The Pronk Pops Show 1306, August 14, 2019, Story 1: President Trump Delays Tariffs on Chinese Goods to After Christmas — Videos — Story 2: Normal Flight Operations Resume Again in Hong Kong — Videos — Story 3: Progressives Try To Panic American People Over Inverted Yield Curve Leading To Recession — U.S. Economy is Growing — Missy Higgins Singing — Videos — Story 4: President Trump Energy Speech at Shell Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex in Monaca, Pennsylvania 

Posted on August 15, 2019. Filed under: 2020 Republican Candidates, Addiction, Addiction, American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, Cartoons, China, Coal, Coal, Communications, Congress, Corruption, Countries, Culture, Currencies, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Economics, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Energy, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Labor Economics, Language, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Liquid Natural Gas (LNG), Lying, Media, Monetary Policy, National Interest, Natural Gas, Natural Gas, News, Nuclear, Oil, Oil, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Private Sector Unions, Progressives, Public Corruption, Public Sector Unions, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Resources, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Science, Social Sciences, Solar, Success, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, U.S. Dollar, Unemployment, Unions, United States of America, Videos, Violence, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1306 August 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1305 August 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1304 August 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1303 August 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1302 August 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1301 August 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1300 August 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1299 July 31, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1298 July 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1297 July 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1296 July 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1295 July 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1294 July 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1293 July 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1292 July 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1291 July 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1290 July 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1289 July 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1288 July 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1287 July 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1286 July 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1285 July 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1284 July 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1283 July 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1282 June 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1281 June 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1280 June 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1279 June 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1278 June 20, 2019 

Pronk Pops Show 1277 June 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1276 June 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1275 June 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1274 June 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1273 June 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1272 June 11, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1267 May 30, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1265 May 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1264 May 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1263 May 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1262 May 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1261 May 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1260 May 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1259 May 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1258 May 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1257 May 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1256 May 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1255 May 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1254 May 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1253 May 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1252 May 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1251 May 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1250 May 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1249 May 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1248 May 1, 2019

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Story 1: President Trump Delays Tariffs on Chinese Goods to After Christmas — Americans Would Have Been Paying The Tariff or Tax — Videos —

Trump Blinked With China Tariff Delay, Exante Data’s Setser Says

Trump says China tariffs delayed for ‘Christmas season’

China Is Changing Strategy in Trade War, Says LSE’s Jin

 

Trump CAVES on China tariffs and puts off levies on laptops, cell phones and toys until after Christmas shopping season following ‘very good call’ with Beijing – in move set to boost faltering stock market

  • The Trump administration announced Tuesday morning that is delaying tariffs on Chinese-manufactured goods like laptops and cell phones until Dec. 15
  • Trump’s trade office says that certain products ‘will not face additional tariffs of 10 percent’ due to health, safety or national security concerns 
  • Some of e products it listed were cell phones, laptop computers, video game consoles, computer monitors, footwear and clothingth
  • USTR said it will post a list of items that are being excluded on its website
  • It announced the postponement shortly after the the stock market opened, and the Dow jumped nearly 500 points within minutes of the news
  • Donald Trump has not commented directly but hinted n a tweet that the action was intended to get China to move forward with large agricultural orders

The Trump administration announced Tuesday morning that is delaying tariffs on Chinese-manufactured goods like laptops and cell phones until Dec. 15, when price hikes from the penalties won’t drive up the price of popular Christmas presents.

Trump’s trade office says that certain products ‘will not face additional tariffs of 10 percent’ due to health, safety or national security concerns.

However, the categories of goods that are being protected suggest that Trump was concerned about the consumer pricing index and the billions of dollars in value of this month’s stock losses.

The U.S. trade office announced the postponement shortly after the the stock market opened in the United States, causing the Dow Jones Industrial Average jump nearly 500 points within minutes.

That excitement tempered off as the day wore on. The Dow leveled out at a 400-point rise that was close to 1,000 points off from where it was a month ago when it started to drop.

Speaking to reporters on the tarmac in New Jersey, before a day trip to Pennsylvania from his vacation, the president defended his tough-on-China stance, saying that other presidents should have tightened the screws on Beijing, too.

He said that he backed off on tariffs because he had a ‘very good call with China.

The Trump administration announced Tuesday morning that is delaying tariffs on Chinese-manufactured goods like laptops and cell phones until Dec. 15. Donald Trump is seen here at the White House the previous Friday

The Trump administration announced Tuesday morning that is delaying tariffs on Chinese-manufactured goods like laptops and cell phones until Dec. 15. Donald Trump is seen here at the White House the previous Friday

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped nearly 500 points within minutes of the statement

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped nearly 500 points within minutes of the statement

Donald Trump said he’d impose a 10 percent penalty on $300 billion in untaxed goods on Sept. 1, if China continued drag out trade talks. 

U.S. negotiators say a deal was nearly finished, when Beijing backed away from major provisions.

A new round of talks was scheduled for September, however Trump drove down skittish markets with claims last week that the meetings could be cancelled.

On Tuesday morning, USTR announced it was loosening the noose on China, specifically on items in the tech and and clothing manufacturing industries.

‘Products in this group include, for example, cell phones, laptop computers, video game consoles, certain toys, computer monitors, and certain items of footwear and clothing,’ according to a United States Trade Representative statement.

USTR said it will post a list of items that are being excluded on its website today.

The president continued to defend his position in a Tuesday morning in tweet that claimed consumers have not paid the price for the 25 percent tariffs on $250 billion of other Chinese items that he’s put in place.

Trump did not mention the policy shift in that tweet or one that he sent a half-hour after the the USTR announcement, however, he hinted that unfilled agricultural orders were part of the calculus.

He said of China’s retracted promises to purchase more American agricultural goods: ‘Maybe this will be different!’ 

Less than an hour prior, the president had been ripping China. He blasted Beijing for financial tinkering the U.S. has blasted as currency manipulation while promising American buyers that tariffs wouldn’t affect everyday product pricing.

‘Through massive devaluation of their currency and pumping vast sums of money into their system, the tens of billions of dollars that the U.S. is receiving is a gift from China. Prices not up, no inflation. Farmers getting more than China would be spending. Fake News won’t report!’ he said.

‘Later, at a manufacturing event in Pennsylvania, the president said in an extended riff on China that it had ‘ripped off our country for years’ and taken advantage of World Trade Organization rules that allow the nation to be classified as a developing economy.

‘And I’m being nice when I say took advantage,’ he argued.

He recounted his threat to leave the WTO, unless it started adjudicating cases in his favor.

‘And it’s only because of attitude,’ he said of a change in behavior. ‘Because we know that they have been screwing us for years.’

He added, ‘And I’d like to use a different word but there’s no word that’s quite as descriptive.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7352783/Trump-postpones-new-tariffs-China-months-stock-shares-lose-billions-value.html

 

Story 2: Normal Flight Operations Resume Again in Hong Kong — Videos

 

Normal operations resume at Hong Kong airport as city braces for more protests

Hong Kong’s Airport Authority said normal flight operations would resume on Thursday after pro-democracy protests forced the cancellation of nearly 1,000 flights this week, while the city braced for more mass protests through the weekend.

China reiterated on Wednesday that Hong Kong’s protest movement was “near terrorism” and more street clashes followed ugly and chaotic scenes at the airport on Tuesday, when protesters set upon two men they suspected of being government sympathisers.

Police and protesters faced off again on the streets of the financial hub overnight, with riot officers quickly firing tear gas as their response to demonstrators toughens .

Ten weeks of increasingly violent confrontations between police and protesters have plunged Hong Kong into its worst crisis since it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

Heightened security would remain at the city’s international airport and the Hong Kong Airport Authority said late on Wednesday an application for protests to be held in the terminal must be made in advance with a “Letter of No Objection” to be obtained from police.

More protests are planned on Friday and over the weekend in different areas of the Chinese-controlled territory.

Protesters have expressed remorse after a peaceful sit-in turned violent at one of the world’s busiest airports earlier this week.

It was not clear whether the violent clashes might have eroded the broad support the movement has so far attracted in Hong Kong. The protests have also hit the city’s faltering economy.

The United States said it was deeply concerned at news of Chinese police forces gathering near the border, urged Hong Kong’s government to respect freedom of speech, and issued a travel advisory urging caution when visiting the city. (Writing by Farah Master Editing by Paul Tait)

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuters/article-7358413/Normal-operations-resume-Hong-Kong-airport-city-braces-protests.html

 

Story 3: Progressives Try To Panic American People Over Inverted Yield Curve Leading To Recession — U.S. Economy is Growing — Missy Higgins Singing — Videos

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Missy Higgins – Any Day Now (Live)

Any Day Now

Missy Higgins

How long, how long, how long will we take to come undone?
If you know the answer tell me now and I’ll write up a calendar for our count down.
‘Cause what if what we see is all, is all we’ve got?
Say you’ve kept some fire aside to set light to me some surprising night.
And say you’ve locked some fire away to set light to me some surprising day.
To me some surprising day, any day now
How come, how come, how come I’m now on a road holding out my thumb?
If you know my destination please buy me the fastest car and throw me the keys.
‘Cause what if what we see is all, is all we’ve got?
Say you’ve kept some fire aside to set light to me some surprising night.
And say you’ve locked some fire away to set light to me some surprising day.
‘Cause finger by finger we’re losing grasp and
I’m questioning the reason why nothing beautiful does last
Say you’ve kept some fire aside to set light to me some surprising night.
And say you’ve locked some fire away to set light to me some surprising day,
To me some surprising day any day now.
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Melissa Higgins
Any Day Now lyrics © Peermusic Publishing, Words & Music A Div Of Big Deal Music LLC

Why Investors Are Obsessed With the Inverted Yield Curve

Fed Must Act on Inverted Yield Curve, Credit Suisse’s Golub Says

What Is An Inverted Yield Curve And How Does It Affect The Stock Market? | NBC News Now

Yield curve inversion does not mean there will be a recession tomorrow, strategist says

Mohamed El-Erian talks yield curve, recession and global economy

President Trump calls Fed Chair Jerome Powell ‘clueless’ and inverted yield curve ‘crazy’

Missy Higgins (9-27-2008) Sugarcane

Sugarcane

Missy Higgins

Baby ballerina’s hiding
Somewhere in the corner
Where the shadow wraps around her
And our torches cannot find her
She will stay there till the morning
Crawl behind us as we are yawning
And she will leave our games
To never be the same
So grow tall, sugarcane
Eat that soil, drink the rain
But know they’ll chase you
If you play their little games
So run, run fast, sugarcane
You see my peep show booth is handy
There’s a one way only mirror
So I can dance here with my hair down
But I don’t see if you get bitter
And there’s a button right beside me
If I happen to want a wall to hide me
If only the ballerina had one too
So grow tall, sugarcane
Eat that soil, drink the rain
But know they’ll chase you
If you play their little games
So run, run fast, sugarcane
And she said, “Always be afraid”
Yes, she said, “Always be afraid”
So grow tall, sugarcane
Eat that soil, drink the rain
But know they’ll chase you
If you play their little games
So run, run fast, sugarcane
Yeah, you’d better run, run fast, sugarcane
Yeah, you’d better run, run fast sugarcane
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Melissa Higgins
Sugarcane lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

Missy Higgins – Where I Stood (Official Video)

Where I Stood

Missy Higgins

I don’t know what I’ve done
Or if I like what I’ve begun
But something told me to run
And honey, you know me, it’s all or none
There were sounds in my head
Little voices whispering
That I should go and this should end
Oh, and I found myself listening
‘Cause I don’t know who I am, who I am without you
All I know is that I should
And I don’t know if I could stand another hand upon you
All I know is that I should
‘Cause she will love you more than I could
She who dares to stand where I stood
See, I thought love was black and white
That it was wrong or it was right
But you aren’t leaving without a fight
And I think, I am just as torn inside
‘Cause I don’t know who I am, who I am without you
All I know is that I should
And I don’t know if I could stand another hand upon you
All I know is that I should
‘Cause she will love you more than I could
She who dares to stand where I stood
And I won’t be far from where you are if ever you should call
You meant more to me than any one I, I’ve ever loved at all
But you taught me how to trust myself
And so I say to you, this is what I have to do
‘Cause I don’t know who I am, who I am without you
All I know is that I should
And I don’t know if I could stand another hand upon you
All I know is that I should
‘Cause she will love you more than I could
She who dares to stand where I stood
She who dares to stand where I stood
Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Melissa Higgins
Where I Stood lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

Kimberley Music – Missy Higgins

Missy Higgins on why she used to break into cemeteries | The Weekly

Missy Higgins & Friends Live

Dow plummets 800 points and 3% in a day amid fears of economic crisis as Treasury yields invert for the first time since the Great Recession

  • Dow Jones plunged more than 800 points on Wednesday on recession fears
  • Yield on the 10-year Treasury note briefly dipped below the two-year yield
  • Known as an ‘inverted yield curve,’ it is a sign investors fear a recession 
  • The past five inverted yield curves have all preceded a recession
  • Trump blasts Fed over rates and calls chairman Jerome Powell ‘clueless’ 

Stocks plunged on Wednesday after the bond market threw up one of its last remaining warning flags on the economy.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury briefly dropped below the two-year Treasury’s yield Wednesday morning, the first time those yields have flipped since 2007. The so-called inversion has correctly predicted many past recessions and is the loudest warning bell yet about a possible recession ahead.

Investors responded by dumping stocks, more than erasing gains from a rally the day before.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 801 points at 25,479, a loss of 3%, in the largest one-day point drop since October 2018,

A one-day view of the yield spread between the 10-year and two-year Treasury bond shows two brief yield curve inversions when the ratio drops below the red line on Wednesday

Based on the latest available data, the S&P 500 lost 85.72 points, or 2.93%, to 2,840.6, and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 242.42 points, or 3.02%, to 7,773.94.

While the market was falling Wednesday, President Donald Trump took to Twitter to again criticize the Federal Reserve for hampering the U.S. economy by raising rates “far too quickly” last year and not reversing its policy aggressively enough – the Fed cut its key rate by a quarter point last month. 

Trump blasted Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell as ‘clueless’. 

He also defended his trade policy, even though investors remain worried that the trade war between the world’s two largest economies may drag on through the 2020 U.S. election and cause more economic damage.

“We still see a substantial risk that the trade dispute will escalate further,” said Mark Haefele, global chief investment officer at UBS in a note to clients.

‘The relief rally inspired by the Trump administration delaying tariffs on some Chinese imports was short lived – blink and you missed it,’ said Fiona Cincotta, senior market analyst at City Index.

With bond yields falling, banks took heavy losses Wednesday. Lower bond yields are bad for banks because they force interest rates on mortgages and other loans lower, which results in lower profits for banks. Citigroup sank 5.1% and Bank of America gave up 5%.

Trump is seen at a White House meeting last month. He is relying upon a strong economy to bolster his reelection chances, and the latest economic signal is a worrying one

Trump is seen at a White House meeting last month. He is relying upon a strong economy to bolster his reelection chances, and the latest economic signal is a worrying one

Much of the market’s focus was on the U.S. yield curve, which has historically been one of the more reliable recession indicators.

If all this talk about yield curves sounds familiar, it should. Other parts of the curve have already inverted, beginning late last year. But each time, some market watchers cautioned not to make too much of it.

Academics tend to pay the most attention to the spread between the three-month Treasury and the 10-year Treasury, which inverted in the spring. Traders often pay more attention to the two-year and 10-year spread.

Each of the last five times the two-year and 10-year Treasury yields have inverted, a recession has followed.

The average amount of time is around 22 months, according to Raymond James’ Giddis.

The indicator isn’t perfect, though, and it’s given false signals in the past.

Some market watchers also say the yield curve may be a less reliable indicator this time because technical factors may be distorting longer-term yields, such as negative bond yields abroad and the Federal Reserve’s holdings of $3.8 trillion in Treasurys and other investments on its balance sheet.

What is a yield curve inversion?

The yield, or the effective interest rate paid, on a 10-year Treasury bond is usually higher than the yield on a two-year bond — because investors typically want to see a higher return for a longer-term investment.

However, bond yields move in the opposite direction of bond prices, which are driven by demand. When investors clamor for bonds, driving prices up, yields go down.

The inversion of the 10-year and two-year yield curves is a signal that investors are rushing money from stocks into bonds, depressing yields and flipping the return on long- and short-term bonds in a way that appears to make little economic sense.

Data from Credit Suisse going back to 1978 shows:

  • The last five 2-10 inversions have eventually led to recessions.
  • A recession occurs, on average, 22 months following a 2-10 inversion.
  • The S&P 500 is up, on average, 12% one year after a 2-10 inversion.
  • It’s not until about 18 months after an inversion when the stock market usually turns and posts negative returns.

This chart shows the spread between 10-year and two-year Treasury bonds since 1978. The portions below the black line represent yield inversions, and shaded areas are recessions

This chart shows the spread between 10-year and two-year Treasury bonds since 1978. The portions below the black line represent yield inversions, and shaded areas are recessions

Macy’s plunged 11.4%, the sharpest loss in the S&P 500, after it slashed its profit forecast for the year. The retailer’s profit for the latest quarter fell far short of analysts’ forecasts as it was forced to slash prices on unsold merchandise. The grim results from Macy’s sent other retailers sharply lower, too. Nordstrom sank 10% and Kohl’s dropped 11%.

Energy stocks also sank sharply, hurt by another drop in the price of crude oil on worries that a weakening global economy will drag down demand. National Oilwell Varco slumped 7.4% and Schlumberger skidded 6.5%. The price of benchmark U.S. crude slid 3.9% to $54.88 per barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, lost 3.7% to $59.04.

Gold gained $13.70 to $1,515.90 per ounce, close to a six-year high. Investors also bid up shares in mining company Newmont Goldcorp 1.8%.

Overseas, Germany’s DAX dropped 2.3% following the weak German economic data. France’s CAC 40 fell 2.2%, and the FTSE 100 in London lost 1.7%.

In Asia, Japan’s Nikkei 225 rose 1%, the Kospi in South Korea gained 0.7% and the Hang Seng in Hong Kong added 0.1%.

Trader Andrew Silverman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. The threat of a recession doesn't seem so remote anymore, and stocks sank Wednesday

Trader Andrew Silverman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. The threat of a recession doesn’t seem so remote anymore, and stocks sank Wednesday

Markets have largely been in a spin cycle since Trump announced on Aug. 1 that he would impose 10% tariffs on about $300 billion in Chinese imports, which would be on top of 25% tariffs already in place on $250 billion in imports.

On Tuesday, responding to pressure from businesses and growing fears that a trade war is threatening the U.S. economy, the Trump administration is delaying most of the import taxes it planned to impose on Chinese goods and is dropping others altogether.

Investors are still worried that the trade war between the world’s two largest economies may drag on through the 2020 U.S. election and cause more economic damage.

For all its whipsawing up and down, the S&P 500 remains within 5% of its record, which was set in late July.

A five-day view of the Dow shows a sharp drop at the open of trading on Wednesday

A five-day view of the Dow shows a sharp drop at the open of trading on Wednesday

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7356699/Warnings-economic-crisis-Treasury-yields-invert-time-Great-Recession.html

Federal funds rate

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Federal Funds Rate compared to U.S. Treasury interest rates

2 to 10 year treasury yield spread

Inflation (blue) compared to federal funds rate (red)

Quarterly gross domestic product compared to Federal Funds Rate.

Federal Funds Rate and Treasury interest rates from 2002-2019

In the United States, the federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions (banks and credit unions) lend reserve balances to other depository institutions overnight on an uncollateralized basis. Reserve balances are amounts held at the Federal Reserve to maintain depository institutions’ reserve requirements. Institutions with surplus balances in their accounts lend those balances to institutions in need of larger balances. The federal funds rate is an important benchmark in financial markets.[1][2]

The interest rate that the borrowing bank pays to the lending bank to borrow the funds is negotiated between the two banks, and the weighted average of this rate across all such transactions is the federal funds effective rate.

The federal funds target rate is determined by a meeting of the members of the Federal Open Market Committee which normally occurs eight times a year about seven weeks apart. The committee may also hold additional meetings and implement target rate changes outside of its normal schedule.

The Federal Reserve uses open market operations to make the federal funds effective rate follow the federal funds target rate. The target rate is chosen in part to influence the money supply in the U.S. economy[3]

Mechanism

Financial institutions are obligated by law to maintain certain levels of reserves, either as reserves with the Fed or as vault cash. The level of these reserves is determined by the outstanding assets and liabilities of each depository institution, as well as by the Fed itself, but is typically 10%[4] of the total value of the bank’s demand accounts (depending on bank size). For transaction deposits of size $9.3 million to $43.9 million (checking accountsNOWs, and other deposits that can be used to make payments) the reserve requirement in 2007–2008 was 3 percent of the end-of-the-day daily average amount held over a two-week period. Transaction deposits over $43.9 million held at the same depository institution carried a 10 percent reserve requirement.

For example, assume a particular U.S. depository institution, in the normal course of business, issues a loan. This dispenses money and decreases the ratio of bank reserves to money loaned. If its reserve ratio drops below the legally required minimum, it must add to its reserves to remain compliant with Federal Reserve regulations. The bank can borrow the requisite funds from another bank that has a surplus in its account with the Fed. The interest rate that the borrowing bank pays to the lending bank to borrow the funds is negotiated between the two banks, and the weighted average of this rate across all such transactions is the federal funds effective rate.

The federal funds target rate is set by the governors of the Federal Reserve, which they enforce by open market operations and adjustments in the interest rate on reserves.[5] The target rate is almost always what is meant by the media referring to the Federal Reserve “changing interest rates.” The actual federal funds rate generally lies within a range of that target rate, as the Federal Reserve cannot set an exact value through open market operations.

Another way banks can borrow funds to keep up their required reserves is by taking a loan from the Federal Reserve itself at the discount window. These loans are subject to audit by the Fed, and the discount rate is usually higher than the federal funds rate. Confusion between these two kinds of loans often leads to confusion between the federal funds rate and the discount rate. Another difference is that while the Fed cannot set an exact federal funds rate, it does set the specific discount rate.

The federal funds rate target is decided by the governors at Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meetings. The FOMC members will either increase, decrease, or leave the rate unchanged depending on the meeting’s agenda and the economic conditions of the U.S. It is possible to infer the market expectations of the FOMC decisions at future meetings from the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) Fed Funds futures contracts, and these probabilities are widely reported in the financial media.

Applications

Interbank borrowing is essentially a way for banks to quickly raise money. For example, a bank may want to finance a major industrial effort but may not have the time to wait for deposits or interest (on loan payments) to come in. In such cases the bank will quickly raise this amount from other banks at an interest rate equal to or higher than the Federal funds rate.

Raising the federal funds rate will dissuade banks from taking out such inter-bank loans, which in turn will make cash that much harder to procure. Conversely, dropping the interest rates will encourage banks to borrow money and therefore invest more freely.[6] This interest rate is used as a regulatory tool to control how freely the U.S. economy operates.

By setting a higher discount rate the Federal Bank discourages banks from requisitioning funds from the Federal Bank, yet positions itself as a lender of last resort.

Comparison with LIBOR

Though the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) and the federal funds rate are concerned with the same action, i.e. interbank loans, they are distinct from one another, as follows:

  • The target federal funds rate is a target interest rate that is set by the FOMC for implementing U.S. monetary policies.
  • The (effective) federal funds rate is achieved through open market operations at the Domestic Trading Desk at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York which deals primarily in domestic securities (U.S. Treasury and federal agencies’ securities).[7]
  • LIBOR is based on a questionnaire where a selection of banks guess the rates at which they could borrow money from other banks.
  • LIBOR may or may not be used to derive business terms. It is not fixed beforehand and is not meant to have macroeconomic ramifications.[8]

Predictions by the market

Considering the wide impact a change in the federal funds rate can have on the value of the dollar and the amount of lending going to new economic activity, the Federal Reserve is closely watched by the market. The prices of Option contracts on fed funds futures (traded on the Chicago Board of Trade) can be used to infer the market’s expectations of future Fed policy changes. Based on CME Group 30-Day Fed Fund futures prices, which have long been used to express the market’s views on the likelihood of changes in U.S. monetary policy, the CME Group FedWatch tool allows market participants to view the probability of an upcoming Fed Rate hike. One set of such implied probabilities is published by the Cleveland Fed.

Historical rates

As of 19 December 2018 the target range for the Federal Funds Rate is 2.25–2.50%.[9] This represents the ninth increase in the target rate since tightening began in December 2015.[10]

The last full cycle of rate increases occurred between June 2004 and June 2006 as rates steadily rose from 1.00% to 5.25%. The target rate remained at 5.25% for over a year, until the Federal Reserve began lowering rates in September 2007. The last cycle of easing monetary policy through the rate was conducted from September 2007 to December 2008 as the target rate fell from 5.25% to a range of 0.00–0.25%. Between December 2008 and December 2015 the target rate remained at 0.00–0.25%, the lowest rate in the Federal Reserve’s history, as a reaction to the Financial crisis of 2007–2008 and its aftermath. According to Jack A. Ablin, chief investment officer at Harris Private Bank, one reason for this unprecedented move of having a range, rather than a specific rate, was because a rate of 0% could have had problematic implications for money market funds, whose fees could then outpace yields.[11]

Federal funds rate history and recessions.png

Explanation of federal funds rate decisions

When the Federal Open Market Committee wishes to reduce interest rates they will increase the supply of money by buying government securities. When additional supply is added and everything else remains constant, the price of borrowed funds – the federal funds rate – falls. Conversely, when the Committee wishes to increase the federal funds rate, they will instruct the Desk Manager to sell government securities, thereby taking the money they earn on the proceeds of those sales out of circulation and reducing the money supply. When supply is taken away and everything else remains constant, the interest rate will normally rise.[12]

The Federal Reserve has responded to a potential slow-down by lowering the target federal funds rate during recessions and other periods of lower growth. In fact, the Committee’s lowering has recently predated recessions,[13] in order to stimulate the economy and cushion the fall. Reducing the federal funds rate makes money cheaper, allowing an influx of credit into the economy through all types of loans.

The charts linked below show the relation between S&P 500 and interest rates.

