Narcissistic Personality Disorder is real, and not a label to throw around loosely. Psychiatrists weigh in on what it means for President Trump. USA TODAY

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When Republican Sen. Bob Corker said last week  that President Trump hasn’t “been able to demonstrate the stability” needed for success and recommended he “move way beyond himself,” it was news mostly because Corker has been one of Trump’s key supporters in Congress.

Then James Clapper, who served in top intelligence jobs under former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, Wednesday morning questioned Trump’s “fitness to be in this office” and said he was worried about the president’s access to the nuclear codes. Clapper, who had a long military career, is a close friend and longtime colleague of Trump’s Defense Secretary, Jim Mattis, a former Marine Corps general.

“If in a fit of pique he decides to do something about Kim Jong Un, there’s actually very little to stop him,” Clapper, former head of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, said on CNN. “The whole system is built to ensure rapid response if necessary. So there’s very little in the way of controls over exercising a nuclear option, which is pretty damn scary.”

Until now, talk of Trump’s erratic behavior and alleged narcissism was common on social media, late-night talk shows and among political opponents. But Trump’s “fire and fury” comments about North Korea, a raucous rally in Arizona Tuesday and changing response to the violent protests in Charlottesville, Va., crossed a line for some Republicans and brought the conversation into the mainstream, even among some supporters.

A poll by the media and technology company Morning Consult over the weekend showed 55% of respondents said Trump was not stable.