.7% -5.5% -422,500 0.4% 38,500
Oklahoma 20.6% 16.1% 16.4% -4.2% -130,200 0.3% 7,000
South Carolina 18.6% 11.8% 13.4% -5.1% -186,600 1.6% 66,100
South Dakota 14.6% 9.8% 11.0% -3.5% -23,900 1.2% 8,200
Tennessee 16.3% 10.8% 11.1% -5.2% -267,700 0.3% 23,600
Texas 24.6% 18.7% 19.6% -5.0% -879,100 0.9% 275,300
Utah 14.8% 9.4% 10.0% -4.7% -106,300 0.6% 19,800
Virginia 14.2% 10.3% 10.2% -3.9% -266,700 0.0% -400
Wisconsin 10.5% 6.1% 6.1% -4.4% -213,900 -0.1% -3,600
Wyoming 14.7% 12.7% 14.5% -0.1% -3,100 1.8% 7,400
NOTES: Includes nonelderly individuals ages 0-64. Expansion status reflects the implementation of Medicaid expansion as of 2017.
SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of 2013, 2016, and 2017 American Community Survey (ACS), 1-Year Estimates.
Appendix Table B: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017
Nonelderly
(millions)
Percent of Nonelderly Uninsured
(millions)
Percent of Uninsured Uninsured
Rate
Total Nonelderly 267.5 100.0% 27.4 100.0% 10.2%
Age
Children – Total 76.1 28.5% 3.8 13.8% 5.0%
Nonelderly Adults – Total 191.4 71.5% 23.6 86.2% 12.3%
Adults 19 – 25 28.3 10.6% 4.2 15.4% 14.8%
Adults 26 – 34 39.1 14.6% 6.1 22.3% 15.6%
Adults 35 – 44 40.5 15.1% 5.5 20.2% 13.6%
Adults 45 – 54 41.8 15.6% 4.5 16.3% 10.7%
Adults 55 – 64 41.6 15.6% 3.3 12.0% 7.9%
Annual Family Income
<$20,000 31.8 11.9% 5.5 20.0% 17.2%
$20,000 – <$40,000 42.8 16.0% 7.4 27.0% 17.3%
$40,000+ 192.9 72.1% 14.5 53.0% 7.5%
Family Poverty Level
<100% 30.4 11.4% 5.0 18.4% 16.6%
100% – <200% 45.3 16.9% 7.8 28.5% 17.2%
200% – <400% 81.9 30.6% 9.6 35.2% 11.7%
400%+ 109.9 41.1% 4.9 18.0% 4.5%
Household Type
1 Parent with Children 19.0 7.1% 1.3 4.9% 7.1%
2 Parents with Children 84.2 31.5% 6.0 22.0% 7.2%
Multigenerational 18.7 7.0% 2.2 7.9% 11.6%
Adults Living Alone or with Other Adults 111.7 41.8% 13.2 48.3% 11.8%
Other 33.9 12.7% 4.6 16.9% 13.6%
Family Work Status
2+ Full-time 101.8 38.1% 8.6 31.5% 8.5%
1 Full-time 119.3 44.6% 12.4 45.3% 10.4%
Only Part-time 19.5 7.3% 2.8 10.4% 14.6%
Non-workers 26.9 10.1% 3.5 12.8% 13.0%
Race/Ethnicity
White 154.3 57.7% 11.3 41.3% 7.3%
Black 34.0 12.7% 3.8 13.8% 11.1%
Hispanic 53.5 20.0% 10.1 36.9% 18.9%
Asian/N. Hawaiian and Pacific Islander 15.9 5.9% 1.1 4.2% 7.2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1.8 0.7% 0.4 1.5% 22.0%
Two or More Races 8.0 3.0% 0.6 2.3% 7.9%
Citizenship
U.S. Citizen – Native 230.6 86.2% 18.9 69.2% 8.2%
U.S. Citizen – Naturalized 16.7 6.2% 1.7 6.1% 10.0%
Non-U.S. Citizen, Residents for <5 Years 6.4 2.4% 1.7 6.4% 27.2%
Non-U.S. Citizen, Residents for 5+ Years 13.9 5.2% 5.0 18.3% 36.0%
NOTES: Includes nonelderly individuals ages 0-64. The U.S. Census Bureau’s poverty threshold for a family with two adults and one child was $19,730 in 2017. Parent includes any person with a dependent child. Multigenerational/other families with children include families with at least three generations in a household, plus families in which adults are caring for children other than their own. Part-time workers were defined as working <35 hours per week. Respondents who identify as mixed race who do not also identify as Hispanic fall intot he “Two or More Races” category. All individuals who identify as Hispanic ethnicity fall into the Hispanic category regardless of race.
SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of 2017 American Community Survey (ACS), 1-Year Estimates.
Endnotes …

 

Story 3: U.S Weekly Jobless Claims Fall To Lowest Level in 50 Years (1969)

Jobless Claims Hit A Low Since The Sixties

 

US weekly jobless claims drop to the lowest level since 1969

  
  • The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a more than 49-year low last week.
  • The data pointed to sustained labor market strength despite slowing economic growth.
  • Initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped to 202,000 for the week ended March 30, the lowest level since early December 1969, the Labor Department said.

The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a more than 49-year low last week, pointing to sustained labor market strength despite slowing economic growth.

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits declined 10,000 to a seasonally adjusted 202,000 for the week ended March 30, the lowest level since early December 1969, the Labor Department said on Thursday.

Data for the prior week was revised to show 1,000 more applications received than previously reported.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims rising to 216,000 in the latest week. The Labor Department said only claims for California were estimated.

Claims have shown no sign of a pickup in layoffs even as the economy has lost momentum as the stimulus from a $1.5 trillion tax cut package fades. Companies are experiencing a shortage of workers, which contributed to a recent slowdown in hiring.

Job growth has slowed from last year’s roughly 225,000 monthly average pace. The pace of increase, however, remains more than sufficient to keep up with growth in the working age population, holding down the unemployment rate.

Initial jobless claimsWeek ending Saturday, seasonally adjusted200820102012201420162018100000200000300000400000500000600000700000Labor DeptSaturday, Jun 10, 2017240 000

The four-week moving average of initial claims, considered a better measure of labor market trends as it irons out week-to-week volatility, fell 4,000 to 213,500 last week, the lowest level since early October 2018.

The claims data has no bearing on March’s employment report, which is scheduled for release on Friday. According to a Reuters survey of economists, nonfarm payrolls likely increased by 180,000 jobs last month after a meager 20,000 in February, which was seen as pay-back after robust gains in the prior two months.

The unemployment rate is forecast unchanged at 3.8 percent.

Thursday’s claims report showed the number of people receiving benefits after an initial week of aid decreased 38,000 to 1.72 million for the week ended March 23. The four-week moving average of the so-called continuing claims slipped 8,000 to 1.74 million.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/04/weekly-jobless-claims.html

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