  • July 13, 1990 — Sept 4, 1992: 8.00%–3.00% (Includes 1990–1991 recession)[14][15]
  • Feb 1, 1995 — Nov 17, 1998: 6.00–4.75 [16][17][18]
  • May 16, 2000 — June 25, 2003: 6.50–1.00 (Includes 2001 recession)[19][20][21]
  • June 29, 2006 — (Oct. 29 2008): 5.25–1.00[22]
  • Dec 16, 2008 — 0.0–0.25[23]
  • Dec 16, 2015 — 0.25–0.50[24]
  • Dec 14, 2016 — 0.50–0.75[25]
  • Mar 15, 2017 — 0.75–1.00[26]
  • Jun 14, 2017 — 1.00–1.25[27]
  • Dec 13, 2017 — 1.25–1.50[28]
  • Mar 21, 2018 — 1.50–1.75[29]
  • Jun 13, 2018 — 1.75–2.00[30]
  • Sep 26, 2018 — 2.00–2.25[9]
  • Dec 19, 2018 — 2.25–2.50[31]

Bill Gross of PIMCO suggested that in the prior 15 years ending in 2007, in each instance where the fed funds rate was higher than the nominal GDP growth rate, assets such as stocks and housing fell.[32]

International effects

A low federal funds rate makes investments in developing countries such as China or Mexico more attractive. A high federal funds rate makes investments outside the United States less attractive. The long period of a very low federal funds rate from 2009 forward resulted in an increase in investment in developing countries. As the United States began to return to a higher rate in 2013 investments in the United States became more attractive and the rate of investment in developing countries began to fall. The rate also affects the value of currency, a higher rate increasing the value of the U.S. dollar and decreasing the value of currencies such as the Mexican peso.[33]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Fedpoints: Federal Funds”Federal Reserve Bank of New York. August 2007. Retrieved October 2, 2011.
  2. ^ “The Implementation of Monetary Policy”. The Federal Reserve System: Purposes & Functions (PDF). Washington, D.C.: Federal Reserve Board. August 24, 2011. p. 4. Retrieved October 2, 2011.
  3. ^ “Monetary Policy, Open Market Operations”. Federal Reserve Bank. January 30, 2008. Archived from the original on April 13, 2001. Retrieved January 30, 2008.
  4. ^ “Reserve Requirements”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. December 16, 2015.
  5. ^ Stefan Homburg (2017) A Study in Monetary Macroeconomics, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-880753-7.
  6. ^ “Fed funds rate”. Bankrate, Inc. March 2016.
  7. ^ Cheryl L. Edwards (November 1997). Gerard Sinzdak. “Open Market Operations in the 1990s” (PDF)Federal Reserve Bulletin (PDF).
  8. ^ “BBA LIBOR – Frequently asked questions”. British Bankers’ Association. March 21, 2006. Archived from the original on February 16, 2007.
  9. Jump up to:a b “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement” (Press release). Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. December 19, 2018. Retrieved June 2, 2019.
  10. ^ Tankersley, Jim (March 21, 2018). “Fed Raises Interest Rates for Sixth Time Since Financial Crisis”The New York Times. Retrieved March 22, 2018.
  11. ^ “4:56 p.m. US-Closing Stocks”. Associated Press. December 16, 2008. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012.
  12. ^ David Waring (February 19, 2008). “An Explanation of How The Fed Moves Interest Rates”. InformedTrades.com. Archived from the original on May 5, 2015. Retrieved July 20, 2009.
  13. ^ “Historical Changes of the Target Federal Funds and Discount Rates, 1971 to present”. New York Federal Reserve Branch. February 19, 2010. Archived from the original on December 21, 2008.
  14. ^ “$SPX 1990-06-12 1992-10-04 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  15. ^ “$SPX 1992-08-04 1995-03-01 (rate rise chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  16. ^ “$SPX 1995-01-01 1997-01-01 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  17. ^ “$SPX 1996-12-01 1998-10-17 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  18. ^ “$SPX 1998-09-17 2000-06-16 (rate rise chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  19. ^ “$SPX 2000-04-16 2002-01-01 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  20. ^ “$SPX 2002-01-01 2003-07-25 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  21. ^ “$SPX 2003-06-25 2006-06-29 (rate rise chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  22. ^ “$SPX 2006-06-29 2008-06-01 (rate drop chart)”. StockCharts.com.
  23. ^ “Press Release”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. December 16, 2008.
  24. ^ “Open Market Operations”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. December 16, 2015.
  25. ^ “Decisions Regarding Monetary Policy Implementation”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. Archived from the original on December 15, 2016.
  26. ^ Cox, Jeff (March 15, 2017). “Fed raises rates at March meeting”CNBC. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  27. ^ “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. June 14, 2017.
  28. ^ “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. December 13, 2017.
  29. ^ “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. March 21, 2018.
  30. ^ “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. June 13, 2018.
  31. ^ “Federal Reserve issues FOMC statement”. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System. December 19, 2018.
  32. ^ Shaw, Richard (January 7, 2007). “The Bond Yield Curve as an Economic Crystal Ball”. Retrieved April 3, 2011.
  33. ^ Peter S. Goodman, Keith Bradsher and Neil Gough (March 16, 2017). “The Fed Acts. Workers in Mexico and Merchants in Malaysia Suffer”The New York Times. Retrieved March 18,2017Rising interest rates in the United States are driving money out of many developing countries, straining governments and pinching consumers around the globe.

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_funds_rate

Missy Higgins

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Missy Higgins
A woman in her twenties with short blonde hair, wearing a black jacket and grey shirt with black stripes.

Missy Higgins, ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards, 10 August 2012
Background information
Birth name Melissa Morrison Higgins
Born 19 August 1983 (age 36)
Origin MelbourneVictoria
Genres Pop rockindieacoustic
Occupation(s) Singer-songwritermusician
Instruments Vocalspianosynthesiserguitarmelodicaxylophonecowbellukulele
Years active 2001–present
Labels Eleven
Reprise
Warner Bros.
Associated acts
Website missyhiggins.com.au

Melissa Morrison Higgins (born 19 August 1983) is an Australian singer-songwriter, musician and actress. Her Australian number-one albums are The Sound of White (2004), On a Clear Night (2007) and The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle (2012), and her singles include “Scar“, “The Special Two“, “Steer” and “Where I Stood“. Higgins was nominated for five ARIA Music Awards in 2004 and won ‘Best Pop Release’ for “Scar”. In 2005, she was nominated for seven more awards and won five. Higgins won her seventh ARIA in 2007. Her third album, The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle, was released in Australia in June 2012 (July 2012 in the US). As of August 2014, Higgins’ first three studio albums had sold over one million units.[1]

Higgins’ fourth studio album, OZ, was released in September 2014 and consists of cover versions of Australian composers, as well as a book of related essays.

Alongside her music career, Higgins pursues interests in animal rights and the environment, endeavouring to make her tours carbon neutral. In 2010 she made her acting debut in the feature film Bran Nue Dae and also performed on its soundtrack.

Biography

Early life

Higgins was born in Melbourne, Victoria, to Gregory Higgins, an English-Australian Tipstave, and Margaret (née Morrison), an Australian childcare centre operator.[2][3] Her sister, Nicola, is seven years older and her brother, David, six years older.[3] Higgins learned to play classical piano from age six, following in the footsteps of Christopher and David, but realised she wanted to be a singer at about 12, when she appeared in an Armadale Primary School production of Andrew Lloyd Webber‘s musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.[4] Bored with practice, she gave up playing piano at that time.[5] Hoping for more freedom, she urged her parents to send her to Geelong Grammar School, an independent boarding school that her siblings attended. At Geelong, Higgins took up the piano again, this time playing jazz and performing with her brother David’s group on weekends.[6]Introverted by nature, Higgins found that piano practice helped her cope with living at boarding school.[5]

At 15, while attending Geelong Grammar’s Timbertop, she wrote “All for Believing” for a school music assignment, completing it just hours before the deadline.[7] The assignment earned an A and she performed her song in front of classmates. She approached a Melbourne record company and was told that they wanted more than one song.[5] She wrote more songs and worked with the Kool Skools project, which enables students to record music.[8] In 2001, Missy’s sister Nicola entered “All for Believing” on her behalf in Unearthed, radio station Triple J‘s competition for unsigned artists. The song won the competition and was added to the station’s play list.[9]

Two record companies showed an interest in Higgins—Sony and Eleven.[5] She signed with Eleven, partly because they agreed that she would not be “made into a pop star”[10] and partly because they were happy for her to take time off for a backpacking holiday.[5]Higgins’ manager is Eleven’s John Watson, who also manages rock band Silverchair.[2] Watson later disclosed that “Missy’s the only time in my career I knew after 90 seconds I really wanted to sign her.”[11] The backpacking trip had been planned with a friend for years and the pair spent most of 2002 in Europe; while Higgins was travelling, “All for Believing” started to receive airplay on Los Angeles radio station KCRW.[12] Such radio exposure attracted the attention of American record labels and, by year’s end, an international recording deal with Warner Bros. had been negotiated.[13]

2003–2005: The Sound of White

Higgins is seated. She sings into a microphone and plays a keyboard instrument. The lettering RD-300SX and Roland are visible across its front.

Higgins, San Francisco, 11 August 2005
Courtesy Nabeel Hyatt

Higgins was the support act on a 2003 Australian tour by folk rock band The Waifs and rock band george.[13] She travelled to the US to work with John Porter, who produced her first EPThe Missy Higgins EP,[14] which was released in November and entered the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Singles Chart Top 50 in August 2004.[15]

She toured Australia, supporting Pete Murray and John Butler Trio.[16] Her four-track single “Scar'” was released in July 2004 and debuted at No. 1 on the ARIA Charts.[15][17] Her first album, The Sound of White, was released in September, and debuted at No. 1 on the ARIA Albums Chart.[15] Also produced by Porter, it sold over 500,000 copies.[18] She was nominated in five categories at the ARIA Music Awards of 2004 for “Scar”: Best Female Artist’, ‘Single of the Year’, ‘Best Pop Release’, ‘Breakthrough Artist – Single’ and ‘Best Video’ (directed by Squareyed Films).[19] At the awards ceremony on 17 October she received the award for Best Pop Release, beating Delta GoodremThe DissociativesKylie Minogue and Pete Murray.[19] This was followed by her first national headline tour.[20] Her second single “Ten Days” was co-written with Jay Clifford (guitarist in US band Jump, Little Children) and was inspired by Higgins’ 2002 break-up with her boyfriend before she travelled to Europe.[21] Released in November, it peaked at No. 12.[15]

On 29 January 2005 Higgins performed with other local musicians including Nick Cave and Powderfinger at the WaveAid fundraising concert in the Sydney Cricket Ground.[22] The concert raised A$2.3 million for four charities supporting the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake.[23] In March Higgins performed at the MTV Australia Awards and won the prize for ‘Breakthrough Artist of the Year’.[24] The following month she released her third single, “The Special Two”, which was a radio hit and reached No. 2.[15] “The Special Two” was released on an EP which included her cover of the Skyhooks song, “You Just Like Me Cos I’m Good In Bed”, recorded for Triple J‘s 30th anniversary. The song had been the first track played on Triple J when it launched (as Double J) in 1975.[25] In May, Higgins won the ‘Song of the Year’ and ‘Breakthrough’ awards for “Scar” from the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA).[26] She continued touring in mid-2005 and released her fourth single, “The Sound of White”, in August.[15] In September she played a sold out performance at the Vanguard in Sydney with the proceeds going to charity.[27] She was nominated for seven more ARIAs and in October won ‘Album of the Year’, ‘Best Pop Release’, ‘Breakthrough Artist – Album’ and ‘Highest Selling Album’ (all for The Sound of White) and ‘Best Female Artist’ (for “Scar”).[28] She teamed up with fellow ARIA award-winning singer Ben Lee in late 2005 for a national tour.[29]

2006–2009: On a Clear Night

Higgins stands and plays an acoustic guitar with her left hand high on the fret board. She sings into a microphone. Her right arm and bottom of guitar are not in view. Background has large stage lights.

Higgins, Live Earth concert, Sydney, 7 July 2007
Courtesy Itapp

During 2006, Higgins lived in Broome, Western Australia for six months, away from the entertainment industry. The relaxed lifestyle helped her focus on writing new material.[30] The landscape made a big impression, “It was the first place I’d ever felt honestly connected with my country, with the physical land of my country” and inspired her to write “Going North”.[31] She then toured the United States and South Africa, writing more material on the road.[32] In September she based herself in Los Angeles to record her second album, On a Clear Night, with producer Mitchell Froom.[33][34] “Steer” was released as an EP, followed a fortnight later by its album on 28 April 2007, both debuted at No. 1 on their respective charts.[15]

In February, Higgins had contributed a tribute song to the album, Cannot Buy My Soul, for noted indigenous singer, Kev Carmody, singing “Droving Woman” with musician Paul Kelly and group Augie March.[35] On 7 July, she participated in the Live Earth concert in Sydney, performing her own set before joining Carmody, Kelly and vocalist John Butler on stage for the song “From Little Things Big Things Grow“.[36] Emily Dunn in The Sydney Morning Herald wrote “[the song] could have been the event’s anthem”.[37] Rolling Stone‘s Dan Lander pointed out a highlight, when the “whole crowd sung along – all eleven verses.”[38]

Higgins returned to Los Angeles to focus on the US market—she spent September and October touring—where she was still relatively unknown.[39] On 26 October, backed by the Sydney Youth Orchestra, she headlined the annual Legs 11 concert, a breast cancer benefit held in The DomainRoyal Botanic Gardens, Sydney.[40] Two days later Higgins performed at the 2007 ARIAs where she was nominated for ‘Best Pop Release’, ‘Highest Selling Album’ and ‘Highest Selling Single’ (for “Steer”) and won ‘Best Female Artist’ (for On a Clear Night)—her seventh ARIA Music Award.[41] On 31 October, she was a guest at television music channel MAX‘s inaugural Concert for the Cure, a private concert for people affected by breast cancer. She sang headline act Powderfinger’s “Sunsets” with front man Bernard Fanning and joined in with the encore of “These Days“.[42][43] She spent November and December on her For One Night Only Tour, taking in Cairns, Sydney and Perth. You Am I lead singer, Tim Rogers, joined her on some shows.[44]

On a Clear Night, was released in the US on 26 February 2008, supported by a tour in March. Her ten-month stay in Los Angeles during 2008 promoted her songs for films and television shows.[33][45] Her first US single “Where I Stood” was featured in US series including Grey’s AnatomyOne Tree Hill and So You Think You Can Dance.[46] During 2008, Higgins supported the Indigo Girls and then Ben Folds on their respective US tours.[47] February and March 2009 saw her co-headlining a US tour with Canadian Justin Nozuka.[48] On 31 March she released an EP, More Than This in Australia that features cover versions of “More Than This” by Roxy Music, “(I’m) In Love Again” by Peggy Lee, “Breakdown” by Tom Petty and “Moses” by Patty Griffin.[49] “Moses” had been included on Triple J’s 2005 compilation album Like a Version: Volume One and “More Than This” was recorded as part of Covered, A Revolution in Sound, a Warner Bros. tribute album also released in March 2009.[50]

2010–2013: The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle

Higgins performing live in December 2012

Higgins started writing music for her third album in 2009.[51] After about seven years of touring and recording she took a break from the music industry to pursue other interests.[52] In 2010 she enrolled in a course in indigenous studies at the University of Melbourne.[53] Her acting debut was as Annie in 2010 film Bran Nue Dae directed by Rachel Perkins. The film is an adaptation of the 1990 musical, Bran Nue Dae, “Australia’s first Aboriginalmusical”.[54] Although Higgins would consider future acting projects she has no plans to actively pursue it as a career.[51][55]

In July and August 2010, Higgins played several dates of Sarah McLachlan‘s Lilith Fair tour in the US.[56][57] At Lilith Fair, she met Australian musician Butterfly Boucher and they decided to work together. In 2011, Higgins travelled to where Boucher was living in Nashville to record her third album, which is co-produced by Boucher and Brad Jones.[58] Titled The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle, the album was released on 1 June 2012.[59] Its first single, “Unashamed Desire“, co-written with Boucher, was released on 23 April.[60] In November 2011, at the ARIA Music Awards, Higgins performed a duet of “Warwu”with Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, from his Rrakala album.[61]

“The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle” album debuted at #1 on the ARIA Albums Chart the week of 12 June 2012. It was Higgins’ 3rd straight number one album. As of January 2019, Higgins ties Olivia Newton-John for the 3rd highest tally of Australian Number One albums by an Australian female artist. Only Delta Goodrem (with four Number 1 ARIA albums) and Kylie Minogue and Kasey Chambers (with five each) have achieved more.

2014: Oz

In September 2014, Higgins released her fourth studio album, Oz, which features cover versions of Australian composers, including The Angels, Slim Dusty, Something For Kate, Warumpi Band, Paul Kelly and The Drones. The album is also accompanied by a book of related essays, in which Higgins uses each of the recordings to reflect upon subjects such as music and love.[62] Higgins collaborated with Dan Sultan for the recording of the Slim Dusty song “The Biggest Disappointment”.[63]

Higgins explained in an October 2014 interview that she experienced a significant bout of writer’s block following the completion of her second album and someone suggested an album of cover versions at the time, but she only revisited the idea during the conception of Oz. Higgins further explained:

I responded to all these songs on an emotional level, when I first heard them. I wanted songs I felt I could tell with my own voice, and interpret them authentically … But it was important to maintain the emotional integrity and the heart of the song. It was a high priority to keep true to the songs.[63]

The album was co-produced by Jherek Bischoff, who previously worked with David Byrne, formerly of Talking Heads, and Amanda Palmer.[1]

Oz debuted at number 3 on the ARIA Albums chart[64] and remained in the top five positions until 18 October 2014.[65]

The national Australian tour in support of Oz commenced on 20 September 2014 in Cairns, Queensland, and ended in Melbourne in October 2014. Higgins was accompanied by Bischoff, and Australian artist Dustin Tebbutt appeared as a special guest.[1]

2015–present: Solastalgia and The Special Ones

Higgins, performing live in Taronga Zoo, February 2016.

On 19 February 2016, Higgins released a new single titled, “Oh Canada“,[66] in her response to the Death of Alan Kurdi.

In May 2017, Higgins released “Torchlight“, for the Australian drama film, Don’t Tell.[67]

In October 2017, Higgins appeared in a revival of the 1996 musical Miracle City by Nick Enright and Max Lambert at the Sydney Opera House, playing the role of Bonnie Mae.[68]

In February 2018, Higgins released the single “Futon Couch“, the first single from her fifth studio album, called Solastalgia, released in May 2018.[69]

In February 2018, it was announced that Missy Higgins would support Ed Sheeran‘s tour around Australia.[70]

In November 2018, Higgins released her first greatest hits album titled The Special Ones.[71]

Musical influences and technique

Higgins grew up in the 1980s and 1990s listening to artists that her older siblings liked—Nicola played Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston, while David favoured Queen and Kiss.[72][73] Departing for boarding school at age 13, she was exposed to alternative artists like Nirvana and Hole and started teaching herself guitar and writing her own music.[73] She also began singing with David’s jazz group on weekends. As an adult she prefers Nina Simone and Ray Charles to “poppy dance music”.[73] She has cited Patty GriffinRon SexsmithRufus WainwrightPaul Kelly and Sarah McLachlan as influences.[5][51][74] Material from her third album is influenced by ambient music from LowJon Hopkins, Icelandic band Sigur Rós and Estonian classical composer Arvo Pärt.[51]

Higgins’ song writing grew out of a desire to express her emotions when she was at school and her lyrics describe her feelings about her own life and relationships.[75][76] The piano was the first instrument she learned to play, and she continues to use it as well as digital pianos including a Roland RD-300SX, RD-700 and KR-15.[77][78] She also uses guitars extensively in her music particularly when touring, due to their portable nature and favours the Australian brand, Maton.[78] On occasion she plays keytarxylophone and melodicaduring performances.[31][79]

On 7 September 2012, Higgins recorded a cover version of Gotye‘s “Heart’s A Mess” for the “Like a Version” segment on Australian radio station Triple J, explaining on-air that the song is her favourite Gotye composition. Higgins had travelled with Gotye previously and referred to him as “an incredible singer” in the interview prior to the rendition.[80]

Causes

As a vegetarian, Higgins promoted the health benefits of not eating meat in a 2005 advertising campaign by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA);[81] and has supported their anti-fur stance.[45] She is interested in environmental issues and is involved with the Sierra Club, a grassroots organisation based in California.[45] She has protested against the proposed industrialisation of the Kimberley region of Western Australia and donated the royalties from her 2009 EP More Than This.[49] Since early 2007, Higgins has tried to make her tours carbon neutral, she purchases green energy to power venues, uses hybrid cars where possible and purchases carbon offsets.[82]

On 5 October 2012, Higgins performed at two “Save the Kimberley” events held at Federation Square in Melbourne and The Esplanade in Fremantle, Western Australia.[83][84] A march to protest against the proposed gas refinery construction at James Price Point accompanied the free concert and campaign supporters were photographed with banners and placards.[85]

As of 2012, Higgins is one of numerous publicly known advocates for the ‘Oscar’s Law’ campaign. The campaign, launched in 2010, protests against the existence of “puppy factories” in Australia, whereby animals are factory farmed. One of the campaign’s slogans is “Break the Puppy Trade—Don’t buy puppies from pet shops” and the list of notable advocates includes Paul Dempsey (musician), Kate Ceberano (singer) and Mick Molloy (comedian).[86]

In response to the proposed dumping of around 3 million cubic metres (110 million cubic feet) of dredged seabed onto the Great Barrier Reef,[87] a legal fighting team was formed by World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)-Australia and the Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) in late 2013/early 2014.[88] The legal team received further support in April 2014, following the release of the “Sounds For The Reef” musical fundraising project. Produced by Straightup, the digital album features Higgins, in addition to artists such as The HerdSiettaJohn ButlerThe Cat EmpireFat Freddys Drop, The Bamboos (featuring Kylie Auldist) and Resin Dogs. Released on 7 April, the album’s 21 songs were sold on the Bandcamp website.[89][90]

Personal life

Higgins has been a patron of multiple mental health charities since 2003. She described her younger self as “a bit of a depressed child” and “introverted”, and that she had “experienced various degrees of depression”.[14][91] Prescribed antidepressant medication while in high school, she learned to channel low moods into songwriting, calling music her “emotional outlet”.[3][72] In a 2006 interview she said that her songs were “coming from more of a happier place”.[92] While recording her second album she discovered a passion for rock climbing, as a “meditative pursuit”[93] and that, “It’s the first and last thing I’ve had — other than music — that I’m passionate about.”[72]

From 2004 to 2007, Higgins’ sexual orientation was the subject of media speculation based partly on interpretations of her lyrics and her interviews. In an October 2007 interview with Australian lesbian magazine Cherrie, she was asked if she fell under the moniker of “not-so-straight” girls. She replied “Um, yeah, definitely. … I think sexuality is a fluid thing and it’s becoming increasingly more acceptable to admit that you’re that way.”[94] In November her Myspace page reported, “I’ve been in relationships with both men and women so I guess I fall most easily under the category ‘Bisexual'”.[95][96]

In 2013, Higgins began a relationship with Broome playwright and comedian Dan Lee.[97][98] Higgins gave birth to her son named Samuel Arrow Lee, on 5 January 2015.[99] They got married in March 2016,[100][101] and she gave birth to daughter named Luna, on 13 August 2018.

Discography

Filmography

Awards and nominations

Higgins at the ARIA Awardsceremony, December 2013, Star Event Centre, Sydney

APRA Awards

The APRA Awards are presented annually from 1982 by the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA).[102] Higgins has won two awards from six nominations.[103][104]

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2005 Scar” (Missy Higgins, Kevin Griffin) – Missy Higgins Song of the Year[103] Won
Ten Days” (Missy Higgins, Jay Clifford) – Missy Higgins Song of the Year[105] Nominated
Missy Higgins Breakthrough Award[104] Won
2006 The Special Two” (Missy Higgins) – Missy Higgins Song of the Year[106] Nominated
Most Performed Australian Work[106] Nominated
“Ten Days” (Missy Higgins, Jay Clifford) Most Performed Australian Work[106] Nominated

ARIA Awards

The ARIA Music Awards are presented annually from 1987 by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). Higgins has won nine awards from twenty-four nominations.[107][108]

 
Year Nominee / work Award Result
2004 Scar Single of the Year Nominated
Best Female Artist Nominated
Breakthrough Artist – Single Nominated
Best Pop Release Won
“Scar” – Squareyed Films Best Video Nominated
2005 The Sound of White Album of the Year Won
Best Female Artist Won
Highest Selling Album Won
Breakthrough Artist – Album Won
Best Pop Release Won
The Sound of White – Cathie Glassby Best Cover Art Nominated
The Special Two Single of the Year Nominated
Highest Selling Single Nominated
2006 If You Tell Me Yours, I’ll Tell You Mine Best Music DVD Nominated
2007 On a Clear Night Best Female Artist Won
Best Pop Release Nominated
Highest Selling Album Nominated
Steer Highest Selling Single Nominated
2008 Peachy Best Female Artist Nominated
2012 The Ol’ Razzle Dazzle Best Female Artist Nominated
Album of the Year Nominated
Best Adult Contemporary Artist Won
Everyone’s Waiting” – Natasha Pincus Best Video Won
2013 “Set Me on Fire” Best Female Artist Nominated
2018 Solastalgia Best Adult Contemporary Album Nominated

Other awards

She has won an MTV Australia Video Music Award.[24]

References …

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missy_Higgins

 

 

Story 4: President Trump Energy Speech at Shell Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex in Monaca, Pennsylvania 

FULL SPEECH: President Trump speech on energy in Pennsylvania

Trump was supposed to give a speech on energy. He went way off script.

Updated 

President Donald Trump on Tuesday headed to a Shell petrochemicals plant being built outside Pittsburgh to give what was billed by the White House as a speech on “America’s Energy Dominance and Manufacturing Revival.”

But the hourlong address was light on energy policy and heavy on stump speech material and off-script riffs, as Trump touched on everything from his love of trucks to his assessment of his potential 2020 rivals. The meandering speech came on a day when the president had already attacked a CNN anchor, endorsed a controversial World Series hero’s potential congressional bid and defended his parroting of a conspiracy theory concerning the apparent suicide of his onetime friend Jeffrey Epstein.

Here are some of Trump’s most off-key comments:

On the supposed benefits of natural gas over renewable energy: “When the wind stops blowing, it doesn’t make any difference does it? Unlike those big windmills that destroy everybody’s property values, kill all the birds. One day the environmentalists are going to tell us what’s going on with that. And then all of a sudden it stops. The wind and the televisions go off. And your wives and husbands say: ‘Darling, I want to watch Donald Trump on television tonight. But the wind stopped blowing and I can’t watch. There’s no electricity in the house, darling.’”

On his construction chops: “I was a good builder. I built good. I love building; in fact, I’m going to take a tour of the site.”

On doing some campaigning: “I’m going to speak to some of your union leaders to say, ‘I hope you’re going to support Trump, OK?’ And if they don’t, vote ‘em the hell out of office because they’re not doing their job — it’s true.”

On his love of trucks: “I love cranes, I love trucks of all types. Even when I was a little boy at 4 years old, my mother would say, ‘You love trucks.’ I do, I always loved trucks, I still do. Nothing changes — sometimes you know you might become president, but nothing changes — I still love trucks. Especially when I look at the largest crane in the world, that’s very cool. You think I’ll get to operate it? We’ll put the media on it and I’ll give them a little ride, right?”

On pundits suggesting he might not leave office willingly: “Can you imagine if I got a fair press? I mean, we’re leading without it; can you imagine if these people treated me fairly? The election would be over. Have they ever called off an election before? Just said, ‘Look just let’s go, go on four more years.’ You want to really drive them crazy? Go to #ThirdTerm, #FourthTerm — you’ll drive them totally crazy.”

On what Trump perceives as a trade imbalance with Japan: “They send us thousands and thousands — millions of cars, we send them wheat. Wheat. That’s not a good deal. And they don’t even want our wheat. They do it because they want us to at least feel that we’re OK, you know, they do it to make us feel good.” This assertion is false.

On the price tag of the presidency: “This thing is costing me a fortune, being president. Somebody said, ‘Oh, he might have rented a room to a man from Saudi Arabia for $500.’ What about the $5 billion that I’ll lose — you know, it’s probably going to cost me, including, upside, downside, lawyers, because every day they sue me for something. These are the most litigious people. It’s probably costing me from $3 to $5 billion for the pleasure of being — and I couldn’t care less, I don’t care. You know if you’re wealthy, it doesn’t matter. I just want to do a great job.”

On his pledge to salvage manufacturing jobs: “You guys, I don’t know what the hell you’re going to do. You don’t want to make widgets, right? You don’t want to make — do you want to learn how to make a computer? A little tiny piece of stuff. … You put it with those big, beautiful hands of yours like … you’re going to take these big hands, going to take this little tiny part. You’re going to go home, ‘Alice this is a tough job.’ Nah, you want to make steel, and you want to dig coal — that’s what you want to do!”

On the number of members of the media at the event, at about 2:45 p.m.: “That’s a lot people back there for, like, an 11 o’clock speech. That’s a lot of people.”

On the Oscars: “Like the Academy Awards during the day, it used to be — you know the Academy Awards is on hard times now, you know that right? Nobody wants to watch it. You know why? Because they started taking us on, everyone got tired of it. It’s amazing. That used to be second after the Super Bowl, and then all of a sudden now it’s just another show because people got tired of people getting up and making fools of themselves and disrespecting the people in this room and the people that won the election in 2016.”

On attacking Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, potential 2020 rivals: “I did it very early with Pocahontas, I should have probably waited. She’s staging a comeback on Sleepy Joe. I don’t know who’s going to win, but we’ll have to hit Pocahontas very hard again if she does win. But she’s staging a little bit of a comeback. What a group — Pocahontas and Sleepy Joe.”

On Mexico deploying soldiers to stem the flow of Central American migrants: “I want to thank Mexico, it’s incredible. We have close to 27,000, you think of that. We never had three — I think we had about 2½ soldiers, one was sitting down all the time. We had nobody.”

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/08/13/donald-trump-energy-speech-pittsburgh-1461337

 

Shell Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex
Monaca, Pennsylvania

2:06 P.M. EDT

AUDIENCE:  USA!  USA!  USA!

THE PRESIDENT: Well, thank you very much.  And thank you, Gretchen.  It’s great to be back in the incredible Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Great place.  And this is my 13th visit to Pennsylvania during my administration, which is more than any other President to this point in the term.

And I really love Pennsylvania.  I went to school in Pennsylvania — Philadelphia.  So, we love this state.  And I love the unions and I love the workers.  And, you know, when I built buildings in New York — (applause) — I built them exclusively with unions.  People don’t understand that.  I was exclusive.

And, in the last really great election, our election of 2016, you know, we did great with the union workers.  Great.  But we didn’t do good with the leadership.  The leadership said, “Well, we’ve always gone Democrat.  Let’s keep going that way.”  That didn’t work out too well for some of them, I want to tell you.  (Applause.)  I’ll tell you.  And as Gretchen said, this would have never happened without me and us.  This would have never happened.  So, I’m with you.  I’m with you.  Remember that.
And remember that Pennsylvania — you know, Pennsylvania has the best numbers they’ve ever had in the history of the state.  And that’s for a very good reason.  And you know what that reason is.

(Audience member waves.)  Hello.  Here I am.  (Applause.)

And I’m truly honored to be here with the amazing energy workers and construction workers.  These are talented people.  The craft workers who make America run and who make America proud.  We’re proud again.  We’re proud again.  (Applause.)

And no one in the world does it better than you.  Nobody.  Nobody does it better.  There’s nobody in the world that does it.  And we’re unleashing that power again like we’ve never seen before, I will say.

And we are doing well and we’re fighting against a lot of countries that have taken advantage of us for many, many years.  But they’re not doing it so much anymore.  And in a little period of time, they won’t be doing it at all anymore.  They have taken advantage of this country.  (Applause.)

Today, we celebrate the revolution in American energy that’s helping make our economy the envy of the world.  This Shell petrochemical plant in Beaver County, Pennsylvania — I did very well here.  We did very well.  How many points did we win by?  Does anybody know?  I’ll tell you.  Isn’t it, I think, 28 points?  That’s a lot.  That’s against a Democrat — (laughter) — or whatever.

It’s one of the single-biggest construction projects in the nation.  And it made it possible and was possible by clean, affordable, all-American natural gas.  Powerful, clean, natural gas.  (Applause.)

And when the wind stops blowing, it doesn’t make any difference, does it?  Unlike those big windmills that destroy everybody’s property values, kill all the birds.  Someday, the environmentalists are going to tell us what’s going on with that.  And then, all of a sudden, it stops; the wind and the televisions go off.  And your wives and husbands say, “Darling, I want to watch Donald Trump on television tonight.”  (Laughter.)  “But the wind stopped blowing and I can’t watch.  There’s no electricity in the house, darling.”  No, we love natural gas and we love a lot of other things, too.

Each of you is taking part in the largest investment in Pennsylvania history.  It’s the largest investment in the history of Pennsylvania, in the history of our country — the money that’s being invested in your state right now.

With your help, we’re not only unleashing American energy, we’re restoring the glory of American manufacturing, and we are reclaiming our noble heritage as a nation of builders again.  (Applause.)  A nation of builders.

I was a good builder.  I built good.  I love building.  In fact, I’m going to take a tour of the site.  They said, “Sir, we were going to do it before the speech, but we’re waiting for it to stop raining.”  I said, “Don’t worry about the rain.  Do we have umbrellas?  Don’t worry about the rain.  Umbrellas work very well, especially when they’re made in America.”  (Laughs.)  (Applause.)  So, I don’t care.  But we’re going to take a tour afterwards.

I’m going to speak to some of your union leaders to say, “I hope you’re going to support Trump.”  Okay?  (Applause.)  And if they don’t, vote them the hell out of office because they’re not doing their job.  It’s true.  It’s true.  (Applause.)  Vote them out of office.

When completed, this facility will transform abundant natural gas — and we have a lot of it — fracked from Pennsylvania wells, which they never would have allowed you to take if I weren’t President.  If my opponent won, this would be a lot of nice, new structures outside.  I guess you would have stopped long ago.  You would have stopped construction before it started too much.

But I was talking to Gretchen.  They would have never gotten the approvals to do what’s needed to fuel these plants.  That wouldn’t have been good.  So, probably, they wouldn’t have started.  But if they would have started, it would have stopped.

But they put it into plastic through a process known as “cracking.”  That raw material will then be shipped all over the country and all over the world to be fashioned into more products stamped with that very beautiful phrase: “Made in the USA.”  Right?  “Made in the USA.”  (Applause.)  Beautiful.

AUDIENCE:  USA!  USA!  USA!

THE PRESIDENT:  That is a beautiful phrase.

Getting this massive job done right has required more than 1,500 pieces of heavy equipment; one of the largest cranes anywhere in the world — I look forward to seeing it.  I love cranes.  I loves trucks of all types.  Even when I was a little boy at four years old, my mother would say, “You love trucks.”  I do.  I always loved trucks.  I still do.  Nothing changes.  Sometimes, you know, you might become President but nothing changes.  I still love trucks, especially when I look at the largest crane in the world.  That’s very cool.  Do you think I’ll get to operate it?  I don’t know.  (Applause.)  We’ll put the media on it, and I’ll give them a little ride, right?   (Applause.)

And you have thousands of tons of concrete, aluminum and steel, and nearly 6,000 of the strongest, toughest, and most talented workers anywhere on Earth.  (Applause.)  True.  I know.  It was the Trump administration that made it possible.  No one else.  Without us, you would never have been able to do this.

I want to thank all of our great union members: the boilermakers, carpenters — (applause) — cement finishers — (applause) — electricians — (applause) — iron workers — (applause) — laborers — (applause) — millwrights — (applause) — operators — (applause) — plumbers — (applause) — painters — (applause) — steamfitters; I know them well.

And a group that I’ve used more than anybody that’s ever run for office times 1,000, because in New York City they would drive those cement trucks up to my building and those trucks were always on time, and sometimes they were lined up for six blocks when I was doing different things.  Even when I was doing the Wollman Rink, the city couldn’t build it.  Took them nine years.  They had no idea what they were doing.

And I had that whole big — about 70,000 feet — it’s like a massive office floor — bigger than an office floor.  We did it all in one day, and the trunks were lined up from Central Park all the way back into Harlem.  And they did it all in one day — that pour.  It was called a contiguous pour.  The city used to build little pieces.  A little piece here.  A little piece there.  A little piece here.  A little there.  (Laughter.)  A few years later: a little piece here.  Then they had pipes underneath and the pipes were made out of copper.

And during the evening, things would happen, like the copper would be stolen because it was very valuable.  (Laughter.)  So they’d have a little piece with copper, and then the rest of the pipe they’d lay.  And they’d get ready to pour, and they’d leave, and everybody would steal the copper.  So they — this took place for — I guess, from seven to nine years.  Nobody actually knows.  Nobody wants to talk about it.  (Laughter.)  But those trucks were operated incredibly well, and I never missed a delivery.  And it’s called the “Teamsters.”  (Applause.)

I also want to thank I also want to thank Bechtel, a real incredible company.  We talk about the great builders of the world: President Jack Futcher.  Where is he?  Where is he?  Jack.  Where is Jack?  (Applause.)  Jack.  What a great job you’ve done, Jack.  Some big ones.  Think of it this way, Jack.  If we don’t win, you won’t be doing anything in this country.  (Laughter.)  And, you know, the world follows us.  You see that.  The world follows us.  And it won’t be so good.  But you and I are friends, and you’re going to have a lot of work to do, I think, Jack.  A lot of work.  Thank you, Jack.  Great job.  (Applause.)  Jack has done an incredible job.  That’s an incredible company.  Incredible — they’re incredible builders.

And the Secretary-Treasurer of North America’s Building Trades Unions, Brent Booker.  Where’s Brent?  Brent.  Thank you.  Great job.  (Applause.)  Young guy.  You’re so young, Brent.  How the hell did you get that job?  (Laughter.)  Man.

We’re honored to be joined by two leaders who truly have the backs of American workers.  They’ve become friends of mine.  They do such an incredible job.  They break up the roadblocks.  We have a lot of roadblocks in this country, where you have — a little clause can stop a project.  A little clause can stop it for years.  And we break up those little clauses.  We break them up fast.  Energy Secretary Rick Perry.  Where’s Rick?  Rick?  (Applause.)  Thank you, Rick.  What a great guy.

I had to compete with him.  You know, he wanted to be President.  He was tough.  He was nasty.  Man.  (Laughter.)  He was nasty.  But then he said, “I want to do something great.”  And you have been incredible.  He ran Texas for like 14 years — (applause) — and he did it well.  And now he’s running a little thing called “Energy.”  And nobody has ever done it better.  Thank you, Rick, very much.  Great job.

And a man who has been incredible in every way.  You know, EPA — Environmental Protection Agency.  You’ve heard a lot of horror stories where nothing can get done, nothing gets passed.  It takes years and years and years to get a simple permit.  It can take 20, 21 years to get a road, before they reject it.  How about this?  They go 20 years — 21 years, in certain cases — for a highway or a road.  Not even a highway.  At the end of the 21st year, they vote to reject it.  How would you like to be — you’re a young person, you’re starting out, and you’re all excited about this project.  And it starts off as being a simple, straight road, and then it ends up being a total catastrophe because of nesting and lots of other things that we can take care of.  And it’s 20 years later, and then they reject it.  You’ve devote half of your working life to a rejection.  It happened to many people.

And we have a man that knows how to break it up but he’s also a great lover of the environment: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler.  He’s done an incredible job.  Andrew?  (Applause.)  Great job, Andrew.  Great.  Really great job.

And I also want to recognize some of my great friends that have helped me so much: Congressman John Joyce.  John?  (Applause.)  John.  Where is John?  John.  John, usually you’re in the front row.  I can’t believe this.  I guess you got shut out by the unions.  Look.  (Laughter.)  Thank you, John.  Fantastic job.  John Joyce.  Been a great friend — a great friend of all of us.

Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives Michael Turzai.  (Applause.)  Michael Turzai.  Thank you.  Michael, great job.  Thank you.  Good to see you, Michael.  Michael Turzai.  Great name in this state, I’ll tell you, for a long time.  How long has it been, Michael?  You’ve been there a long time.  How long?

SPEAKER TURZAI:  (Inaudible.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Okay.  Good luck.  (Laughter.)  It’s not that long.  Thank you, Mike.

And one of my good friends from Beaver County, David Urban.  David.  (Applause.)  David.  Where’s David?  David?  Thank you, David.  Great football player.  Great athlete.  And he was a Trump supporter.  He liked Trump.  And when he liked Trump, nobody was going to get in his way.  Right, David?

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love Trump!

THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughs.)  Thank you.  Thank you.
How are we doing in the state, David?  We looking good?

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  I appreciate it.  (Applause.)  Thank you.

I think we’re looking very good.  I think we’re looking good all over: in Ohio, in North Carolina, in South Carolina, Florida.  We just got numbers in Florida.  We’re looking fantastically good.

Now, you know, sometimes — and they do.  They do.  They say, “Donald Trump…”  Can you imagine if I got a fair press?  I mean, we’re leading without it.  Can you imagine if these people treated me fairly?  (Applause.)  The election would be over.  Have they ever called off an election before?  Just said, “Look, just — let’s go.  Go on.  Four more years.”

Yeah.  And then, you want to really drive them crazy?  Go to “#thirdterm”; “#fourthterm.”  You’ll drive them totally crazy.  (Laughter.)  I mean, you have one guy on television: “I’m telling you, he’s not leaving.  He’s going to win and then he’s not leaving.  So, in 2024, he won’t leave.  I’m telling you…”  This is a serious person.  These people have gone stone-cold crazy.  (Laughter.)

And we’re grateful especially to the Chairman of Royal Dutch Shell.  That’s big stuff, folks.  You know, I’m a business guy.  When I hear “Royal Dutch Shell” — you know, until I became President, that was like a big deal, but now I don’t view it the same.  (Laughter.)  Once you’re President, nothing seems big.  Right?  Chad Holliday.  Where’s Chad?  (Applause.)  Chad understands it.  That’s a big deal, Chad.  But thank you for coming.  That’s a big deal.  You don’t get any bigger.  That’s an incredible company.

Shell’s U.S. President — you just met her and you know her; everybody knows her, and she’s got a lot of other things in store.  And she’s thanked me for what we’ve done here.  But I said, “Forget this.  We got a lot of jobs.  Let’s do a couple of more fast.  Do them fast.  We’ll get you fast approvals.”  And you may get rejected, you know, if it’s not going to be environmentally good, environmentally sound; if something is going to be wrong.  But we’re not going to take 20 years to reject you, like they did with the pipelines.  It didn’t matter; I approved them.  But that’s okay.

So we have pipelines — (applause) — oh — (applause) — we got plenty of pipeline folks here, don’t we?  Huh?  (Applause.)  I’ll tell you.  Hey, you know, that’s a bigger hand than we got from the Teamsters.  Do you believe that?  No, but, you know, they did that with the pipelines, right?  Keystone XL.  They did it with the pipelines.  Dakota Access Pipeline.  We’re building pipelines.  And if we get the pipelines approved, then you better work.  The EPA is working right now to get them approved in Texas.  And if we can do — we can increase our — we can increase.  We’re now the largest in the world in energy, by far.  But if we get those approved, Andrew — I hope Andrew is listening — EPA.  Andrew, you know what I’m saying, right?  If we get them approved in Texas fast — they said it will take 18 years.  I said, “Could you do it in about a month?”  (Applause.)  Right?

If we get, though — oh, look at those pipeline guys.  They’re so happy.  That’s a lot of jobs.  But, Andrew, if we get them approved fast, we can increase our entire output.  Texas is so big.  And it’s bigger — it turned out to be much bigger.

I also got you ANWR, in Alaska, which may be bigger than everything.  And they couldn’t get it.  Ronald Reagan couldn’t get it.  No President could get it.  And I got it approved, and we’re all set.  And so — (applause) — so we’re all set.

So, Andrew, in Texas, if you can get those pipelines going, you will be so happy.  We’ll have dinner with your family.  I’ll tell them how great you were.  (Laughter.)  Okay?  EPA.  Thank you, Andrew.

So I want to thank, though, Gretchen.  She’s been fantastic.  I also want to thank Vice President of Pennsylvania Chemicals Hilary Mercer.  I want to thank you very much for investing in the people of Pennsylvania.  (Applause.)  Hilary?  Where’s Hilary?  Thank you, Hilary.  (Applause.)  You’re investing in the people of Pennsylvania, so that’s a guarantee, as far as I’m concerned.

For generations, American greatness was forged, and fueled, and won by the extraordinary workers of this region.  This region is an incredible region.

Pennsylvania Steel raised the skyscrapers that built our cities.  And, by the way, steel — steel was dead.  Your business was dead.  Okay?  I don’t want to be overly crude.  Your business was dead.  And I put a little thing called “a 25 percent tariff” on all of the dumped steel all over the country.  And now your business is thriving.  Probably there’s few businesses that have gone proportionately up like steel and aluminum.
We did it with aluminum, too.  But they are doing well — 25 percent and 10 percent on aluminum.

And they still dump, but now the United States takes in billions of dollars and the dumping is much less, and the steel companies are thriving again.

We have to have a steel industry.  We can’t — (applause) — I mean, we need steel for defense.  We need steel — what are we going to do?  We have a little bit of a problem.  We have a little bit of a conflict.  We’ll say, “Listen, China, could you do us a favor?  We need help.  All our steel mills are closed.  Oh, damn it.  Could you send us some steel, please?  We don’t make steel anymore.”

Well, we make it now.  And I’ll tell you what: Those steel mills — U.S. Steel and all of them, all of them — they’re expanding all over the place.  New mills.  New expansions.  We hadn’t have — we didn’t have a new mill built in 30 years, and now we have many of them going up.

Many car plants — they’re coming in from Japan.  I told Prime Minister Abe — great guy.  I said, “Listen, we have a massive deficit with Japan.”  They send thousands and thousands — millions — of cars.  We send them wheat.  Wheat.  (Laughter.)  That’s not a good deal.  And they don’t even want our wheat.  They do it because they want us to at least feel that we’re okay.  You know, they do it to make us feel good.

But the deficit is massive, which — changing rapidly.  But what they’re doing is they’re buying a lot of our stuff, including our military equipment.  They’re building car plants now in the United States — in Michigan, in Pennsylvania.  Many, many of the Japanese car companies are coming over and building car plants in the United States.  It doesn’t fully do the trick, but it helps.  And those deficits will start coming down very substantially.

But we’re losing $78 billion.  For many years, we’re losing billions and billions with these countries.  And, frankly, the countries that we do the worst with are the allies — our allies.  Does that make sense to you?  Our allies take advantage of us far greater than our enemies.  And someday, I’m going to explain that to a lot of people.

Pennsylvania miners.  Do we love our miners?  (Applause.)  They lit up our towns and powered our industries.  And Pennsylvania factory workers made the American brand into the universal symbol of excellence all around the world — all over.

But, in recent decades, the loyalty of Pennsylvania workers was repaid only with betrayal.  They betrayed you.  They let your companies move to Mexico, to Canada, to China, to many other places.  We ended up with no income and massive unemployment.  Well, right now, our employment has reached the lowest level that it’s seen since the 1960s, and we’ll soon be breaking that record, I predict.  (Applause.)

And you’ve heard me say it, but now it’s even better.  Numbers just came out.  African American unemployment — lowest in history.  (Applause.)  Asian American, Hispanic American — lowest in the history of our country.  Women — lowest in 70 years.  (Applause.)  Sorry, women.  I let you down again.  Think of it: Lowest in 70 years, and I have to apologize to women.  But soon we’re going to have that — that will be a record very soon.  We’re very close to saying “lowest in history” for women — unemployment.

Today, we have more workers working in the United States than — almost 160 million — than at any time in the history of our country.  Think of that.  That’s a hell of a stat.  (Applause.)

The political class in Washington gutted your factories with horrendous trade deals — horrible.  NAFTA — one of the worst trade deals ever.  By the way, World Trade Organization, it made China.  China made themselves.  They did a good job.  But they ripped off our country for years, and with our money and World Trade Organization backing.  And then they took advantage of the rules of the World Trade Organization.  And I’m being nice when I say “took advantage.”  Much more than “took advantage.”  They went up like a rocket ship.  They were flat-lined for 100 years.  And then, one day, World Trade Organization — a terrible move.

And, you know, we were losing all our cases until I came along.  We were losing all our cases in the World Trade Organization.  Almost every case, we were — lost, lost, lost.  They thought we were stupid.  They were the ones ruling.

And then I came along.  Now we’re winning a lot of cases because they know that they’re not on very solid ground.  We will leave, if we have to.  And all of the sudden, we’re winning a lot of cases.  We’re winning most of our cases.  And it’s only because of attitude, because we know that they have been screwing us for years.  And it’s not going to happen any longer.  They get it.  They get it.  So they’re giving us victories.  They’re giving us victories.  (Applause.)

And I’d like to use a different word, but there’s no word that’s quite as —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  (Inaudible.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Right?  There’s no word that’s quite as descriptive.  I’d like to.  But that’s exactly what they were doing.  They were taking advantage of us for years and years.  And now they understand that if it’s not going to be fair, it’s not going to be at all.  We don’t need it.  We don’t need it.

So, a lot of good things.  And I think we will — I think they will treat us fairly.  I mean, the concept should work.  But people have taken advantage.

Like, for instance, they view certain countries — like China, India, many countries — for a long time, they viewed them as “they’re growing.”  Right?  They’re “growing nations.”  We’re a “mature nation.”  They’re growing.  These are “growing nations.”

Well, they’ve grown.  And they had tremendous advantages.  But we’re not letting that happen anymore, okay?  We’re not letting that happen anymore.  Everybody is growing but us.  You know, they’re all “growing nations.”  We have to work with them, but nobody ever wants to work with the United States.  It’s a disgrace.  But it’s changing, and it’s changing fast.

And I think it’s the primary reason, probably, that I ran for President.  (Applause.)  I’d see these factories all over the country, and I’d see them empty, and I’d see the jobs going to other countries.  And I just never understood why the politicians didn’t do anything about it.  But now we’re doing it.

And, by the way, the USMCA — that’s Mexico and Canada — that deal is a fantastic deal.  And it’s a great deal for your unions, too.  We have the farmers, the unions, the manufacturers.  It’s good for everybody.  We have to get the Democrats to put it up for a vote.  And most Democrats are going to vote for it, too.  They’re under a lot of pressure to vote for it.

But that replaces one of the worst trade deals ever made, which is NAFTA.

But I watched them crush your industries with taxes and regulations, and they targeted American energy for total destruction.  You weren’t going to be able to take anything out.  That’s our gold.  That’s gold underneath our feet.  And they weren’t going to allow it to happen.

The Paris Accord: The Paris Accord was good for other countries.  It wasn’t good for us.

All the while, they expected you to stay on the sidelines, silence your voices, and surrender the future of our nation.  And you didn’t do it, but you didn’t have the right people representing you, so it didn’t matter.  But when you finally had the right person — the person that really cared — because let me tell — this thing is costing me a fortune, being President.  Somebody said, “Oh, he might have rented a room for — to a man from Saudi Arabia for $500.”  What about the $5 billion that I’ll lose?  You know, it’s probably going to cost me — including upside, downside, lawyers — because every day, they sue me for something.  (Laughter.)  These are the most litigious people.  It’s probably costing me from 3 to 5 billion for the privilege of being — and I couldn’t care less.  I don’t care.  You know, if you’re wealthy, it doesn’t matter.  I just want to do a great job.  That’s why — I don’t care.  I want to do the right job.

When this great building company comes here and wants to build a plant, I want to make it easy for them, not hard for them.  I’m not jealous of them.  I couldn’t care less.  Bechtel.  (Applause.)  I’m not jealous of them.

I got sued on a thing called “emoluments.”  Emoluments.  You ever hear the word?  Nobody ever heard of it before.  They went back.  Now, nobody looks at Obama getting $60 million for a book.  That’s okay.  Even though nobody in history ever got that money for a book.  Obama got $60 million.  Think of it: $60 million for a book.  Nobody looks — nobody looks at any —

But with me, it’s everything.  Emoluments.  Nobody knows what it is.  Here’s the good news: Last month, I just won two cases on emoluments.  And the judge was scolding of the other side.  And what it is, is presidential harassment because this thing is costing me a fortune, and I love it, okay?  I love it because I’m making the lives of other people much, much better.  (Applause.)
And each of you here today is living proof that America never surrenders.  We don’t surrender.  And we were in bad shape.  This area was in really bad shape.  And now you look outside, and you say, “That’s like the eighth wonder of the world.”

Under my administration, we’re fighting back and we’re winning because we are truly and finally putting America first.  (Applause.)  After years of building up foreign countries, we are finally building up our country.  Think of it, we protect the border of South Korea, but we don’t protect our own border.  But now we are.

And the wall is being built.  We won that case two weeks ago.  (Applause.)  We won that case.  The wall is being — and we’re going to have a lot of it.  We’re going to have anywhere from 400 to 500 miles built by the end of next year.  We’re building a lot of wall and we need it.  We need it.  We want people to come into our country.  They have to come in legally and we want them to come in through merit.  (Applause.)

The last administration tried to shut down Pennsylvania coal and Pennsylvania fracking.  If they got in, your fracking is gone, your coal is gone, you guys — I don’t know what the hell you’re going to do.  You don’t want to make widgets, right?  (Laughter.)  You don’t want to make — do you want to learn how to make a computer?  A little tiny piece of stuff you put in with those big, beautiful hands of yours.  (Laughter.)  They’re going to take these big hands — he’s going to take this little tiny part.  (Laughter.)  He’s going to go home, “Alice, this is a tough job.”  (Laughter.)  No, you want to make steel and you want to dig coal, and that’s what you want to do.

I was in West Virginia when Hillary made that terrible statement that she wants to close up all of the coal.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  She forgot: In three weeks, she was going to West Virginia.  Remember, she wanted to close up all coal.  She was in an area where they didn’t do the coal.  And she said, “Well, I look forward to closing up all coal.  It’s going to be closed.  Steel — going to be in big trouble.”  She forgot: In three weeks, she was going to West Virginia.  That didn’t work out too well.  (Laughter.)  I won that one by 42 points.  Forty-two points.  West Virginia.  (Applause.)

And I actually think, this time, we have a good chance of winning Virginia, which is a tough one to win because, you know, you have some people there that maybe don’t agree with us.  But I think we have a really good chance of Virginia, too, which is something that hasn’t been won by a Republican in a long time.  But it’s common sense.  Some — a lot of this is — you know, they say, politics — politics — great politics is common sense.

But on my first day in office, I ended the war on American energy.  And that’s common sense, I think.  You know, that’s common sense.  (Applause.)

We’re lucky.  You go to places like China, they don’t have oil and gas.  They don’t have it under their — they have to go buy it and then they devalue their currency and manipulate their currency.  And that costs them a fortune to go out and buy it.  They hurt themselves in the long run.  But they’re devaluing all over the place, as others are.

But we have this unbelievable — the greatest in the world.  We have the greatest resources, which really came about over the last few years.  Nobody knew this.  Fracking made it possible.  Other new technologies made it possible.  And now we’re the number-one — think of it, as I said — the number-one energy producer in the world.

I’m so proud of that because we wouldn’t have been number five.  They were going to close it up.  They were going to close it up.  And it’s common sense.  They wanted to take away our wealth.

That’s what the Paris Accord would have done.  It would have taken away our wealth.  It wasn’t for us; it was good for others.  It wasn’t for us.  We had to pay money to other countries that are very substantial countries.  They wanted to take away your wealth.  They didn’t want you to drill.  They didn’t want you to frack.  They didn’t want you to do steel.  They wanted to take away your wealth.

Now, the press will try and spin that differently, but I’m right, okay?  The fake news.  (Applause.)  That’s a lot of people back there for a — like an 11 o’clock speech.  That’s a lot of people.  (Laughter.)  That’s a lot.  That’s like the Academy Awards during the day.  (Laughter.)

It used to be.  You know, the Academy Awards is on hard times now.  You know that.  Nobody wants to watch it.  You know, why?  Because they started taking us on.  Everyone got tired of it.  It’s amazing.  That used to be second after the Super Bowl, and then, all of a sudden, now it’s just another show because people got tired of people getting up and making fools of themselves and disrespecting the people in this room and the people that won the election in 2016 — (applause) — and the people that won the Senate, without me on the ticket, in 2018.

You know, they never say that.  We won the Senate.  That’s why we’ll have appointed, within two months, 179 federal judges and two Supreme Court judges.  Think of that: 179.  (Applause.)  But they don’t say we won the Senate; they say we lost the House.  And, you know, there were a lot of people running for the House; it’s hard for me to campaign.  But almost everybody I campaigned for won.  We had tremendous records in ’18 and I wasn’t running.  There’s a big difference.  In 2020, we’re running, so you better get out there and make sure we win.  (Applause.)

And we have a record that nobody’s ever had.  Remember, when I was running, I was saying, “We’re going to do this.  We’re going to create jobs.”  Everyone — you know, big yawn.  And, you know, we like — “Let’s give him a shot.  What do we have to lose, right?”

I said that with African Americans.  They had the worst crime rates, the worst education, the worst everything.  They had like 10 things — I’m reading it off a list.  I looked — I said, “What the hell do you have to lose?”

But I really sort of said the same thing to everybody because our country wasn’t doing well with Biden and Obama.  It wasn’t doing well.  And they were pouring money in — pouring, pouring money in.  And it wasn’t doing well.

Even now, you know, you see the interest rates.  I’m paying a normalized interest rate.  We should be paying less, frankly.  This guy has made a big mistake.  He’s made a big mistake — the head of the Fed.  That was another beauty that I chose.  But even with that, we’re paying a normalized interest rate.

The nice thing is you get some interest from the bank.  With President Obama, he was paying nothing.  It’s easy to make money when you you’re paying nothing; you’re paying zero.  Easy.  But even with that, our economy is roaring and his wasn’t.  It was the weakest economy since the Great Depression.  The weakest up.

So we have it going.  Our country now has the hottest economy anywhere in the world.  Every time a prime minister, president, king, queen, dictator, whatever they may be — some are sort of mutual.  Some you have presidents and prime ministers who are actually dictators.  But they come in and they see me at the Oval Office, they always say — almost everybody — “Congratulations on your incredible economy.  What you’ve done is incredible: the tax cuts, the regulation cuts, all of the things we’ve done.”

And they were all saying — and they want to try and copy us.  It’s not easy to copy us. And part of the reason it’s not easy is because of the people like this, all over the country — the people in this room.  You are incredible people.  That was an incredible win.  Thank you.  (Applause.)  Incredible.  Incredible people.  Incredible people.

And here in the Appalachian region, where the Marcellus and Utica shale formations generate one-third of American natural gas — think of that.  You’ve been sitting on this for a long time, and yet, look at the numbers.  Look at the way you lived.  Because you never had anybody that wanted to take advantage of it, but now we’re taking advantage of it.  You’re sitting on gold, and we’re taking advantage of it.  And your future has never looked brighter or better.  It’s so great that you stayed, because you suffered.  This whole region — Appalachia.  The whole re- — it just suffered, this whole region, with great people — the greatest people.  And you suffered.

When this plant opens, 600 American workers will get the fulltime jobs, with quality healthcare, pensions, and great pay to support a family.  And you have — I said before — almost 2,000 construction workers.  And you’re going to another plant because we’re going to talk to Bechtel after this, and we’re talking to Shell.  I mean, you got the boss from Shell.  You people don’t realize, that’s a big deal.  I don’t know where the hell he comes from.  Where are you based?  It’s not in this country.  Hey, how about moving Shell to the United States?  (Applause.)  Well, we’re ready if you are.  Just let me know.  But they have their big USA division.  But that’s a great company.  It’s a big deal.  And that you’re here is a big deal.  That’s a big deal to me, and it’s a big deal to everybody in this room.  (Applause.)  You have the top man — top man at Shell.

But this is just the beginning.  My administration is clearing the way for other massive, multi-billion-dollar investments.  We just did one in Louisiana.  It’s a 10-billion-dollar plant.  There’s more pipes in that plant that I’ve ever seen in my life.  There’s more plant — you know that.  LNG.  It’s an LNG plant.  Ten billion dollars.  And we’re now — it’s totally sold out.  They sell it like you rent office space.  Can you believe it?  It’s all sold out.

All over the world, people have used it.  And you haven’t had a plant like that built in this country, really, ever, because there’s never been anything that big.  But you didn’t build plants like that because, environmentally, they weren’t letting you.  And yet, environmentally, it’s so good what they’ve done and what they can build today.

Investments that could bring more than 100,000 new jobs to this region are now being looked at very seriously.  And I think the hundred-thousand-doll- — I really do.  I feel the hundred thousand jobs, Andrew, is going to be a very low number.  I think you’re going to have many more.  This is an incredible region.  You’re sitting on top of something special.  It’s all fueled by the greatest treasure on the planet: American energy.  And we don’t want people taking that away from us.

Two more companies have recently proposed a 10-billion-dollar investment in the great state of Ohio.  Incredible state.  (Applause.)  We have tens of billions of dollars’ worth of investments, and this is really good stuff that we’re now negotiating.  But these two are in Ohio.  The energy revolution is also creating new jobs in West Virginia, [New] Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Kansas, Louisiana, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, all across our beautiful land.  You have no idea what’s going on, including, as I said before, car companies.  We didn’t make cars.  Look, we lost 32 percent of our car companies to Mexico — before I got there, by the way.  Now it’s very, very hard to do that anymore.  Nobody is going to be looking that way, I don’t think.

And I want to thank Mexico because the President now has been great, and he’s got 27,000 soldiers on our southern border and on his border with Guatemala, keeping our borders safe.  (Applause.)  Our numbers are plummeting — the people coming in — (applause) — all because the Democrats won’t approve fixing the loopholes and asylum.  So, I want to thank Mexico.  It’s incredible.  We have close to 27,000 — so, you think of that.  We never had three.  I think we had about two and a half soldiers.  One was sitting down all the time.  We had nobody.

And don’t forget, the southern border is 2,000 miles, from the Gulf to the Pacific.  We have 27,000, and they’re doing a great job.  And they’re helping themselves too because they’re disrupting and really hurting the cartels.  So much of that stuff is run illegally by the cartels: human trafficking, drugs, people.  It’s terrible.  And Mexico, I’ll tell you, they’re — so far.  I hope they’re going to keep it up.  I hope they’re going to keep it up.  But they’ve been great.  And 27,000 people.  They wouldn’t have done that for any other President, that I can tell you.  That I can tell you.

With us today are a few of the hardworking Pennsylvania patriots who are making this comeback possible.

Jason Eckhart is the third generation of his family to work on these grounds.  And he’s doing better than any of them.  His father and — by the way, three years ago, you wouldn’t have said that.  Three years ago, his father would say, “Hey, I had it made.”  His grandparents would say, “We had it made.”  Now he can look at them and say, “Dad, we have it made.”

His father and grandfather worked for the zinc smelting company previously housed at this site.  When that plant closed in 2014, 500 jobs disappeared — like magic.  Remember President Obama, “You need magic to bring back manufacturing jobs.  You need a magic wand.”  You remember?  “Not going to happen.”  Well, so far, we’ve brought back 600,000 manufacturing jobs.  (Applause.)

And Jason never imagined he would get the chance to carry on his family’s legacy. But now, he has.  He is carrying it on, and he’s carrying it on proudly.  He’s a great American.  Jason — where are you, Jason?  Jason.  Jason.  Come on up, Jason.  Come on.  Let’s get Jason up.  (Applause.)  Come on up.  Jason.  I’d like Jason to tell us what this great facility means to him and to his family.  Thank you.

Jason, come tell us what this facility means to you.

MR. ECKHART:  Thank you, Mr. President.  (Applause.)

It’s been amazing to see the transformation on this site, from a 100-year-old zinc smelter to a state-of-the-art petrochem facility.  I’m very proud to be part of Pennsylvania Chemicals, to redevelop this site, and create the jobs in Western Pennsylvania for all of you.  (Applause.)

And it’s very exciting to think about what we have to come, starting this place up and having jobs into the future for our families.

As a native from this area — I’m from right here in Center Township — I can appreciate how much this means to the area.  I’m really proud to be a part of this and be proud of all you guys.  Thanks.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you, Jason.  Great.  Did you enjoy doing that, Jason?  Huh?  I think so.  You had a big group of people back here that likes you a lot.  They’re giving him a hard time back there, right?  His friends.  Thanks, Jason.

Heather Michaux grew up here in Beaver County, and has been working for Shell in other states for several years.  Now she can raise her family right near her parents and loved ones, and actually be home, where she wants to be and where she belongs.

Heather, please come up and tell us about your journey.  (Applause.)

MS. MICHAUX:  Thank you, Mr. President.

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.

MS. MICHAUX:  So, for me, when Shell announced that we were going to be building a facility in Beaver County, I was in Texas and I was so excited — but not just for me getting to further my career and move home; I was excited for all the possibilities that had opened up for my hometown.  I was excited because I recognized the potential that a place like this has, for us to be able to hone our existing skills and to gain new ones, too.

So I knew that we, the hardworking people of Western Pennsylvania — and other places in the U.S., too — would now have this fresh opportunity and would take advantage of it.  And that’s the opportunity that I see the thousands of you folks taking advantage of now — not only today, but we’re also creating something that is going to well outlive us by building this site.  And I am really proud to be a part of that legacy, sir.

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)  Great job.  Thank you.  She’ll be running for office soon.  (Laughter.)  Fantastic job.

Samantha Polizotto was a single mom working full-time when she learned about process technology training programs at the local community college, funded by Shell.  She became the first woman to graduate from that program, and she made the Dean’s List.  That’s pretty good.  Now she’s leading the way as one of the very first production operators hired here at Shell.

Samantha, please come up and say a few words.  Please.  (Applause.)

MS. POLIZOTTO:  Growing up in Beaver County, I can recall people talking of the “good old days,” when steel mills were running and, often, people were born and spent their whole lives in the same town.  Local families had multiple generations working the same industry and, in many cases, the same companies.

This was a fact for our parents.  But with the fall of the steel mills in this area, it began to see a period of stagnation.  Hardworking men and women in this area, full of pride, still lace up their work boots, driving by the vacant skeletons of the old mills and refineries, holding onto the hope that, one day, this area would see its former glory.

The announcement of Shell Pennsylvania Chemicals Plant seems to have kindled that spark within the community.  It has provided an opportunity for steady employment for many different skilled tradesmen, emptying many of the local union halls.

As a young woman, this has also afforded me an incredible opportunity to come into the ground floor of an unprecedented project.  In school, I chose a field far different than many of my female colleagues.  Process technology is a focused area of studies around production and operations.

Predominantly male-dominated careers, I knew there would be challenges as I entered the workforce.  Being a mother and a wife, I must balance my responsibilities at work and at home.  The challenges I have faced have been softened by a network of support that has been given to me not only by my family, but also through the Community College of Beaver County, my coworkers, and, now, the culture of care at Shell.  I am proud to play a role in this project, as it restores this area and makes Beaver County great again.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you, Samantha.  That was a great job.  Thank you.

To help create more opportunities for workers like Jason, Heather, and Samantha, my administration started the Pledge to America’s Workers.  Our partners are providing over 12 million training and enhanced career opportunities to American workers.  And my daughter, Ivanka, is working so hard on it.  She’s done a great job.  Twelve million people, so far, have been positively affected.

Today, I’m pleased to announce that Shell is signing the Pledge to America’s Workers to provide enhanced career opportunities.  By the way, Shell, thank you.  (Applause.)  They’re providing career opportunities to 3,300 workers over five years, right here in Western Pennsylvania.  That’s great.  Thank you, fellas.  Thank you very much.  And thank you, Hilary, for that tremendous commitment that you’ve made.  We really appreciate it.  Fantastic job.

Under this administration, we live by two very simple words: Buy American.  That’s what we want.  I’m going to add something: “Hire American.”  It’s about hiring American, buying American.  It’s about “America First.”  It’s about “Make America Great Again.”  It’s about “Keep America Great.”  (Applause.)

Despite all of this exceptional progress, however, some politicians in this country still want to keep America’s vast energy treasures buried deep underground and let other nations take advantage of our country.  Not happening anymore.

They see factories like this one not as a cause for celebration, but for condemnation.  Democrats in Congress are pushing hard for the Green New Deal.  How about that one?  Green New Deal.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Where it puts everybody in this room out of work — hate to tell you — and a lot more people.  Everybody out of work.  And other — but I don’t want to speak badly about it.  You know, you’ve heard me say this: I want to encourage them.  That should be their platform.  (Laughter.)  I don’t want to do it too early.  I did it very early, with Pocahontas; I should have probably waited.  She’s staging a comeback on Sleepy Joe.  (Laughter.)  I don’t know who’s going to win, but we’ll have to hit Pocahontas very hard again if she does win.  But she’s staging a little bit of a comeback.

What a group: Pocahontas and Sleepy Joe.  (Laughter.)  I don’t think they give a damn about Western Pennsylvania, do you?

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  I don’t think so.  And other radical plans to wipe out our coal.  That’s what they want.  They want to wipe out our oil.  They want to wipe out our natural gas industries, while allowing other countries to steal our jobs.

Virtually every leading Democrat has vowed to eliminate fossil fuels, obliterating millions of American jobs, devastating communities, and bankrupting factories, families, and senior citizens all across this region.

And, by the way, this is only fuel that has the power for plants.  When you have to steam up and you have to fuel up on these giant plants, these giant generators, these giant electrical factories, you need what you’re doing.  You need this.  It’s got the power.  The other doesn’t have the power; certainly not yet.  Probably never will.

And we’re not taking chances.  And we have the cleanest air and water we’ve ever had in our country right now.  The cleanest we’ve ever had.  And we’re going to keep it that way.  (Applause.)

But we’re never going to allow other countries and outside sources to take away our great wealth, because that’s what they want to do.  They want to take away our wealth, take away our jobs.  We’re not going to let it happen.

To see the destructive results of the far-left’s energy nightmare, just compare the enormous success here in Pennsylvania with the tremendous folly happening right across a line — a little line — ina New York.  Both states have vast energy reserves, but New York prohibits development while Pennsylvania welcomes it.

From 2010 to 2017, natural gas production plummeted by nearly 70 percent in New York, but it soared almost 1,000 percent in Pennsylvania.  And New York won’t allow us to build a pipeline across because New York is sort of a long state and we can’t have pipelines going across, helping a region that’s not a wealthy region at all.  They have a lot of economic problems.  People are leaving, left and right.

We want to get it over to the waters.  We want to get it over to the oceans.  We want to get it up to New England, where they have the highest energy costs anywhere in the United States.  We can’t get energy because New York doesn’t allow the pipelines to go through.  And that’s going to be very costly for New York, ultimately.

As a result, families in Pennsylvania shale country got more jobs, billions of dollars in royalty payments, and wages that are significantly higher compared to their neighbors just across the state line.

Meanwhile, families in New York — I love New York; that’s where I’m from.  Probably, most of you don’t know that.  (Laughter.)  That’s where I’m from.  They’re burdened with more power outages and electricity rates — you never saw anything like this — that are much, much higher than neighboring states and than your state.  New York energy rates are through the roof.  New England, through the roof.  A lot of it has to do with the fact that we can’t get pipelines through New York.  New York won’t let us.  They won’t let us.

All New York likes to do is sue me.  They like to sue me.  (Laughter.)  They’re always suing.  I said, “Which lawyer is handling that case?”  No, they sue me for everything so they can try to stop us by any means possible.  The radical Left wants to do to America what they’ve done to New York: raise prices, kill jobs, and leave our nation less independent and far less secure.

My vision is the exact opposite.  And we want to work with New York and we want to help New York.  They need jobs in New York so badly.

You know, they talk about the environment.  So you have the state line, and over here you have machinery fracking.  And over here you have nothing, except poverty.  Over here you have people driving new cars and nice cars.  And over here you have cars that are 40 years old.  Now, what does that have to do with the environment?  It’s the same.  It’s an artificial line.

And I wonder what happens when they get down there.  What happens?  I just wonder, is New York losing its wealth?  You know what I’m talking about, right?  What happens when those lines go down and they can go in any direction now?  The equipment is so incredible.

So, hopefully, we can help New York.  I want to help New York so much.  We will never allow ourselves to be at the mercy of foreign energy suppliers.  And that’s what’s fighting us.  They don’t want us to have great energy.  They’ve made a fortune selling us energy.

You probably saw the Straits the other day.  Very few American boats are there.  They capture — Iran, I broke up that deal.  That was a good thing to do.  It’s a whole different country right now.  (Applause.)

But they’re capturing boats from other countries.  They’re not taking our boats.  And one of the things that was brought up by the media, actually — and wisely and correctly brought out — we have very few boats going there anymore because we have our own oil and gas.  We don’t need it from the Middle East anymore.  (Applause.)

And that’s why we’re pursuing a future not only of energy independence — but not just words.  You know, you’ve been hearing “energy independence” for years and years, and you’d hear it.  We have real independence.  But what we want now is not independence; we want American energy dominance.  Dominance.  (Applause.)

Instead of relying on foreign countries, we are now relying on American producers.  And we are relying on American workers to build our own future right here on American soil.  It’s time.  (Applause.)

And together, we’re defending the oil and gas workers who light up our cities and uplift our communities.  We’re fighting for the technicians and construction workers here in Beaver County who are building a powerful engine of American commerce.  There’s no place like what you’re seeing right outside these doors.  There is no place like it.

We’re here once again to stand up for the engineers and the factory workers who will shape the work of your hands into American-made products sold all over the world.  That’s what’s going to happen.  That’s what you’re producing.

And everyday patriots who make this all possible, you are the backbone of America.  The absolute backbone.  And you haven’t been given the honor of having that said by other people.  But you are the backbone of this country.  (Applause.)  It’s true.  So true.

You are the ones who work hard, pay your taxes, build your neighborhoods, obey our laws, safeguard our values, raise up your children, make this land the greatest nation ever to exist on the face of the Earth.  You are the ones who do it.  We work with a lot of people, but you are there and you are doing it.  You’ve always been loyal to America, and now you finally have a President of the United States who is loyal to you.  (Applause.)

Our vision is pro-worker, pro-jobs, pro-family, pro-growth, pro-energy, and 100 percent pro-American.  (Applause.)

And we’re taking care of our military, and we’re taking care of our vets.  Veterans Choice: You’ve been hearing it about for 45 years.  I got it approved.  Veterans Choice.  We’re taking care of our veterans.  We’re taking care of our military like never, ever before.  (Applause.)

Because Americans can do anything, go anywhere, and outperform anyone.  Nobody can beat us.  Nothing can stop us because winning is what Americans do.  Winning is what we know best.  We will keep winning, wining, winning.

And I used to tell you the story about winning.  I used to say that your great leaders would come to Washington and they would say, “President, we’re winning too much.  We can’t take it anymore.  The people of Pennsylvania cannot stand winning.  We haven’t won for years and years and now we’re winning too much.  Mr. President, please, for the good of the people of Pennsylvania, stop winning.  Stop creating all these jobs.  Stop creating all this product.  Please, sir.  Please, stop winning.”

And I said to them, and I will say to them, “We’re never going to stop winning because nobody has ever won like what’s happened over the last couple of years.  Nobody has ever won like you’re winning.”  I’ve more than fulfilled my promises.  Even they said, “He promised things, and he actually produced more than he promised.”  That’s true.  But we’re going to produce more and more.

I just want to thank everybody.  With your help, factory floors across this land are once more crackling with life.  (Applause.)  Our steel mills are fired up and blazing bright.  The assembly lines are roaring.  Industry is booming.  And the hearts of our workers, the American spirit, is soaring higher, stronger, freer, and greater than ever before.

I want to thank you all for giving this nation your very best.  And your very best cannot be beaten.  I want to thank you for filling America with pride.  We are proud of you.  We think you are just incredible, incredible people.  And it’s an honor for me to be with you in Pennsylvania.

Thank you very much.  God bless you.  (Applause.)  God bless you.

END

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-american-energy-manufacturing-monaco-pa/

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The Pronk Pops Show 1233, April 4, 2019, Story 1: Largest Raid Of A Business, CVE, In United States In Last Ten Years: Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Arrests 280 Illegal Alien Employees At Business In Allen For Administrative Immigration Violations — Did Not Arrest  Managers, Executives and Owners of Company Who Hired Illegal Aliens — Family Deported Together Stays Together — Videos — Story 2: Competitive Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Health Care vs Monopoly Socialized Government Health Care — Live Now or Die While Waiting — Videos — Story 3: U.S Weekly Jobless Claims Fall To Lowest Level in 50 Years (1969) — Videos

Posted on April 6, 2019. Filed under: 2020 Democrat Candidates, 2020 President Candidates, 2020 Republican Candidates, Addiction, American History, Barack H. Obama, Bernie Sander, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Business, Cartoons, Clinton Obama Democrat Criminal Conspiracy, Communications, Computers, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Culture, Deep State, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Drugs, Economics, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Energy, Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Former President Barack Obama, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Immigration, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Kamala Harris, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Medicare, Medicine, Mental Illness, Military Spending, National Interest, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Progressives, Public Corruption, Radio, Rand Paul, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Resources, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Security, Spying, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Surveillance/Spying, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, Trump Surveillance/Spying, Unemployment, United States Constitution, United States of America, United States Supreme Court, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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See the source imageSee the source imageSee the source imageSee the source imageSee the source imageSee the source image

See the source image

 

Story 1: Story 1: Largest Raid Of Business CVE In United States In Last Ten Years: Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Arrests 280 Illegal Alien Employees At Business In Allen For Administrative Immigration Violations — Did Not Arrest  Managers, Executives and Owners of Company Who Hired Illegal Aliens — Family Deported Together Stays Together — Videos —

See the source image

ICE Arrests Hundreds In Texas In Largest Workplace Raid In Over A Decade

280 People Arrested On Immigration Violations In Allen

SURPRISE It’s ICE: Illegal Immigration Raid In Texas

ICE cracking down on employers hiring undocumented workers

Eye on America: Georgia law enforcement partners with federal agents in immigration crackdown

Eye on America: Georgia law enforcement partners with federal agents in immigration crackdown

On the ground with ICE agents enforcing Trump’s immigration crackdown

Local police departments partnering with ICE in Texas

Inside a raid on Texas home with 62 undocumented immigrants

ICE Enforcement In Action (2017) • Dallas & New York City

A day with ICE in the so-called “Sanctuary City…

Why Many Employers Prefer to Hire Illegal Aliens

The High Cost of Illegal Immigration

Top 10 US States With The Most Illegal Immigrants 2014

Form I-9 Breaking Down The List of Acceptable Documents

 

How to Fill Out the I-9 Form

5 Most Common Questions Regarding I-9 Forms

Form I-9 On-Demand Webinar

ICE arrests nearly 300 in Texas, the largest workplace raid since before the Obama administration

I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States. This includes citizens and noncitizens. Both employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. On the form, an employee must attest to his or her employment authorization. The employee must also present his or her employer with acceptable documents evidencing identity and employment authorization. The employer must examine the employment eligibility and identity document(s) an employee presents to determine whether the document(s) reasonably appear to be genuine and to relate to the employee and record the document information on the Form I-9. The list of acceptable documents can be found on the last page of the form. Employers must retain Form I-9 for a designated period and make it available for inspection by authorized government officers. NOTE: State agencies may use Form I-9. Also, some agricultural recruiters and referrers for a fee may be required to use Form I-9.

Form 3; Supplement (if applicable): 1; Instructions 15

07/17/2017.

Do not file Form I-9 with USCIS or U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Employers must have a completed Form I-9 on file for each person on their payroll who is required to complete the form. Form I-9 must be retained and stored by the employer either for three years after the date of hire or for one year after employment is terminated, whichever is later. The form must be available for inspection by authorized U.S. Government officials from the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Labor, or Department of Justice.

$0

The Spanish version of Form I-9 may be filled out by employers and employees in Puerto Rico ONLY. Spanish-speaking employers and employees in the 50 states and other U.S. territories may print this for their reference, but may only complete the form in English to meet employment eligibility verification requirements.

To more easily complete Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, download the PDF directly to your computer. You should use the latest version of the free Adobe Reader. The Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari web browsers will prompt you to open or save the form.
To download the form from the Chrome web browser:

  1. Click the link to the Form I-9 you wish to download.
  2. Click the arrow that displays in the PDF file download box that will appear in the bottom left-hand corner.
  3. Select ‘Show in folder’ from the drop-down that appears.
  4. Open the form that appears in your Download folder.

For best results, ensure that you use the most current version of the browser of your choice.

 

Story 2: Competitive Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Health Care vs Monopoly Socialized Government Health Care — Live Now or Die While Waiting — Videos —

What’s Wrong with Government-Run Healthcare?

Government Can’t Fix Healthcare

Single-Payer Health Care: America Already Has It

The TRUTH About Universal Healthcare! (from a Canadian)

Why Is Healthcare So Expensive?

Republicans pump the brakes as Trump challenges Obamacare

Trump Delays Obamacare Replacement Vote Until After 2020 Election

 

Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2017

REPORT NUMBER P60-264
EDWARD R. BERCHICK, EMILY HOOD, AND JESSICA C. BARNETT

Introduction

This report presents statistics on health insurance coverage in the United States based on information collected in the 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements (CPS ASEC) and the American Community Survey (ACS).

Highlights

• In 2017, 8.8 percent of people, or 28.5 million, did not have health insurance at any point during the year as measured by the CPS ASEC. The uninsured rate and number of uninsured in 2017 were not statistically different from 2016 (8.8 percent or 28.1 million).

• The percentage of people with health insurance coverage for all or part of 2017 was 91.2 percent, not statistically different from the rate in 2016 (91.2 percent). Between 2016 and 2017, the number of people with health insurance coverage increased by 2.3 million, up to 294.6 million.

 In 2017, private health insurance coverage continued to be more prevalent than government coverage, at 67.2 percent and 37.7 percent, respectively. Of the subtypes of health insurance coverage, employer-based insurance was the most common, covering 56.0 percent of the population for some or all of the calendar year, followed by Medicaid (19.3 percent), Medicare (17.2 percent), direct-purchase coverage (16.0 percent), and military coverage (4.8 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the rate of Medicare coverage increased by 0.6 percentage points to cover 17.2 percent of people for part or all of 2017 (up from 16.7 percent in 2016).

• The military coverage rate increased by 0.2 percentage points to 4.8 percent during this time. Coverage rates for employment-based coverage, direct-purchase coverage, and Medicaid did not statistically change between 2016 and 2017.

• In 2017, the percentage of uninsured children under age 19 (5.4 percent) was not statistically different from the percentage in 2016.

• For children under age 19 in poverty, the uninsured rate (7.8 percent) was higher than for children not in poverty (4.9 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the uninsured rate did not statistically change for any race or Hispanic origin group.

• In 2017, non-Hispanic Whites had the lowest uninsured rate among race and Hispanic-origin groups (6.3 percent). The uninsured rates for Blacks and Asians were 10.6 percent and 7.3 percent, respectively. Hispanics had the highest uninsured rate (16.1 percent).

• Between 2016 and 2017, the percentage of people without health insurance coverage at the time of interview decreased in three states and increased in 14 states.

https://www.census.gov/library/publications/2018/demo/p60-264.html

Key Facts about the Uninsured Population

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) led to historic gains in health insurance coverage by extending Medicaid coverage to many low-income individuals and providing Marketplace subsidies for individuals below 400% of poverty. The number of uninsured nonelderly Americans decreased from over 44 million in 2013 (the year before the major coverage provisions went into effect) to just below 27 million in 2016. However, in 2017, the number of uninsured people increased by nearly 700,000 people, the first increase since implementation of the ACA. Ongoing efforts to alter the ACA or to make receipt of Medicaid contingent on work may further erode coverage gains seen under the ACA. This fact sheet describes how coverage has changed in recent years, examines the characteristics of the uninsured population, and summarizes the access and financial implications of not having coverage.

Summary: Key Facts about the Uninsured Population
How many people are uninsured?
In the past, gaps in the public insurance system and lack of access to affordable private coverage left millions without health insurance. Beginning in 2014, the ACA expanded coverage to millions of previously uninsured people through the expansion of Medicaid and the establishment of Health Insurance Marketplaces. Data show substantial gains in public and private insurance coverage and historic decreases in the number of uninsured people under the ACA, with nearly 20 million gaining coverage. However, for the first time since the implementation of the ACA, the number of uninsured increased by more than half a million in 2017.Why do people remain uninsured?
Even under the ACA, many uninsured people cite the high cost of insurance as the main reason they lack coverage. In 2017, 45% of uninsured adults said that they remained uninsured because the cost of coverage was too high. Many people do not have access to coverage through a job, and some people, particularly poor adults in states that did not expand Medicaid, remain ineligible for financial assistance for coverage. Some people who are eligible for financial assistance under the ACA may not know they can get help, and undocumented immigrants are ineligible for Medicaid or Marketplace coverage.Who remains uninsured?
Most uninsured people are in low-income families and have at least one worker in the family. Reflecting the more limited availability of public coverage in some states, adults are more likely to be uninsured than children. People of color are at higher risk of being uninsured than non-Hispanic Whites.How does not having coverage affect health care access?
People without insurance coverage have worse access to care than people who are insured. One in five uninsured adults in 2017 went without needed medical care due to cost. Studies repeatedly demonstrate that the uninsured are less likely than those with insurance to receive preventive care and services for major health conditions and chronic diseases.What are the financial implications of being uninsured?
The uninsured often face unaffordable medical bills when they do seek care. In 2017, uninsured nonelderly adults were over twice as likely as their insured counterparts to have had problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months. These bills can quickly translate into medical debt since most of the uninsured have low or moderate incomes and have little, if any, savings.

How many people are uninsured?

In the past, gaps in the public insurance system and lack of access to affordable private coverage left millions without health insurance, and the number of uninsured Americans grew over time, particularly during periods of economic downturns. By 2013, more than 44 million people lacked coverage. Under the ACA, as of 2014, Medicaid coverage has been expanded to nearly all adults with incomes at or below 138% of poverty in states that have expanded their programs, and tax credits are available for people who purchase coverage through a health insurance marketplace. Millions of people have enrolled in these new coverage options, and the uninsured rate dropped to a historic low. Coverage gains were particularly large among low-income adults living in states that expanded Medicaid. Still, millions of people—27.4 million nonelderly individuals in 2017—remain without coverage.1

Key Details:
  • The number of uninsured, and the share of the nonelderly population that was uninsured, rose from 44.2 million (17.1%) to 46.5 million (17.8%) between 2008 and 2010 as the country faced an economic recession (Figure 1). As early provisions of the ACA went into effect in 2010, and as the economy improved, the number of uninsured people and uninsured rate began to drop. When the major ACA coverage provisions went into effect in 2014, the number of uninsured and uninsured rate dropped dramatically and continued to fall through 2016, when just below 27 million people (10% of the nonelderly population) lacked coverage.

Number of Uninsured and Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population, 2008-2017

Figure 1: Number of Uninsured and Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population, 2008-2017

Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2013-2016

Figure 2: Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2013-2016

  • Coverage gains from 2013 to 2016 were particularly large among groups targeted by the ACA, including adults and poor and low-income individuals. The uninsured rate among nonelderly adults, who are more likely than children to be uninsured, dropped 8.4 percentage points from 20.6% in 2013 to 12.2% in 2016, a 41% decline.2 In addition, between 2013 and 2016, the uninsured rate declined substantially for poor and near-poor nonelderly individuals (Figure 2). People of color, who had higher uninsured rates than non-Hispanic Whites prior to 2014, had larger coverage gains from 2013 to 2016 than non-Hispanic Whites. Though uninsured rates dropped across all states, they dropped more in states that chose to expand Medicaid, decreasing by 7.2 percentage points from 2013 to 2016 compared to a 6.1 percentage point drop in non-expansion states.3
  • In 2017, the uninsured rate reversed course and, for the first time since the passage of the ACA, rose significantly to 10.2%. Changes in the uninsured rate in the set of states that expanded Medicaid were essentially flat overall, declining by less than 0.1 percentage points, but patterns varied by states (Appendix Table A) and by demographic group (Figure 3). In contrast, the uninsured rate in states that did not expand Medicaid increased both overall (rising by 0.6 percentage points) and for most groups (Figure 3). The largest increases in the uninsured rates in non-expansion states were among non-Hispanic Blacks and those living above poverty (Figure 3). Again, changes in coverage from 2016-2017 varied within the set of states that have not expanded Medicaid (Appendix A).

Figure 3: Change in Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics and Expansion Status, 2016-2017

Why do people remain uninsured?

Most of the nonelderly in the United States obtain health insurance through an employer, but not all workers are offered employer-sponsored coverage or, if offered, can afford their share of the premiums. Medicaid covers many low-income individuals, and financial assistance for Marketplace coverage is available for many moderate-income people. However, Medicaid eligibility for adults remains limited in some states, and few people can afford to purchase coverage without financial assistance. Some people who are eligible for coverage under the ACA may not know they can get help, and others may still find the cost of coverage prohibitive.

Key Details:
  • Cost still poses a major barrier to coverage for the uninsured. In 2017, 45% of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were uninsured because the cost is too high, making it the most common reason cited for being uninsured (Figure 4). Though financial assistance is available to many of the remaining uninsured under the ACA,4 not everyone who is uninsured is eligible for free or subsidized coverage. In addition, some uninsured who are eligible for help may not be aware of coverage options or may face barriers to enrollment.5 Outreach and enrollment assistance was key to facilitating both initial and ongoing enrollment in ACA coverage, but these programs face challenges due to funding cuts and high demand.6,7

    Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Uninsured Nonelderly Adults, 2017

    Figure 4: Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Uninsured Nonelderly Adults, 2017

  • Access to health coverage changes as a person’s situation changes. In 2017, 22% of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were uninsured because the person who carried the health coverage in their family lost their job or changed employers (Figure 4). More than one in ten were uninsured because of a marital status change, the death of a spouse or parent, or loss of eligibility due to age or leaving school (11%), and some lost Medicaid because of a new job/increase in income or the plan stopping after pregnancy (11%).8
  • As indicated above, not all workers have access to coverage through their job. In 2017, 71% of nonelderly uninsured workers worked for an employer that did not offer health benefits to the worker.9 Moreover, nine out of ten uninsured workers who do not take up an offer of employer-sponsored coverage report cost as the main reason for declining (90%).10 From 2008 to 2018, total premiums for family coverage increased by 55%, and the worker’s share increased by 65%, outpacing wage growth.11
  • Medicaid and CHIP are available for low-income children, but eligibility for adults is more limited. As of November 2018, 37 states including DC adopted Medicaid expansion eligibility for adults under the ACA.12,13 However, in states that have not expanded Medicaid, eligibility for adults remains limited, with median eligibility level for parents at just 43% of poverty and adults without dependent children ineligible in most cases.14 Millions of poor uninsured adults fall in a “coverage gap” because they earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to qualify for Marketplace premium tax credits.15
  • Undocumented immigrants are ineligible for Medicaid or Marketplace coverage.16 While lawfully-present immigrants under 400% of poverty are eligible for Marketplace tax credits, only those who have passed a five-year waiting period after receiving qualified immigration status can qualify for Medicaid.

Who remains uninsured?

Most remaining uninsured people are in working families, are in families with low incomes, and are nonelderly adults.17 Reflecting income and the availability of public coverage, people who live in the South or West are more likely to be uninsured. Most who remain uninsured have been without coverage for long periods of time. (See Appendix Table B for detailed data on the uninsured population.)

Key Details:
  • In 2017, over three quarters of the uninsured (77%) had at least one full-time worker in their family, and an additional 10% had a part-time worker in their family (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017

Figure 5: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017

  • Individuals below poverty18 are at the highest risk of being uninsured. In total, more than eight in ten of the uninsured were in families with incomes below 400% of poverty in 2017 (Figure 5).
  • While a plurality (41%) of the uninsured are non-Hispanic Whites, people of color are at higher risk of being uninsured than Whites. People of color make up 42% of the nonelderly U.S. population19 but account for over half of the total nonelderly uninsured population (Figure 5). Hispanics and Blacks have significantly higher uninsured rates (19% and 11%, respectively) than Whites (7%) (Figure 6).20

Figure 6: Uninsured Rates Among the Nonelderly Population by Selected Characteristics, 2017

  • Most (86%) of the uninsured are nonelderly adults. The uninsured rate among children was just 5% in 2017, less than half the rate among nonelderly adults (12%),21 largely due to broader availability of Medicaid/CHIP for children than for adults.
  • Most of the uninsured (75%) are U.S. citizens, and 25% are non-citizens.22 Uninsured non-citizens include both lawfully present and undocumented immigrants. Undocumented immigrants are ineligible for federally funded health coverage, but legal immigrants can qualify for subsidies in the Marketplaces and those who have been in the country for more than five years are eligible for Medicaid.23
  • Uninsured rates vary by state and by region, with individuals living in non-expansion states being the most likely to be uninsured (Figure 6). Thirteen of the eighteen states with the highest uninsured rates in 2017 were non-expansion states as of that year (Figure 7 and Appendix A). Economic conditions, availability of employer-sponsored coverage, and demographics are other factors contributing to variation in uninsured rates across states.

    Figure 7:

    Figure 7: Uninsured Rates Among the Nonelderly by State, 2017

  • Nearly three-fourths (74%) of the nonelderly adults uninsured in 2017 have been without coverage for more than a year.24 People who have been without coverage for long periods may be particularly hard to reach in outreach and enrollment efforts.

How does not having coverage affect health care access?

Health insurance makes a difference in whether and when people get necessary medical care, where they get their care, and ultimately, how healthy they are. Uninsured adults are far more likely than those with insurance to postpone health care or forgo it altogether. The consequences can be severe, particularly when preventable conditions or chronic diseases go undetected.

Key Details:
  • Studies repeatedly demonstrate that the uninsured are less likely than those with insurance to receive preventive care and services for major health conditions and chronic diseases.2526 One in five (20%) nonelderly adults without coverage say that they went without care in the past year because of cost compared to 3% of adults with private coverage and 8% of adults with public coverage. Part of the reason for poor access among the uninsured is that many (50%) do not have a regular place to go when they are sick or need medical advice (Figure 8).

    Figure 8: Barriers to Health Care Among Nonelderly Adults by Insurance Status, 2017

  • Because of the cost of care, many uninsured people do not obtain the treatments their health care providers recommend for them. In 2017, uninsured nonelderly adults were more than three times as likely as adults with private coverage to say that they postponed or did not get a needed prescription drug due to cost (19% vs. 6%).27 And while insured and uninsured people who are injured or newly diagnosed with a chronic condition receive similar plans for follow-up care, people without health coverage are less likely than those with coverage to obtain all the recommended services.28
  • Because people without health coverage are less likely than those with insurance to have regular outpatient care, they are more likely to be hospitalized for avoidable health problems and to experience declines in their overall health. When they are hospitalized, uninsured people receive fewer diagnostic and therapeutic services and also have higher mortality rates than those with insurance.29,30,31,32
  • Research demonstrates that gaining health insurance improves access to health care considerably and diminishes the adverse effects of having been uninsured. A seminal study of a Medicaid expansion in Oregon found that uninsured adults who gained Medicaid coverage were more likely to receive care than their counterparts who did not gain coverage.33 A comprehensive review of research on the effects of the ACA Medicaid expansion finds that expansion led to positive effects on access to care, utilization of services, the affordability of care, and financial security among the low-income population.34
  • Public hospitals, community clinics and health centers, and local providers that serve disadvantaged communities provide a crucial health care safety net for uninsured people. However, safety net providers have limited resources and service capacity, and not all uninsured people have geographic access to a safety net provider.35,36 High uninsured rates also contribute to rural hospital closures, leaving individuals living in rural areas at an even greater disadvantage to accessing care.37

What are the financial implications of being uninsured?

The uninsured often face unaffordable medical bills when they do seek care. These bills can quickly translate into medical debt since most of the uninsured have low or moderate incomes and have little, if any, savings.38

Key Details:
  • Those without insurance for an entire year pay for one-fourth of their care out-of-pocket.39 In addition, hospitals frequently charge uninsured patients much higher rates than those paid by private health insurers and public programs.40,41
  • Medical bills can put great strain on the uninsured and threaten their financial well-being. In 2017, nonelderly uninsured adults were over twice as likely as those with insurance to have problems paying medical bills (29% vs. 14%; Figure 9) with nearly two thirds of uninsured who had medical bill problems unable to pay their medical bills at all (65%).42 Uninsured adults are also more likely to face negative consequences due to medical bills, such as using up savings, having difficulty paying for necessities, borrowing money, or having medical bills sent to collection.43
  • Uninsured nonelderly adults are also much more likely than their insured counterparts to lack confidence in their ability to afford usual medical costs and major medical expenses or emergencies. Uninsured nonelderly adults are over twice as likely as insured adults to worry about being able to pay costs for normal health care (61% vs. 27%; Figure 9). Furthermore, over three quarters of uninsured nonelderly adults (76%) say they are very or somewhat worried about paying medical bills if they get sick or have an accident, compared to 45% of insured adults.
  • Lacking insurance coverage puts people at risk of medical debt. In 2017, three in ten (31%) of uninsured nonelderly adults said they were paying off at least one medical bill over time (Figure 9). Nearly three in five consumers (59%) reported being contacted regarding a collection for medical bills in the United States.44 More than half (53%) of uninsured people said they had problems paying household medical bills in the past year and are more likely to be in medical debt than people with insurance.45

    Figure 9: Problems Paying Medical Bills by Insurance Status, 2017

  • Though the uninsured are typically billed for medical services they use, when they cannot pay these bills, the costs may become bad debt or uncompensated care for providers. State, federal, and private funds defray some but not all of these costs. With the expansion of coverage under the ACA, providers are seeing reductions in uncompensated care costs, particularly in states that expanded Medicaid.46
  • Research suggests that gaining health coverage improves the affordability of care and financial security among the low-income population. Multiple studies of the ACA have found larger declines in trouble paying medical bills in expansion states relative to non-expansion states. A separate study found that, among those residing in areas with high shares of low-income, uninsured individuals, Medicaid expansion significantly reduced the number of unpaid bills and the amount of debt sent to third-party collection agencies.47

Conclusion

Millions of people gained coverage under the ACA, but recent trends in insurance coverage indicate that coverage gains may be eroding. In 2017, 27.4 million people lacked health coverage, up slightly from 2016. Ongoing debate about altering the ACA or limiting Medicaid to populations traditionally served by the program could lead to further loss of coverage. On the other hand, if additional states opt to expand Medicaid as allowed under the ACA, there may be additional coverage gains as low-income individuals gain access to affordable coverage. Going without coverage can have serious health consequences for the uninsured because they receive less preventive care, and delayed care often results in serious illness or other health problems. Being uninsured also can have serious financial consequences. The outcome of ongoing debate over health coverage policy in the United States has substantial implications for people’s coverage, access, and overall health and well-being.

Appendix Table A: Uninsured Rate Among the Nonelderly by State, 2013-2017
2013
Uninsured Rate
2016
Uninsured Rate
2017
Uninsured Rate
Change in
Uninsured Rate
2013-2017
Change in Number of Uninsured
2013-2017
Change in
Uninsured Rate
2016-2017
Change in Number of Uninsured
2016-2017
US Total 16.8% 10.0% 10.2% -6.6% -17,037,000 0.2% 684,800
Expansion States 15.1% 7.7% 7.6% -7.4% -12,070,200 0.0% 4,400
Alaska 20.5% 16.0% 15.5% -4.9% -32,900 -0.5% -4,900
Arizona 20.4% 11.9% 12.0% -8.4% -435,600 0.1% 11,600
Arkansas 19.0% 9.5% 9.6% -9.5% -230,300 0.1% 2,400
California 19.4% 8.4% 8.2% -11.2% -3,619,900 -0.2% -48,700
Colorado 15.8% 8.7% 8.6% -7.2% -306,600 -0.1% -3,400
Connecticut 10.9% 5.7% 6.6% -4.3% -129,900 0.9% 25,600
Delaware 11.8% 6.8% 6.6% -5.2% -38,600 -0.1% -1,000
District of Columbia 7.2% 4.5% 4.1% -3.1% -15,000 -0.4% -1,900
Hawaii 8.2% 4.1% 4.5% -3.7% -41,800 0.4% 3,200
Illinois 14.5% 7.5% 7.9% -6.6% -739,500 0.4% 37,400
Indiana 16.3% 9.4% 9.8% -6.5% -358,700 0.4% 23,300
Iowa 10.3% 4.8% 5.2% -5.1% -129,900 0.4% 9,400
Kentucky 16.8% 6.0% 6.4% -10.4% -380,900 0.4% 14,700
Louisiana 19.2% 11.9% 9.7% -9.6% -375,800 -2.2% -85,600
Maryland 11.5% 7.0% 7.1% -4.4% -220,500 0.1% 6,100
Massachusetts 4.4% 2.9% 3.2% -1.2% -63,200 0.3% 18,900
Michigan 12.9% 6.3% 6.1% -6.9% -571,800 -0.2% -19,400
Minnesota 9.6% 4.9% 5.2% -4.3% -194,900 0.3% 15,000
Montana 19.9% 10.1% 11.0% -8.9% -72,700 0.8% 7,200
Nevada 23.5% 12.8% 12.9% -10.6% -235,000 0.1% 6,100
New Hampshire 12.8% 7.6% 6.8% -6.0% -66,400 -0.8% -9,000
New Jersey 15.4% 8.9% 8.9% -6.5% -488,200 0.0% -1,000
New Mexico 22.3% 10.7% 10.7% -11.6% -205,600 0.1% 1,500
New York 12.5% 7.0% 6.7% -5.8% -961,800 -0.3% -58,600
North Dakota 12.0% 9.1% 8.7% -3.3% -17,500 -0.4% -2,700
Ohio 12.9% 6.6% 6.9% -6.0% -579,800 0.3% 29,100
Oregon 17.5% 7.3% 8.1% -9.4% -296,500 0.8% 28,900
Pennsylvania 11.5% 7.0% 6.6% -4.8% -508,400 -0.3% -35,400
Rhode Island 14.1% 5.0% 5.3% -8.7% -74,700 0.3% 2,900
Vermont 8.3% 4.4% 5.1% -3.2% -17,100 0.7% 3,300
Washington 16.2% 6.9% 7.1% -9.2% -519,300 0.2% 15,800
West Virginia 16.3% 6.0% 7.1% -9.2% -141,400 1.1% 13,600
Non-Expansion States 19.6% 13.8% 14.3% -5.3% -4,966,700 0.6% 680,400
Alabama 16.0% 10.9% 11.3% -4.7% -191,700 0.4% 16,200
Florida 24.4% 15.3% 15.9% -8.5% -1,179,400 0.6% 133,400
Georgia 21.2% 14.8% 15.4% -5.9% -466,400 0.6% 62,800
Idaho 18.6% 12.1% 12.6% -6.0% -73,400 0.6% 10,900
Kansas 14.3% 9.8% 10.0% -4.3% -106,200 0.2% 4,500
Maine 13.4% 9.7% 9.8% -3.7% -41,500 0.0% -200
Mississippi 19.7% 13.8% 14.3% -5.5% -144,000 0.5% 9,200
Missouri 15.3% 10.6% 10.8% -4.5% -228,800 0.2% 6,100
Nebraska 12.4% 10.3% 10.0% -2.4% -35,300 -0.3% -4,500
North Carolina 18.2% 12.3% 12.7% -5.5% -422,500 0.4% 38,500
Oklahoma 20.6% 16.1% 16.4% -4.2% -130,200 0.3% 7,000
South Carolina 18.6% 11.8% 13.4% -5.1% -186,600 1.6% 66,100
South Dakota 14.6% 9.8% 11.0% -3.5% -23,900 1.2% 8,200
Tennessee 16.3% 10.8% 11.1% -5.2% -267,700 0.3% 23,600
Texas 24.6% 18.7% 19.6% -5.0% -879,100 0.9% 275,300
Utah 14.8% 9.4% 10.0% -4.7% -106,300 0.6% 19,800
Virginia 14.2% 10.3% 10.2% -3.9% -266,700 0.0% -400
Wisconsin 10.5% 6.1% 6.1% -4.4% -213,900 -0.1% -3,600
Wyoming 14.7% 12.7% 14.5% -0.1% -3,100 1.8% 7,400
NOTES: Includes nonelderly individuals ages 0-64. Expansion status reflects the implementation of Medicaid expansion as of 2017.
SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of 2013, 2016, and 2017 American Community Survey (ACS), 1-Year Estimates.
Appendix Table B: Characteristics of the Nonelderly Uninsured, 2017
Nonelderly
(millions)
Percent of Nonelderly Uninsured
(millions)
Percent of Uninsured Uninsured
Rate
Total Nonelderly 267.5 100.0% 27.4 100.0% 10.2%
Age
Children – Total 76.1 28.5% 3.8 13.8% 5.0%
Nonelderly Adults – Total 191.4 71.5% 23.6 86.2% 12.3%
Adults 19 – 25 28.3 10.6% 4.2 15.4% 14.8%
Adults 26 – 34 39.1 14.6% 6.1 22.3% 15.6%
Adults 35 – 44 40.5 15.1% 5.5 20.2% 13.6%
Adults 45 – 54 41.8 15.6% 4.5 16.3% 10.7%
Adults 55 – 64 41.6 15.6% 3.3 12.0% 7.9%
Annual Family Income
<$20,000 31.8 11.9% 5.5 20.0% 17.2%
$20,000 – <$40,000 42.8 16.0% 7.4 27.0% 17.3%
$40,000+ 192.9 72.1% 14.5 53.0% 7.5%
Family Poverty Level
<100% 30.4 11.4% 5.0 18.4% 16.6%
100% – <200% 45.3 16.9% 7.8 28.5% 17.2%
200% – <400% 81.9 30.6% 9.6 35.2% 11.7%
400%+ 109.9 41.1% 4.9 18.0% 4.5%
Household Type
1 Parent with Children 19.0 7.1% 1.3 4.9% 7.1%
2 Parents with Children 84.2 31.5% 6.0 22.0% 7.2%
Multigenerational 18.7 7.0% 2.2 7.9% 11.6%
Adults Living Alone or with Other Adults 111.7 41.8% 13.2 48.3% 11.8%
Other 33.9 12.7% 4.6 16.9% 13.6%
Family Work Status
2+ Full-time 101.8 38.1% 8.6 31.5% 8.5%
1 Full-time 119.3 44.6% 12.4 45.3% 10.4%
Only Part-time 19.5 7.3% 2.8 10.4% 14.6%
Non-workers 26.9 10.1% 3.5 12.8% 13.0%
Race/Ethnicity
White 154.3 57.7% 11.3 41.3% 7.3%
Black 34.0 12.7% 3.8 13.8% 11.1%
Hispanic 53.5 20.0% 10.1 36.9% 18.9%
Asian/N. Hawaiian and Pacific Islander 15.9 5.9% 1.1 4.2% 7.2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1.8 0.7% 0.4 1.5% 22.0%
Two or More Races 8.0 3.0% 0.6 2.3% 7.9%
Citizenship
U.S. Citizen – Native 230.6 86.2% 18.9 69.2% 8.2%
U.S. Citizen – Naturalized 16.7 6.2% 1.7 6.1% 10.0%
Non-U.S. Citizen, Residents for <5 Years 6.4 2.4% 1.7 6.4% 27.2%
Non-U.S. Citizen, Residents for 5+ Years 13.9 5.2% 5.0 18.3% 36.0%
NOTES: Includes nonelderly individuals ages 0-64. The U.S. Census Bureau’s poverty threshold for a family with two adults and one child was $19,730 in 2017. Parent includes any person with a dependent child. Multigenerational/other families with children include families with at least three generations in a household, plus families in which adults are caring for children other than their own. Part-time workers were defined as working <35 hours per week. Respondents who identify as mixed race who do not also identify as Hispanic fall intot he “Two or More Races” category. All individuals who identify as Hispanic ethnicity fall into the Hispanic category regardless of race.
SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of 2017 American Community Survey (ACS), 1-Year Estimates.
Endnotes …

 

Story 3: U.S Weekly Jobless Claims Fall To Lowest Level in 50 Years (1969)

Jobless Claims Hit A Low Since The Sixties

 

US weekly jobless claims drop to the lowest level since 1969

  
  • The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a more than 49-year low last week.
  • The data pointed to sustained labor market strength despite slowing economic growth.
  • Initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped to 202,000 for the week ended March 30, the lowest level since early December 1969, the Labor Department said.

The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a more than 49-year low last week, pointing to sustained labor market strength despite slowing economic growth.

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits declined 10,000 to a seasonally adjusted 202,000 for the week ended March 30, the lowest level since early December 1969, the Labor Department said on Thursday.

Data for the prior week was revised to show 1,000 more applications received than previously reported.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims rising to 216,000 in the latest week. The Labor Department said only claims for California were estimated.

Claims have shown no sign of a pickup in layoffs even as the economy has lost momentum as the stimulus from a $1.5 trillion tax cut package fades. Companies are experiencing a shortage of workers, which contributed to a recent slowdown in hiring.

Job growth has slowed from last year’s roughly 225,000 monthly average pace. The pace of increase, however, remains more than sufficient to keep up with growth in the working age population, holding down the unemployment rate.

Initial jobless claimsWeek ending Saturday, seasonally adjusted200820102012201420162018100000200000300000400000500000600000700000Labor DeptSaturday, Jun 10, 2017240 000

The four-week moving average of initial claims, considered a better measure of labor market trends as it irons out week-to-week volatility, fell 4,000 to 213,500 last week, the lowest level since early October 2018.

The claims data has no bearing on March’s employment report, which is scheduled for release on Friday. According to a Reuters survey of economists, nonfarm payrolls likely increased by 180,000 jobs last month after a meager 20,000 in February, which was seen as pay-back after robust gains in the prior two months.

The unemployment rate is forecast unchanged at 3.8 percent.

Thursday’s claims report showed the number of people receiving benefits after an initial week of aid decreased 38,000 to 1.72 million for the week ended March 23. The four-week moving average of the so-called continuing claims slipped 8,000 to 1.74 million.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/04/weekly-jobless-claims.html

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The Pronk Pops Show 1166, October 31, 2018, Story 1: President Trump Sends 15,000 Troops To Border — Nobody Is Coming In — Immigration Is A Very Big and Dangerous Topic — Videos — Story 2: Private Companies Pledges To A New American Work Force — Training, Skills, and Jobs – Less Government Intervention in Economy and More Competition Among Businesses — Videos

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Story 1: President Trump Sends 15,000 Troops To Border — Nobody Is Coming In — Immigration Is A Very Big and Dangerous Topic — Videos —

Trump suggests sending 15,000 troops to border

Trump says he may send up to 15,000 troops to border

Tucker: Media push narrative that caravan is not a threat

[youtub=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4e4-eT4xb4s]

 

Trump, Democrats kick off final midterm campaign blitz

an hour ago
Donald Trump

President Donald Trump waves from the top of the steps of Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Trump is heading to Fort Myers, Fla. to speak at a rally. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump launched an eight-state campaign blitz on Wednesday, seeking to shore up Senate Republicans and GOP gubernatorial candidates against an onslaught of Democratic surrogates, including entertainment icon Oprah Winfrey.

Trump will crisscross the nation, landing him in Senate battlefields such as Indiana, Missouri and Florida along with nail-biter contests for governor in Georgia and Ohio.

Winfrey, who offered crucial support to President Barack Obama during his 2008 rise, will campaign Thursday for Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, who is attempting to become the nation’s first black female governor.

Democrats are defending several Senate incumbents in Republican-leaning states in their quest to narrow the GOP’s 51-49 majority. The terrain is more favorable in the House, where Democrats need a net pickup of 23 seats to recapture the majority, and in several states with vulnerable Republican governors.

A look at midterm campaign activities Wednesday:

___

RYAN

Trump slammed outgoing House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., tweeting that Ryan “should be focusing on holding the Majority” instead of weighing in on the president’s push to end the Constitution’s guarantee of birthright citizenship.

Trump tweeted that Ryan shouldn’t offer “his opinions on Birthright Citizenship, something he knows nothing about!”

Trump has said he can end the right to citizenship for babies born to non-U.S. citizens on American soil with an executive order. And he has argued that the right isn’t covered by the 14th Amendment, even though the text of the constitutional amendment says that “all persons born or naturalized” in the U.S. are citizens.

Ryan, who is retiring, said Tuesday that Trump couldn’t “end birthright citizenship with an executive order.”

___

FLORIDA GOVERNOR

Former Rep. Ron DeSantis suggested during a rally with President Donald Trump that his Democratic opponent in the race for Florida governor should be impeached over ethics questions in his role leading the city of Tallahassee.

DeSantis criticized his Democratic opponent, Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, at length during his speech at the rally, bringing up an ongoing ethics investigation involving Gillum.

Gillum has asserted he paid his way on trips to Costa Rica and New York City, but newly released documents appear to contradict him.

Gillum has steadfastly denied any wrongdoing in the ethics probe, which is separate but related to an ongoing FBI investigation into city government.

DeSantis said maybe Gillum should be impeached. That prompted the crowd to chant, “Lock him up. Lock him up.”

___

MONTANA SENATE

The Libertarian candidate in Montana’s Senate race threw his support behind Republican Matt Rosendale in response to an election mailer from an unknown group that appears aimed at undermining Rosendale’s support among conservatives.

Rick Breckenridge said Wednesday that he doesn’t know the source of the mailer promoting him as a “true conservative” and claiming that Rosendale supports using drones to spy on private citizens.

Breckenridge said it was an attempt by so-called dark money groups to influence Montana’s election. He said he has decided to back Rosendale, who is in a tight race against two-term Democratic Sen. Jon Tester.

The mailer is reminiscent of tactics used by Democratic-friendly groups in Tester’s 2012 race to promote the Libertarian candidate and peel away Republican voters.

___

PENCE-IMMIGRATION

Vice President Mike Pence said during a stop in Ohio that the caravan of Central Americans walking toward the U.S. southern border represents “an assault on our country” and Republicans are “determined to end this crisis of illegal immigration once and for all.”

An estimated 4,000 Central American migrants have been walking across Mexico toward the U.S. border. The Defense Department has authorized the deployment of 5,200 troops to help along the U.S. border.

Pence was accompanied by Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, for a rally attended by several hundred people inside a hangar at an airport in Mansfield, Ohio.

It was aimed at helping Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who is running for governor, Senate candidate Jim Renacci and Republican members of Congress.

___

OHIO VOTERS

Federal judges ordered Ohio to allow voters who had been purged for not voting over a six-year period to participate in this year’s election.

A divided 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel granted an emergency motion sought by voting-rights groups. The ruling overturned in part an Oct. 10 ruling by a federal judge that said voters haven’t been illegally purged from Ohio’s rolls.

Plaintiffs, led by the A. Philip Randolph Institute, lost their broader challenge in June to Ohio’s election administration process as unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Ohio’s practices.

Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted said he wouldn’t fight the order, aiming to avoid “an unnecessary source of contention with election only five days away.”

___

PELOSI PREDICTS

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi declared late Tuesday that Democrats will win the House majority, predicting a “great night for America.”

Pelosi said in an interview with Stephen Colbert on “The Late Show” that “up until today, I would have said, ‘If the election were held today, we would win.’” Asked what had changed, Pelosi said, “What now I’m saying is we will win. We will win. We will win.”

Pelosi, who was the nation’s first female House speaker, could be in position to reclaim the gavel in House leadership elections after the midterms.

___

FLORIDA VOTES

More than 3.4 million people in Florida have already voted, surpassing the number who voted early or by mail four years ago.

New statistics released Wednesday by the state Division of Elections show registered Republicans still have the edge, casting 1.43 million ballots compared to nearly 1.37 million by registered Democrats. More than 592,000 voters with no party affiliation have voted.

More than 1.48 million people have voted early, and more than 1.9 million people have voted by mail.

During the last midterm election, nearly 3.19 million Floridians cast their ballots before Election Day. More than 6.6 million voted early or voted by mail in the 2016 presidential election.

Florida has more than 13 million registered voters.

https://apnews.com/90543426772e42a3b0ceadca1127c508

Trump eyes asylum limits for caravans; would they be legal?

JILL COLVIN and COLLEEN LONG

Associated Press
Immigration takes center stage as midterms near

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WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was expected to announce on Thursday his plans to deny asylum to migrants who try to enter the U.S. between ports of entry — a legally questionable move that was part of his election-season barrage of actions aimed at caravans heading toward the border.

It was unclear whether the restrictions Trump was expected to propose would apply only to those traveling in the caravans or extend to all people trying to enter the country. And it also was questionable whether Trump has the legal authority. The asylum clause of the Immigration and Nationality Act says that anyone who arrives to the U.S. may apply for asylum. And any change would almost certainly be immediately challenged in court.

Trump was to make his announcement during brief remarks Thursday afternoon, according to three people familiar with the plans. They spoke only on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly by name.

The administration has been discussing various options to address the caravans for days and it was possible that things could change before Trump’s 4:15 p.m. remarks “on the illegal immigration crisis” before he departs the White House for a campaign rally in Missouri.

The announcement would be Trump’s latest attempt to keep the issue of immigration front-and-center as he tries to drum up GOP enthusiasm in the final stretch before next Tuesday’s elections, which will determine whether the GOP retains control of Congress. Trump and his aides have long believed immigration is key to turning out his base, and he has seized on the caravans of Central American migrants slowly making their way through Mexico toward the U.S.

The president announced on Wednesday that he was considering deploying up to 15,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexican border in response to the still far-off caravans — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently plans for a mission whose dimensions are shifting daily. And he has threatened that those who do enter will be housed in “tent cities” he plans to build while their cases are processed.

Trump and other administration officials have long encouraged those seeking asylum to come through legal ports of entry. But many migrants are unaware of that guidance, and official border crossings have grown increasingly clogged. Immigration officials have turned away asylum-seekers at ports of entry because of overcrowding, telling them to return at a later date. Backlogs have grown especially bad in recent months at crossings in California, Arizona and Texas, with people generally waiting five weeks to claim asylum at San Diego’s main crossing and sleeping out in the open for days at a time.

The administration has also been ramping up security at ports of entry this week. In McAllen, Texas, in the Rio Grande Valley, workers were seen installing additional gates and fences along a walkway on a bridge between the U.S. and Mexico, according to The Monitor paper of McAllen.

Migrants who cross illegally are generally arrested and often seek asylum or some other form of protection. Claims have spiked in recent years, and there is currently a backlog of more than 800,000 cases pending in immigration court. Administration officials have railed against what they say are loopholes designed to encourage people, especially from Central America, to come to the U.S. and claim asylum. Generally, only about 20 percent of applicants are approved.

The U.S. fielded more than 330,000 asylum claims in 2017, nearly double the number two years earlier and surpassing Germany as highest in the world. A U.N. Refugee Agency report doesn’t break out exactly where and how they claimed asylum.

There are currently four caravans making their way toward the U.S. The main group of about 4,000 migrants — down from its estimated peak of more than 7,000 — remains in southern Mexico, on foot and hundreds of miles from the border. A second, smaller group of 1,000 or so migrants is more than 200 miles behind the first caravan. A third band of about 500 from El Salvador has made it to Guatemala, and a fourth group of about 700 set out from the Salvadoran capital Wednesday.

Trump has nonetheless mounted an enormous show of force in response. The Pentagon said “more than 7,000” troops were being sent to the southwest border to support Customs and Border Protection agents, though troop numbers have been changing at a dizzying pace.

Just last week officials were indicating that about 800 to 1,000 might be sent. On Monday, officials announced that about 5,200 were being deployed. The next day, the Air Force general running the operation said more than the initially announced total were going, and he pointedly rejected a news report that it could reach 14,000, saying that was “not consistent with what’s actually being planned.”

Just 24 hours later, Trump caught the Pentagon by surprise.

“As far as the caravan is concerned, our military is out,” Trump said Wednesday. “We have about 5,800. We’ll go up to anywhere between 10,000 and 15,000 military personnel on top of Border Patrol, ICE and everybody else at the border.”

Trump has rejected the idea he has been “fearmongering” and using the issue for political purposes, but his escalating rhetoric in the final days of the campaign season calls that denial into question. He also has said he plans an executive order to unilaterally end the constitutionally protected right of citizenship for children born to non-U.S. citizens.

Trump also tweeted a video Wednesday alleging Democrats were responsible for allowing a homicidal immigrant into the U.S. but provided no evidence supporting that claim.

In his Wednesday tweet, Trump highlighted the case of Luis Bracamontes, a twice-deported immigrant from Mexico sentenced to death in California for killing two police officers. The 53-second spot includes expletives uttered by Bracamontes during his trial as he professed regret at not killing more officials.

The video includes scenes of migrants moving toward the U.S. and asks ominously, “Who else would Democrats let in?”

It was reminiscent of the infamous “Willie Horton” ad used against Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis in 1988 and condemned as racist. Horton, who was black, raped a woman while out of prison on a weekend furlough. As Massachusetts governor, Dukakis supported the furlough program. He lost to Republican George H.W. Bush.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-says-border-troops-could-hit-15k-surprising-045505456–politics.html

 

Drone activity by drug cartels surges on San Diego’s border with Mexico

President Trump Remarks at Pledge to America’s Workers Event, Oct 31 2018

President Trump at Jobs Event: If Midterms Don’t Go Well, You’re Going to Lose Money 10/31/18

 

ANSWERING THE PLEDGE: Companies and associations are responding to President Donald J. Trump’s call and pledging to educate and train more than 6 million workers.  

  • Companies and associations continue to sign the Pledge to America’s Workers and have now committed to provide more than 6 million educational and training opportunities.
    • With these new opportunities, millions of American workers will have the skills and training to advance their careers and earn bigger paychecks.
    • These opportunities were secured through private sector pledges, not taxpayer dollars.
    • Further, a bipartisan group of 41 governors have signed a pledge to America’s workers.
  • President Trump launched the pledge in late July, prompting more than 20 companies and associations to pledge more than 3.8 million training opportunities over the next five years.
    • Walmart pledged 1,000,000 new opportunities.
    • IBM pledged 100,000 new opportunities.
    • FedEx pledged more than 500,000 new opportunities.
    • Other companies included Apple, Boeing, and Lockheed Martin, and more.
  • Since then, more than 100 new companies and associations have joined these efforts to bring the total to more than 6 million new opportunities.
    • IPC, the Association Connecting Electronics Industries, is pledging 1 million new opportunities.
    • AT&T is pledging 200,000 new opportunities.
    • The National Association of Landscape Professionals is pledging 150,000 opportunities.

DEVELOPING OUR WORKFORCE: President Trump has prioritized workforce development to better train and equip American workers.

  • Reflecting his commitment to preparing our Nation’s workforce, President Trump signed an Executive Order creating the National Council for the American Worker in July 2018.
  • The Council, comprised of senior Federal officials, is creating a national strategy to ensure our students and workers have the education and training needed to compete in today’s economy.
  • The President also established an Advisory Board comprised of business, non-profit, and education leaders to provide recommendations to the Council.

MEETING JOB MARKET DEMANDS: The American economy is roaring back to life and offering workers more and more opportunities that require new skills and training. 

  • As a result of President Donald Trump’s policies, the economy is booming and providing workers with an unpreceded number of job opportunities.
    • The unemployment rate has reached a 49 year low.
    • There are a record 7.1 million job openings in the United States.
    • The record number of job openings is bringing workers back off the sidelines who had been pushed out of the workforce.
  • Workers are in high demand as employers report challenges in locating individuals with the skills and training to fill open positions.
  • The rapidly changing modern economy will require new skill sets for our future workforce as new technology and automation grows.https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trumps-commitment-workforce-development-generates-training-opportunities-millions-americans/

 

White House Says Companies Pledge to Create Millions of Job-Training Opportunities

The efforts are part of an initiative to address job market changes, though it’s unclear how far company plans go beyond what they would already be doing

Ivanka Trump speaks at the White House in July, when her father, President Trump, signed an executive order to create the National Council for the American Worker.
Ivanka Trump speaks at the White House in July, when her father, President Trump, signed an executive order to create the National Council for the American Worker. PHOTO: LIU JIE/XINHUA/ZUMA PRESS

WASHINGTON—The White House said Wednesday it has pledges from companies to create more than 6 million job-training opportunities, part of an initiative to address job market changes and a shortage of qualified workers.

“Our strong economy has brought a longstanding critical issue to the forefront: Employers are having trouble finding enough workers with the right skills,” Ivanka Trump, an adviser to President Trump and his daughter, said during a conference call with reporters.

The White House didn’t say how many of the 6 million pledges represent new hires versus job-training opportunities for current employees, and it’s unclear how far the efforts go beyond what companies would already be doing.

In July, Mr. Trump signed an executive order to create the National Council for the American Worker, a group of senior administration officials focused on developing a nationwide strategy for training employees, as well as an advisory board. Initially, the president announced pledges from companies including Lockheed Martin Corp. andWalmart Inc. to hire or train more than 3.8 million people over the next five years.

Additional pledges have been secured since then, and companies are in different stages of the initiatives.

At a White House event Wednesday afternoon featuring people who are benefiting from the training, Mr. Trump touted a “hot” economy and said jobs need to be filled. He also raised immigration. “We want people to come into the country,” he said. “We want them to come in legally.”

Workforce-development issues have been a growing focus for U.S. business leaders—and the Trump administration—as job market changes have left large gaps in skills. Nearly one in five working Americans are employed in jobs that didn’t exist in 1980, many of them in technology, the fastest-growing segment.

Job openings are exceeding the number of job seekers—by 902,000 in August, the largest such gap on record, according to the Labor Department—but new skills are required.

The bulk of spending on education and training is focused on people younger than 25 and in school, not reflecting the need for continuing updated skills, Ms. Trump said, referring to a report by the Council of Economic Advisers. But “while employers invest substantially in training college educated workers, they invest only half of that in workers with a high-school degree,” she added.

The White House meeting dovetailed with a Tuesday workforce conference hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, where President Tom Donohue talked about a “two gap challenge” on the lack of skills and a lack of workers.

“Our economy is being rapidly reshaped by technology, automation, globalization and other forces. This transformation is creating opportunity, but it’s also creating disruption—and with it, insecurity for many businesses and workers,” he said in a speech. “Closing both gaps is imperative to our competitiveness.”

Mr. Donohue outlined a series of steps, including “common-sense immigration policies” and addressing issues preventing veterans, former incarcerated individuals and victims of the opioid epidemic into the workforce.

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 993-1000

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 906-915

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 889-896

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 878-883

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 870-877

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 864-869

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 850-856

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 845-849

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 840-844

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 833-839

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 827-832

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 821-826

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 815-820

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 806-814

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 800-805

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 793-799

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 785-792

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 777-784

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 769-776

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 759-768

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 751-758

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 745-750

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 738-744

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 732-737

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 727-731

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 720-726

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 713-719

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 705-712

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 695-704

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 685-694

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 675-684

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 668-674

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 660-667

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 651-659

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 644-650

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 637-643

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 629-636

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 617-628

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 608-616

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 599-607

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 590-598

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 585- 589

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 575-584

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 565-574

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 556-564

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 546-555

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 538-545

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 532-537

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 526-531

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 519-525

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 510-518

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 500-509

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 490-499

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 480-489

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 473-479

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 464-472

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 455-463

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 447-454

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 439-446

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 431-438

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 422-430

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 414-421

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 408-413

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 400-407

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 391-399

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 383-390

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 376-382

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 369-375

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 360-368

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 354-359

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShow 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

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The Pronk Pops Show 1122, August 9, 2018, Story 1: President Trump For Criminal Justice and Prison Reform and First Step Act — Good Policy and Fiscally Sound — Videos — Story 2: Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis On Establishing United States Space Force Plan As Sixth Military Service — Space Arms Race — Videos — Story 3: Attorney General Jeff Session on Importance of Religious Liberty — Videos –Story 4: U.S. vs. China Trade Dispute — Who Will Cry Uncle First? — China — Videos

Posted on August 10, 2018. Filed under: Addiction, Addiction, American History, Applications, Barack H. Obama, Benghazi, Bill Clinton, Blogroll, Breaking News, Bribes, British Pound, Budgetary Policy, Business, Cartoons, China, Clinton Obama Democrat Criminal Conspiracy, College, Communications, Computers, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Culture, Currencies, Deep State, Defense Spending, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Drugs, Education, Elections, Empires, Employment, Energy, Euro, European History, European Union, Extortion, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Government, First Amendment, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Former President Barack Obama, Free Trade, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Hardware, Hate Speech, Health, Health Care, Health Care Insurance, High Crimes, Hillary Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Hillary Clinton, History, House of Representatives, Housing, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Iran Nuclear Weapons Deal, Islam, Islamic Republic of Iran, James Comey, Killing, Labor Economics, Language, Law, Legal Drugs, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Medicare, Mental Illness, Middle East, Monetary Policy, National Interest, Natural Gas, Networking, News, Nuclear Weapons, Obama, Oil, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Barack Obama, President Trump, Presidential Appointments, Privacy, Public Corruption, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Religion, Republican Candidates For President 2016, Resources, Robert S. Mueller III, Rule of Law, Russia, Scandals, Second Amendment, Senator Jeff Sessions, Servers, Social Networking, Social Security, Software, South Korea, Spying, Success, Surveillance and Spying On American People, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, Treason, Trump Surveillance/Spying, U.S. Dollar, U.S. Space Program, Unemployment, United Kingdom, United States Constitution, United States of America, United States Space Force, United States Supreme Court, Videos, Violence, War, Wealth, Weapons, Weather, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1122, August 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1121, August 8, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1120, August 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1119, August 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1118, August 1, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1117, July 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1116, July 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1115, July 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1114, July 25, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1113, July 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1112, July 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1111, July 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1110, July 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1109, July 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1108, July 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1107, July 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1106, July 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1105, July 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1104, July 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1103, July 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1102, JUly 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1101, July 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1100, June 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1099, June 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1098, June 25, 2018 

Pronk Pops Show 1097, June 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1096, June 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1095, June 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1094, June 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1093, June 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1092, June 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1091, June 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1090, June 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1089, June 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1088, June 6, 2018 

Pronk Pops Show 1087, June 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1086, May 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1085, May 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1084, May 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1083, May 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1082, May 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1081, May 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1080, May 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1079, May 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1078, May 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1077, May 15, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1076, May 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1075, May 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1073, May 8, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1072, May 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1071, May 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1070, May 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1069, May 2, 2018

Image result for prison reform trump meeting august 9, 2018Image result for pence and mattis on united states space force august 9, 2018Image result for attorney general jeff sessions speech at ADF summit august 7, 2018Image result for cartoons us space forceImage result for branco cartoons us space force

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Story 1: President Trump For Criminal Justice and Prison Reform — Good Policy and Fiscally Sound — Videos

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BREAKING 🔴 President Trump URGENT Speech at IMPORTANT Roundtable in Bedminster, NJ August 9, 2018

Pastor says he faced backlash over meeting with Trump

Published on Aug 3, 2018

Trump pushes for prison reform bill

Published on May 18, 2018

Trump takes on prison reform

Published on Jan 12, 2018

Van Jones is teaming up with the White House on prison reform

Trump, Congress try to breathe life into long-delayed criminal justice reform package

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1122

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1112-1121

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1101-1111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1091-1100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1082-1090

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1073-1081

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1066-1073

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1058-1065

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1048-1057

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1041-1047

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1033-1040

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1023-1032

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1017-1022

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1001-1009

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 993-1000

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 984-992

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 977-983

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 970-976

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 963-969

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 955-962

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 946-954

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 938-945

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 926-937

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 916-925

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 906-915

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 889-896

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 833-839

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 821-826

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 815-820

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 800-805

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 793-799

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 785-792

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 777-784

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 769-776

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 759-768

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 751-758

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 745-750

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 738-744

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 732-737

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 727-731

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 713-719

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 705-712

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 695-704

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 685-694

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 675-684

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 668-674

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 660-667

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 651-659

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 637-643

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 629-636

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 617-628

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 608-616

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 599-607

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 590-598

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 585- 589

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 575-584

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 565-574

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 556-564

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 546-555

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 538-545

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 532-537

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 526-531

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 519-525

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 510-518

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 500-509

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 490-499

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 480-489

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 473-479

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 464-472

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 455-463

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 447-454

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 439-446

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 431-438

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 422-430

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 414-421

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 408-413

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 400-407

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 391-399

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 383-390

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 376-382

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 369-375

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 360-368

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 354-359

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 131-134

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

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The Pronk Pops Show 1087, June 5, 2018, Story 1: Labor Participation Rate at 62.7% Still Way Below 66-67% Rate in Bush and Clinton Years and 95.9 Million Americans Not In Labor Force — An Increase of 170,000 in May — Heading Towards 100 Million — Videos — Story 2: Supreme Court Rules 7-2 in Favor of Bakery Owner Who Refused to Make A Wedding Cake for Gay Couple — Colorado Civil Rights Commission Showed Impermissible Hostility Toward Religion When It Stated Jack Phillips, Bakery Owner, Violated State’s Anti-Discrimination — Videos– Story 3: Kristian Saucier, Sailor Who Served 1 Year in Prison and Pardoned by Trump Suing Obama and Comey For Clearing Hillary Clinton of Mishandling Classified Documents — Videos

Posted on June 4, 2018. Filed under: Blogroll, Breaking News, Business, Cartoons, Communications, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Culture, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Education, Elections, Federal Government, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Hate Speech, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Law, Life, Lying, Media, National Interest, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Privacy, Progressives, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Rule of Law, Scandals, Terror, Terrorism, Transportation, Unemployment, United States Constitution, United States of America, United States Supreme Court, Videos, War, Wealth, Weapons, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1087, June 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1086, May 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1085, May 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1084, May 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1083, May 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1082, May 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1081, May 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1080, May 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1079, May 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1078, May 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1077, May 15, 2018

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Pronk Pops Show 1069, May 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1068, April 26, 2018

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Pronk Pops Show 1064, April 19, 2018

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Labor Force Participation Rate 62.7%

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Story 1: Labor Participation Rate at 62.7% Still Way Below 66-67% Rate in Bush and Clinton Years and 95.9 Million Americans Not In Labor Force — An Increase of 170,000 in May — Heading Towards 100 Million — Videos —

Labor Force Participation Rate 62.7%

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over


Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.6 62.3 62.5 62.5 62.7
2016 62.8 62.9 63.0 62.8 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.9 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.0 62.7 62.7 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.7

U-3 Unemployment Rate 3.8%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.3 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.5 5.4 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.6 4.7
2017 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.1 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8

U-6 Unemployment Rate 7.6%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.1 11.9 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.7 9.8 9.8 9.8 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.3 9.1
2017 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.6 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 8.0 7.8 7.6

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until USDL-18-0916 8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, June 1, 2018 Technical information: Household data: (202) 691-6378 * cpsinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/cps Establishment data: (202) 691-6555 * cesinfo@bls.gov * http://www.bls.gov/ces Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION — MAY 2018 Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 223,000 in May, and the unemployment rate edged down to 3.8 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment continued to trend up in several industries, including retail trade, health care, and construction. Household Survey Data The unemployment rate edged down to 3.8 percent in May, and the number of unemployed persons declined to 6.1 million. Over the year, the unemployment rate was down by 0.5 percentage point, and the number of unemployed persons declined by 772,000. (See table A-1.) Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.5 percent), Blacks (5.9 percent), and Asians (2.1 percent) decreased in May. The jobless rates for adult women (3.3 percent), teenagers (12.8 percent), Whites (3.5 percent), and Hispanics (4.9 percent) changed little over the month. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.) The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was little changed at 1.2 million in May and accounted for 19.4 percent of the unemployed. Over the past 12 months, the number of long-term unemployed has declined by 476,000. (See table A-12.) Both the labor force participation rate, at 62.7 percent, and the employment-population ratio, at 60.4 percent, changed little in May. (See table A-1.) The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 4.9 million in May. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or they were unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.) The number of persons marginally attached to the labor force, at 1.5 million in May, was little different from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.) Among the marginally attached, there were 378,000 discouraged workers in May, little changed from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.1 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in May had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.) Establishment Survey Data Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 223,000 in May, compared with an average monthly gain of 191,000 over the prior 12 months. Over the month, employment continued to trend up in several industries, including retail trade, health care, and construction. (See table B-1.) In May, retail trade added 31,000 jobs, with gains occurring in general merchandise stores (+13,000) and in building material and garden supply stores (+6,000). Over the year, retail trade has added 125,000 jobs. Employment in health care rose by 29,000 in May, about in line with the average monthly gain over the prior 12 months. Ambulatory health care services added 18,000 jobs over the month, and employment in hospitals continued to trend up (+6,000). Employment in construction continued on an upward trend in May (+25,000) and has risen by 286,000 over the past 12 months. Within the industry, nonresidential specialty trade contractors added 15,000 jobs over the month. Employment in professional and technical services continued to trend up in May (+23,000) and has risen by 206,000 over the year. Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs over the month and 156,000 over the year. In May, job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+7,000) and in couriers and messengers (+5,000). Manufacturing employment continued to expand over the month (+18,000). Durable goods accounted for most of the change, including an increase of 6,000 jobs in machinery. Manufacturing employment has risen by 259,000 over the year, with about three-fourths of the growth in durable goods industries. Mining added 6,000 jobs in May. Since a recent low point in October 2016, employment in mining has grown by 91,000, with support activities for mining accounting for nearly all of the increase. In May, employment changed little in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government. The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.5 hours in May. In manufacturing, the workweek decreased by 0.2 hour to 40.8 hours, and overtime edged down by 0.2 hour to 3.5 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls remained at 33.8 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.) In May, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 8 cents to $26.92. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 71 cents, or 2.7 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $22.59 in May. (See tables B-3 and B-8.) The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for March was revised up from +135,000 to +155,000, and the change for April was revised down from +164,000 to +159,000. With these revisions, employment gains in March and April combined were 15,000 more than previously reported. (Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from businesses and government agencies since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 179,000 over the last 3 months. _____________ The Employment Situation for June is scheduled to be released on Friday, July 6, 2018, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

 

 

Table A-1. Employment status of the civilian population by sex and age

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-1. Employment status of the civilian population by sex and age
[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, sex, and age Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted(1)
May
2017
Apr.
2018
May
2018
May
2017
Jan.
2018
Feb.
2018
Mar.
2018
Apr.
2018
May
2018

TOTAL

Civilian noninstitutional population

254,767 257,272 257,454 254,767 256,780 256,934 257,097 257,272 257,454

Civilian labor force

159,979 161,280 161,765 159,729 161,115 161,921 161,763 161,527 161,539

Participation rate

62.8 62.7 62.8 62.7 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.7

Employed

153,407 155,348 156,009 152,892 154,430 155,215 155,178 155,181 155,474

Employment-population ratio

60.2 60.4 60.6 60.0 60.1 60.4 60.4 60.3 60.4

Unemployed

6,572 5,932 5,756 6,837 6,684 6,706 6,585 6,346 6,065

Unemployment rate

4.1 3.7 3.6 4.3 4.1 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8

Not in labor force

94,788 95,992 95,689 95,038 95,665 95,012 95,335 95,745 95,915

Persons who currently want a job

5,976 5,010 5,696 5,475 5,171 5,131 5,096 5,115 5,183

Men, 16 years and over

Civilian noninstitutional population

123,120 124,418 124,509 123,120 124,173 124,250 124,331 124,418 124,509

Civilian labor force

85,007 85,965 86,309 84,852 85,931 86,267 86,169 86,152 86,157

Participation rate

69.0 69.1 69.3 68.9 69.2 69.4 69.3 69.2 69.2

Employed

81,572 82,610 83,103 81,272 82,274 82,685 82,630 82,611 82,784

Employment-population ratio

66.3 66.4 66.7 66.0 66.3 66.5 66.5 66.4 66.5

Unemployed

3,436 3,355 3,206 3,581 3,658 3,582 3,539 3,541 3,373

Unemployment rate

4.0 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.3 4.2 4.1 4.1 3.9

Not in labor force

38,113 38,453 38,201 38,268 38,242 37,983 38,162 38,266 38,352

Men, 20 years and over

Civilian noninstitutional population

114,627 115,921 116,017 114,627 115,669 115,748 115,832 115,921 116,017

Civilian labor force

82,130 83,225 83,458 81,915 82,928 83,309 83,200 83,199 83,234

Participation rate

71.6 71.8 71.9 71.5 71.7 72.0 71.8 71.8 71.7

Employed

79,126 80,242 80,698 78,794 79,705 80,213 80,113 80,111 80,329

Employment-population ratio

69.0 69.2 69.6 68.7 68.9 69.3 69.2 69.1 69.2

Unemployed

3,004 2,983 2,761 3,120 3,223 3,096 3,087 3,088 2,905

Unemployment rate

3.7 3.6 3.3 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.5

Not in labor force

32,497 32,697 32,559 32,712 32,741 32,440 32,632 32,723 32,783

Women, 16 years and over

Civilian noninstitutional population

131,647 132,853 132,944 131,647 132,607 132,684 132,766 132,853 132,944

Civilian labor force

74,972 75,314 75,456 74,877 75,183 75,654 75,594 75,375 75,382

Participation rate

56.9 56.7 56.8 56.9 56.7 57.0 56.9 56.7 56.7

Employed

71,835 72,738 72,907 71,620 72,157 72,530 72,548 72,569 72,690

Employment-population ratio

54.6 54.8 54.8 54.4 54.4 54.7 54.6 54.6 54.7

Unemployed

3,136 2,576 2,549 3,257 3,027 3,124 3,046 2,805 2,692

Unemployment rate

4.2 3.4 3.4 4.3 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.7 3.6

Not in labor force

56,675 57,539 57,488 56,770 57,423 57,030 57,172 57,479 57,562

Women, 20 years and over

Civilian noninstitutional population

123,386 124,579 124,674 123,386 124,328 124,407 124,491 124,579 124,674

Civilian labor force

72,085 72,573 72,599 71,979 72,210 72,565 72,610 72,498 72,493

Participation rate

58.4 58.3 58.2 58.3 58.1 58.3 58.3 58.2 58.1

Employed

69,340 70,266 70,341 69,087 69,583 69,828 69,916 69,992 70,077

Employment-population ratio

56.2 56.4 56.4 56.0 56.0 56.1 56.2 56.2 56.2

Unemployed

2,745 2,307 2,258 2,892 2,627 2,737 2,695 2,506 2,415

Unemployment rate

3.8 3.2 3.1 4.0 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.3

Not in labor force

51,300 52,006 52,075 51,407 52,118 51,842 51,880 52,081 52,181

Both sexes, 16 to 19 years

Civilian noninstitutional population

16,754 16,771 16,763 16,754 16,783 16,778 16,774 16,771 16,763

Civilian labor force

5,764 5,482 5,707 5,836 5,977 6,048 5,952 5,831 5,812

Participation rate

34.4 32.7 34.0 34.8 35.6 36.0 35.5 34.8 34.7

Employed

4,941 4,840 4,970 5,010 5,143 5,174 5,149 5,078 5,068

Employment-population ratio

29.5 28.9 29.7 29.9 30.6 30.8 30.7 30.3 30.2

Unemployed

823 642 737 825 834 874 803 752 745

Unemployment rate

14.3 11.7 12.9 14.1 13.9 14.4 13.5 12.9 12.8

Not in labor force

10,991 11,290 11,056 10,919 10,806 10,731 10,822 10,941 10,951

Footnotes
(1) The population figures are not adjusted for seasonal variation; therefore, identical numbers appear in the unadjusted and seasonally adjusted columns.

NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t01.htm

Table A-2. Employment status of the civilian population by race, sex, and age

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-2. Employment status of the civilian population by race, sex, and age
[Numbers in thousands]
Employment status, race, sex, and age Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted(1)
May
2017
Apr.
2018
May
2018
May
2017
Jan.
2018
Feb.
2018
Mar.
2018
Apr.
2018
May
2018

WHITE

Civilian noninstitutional population

198,775 199,950 200,039 198,775 199,738 199,799 199,871 199,950 200,039

Civilian labor force

124,722 125,488 125,848 124,529 125,334 125,930 125,714 125,731 125,688

Participation rate

62.7 62.8 62.9 62.6 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.9 62.8

Employed

120,375 121,358 121,788 119,895 120,886 121,274 121,236 121,233 121,303

Employment-population ratio

60.6 60.7 60.9 60.3 60.5 60.7 60.7 60.6 60.6

Unemployed

4,346 4,130 4,060 4,634 4,447 4,656 4,478 4,498 4,385

Unemployment rate

3.5 3.3 3.2 3.7 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.5

Not in labor force

74,053 74,462 74,191 74,246 74,405 73,869 74,157 74,219 74,350

Men, 20 years and over

Civilian labor force

65,380 65,988 66,049 65,216 65,732 65,948 65,928 65,982 65,890

Participation rate

72.0 72.1 72.1 71.8 71.9 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.0

Employed

63,293 63,848 64,113 62,983 63,510 63,683 63,734 63,746 63,785

Employment-population ratio

69.7 69.8 70.0 69.3 69.5 69.6 69.7 69.7 69.7

Unemployed

2,087 2,140 1,936 2,233 2,222 2,265 2,194 2,235 2,106

Unemployment rate

3.2 3.2 2.9 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.4 3.2

Women, 20 years and over

Civilian labor force

54,933 55,210 55,277 54,834 54,896 55,243 55,176 55,179 55,197

Participation rate

57.5 57.4 57.5 57.4 57.2 57.5 57.4 57.4 57.4

Employed

53,169 53,641 53,681 52,930 53,255 53,448 53,385 53,429 53,450

Employment-population ratio

55.6 55.8 55.8 55.4 55.5 55.7 55.6 55.6 55.6

Unemployed

1,764 1,568 1,595 1,904 1,641 1,795 1,791 1,750 1,747

Unemployment rate

3.2 2.8 2.9 3.5 3.0 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2

Both sexes, 16 to 19 years

Civilian labor force

4,408 4,290 4,522 4,478 4,705 4,738 4,610 4,570 4,601

Participation rate

35.7 34.8 36.7 36.3 38.1 38.4 37.4 37.1 37.3

Employed

3,914 3,868 3,994 3,981 4,121 4,143 4,117 4,057 4,068

Employment-population ratio

31.7 31.4 32.4 32.3 33.4 33.6 33.4 32.9 33.0

Unemployed

495 421 528 497 584 595 492 512 533

Unemployment rate

11.2 9.8 11.7 11.1 12.4 12.6 10.7 11.2 11.6

BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN

Civilian noninstitutional population

32,193 32,672 32,704 32,193 32,575 32,607 32,638 32,672 32,704

Civilian labor force

20,082 20,172 20,292 20,088 20,211 20,495 20,466 20,220 20,296

Participation rate

62.4 61.7 62.0 62.4 62.0 62.9 62.7 61.9 62.1

Employed

18,593 18,953 19,145 18,560 18,663 19,087 19,051 18,892 19,092

Employment-population ratio

57.8 58.0 58.5 57.7 57.3 58.5 58.4 57.8 58.4

Unemployed

1,489 1,219 1,147 1,528 1,548 1,408 1,415 1,328 1,204

Unemployment rate

7.4 6.0 5.7 7.6 7.7 6.9 6.9 6.6 5.9

Not in labor force

12,111 12,500 12,412 12,105 12,364 12,112 12,172 12,452 12,408

Men, 20 years and over

Civilian labor force

9,103 9,248 9,407 9,093 9,254 9,438 9,314 9,257 9,382

Participation rate

67.8 67.6 68.7 67.7 67.9 69.2 68.2 67.7 68.5

Employed

8,511 8,681 8,840 8,477 8,564 8,880 8,749 8,663 8,792

Employment-population ratio

63.3 63.5 64.6 63.1 62.9 65.1 64.1 63.3 64.2

Unemployed

593 567 567 616 690 558 564 594 590

Unemployment rate

6.5 6.1 6.0 6.8 7.5 5.9 6.1 6.4 6.3

Women, 20 years and over

Civilian labor force

10,178 10,239 10,207 10,207 10,197 10,254 10,337 10,229 10,233

Participation rate

62.7 62.1 61.8 62.8 62.0 62.3 62.7 62.0 62.0

Employed

9,497 9,764 9,757 9,504 9,524 9,622 9,713 9,707 9,754

Employment-population ratio

58.5 59.2 59.1 58.5 57.9 58.5 59.0 58.9 59.1

Unemployed

681 475 450 703 673 632 624 522 479

Unemployment rate

6.7 4.6 4.4 6.9 6.6 6.2 6.0 5.1 4.7

Both sexes, 16 to 19 years

Civilian labor force

801 685 678 788 759 803 816 734 681

Participation rate

31.9 27.4 27.1 31.4 30.3 32.0 32.6 29.3 27.3

Employed

586 508 548 579 575 584 588 521 547

Employment-population ratio

23.3 20.3 21.9 23.1 22.9 23.3 23.5 20.8 21.9

Unemployed

215 177 130 209 185 219 227 213 135

Unemployment rate

26.8 25.8 19.2 26.5 24.3 27.2 27.9 29.0 19.8

ASIAN

Civilian noninstitutional population

15,433 15,933 15,874 15,433 15,731 15,792 15,983 15,933 15,874

Civilian labor force

9,818 10,034 9,932 9,817 9,885 9,908 10,092 10,034 9,932

Participation rate

63.6 63.0 62.6 63.6 62.8 62.7 63.1 63.0 62.6

Employed

9,479 9,765 9,732 9,466 9,584 9,617 9,780 9,755 9,720

Employment-population ratio

61.4 61.3 61.3 61.3 60.9 60.9 61.2 61.2 61.2

Unemployed

339 269 201 351 300 291 313 280 212

Unemployment rate

3.5 2.7 2.0 3.6 3.0 2.9 3.1 2.8 2.1

Not in labor force

5,615 5,898 5,941 5,616 5,846 5,884 5,891 5,898 5,942

Footnotes
(1) The population figures are not adjusted for seasonal variation; therefore, identical numbers appear in the unadjusted and seasonally adjusted columns.

NOTE: Estimates for the above race groups will not sum to totals shown in table A-1 because data are not presented for all races. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t02.htm

Story 2: Supreme Court Rules 7-2 in Favor of Bakery Owner Who Refused to Make A Wedding Cake for Gay Couple — Colorado Civil Rights Commission Showed Impermissible Hostility Toward Religion When It Stated Jack Phillips, Bakery Owner, Violated State’s Anti-Discrimination — Videos–

Cakeshop lawyer: It’s a great day for us, religious people

Jubilant Christian baker, who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple, is pictured celebrating with his customers and posing for selfies after Supreme Court sides with his case

  • The Supreme Court has ruled 7-2 in favor of a Colorado baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake over his Christian beliefs  in 2012 
  • The justices’ limited ruling Monday does not tackle the big issue in the case – whether a business can refuse to serve gay and lesbian people
  • Instead, it focused on the actions of the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which claimed Phillips had violted the state’s anti-discrimination law
  • Justice Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion, said that the Commission had not been neutral towards religion when they made their decision   
  • Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Sonia Sotomayor were the two dissenters  

The Colorado baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake rejoiced on Monday after the Supreme Court sided with his case.

However, the justices’ ruling was limited, and didn’t deal with the biggest concern in the case – whether religious people like Jack Phillips could refuse to serve gay or lesbian people.

The 7-2 limited ruling Monday turns on what the court described as anti-religious bias on the Colorado Civil Rights Commission when it ruled against baker Jack Phillips.

After Phillips refused to make a cake for Charlie Craig and David Mullins in 2012, the gay couple filed a complaint with the Commission. The Commission ruled in their favor, saying Phillips had violated the state’s anti-discrimination law, which bars businesses from discriminating against customers based on their race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation.

The Supreme Court has ruled in the favor of Jack Phillips, a Colorado baker who refused to make a gay couple's wedding cake over his Christian beliefs in 2012. Phillips is seen above at work on Monday after the decision was released 

The Supreme Court has ruled in the favor of Jack Phillips, a Colorado baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake over his Christian beliefs in 2012. Phillips is seen above at work on Monday after the decision was released

Phillips was all smiles after the decision was released on Monday 

Phillips was all smiles after the decision was released on Monday

Phillips even posed for a selfie with one happy customer 

Phillips even posed for a selfie with one happy customer

The justices voted 7-2 that the Commission violated Phillips’ First Amendment right to exercise his religion.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who was forecast to be the swing vote, wrote the majority opinion, saying Phillips’ Free Exercise rights were violated because the Commission showed hostility to his religious beliefs when they were making the decision.

The outcome of the case hinged on the actions of the Colorado commission. In one exchange at a 2014 hearing cited by Kennedy, former commissioner Diann Rice said that ‘freedom of religion, and religion, has been used to justify all kinds of discrimination throughout history, whether it be slavery, whether it be the Holocaust.’

Charlie Craig, left, and David Mullins talk about a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that sets aside a Colorado court decision against a baker who would not make a wedding cake for the same-sex couple as they meet reporters Monday, June 4, 2018, in Denver

Charlie Craig, left, and David Mullins talk about a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that sets aside a Colorado court decision against a baker who would not make a wedding cake for the same-sex couple as they meet reporters Monday, June 4, 2018, in Denver

‘The commission’s hostility was inconsistent with the First Amendment’s guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral toward religion,’ he wrote.

Kennedy also noted that the commission had ruled the opposite way in three other cases brought against bakers in which the business owners had refused to bake cakes containing messages they disagreed with that demeaned gay people or same-sex marriage. In all of those cases, the Commission allowed the bakers to refuse to decorate their cakes with a message they found offensive.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg, front left, and Sonia Sotomayor, back row second from right, were the two dissenters in the case 

Ruth Bader Ginsberg, front left, and Sonia Sotomayor, back row second from right, were the two dissenters in the case

Supreme Court sides with Christian baker in controversial ruling

When it comes to the question of whether businesses can refuse to serve gay couples because of their religious beliefs, Kennedy said that decision would have to wait until another day.

‘The outcome of cases like this in other circumstances must await further elaboration in the courts, all in the context of recognizing that these disputes must be resolved with tolerance, without undue respect to sincere religious beliefs, and without subjecting gay persons to indignities when they seek goods and services in an open market,’ Kennedy added.

Liberal justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan joined the conservative justices in the outcome. Kagan wrote separately to emphasize the limited ruling.

The court’s three most conservative justices – Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito – wrote separate concurrences, giving a different rationale for their opinions.

Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor were the two dissenters.

Phillips got many hugs and balloons after the decision was released on Monday

Phillips took regular breaks to take pictures with his fans on Monday 

Phillips took regular breaks to take pictures with his fans on Monday

Above, another photo of Phillips and a well-wisher on Monday 

Above, another photo of Phillips and a well-wisher on Monday

In Ginsburg’s dissent, the justice quotes several parts of the majority opinion which she agrees with, including that Colorado state law can protect gay persons from being discriminated against because of their sexual orientation.

‘I disagree strongly, however, with the Court’s conclusion that Craig and Mullins should lose the case,’ she said, saying all of the statement’s she cited from the opinion ‘point in the opposite direction’.

GAY COUPLE BEHIND THE CASE SPEAK OUT

Following the Supreme Court’s decision on Monday, the couple behind the Colorado baker case spoke out to the Denver Post

‘We had no idea that we would end up on a journey that wound up at the Supreme Court,’ David Mullins said. 

Despite the fact that their case eventually lost, the couple said they would go through the ordeal again in a heartbeat. 

‘We’ve put a lot into this,’ Mullins said. ‘This case has technically been going on longer than our marriage has. There are a lot of good things in this verdict, even though it is a loss for us. But it’s hard to all take in.’

‘I think the hardest part for me personally has just been having to be on and feel the pressure of making sure to be an inspiring public figure,’ Charlie Craig said. ‘We’re just human beings. When you’ve asked to rise to a level that you didn’t know you were capable to do, that’s hard. Lots of growing.’

They said they harbor no ill feelings towards Phillips. 

‘This has always been about a policy and not about a person,’ they said. 

Ginsburg says Kennedy’s focus on the three other instances in which bakers were allowed to refuse writing ‘offensive’ signs on cakes is no parallel to Phillips’ case.

‘Phillips declined to make a cake he found offensive where the offensiveness of the product was determined solely by the identity of the customer resquesting it.

‘The three other bakeries declined to make cakes where their objection to the product was due to the demeaning message the requested product would lierally display,’ she wrote.

The difference, she said, is that Phillips was discriminating against a gay couple specifically, whereas the three other bakers objected to the statements they were asked to decorate their cakes with – not the customers or their religious beliefs.

While the court has set aside the question of whether businesses can refuse service to gay couples because of their religious beliefs, there are other cases in the pipeline that will force the court to give their opinion eventually.

Appeals in similar cases are pending, including one at the Supreme Court from a florist who didn’t want to provide flowers for a same-sex wedding.

Monday’s ruling was heralded as a victory for conservative Christians, including the one that represented Phillips in his case.

‘Government hostility toward people of faith has no place in our society, yet the state of Colorado was openly antagonistic toward Jack’s religious beliefs about marriage. The court was right to condemn that,’ said Kristen Waggoner, a lawyer at conservative Christian group Alliance Defending Freedom, which represents Phillips. Since 2017, the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups, has labeled the Alliance as ‘virulently anti-gay’.

Waggoner added that the decision ‘makes clear that the government must respect Jack’s beliefs about marriage.’

ACLU lawyer Louise Melling, who represents Mullins and Craig, said that high court had made it clear that businesses open to the public must serve everyone.

‘The court reversed the Masterpiece Cakeshop decision based on concerns unique to the case but reaffirmed its longstanding rule that states can prevent the harms of discrimination in the marketplace, including against LGBT people,’ Melling added.

Phillips’ lawyers argued that his cakes are an art form – a ‘temporary sculpture’ – and being forced to create one to commemorate a gay wedding would violate his rights under the U.S. Constitution to freedom of speech and expression and free exercise of religion.

Mullins and Craig, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, said Phillips was using his Christian faith as pretext for unlawful discrimination based on sexual orientation. The ACLU said the baker was advocating for a ‘license to discriminate’ that could have broad repercussions beyond gay rights.

The case became a cultural flashpoint in the United States, underscoring the tensions between gay rights proponents and conservative Christians.

The litigation, along with similar cases around the country, is part of a conservative Christian backlash to the Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling. Phillips and others like him who believe that gay marriage is not consistent with their Christian beliefs, have said they should not be required to effectively endorse the practice.

Gay rights advocates said the case is just one part of a bigger struggle seeking greater legal protections for gay, bisexual and transgender people, including in the workplace, even as they fight efforts by conservatives to undermine gains secured in recent years.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5803945/U-S-Supreme-Court-hands-narrow-win-baker-gay-couple-dispute.html#ixzz5HV40EuB4

 

U.S. Supreme Court backs Christian baker who spurned gay couple

by Reuters
Monday, 4 June 2018 15:33 GMT

From major disaster, conflicts and under-reported stories, we shine a light on the world’s humanitarian hotspots

* Court says state panel violated baker’s religious rights

* Ruling was 7-2, with 2 liberals joining 5 conservatives (Adds details on 2012 incident that triggered the case, Kennedy quote)

By Lawrence Hurley

WASHINGTON, June 4 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed a victory on narrow grounds to a Colorado Christian baker who refused for religious reasons to make a wedding cake for a gay couple, stopping short of setting a major precedent allowing people to claim exemptions from anti-discrimination laws based on religious beliefs.

The justices, in a 7-2 decision, said the Colorado Civil Rights Commission showed an impermissible hostility toward religion when it found that baker Jack Phillips violated the state’s anti-discrimination law by rebuffing gay couple David Mullins and Charlie Craig in 2012. The state law bars businesses from refusing service based on race, sex, marital status or sexual orientation.

The ruling concluded that the commission violated Phillips’ religious rights under the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment.

But the justices did not issue a definitive ruling on the circumstances under which people can seek exemptions from anti-discrimination laws based on their religious views. The decision also did not address important claims raised in the case including whether baking a cake is a kind of expressive act protected by the Constitution’s free speech guarantee.

Two of the court’s four liberals, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan, joined the five conservative justices in the ruling authored by Justice Anthony Kennedy, who also was the author of the landmark 2015 decision legalizing gay marriage nationwide.

“The commission’s hostility was inconsistent with the First Amendment’s guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral toward religion,” Kennedy wrote.

But Kennedy also stressed the importance of gay rights while noting that litigation on similar issues is likely to continue in lower courts.

“Our society has come to the recognition that gay persons and gay couples cannot be treated as social outcasts or as inferior in dignity and worth,” Kennedy wrote.

“The outcome of cases like this in other circumstances must await further elaboration in the courts, all in the context of recognizing that these disputes must be resolved with tolerance, without undue disrespect to sincere religious beliefs, and without subjecting gay persons to indignities when they seek goods and services in an open market,” Kennedy added.

The case marked a test for Kennedy, who has authored significant rulings that advanced gay rights but also is a strong advocate for free speech rights and religious freedom.

Of the 50 states, 21 including Colorado have anti-discrimination laws protecting gay people.

The case pitted gay rights against religious liberty. President Donald Trump’s administration intervened in the case in support of Phillips.

Mullins and Craig were planning their wedding in Massachusetts in 2012 and wanted the cake for a reception in Colorado, where gay marriage was not yet legal. During a brief encounter at Phillips’ Masterpiece Cakeshop in the Denver suburb of Lakewood, the baker politely but firmly refused, leaving the couple distraught.

They filed a successful complaint with the state commission, the first step in the six-year-old legal battle. State courts sided with the couple, prompting Phillips to appeal to the top U.S. court. Phillips has said a backlash against his business has left him struggling to keep the shop afloat.

The case’s outcome hinged on the actions of the Colorado commission. In one exchange at a 2014 hearing cited by Kennedy, former commissioner Diann Rice said that “freedom of religion, and religion, has been used to justify all kinds of discrimination throughout history, whether it be slavery, whether it be the Holocaust.”

‘OPENLY ANTAGONISTIC’

Kennedy noted that the commission had ruled the opposite way in three cases brought against bakers in which the business owners refused to bake cakes containing messages that demeaned gay people or same-sex marriage.

“Government hostility toward people of faith has no place in our society, yet the state of Colorado was openly antagonistic toward Jack’s religious beliefs about marriage. The court was right to condemn that,” said lawyer Kristen Waggoner of the conservative Christian group Alliance Defending Freedom, which represents Phillips.

Waggoner said the decision “makes clear that the government must respect Jack’s beliefs about marriage.”

American Civil Liberties Union lawyer Louise Melling, who represents Mullins and Craig, said the high court made it clear that businesses open to the public must serve everyone.

“The court reversed the Masterpiece Cakeshop decision based on concerns unique to the case but reaffirmed its longstanding rule that states can prevent the harms of discrimination in the marketplace, including against LGBT people,” Melling added.

The case became a cultural flashpoint in the United States, underscoring the tensions between gay rights proponents and conservative Christians.

Mullins and Craig said Phillips was using his Christian faith as pretext for unlawful discrimination based on sexual orientation. Phillips’ lawyers said his cakes are an art form – a “temporary sculpture” – and being forced to create one to commemorate a gay wedding would violate his constitutional rights to free speech and expression and free exercise of religion.

The litigation, along with similar cases around the country, is part of a conservative Christian backlash to the Supreme Court’s gay marriage ruling. Phillips and others like him who believe that gay marriage is not consistent with their Christian beliefs have said they should not be required to effectively endorse the practice.

Gay rights advocates said the case is just one part of a bigger struggle seeking greater legal protections for gay, bisexual and transgender people, including in the workplace, even as they fight efforts by conservatives to undermine gains secured in recent years.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

http://news.trust.org/item/20180604150452-eu3tg

 

Story 3: Kristian Saucier, Sailor Who Served 1 Year in Prison and Pardoned by Trump Suing Obama and Comey For Clearing Hillary Clinton of Mishandling Classified Documents — Videos

Ex-Navy sailor doesn’t have a case against Obama: Judge Napolitano

 

Sailor pardoned by Trump is SUING Obama and Comey for going easy on Hillary Clinton but sending him to prison after he photographed classified area of nuclear sub

  • Kristian Saucier spent 1 year in federal prison for taking souvenir photos of a classified area aboard the nuclear sub where he worked as a U.S. Navy sailor
  • President Trump pardoned him this year but his life had largely been ruined as he was forced to work as a garbageman to feed his family
  • Now Saucier is preparing to sue the Justice Department, former president Barack Obama and former FBI Director James Comey
  • He says he received unequal legal treatment and cites their failure to prosecute Hillary Clinton for storing classified files on her private email server
  • ‘There’s a two-tier justice system and we want it to be corrected,’ his lawyer says

A former U.S. Navy seaman who spent a year in federal prison for photographing a classified area of a nuclear submarine plans to sue former President Barack Obama and fired FBI director James Comey for selectively prosecuting him.

Donald Trump issued a presidential pardon this year to Kristian Saucier, whose lawyer Ronald Daigle told Fox News on Monday that the pending lawsuit will also name the Justice Department as a defendant.

Daigle says former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was given a free pass by avoiding prosecution for mishandling classified information on her infamous private email server.

Saucier, 31, believes Comey and Obama should be held responsible for treating him unequally.

‘They interpreted the law in my case to say it was criminal,’ he told Fox, ‘but they didn’t prosecute Hillary Clinton. Hillary is still walking free.’

‘Two guys on my ship did the same thing and weren’t treated as criminals. We want them to correct the wrong.’

Saucier and his lawyer say Obama and Comey should be held responsible for his unequal legal treatment since they sent him to prison while failing to prosecute Hillary Clinton

Clinton, the Democratic Party's 2016 presidential nominee, was let off the hook despite operating a private, unsecured email server that housed classified files while she was secretary of state

Clinton, the Democratic Party’s 2016 presidential nominee, was let off the hook despite operating a private, unsecured email server that housed classified files while she was secretary of state

Daigle told Fox News that his legal strategy includes drawing attention to ‘the differences in the way Hillary Clinton was prosecuted and how my client was prosecuted.’

‘There’s a two-tier justice system and we want it to be corrected,’ he said.

Saucier admitted in 2016 that he had taken photos inside the USS Alexandria while it was docked in Connecticut seven years earlier.

He said he wanted to show his family where he worked, but now acknowledges he was wrong to take the pictures.

Federal prosecutors persuaded him to plead guilty by threatening to paint him as a resentful serviceman who risked the security of the United States and then destroyed a camera and a computer to hide the evidence.

But Saucier believes prosecuting him was a politically motivated decision driven by the Obama Justice Department’s desire to appear tough on the kinds of crime it was sweeping under the rug when Clinton was their investigative target.

‘They used me as an example because of Hillary Clinton,’ he said Monday.

Saucier’s pardon drew eyeballs to his post-incarceration plight: He said the only job he could get after his release from prison was as a garbage man.

Saucier expressed his gratitude towards President Donald Trump after he was pardoned in early March, 2018

Trump often compared Saucier's and Clinton's cases while he was campaigning for the White House, saying it was unfair that his rival got off scot-free while the Obama administration threw the book at the sailor

Trump often compared Saucier’s and Clinton’s cases while he was campaigning for the White House, saying it was unfair that his rival got off scot-free while the Obama administration threw the book at the sailor

Saucier maintains that the pictures he took inside the USS Alexandria submarine were meant to be souveniers

‘They took the kid who wanted some pictures of the submarine,’ he told a crowd just days before his November 2016 election. ‘That’s an old submarine! They’ve got plenty of pictures, if the enemy wants them, they’ve got plenty of them.’

‘He wanted to take a couple of pictures. They put him in jail for a year.’

‘We’ve never been in a situation like this,’ Trump added, before pivoting to bash his Democratic opponent: ‘And then she’s allowed to run for president!’

Saucier, of Arlington, Vermont, was a 22-year-old machinist’s mate on the nuclear-powered attack submarine when he took the photos.

His lawyers said he knew the photos would be classified but he wanted to show his family what he did in the Navy. He denied sharing the photos with any unauthorized recipient.

Clinton’s case was the subject of bipartisan acrimony. Comey, then the nation’s top cop, announced in July 2016 that his agency had wrapped up its probe of the classified material on her private server and determined that it would be improper to prosecute her.

Former sailor Kristian Saucier is pictured with his wife Sadie (right) and baby daughter; he said as a felon, the only work he could get after his prison release was a job as a garbageman

Republican cried foul, but later cheered Comey when he told Congress just days before the election that a new cache of emails had been located – necessitating a reboot of the investigation.

That step came after DailyMail.com reported on the existence of a laptop that had belonged to the disgraced former congressman Anthony Weiner, whose wife Huma Abedin had been Clinton’s deputy campaign chairwoman.

Clinton and her attorneys deleted more than 33,000 emails from her server before handing it over to law enforcement agents. Those messages were never recovered.

But some of the material that was forwarded to Weiner was also classified.

‘Somehow,’ Comey testified last year in a Senate hearing, ‘her emails were being forwarded to Anthony Weiner, including classified information, by her assistant Huma Abedin.’
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5805519/Sailor-pardoned-Trump-photographing-classified-area-sub-SUING-Obama-Comey.html#ixzz5HV9uCQNc

 

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 910, June 13, 2017, Story 1: Attorney General Sessions Testifies Before Senate Intelligence Committee — Theater of The Absurd — A Sideshow of A Sideshow — Videos — Story 2: Two Party Tyranny Ignores The Real Concerns of American People — Jobs, The Economy, National Security and Terrorism, Illegal Immigration, Education and Healthcare — Videos

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Image result for attorney general jeff session testifies before senateImage result for cartoon about russian interference in us electionsImage result for cartoon about russian interference in us elections comey

Story 1: Attorney General Sessions Testifies Before Senate Intelligence Committee — Theater of The Absurd — A Sideshow of A Sideshow — Videos —

Image result for sideshow circus tentsImage result for Sideshow by Chrystal Vaughan

“Sometimes life asks us to make more serious choices than whether or not to believe a fairy tale”
~ Chrystal Vaughan, Sideshow

” There may be honor among thieves, but there’s none in politicians.”

~ T.E. Lawrence

Jeff Sessions Testifies To Senate Intelligence Committee- Full Hearing

WATCH Jeff Sessions Absolutely Destroys Democrats And Republicans Who Doubt The Trump Administration

Jeff Sessions’s heated testimony, in 3 minutes

Jeff Sessions Opening Statement Senate Intelligence Committee!

Sessions refutes allegations of additional Russian meetings in opening statement

Sen. Warner: ‘Not acceptable’ for Trump administration to come to Congress without answers

Jeff Sessions begins testimony on Comey firing, meeting with Russian ambassador

AG Jeff Sessions – Highlights – Senate Intelligence Committee

FULL. AG Jeff Sessions testifies on Russia at Senate. June 13, 2017. M. Flynn. Dir Comey

Sessions’ testimony frustrates Democrats

Jeff Sessions Testifies To Senate Intelligence Committee- Full Hearing

Feinstein grills Sessions on Comey firing

Leftist Kamala Harris Scolded for Not Allowing Jeff Sessions to Answer Questions

Sessions protects right to ‘executive privilege’

Tom Cotton Decimates Democrats for Providing No Evidence of Russia Collusion

‘Do You Like Spy Fiction James Bond Movies?’ Things Get Weird Between Sen. Cotton and Sessions

Sen Blunt and Sen King Question Jeff Sessions

Sen Collins and Sen Heinrich Question Jeff Sessions

Sen Lankford and Sen Manchin Question Jeff Sessions

Marco Rubio and Ron Weyden Question Jeff Sessions. Some Sparks!

Sen Cornyn Questions Jeff Sessions. Also Quite Good.

WATCH: Attorney General Jeff Sessions On Why FBI Director James Comey Was Fired

JEFF SESSIONS HEARING: President Trump calls Russia threat WITCHHUNT and FAKE NEWS! NEED THE TRUTH!

JEFF SESSIONS HEARING: “Senator Franken asked me A RAMBLING QUESTION!”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions Grilled About Meetings With The Russian Ambassador

‘I Am Not Stonewalling!’ Sessions, Wyden Go Off on Each Other in Explosive Back-and-Forth

HEATED EXCHANGE: Sen. Kamala Harris vs. AG Jeff Sessions – Senate Intelligence Committee Hearing

INTENSE: Sen. Heinrich ACCUSES Jeff Sessions of OBSTRUCTION at Senate Intelligence Committee Hearing

Britt Hume Gives Analysis on AG Sessions Testimony

Judge Napolitano Does Not Think It’s a Good idea For Sessions to Testify Before the Senate

Krauthammer: Going After Sessions is the Democrats’ Third Attempt to Take Down the President

Krauthammer Says Sessions Did a Good Job Fending Off Charges

Theatre of the Absurd and Beckett

SIDESHOW – BLUE MAGIC – (1974)

Sessions calls suggestion he colluded with Russia a ‘detestable lie’

The attorney general also denies that he had a third undisclosed meeting with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

06/13/2017 03:07 PM EDT

Updated 06/13/2017 04:40 PM EDT

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday forcefully denied he engaged in any collusion with Russian officials during the campaign, calling such a suggestion a “detestable lie,” while saying he did not recall having a third undisclosed meeting with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

“The suggestion that I participated in any collusion or that I was aware of any collusion with the Russian government to hurt this country, which I have served with honor for over 35 years, or to undermine the integrity of our democratic process, is an appalling and detestable lie,” Sessions said as he testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Sessions also pushed back against the idea that he had more meetings with Kislyak, after having been forced to clarify remarks from his confirmation hearing in January that he did not have communications with Russian officials during the campaign. Two previous meetings with Kisylak surfaced earlier this year, but Sessions said on Tuesday he doesn’t remember any further encounters, including an allegation he met with Kislyak in April 2016 at the Mayflower Hotel, which hosted a foreign policy speech by Donald Trump.

“I did not have any private meetings nor do I recall any conversations with any Russian officials at the Mayflower Hotel,” Sessions said.

He later elaborated that a brief interaction with Kislyak may have occurred, noting that “I may have had an encounter during the reception” but that would’ve been the extent of any communication.

Sessions took his uncomfortable star turn in the same seat occupied by James Comey five days ago as the former FBI director pointedly accused Trump of lying about his dismissal.

Sessions has found himself at the center of the Russian controversy in recent days, particularly after Comey’s testimony that he’d asked Sessions to intervene after Trump initiated a series of contacts the FBI director viewed as improper.

The ex-FBI chief also suggested Sessions realized something inappropriate was afoot when Trump asked Comey to stay behind at an Oval Office meeting at February, while dismissing Sessions and others from the room.

“My sense was the attorney general knew he shouldn’t be leaving, which is why he was lingering,” Comey testified.

Comey also said that in the one-on-one meeting that followed, Trump asked that the FBI “let…go” of a probe into former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn. Trump has said he made no such request.

Sessions denied on Tuesday that he stayed silent when Comey urged him never to leave him alone again with Trump — testifying that he urged the FBI and Justice Department officials to follow proper protocol in their communications with the White House.

That directly counters Comey’s testimony from last week, when the ex-FBI chief said Sessions had no response when he told the attorney general that him being left alone with Trump was inappropriate and should not happen. A Justice Department spokesman rejected Comey’s account following the June 8 hearing.

“He didn’t recall this, but I responded to his comment by agreeing that the FBI and the Department of Justice needed to be careful to follow department policies regarding appropriate contacts with the White House,” Sessions testified.

Sessions did not say if he made any effort to stop Trump from contacting the FBI, such as intervening with the president directly or seeking to pass such a message through the White House counsel or other officials.

The attorney general’s closely-watched testimony came as Washington buzzed about suggestions from Trump allies that the president was considering firing the man tapped last month to take over the probe into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election: special counsel Robert Mueller.

Sessions would not specifically talk about Mueller’s job performance, but said, “I have confidence in Mr. Mueller.”

The attorney general cited his recusal from the Russia probe as one of the reasons he could not elaborate on Mueller. In March, Sessions declared that because of his role in the Trump campaign he was recusing himself from all inquiries related to Russia’s alleged interference in the 2016 elections.

During his testimony on Tuesday, Sessions disclosed more details of the timeline of his recusal: One day after he was sworn in as attorney general on Feb. 9, Sessions had his first meeting to generally discuss the recusal matter. Several meetings followed, and “it became clear to me over time that I qualified as a significant principal adviser type person to the campaign and it would be appropriate and the right thing for me to recuse myself.”

His recusal from matters related to the presidential campaign, which Sessions said was essentially in place from his first day as attorney general, is apparently so broad that he has never been briefed on Russian hacking attempts last year.

“I never received any detailed briefing on how the hacking occurred,” Sessions testified, saying he had only gotten his information about Russian interference in the 2016 campaign through the news media.

Speaking to Sen. Angus King (I-Maine), Sessions added that “you might have been very critical if I, as an active part of the campaign, was seeking intelligence related to something that might be relevant to the campaign.”

Sessions also said Tuesday that he would not claim executive privilege as he testifies “because that is the president’s power.” But he added that he would abide by longstanding DOJ practice to shield his discussions with Trump.

“I cannot and will not violate my duty to protect confidential communications with the president,” he said.

Sessions refused to answer a pivotal question from Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.): whether he discussed Comey’s handling of the investigations into the Trump campaign with the president prior to the FBI director’s dismissal.

“I’m not able to discuss with you or confirm or deny the nature of a private conversation that I may have had with the president on this subject or others. I know this will be discussed, but that’s the rules that have been adhered to by the Department of Justice,” Sessions said.

Asked to react to Trump’s public statement that he had the Russia probe on his mind at the time of the firing, the attorney general demurred.

“I will have to let his words speak for himself. I’m not sure what was in his mind specifically when we talked to him,” Sessions said.

As Sessions declined to answer a series of questions, Democrats bluntly accused him of undermining Congress’s effort to get to the truth. Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon said the lack of responses amounted to stonewalling.

“I am not stonewalling. I am following the historic policies of the Department of Justice,” the attorney general declared.

“You’re impeding this investigation,” Sen. Martin Heinrich of New Mexico said. “You are obstructing that congressional investigation by not answering the questions.”

Sessions insisted that he was not invoking executive privilege, but preserving Trump’s right to do so.

“I’m not able to invoke executive privilege that’s the president’s prerogative,” the attorney general said.

Resolving a longstanding question, Sessions acknowledged publicly for the first time Tuesday that he gave Comey no warning before his firing on May 9.

“Did you ever have a conversation about his failure to perform?” Sen. Mark Warner, the ranking Democrat on the committee, asked.

“I did not,” Sessions said.

“You never thought it was appropriate to raise those concerns before he was actually terminated by the president?” Warner asked.

“I did not do so,” Sessions said, noting that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein prepared a memo critiquing Comey’s performance. “It’s something that we both agreed to that a fresh start at the FBI was probably the best.”

“The timing seems a little peculiar,” Warner said.

Democratic senators and Comey have suggested that Sessions should not have been involved in the firing of the FBI director, particularly since investigations Sessions was recused from appear to have played roles in spurring that decision.

Sessions flatly rejected those arguments on Tuesday.

“It is absurd, frankly, to suggest that a recusal from a single specific investigation would render an Attorney General unable to manage the leadership of the various Department of Justice law enforcement components that conduct thousands of investigations,” Sessions said.

The usually genial Alabaman showed outbursts of anger, including under questioning from Wyden when the Oregon Democrat pressed Sessions on what Comey found so “problematic” about the attorney general that he felt his recusal was inevitable.

“Why don’t you tell me?” Sessions responded to Wyden, his tone escalating. “There are none … this is a secret innuendo.”

Sessions also offered his first-hand account of the Feb. 14 Oval Office encounter that resulted in Comey being alone with Trump.

“We were there. I was standing there and without revealing any conversation that took place, what I do recall is I did depart. I believe everyone else did depart and Director Comey was sitting in front of the president’s desk and they were talking….That in itself is not problematic,” Sessions said.

The attorney general confirmed that the next day Comey complained about the contact.

“He did not tell me at that time any detail about anything that was said that was improper,” Sessions said, claiming he “backed [Comey] up in his concern” about improper contacts.

“He was concerned about it….His recollection of what he said about his concern is consistent with my recollection,” the attorney general added.

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/06/13/sessions-calls-suggestion-he-colluded-with-russia-a-detestable-lie-239507

 

Executive privilege

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the United States government, executive privilege is the power claimed by the President of the United States and other members of the executive branch to resist certain subpoenas and other interventions by the legislative and judicial branches of government to access information and personnel relating to the executive branch. The concept of executive privilege is not mentioned explicitly in the United States Constitution, but the Supreme Court of the United States ruled it to be an element of the separation of powers doctrine and derived from the supremacy of the executive branch in its own area of Constitutional activity.[1]

The Supreme Court confirmed the legitimacy of this doctrine in United States v. Nixon, but only to the extent of confirming that there is a qualified privilege. Once invoked, a presumption of privilege is established, requiring the Prosecutor to make a “sufficient showing” that the “Presidential material” is “essential to the justice of the case” (418 U.S. at 713–14). Chief JusticeWarren Burger further stated that executive privilege would most effectively apply when the oversight of the executive would impair that branch’s national security concerns.

Historically, the uses of executive privilege underscore the untested nature of the doctrine, since Presidents have generally sidestepped open confrontations with the United States Congress and the courts over the issue by first asserting the privilege, then producing some of the documents requested on an assertedly voluntary basis.

Early precedents

Executive privilege is a specific instance of the more general common-law principle of deliberative process privilege and is believed to trace its roots to the English crown privilege (now known as public-interest immunity).[2]

In the context of privilege assertions by US presidents, “In 1796, President George Washington refused to comply with a request by the House of Representatives for documents related to the negotiation of the then-recently adopted Jay Treaty with the Kingdom of Great Britain. The Senate alone plays a role in the ratification of treaties, Washington reasoned, and therefore the House had no legitimate claim to the material. Therefore, Washington provided the documents to the Senate but not the House.”[3]

President Thomas Jefferson continued the precedent for this in the trial of Aaron Burr for treason in 1809. Burr asked the court to issue a subpoena duces tecum to compel Jefferson to testify or provide his private letters concerning Burr. Chief Justice John Marshall, a strong proponent of the powers of the federal government but also a political opponent of Jefferson, ruled that the Sixth Amendment to the Constitution, which allows for these sorts of court orders for criminal defendants, did not provide any exception for the president. As for Jefferson’s claim that disclosure of the document would imperil public safety, Marshall held that the court, not the president, would be the judge of that. Jefferson refused to personally testify but provided selected letters.

In 1833, President Andrew Jackson cited executive privilege when Senator Henry Clay demanded he produce documents concerning statements the president made to his cabinet about the removal of federal deposits from the Second Bank of the United States during the Bank War.[4]

Cold War era

During the period of 1947–49, several major security cases became known to Congress. There followed a series of investigations, culminating in the famous HissChambers case of 1948. At that point, the Truman Administration issued a sweeping secrecy order blocking congressional efforts from FBI and other executive data on security problems.[citation needed] Security files were moved to the White House and Administration officials were banned from testifying before Congress on security related matters. Investigation of the State Department and other cases was stymied and the matter left unresolved.

During the Army–McCarthy hearings in 1954, Eisenhower used the claim of executive privilege to forbid the “provision of any data about internal conversations, meetings, or written communication among staffers, with no exception to topics or people.” Department of Defense employees were also instructed not to testify on any such conversations or produce any such documents or reproductions.[5] This was done to refuse the McCarthy Committee subpoenas of transcripts of monitored telephone calls from Army officials, as well as information on meetings between Eisenhower officials relating to the hearings. This was done in the form of a letter from Eisenhower to the Department of Defense and an accompanying memo from Eisenhower Justice. The reasoning behind the order was that there was a need for “candid” exchanges among executive employees in giving “advice” to one another. In the end, Eisenhower would invoke the claim 44 times between 1955 and 1960.

United States v. Nixon

The Supreme Court addressed “executive privilege” in United States v. Nixon, the 1974 case involving the demand by Watergatespecial prosecutorArchibald Cox that President Richard Nixonproduce the audiotapes of conversations he and his colleagues had in the Oval Office of the White House in connection with criminal charges being brought against members of the Nixon Administration. Nixon invoked the privilege and refused to produce any records.

The Supreme Court did not reject the claim of privilege out of hand; it noted, in fact, “the valid need for protection of communications between high Government officials and those who advise and assist them in the performance of their manifold duties” and that “[h]uman experience teaches that those who expect public dissemination of their remarks may well temper candor with a concern for appearances and for their own interests to the detriment of the decisionmaking process.” This is very similar to the logic that the Court had used in establishing an “executive immunity” defense for high office-holders charged with violating citizens’ constitutional rights in the course of performing their duties. The Supreme Court stated: “To read the Article II powers of the President as providing an absolute privilege as against a subpoena essential to enforcement of criminal statutes on no more than a generalized claim of the public interest in confidentiality of nonmilitary and nondiplomatic discussions would upset the constitutional balance of ‘a workable government’ and gravely impair the role of the courts under Article III.” Because Nixon had asserted only a generalized need for confidentiality, the Court held that the larger public interest in obtaining the truth in the context of a criminal prosecution took precedence.

“Once executive privilege is asserted, coequal branches of the Government are set on a collision course. The Judiciary is forced into the difficult task of balancing the need for information in a judicial proceeding and the Executive’s Article II prerogatives. This inquiry places courts in the awkward position of evaluating the Executive’s claims of confidentiality and autonomy, and pushes to the fore difficult questions of separation of powers and checks and balances. These ‘occasion[s] for constitutional confrontation between the two branches’ are likely to be avoided whenever possible. United States v. Nixon, supra, at 692.”[6]

Post-Watergate era

Clinton administration

The Clinton administration invoked executive privilege on fourteen occasions.

In 1998, President Bill Clinton became the first president since Nixon to assert executive privilege and lose in court, when a federal judge ruled that Clinton aides could be called to testify in the Lewinsky scandal.[7]

Later, Clinton exercised a form of negotiated executive privilege when he agreed to testify before the grand jury called by Independent CounselKenneth Starr only after negotiating the terms under which he would appear. Declaring that “absolutely no one is above the law”, Starr said such a privilege “must give way” and evidence “must be turned over” to prosecutors if it is relevant to an investigation.

George W. Bush administration

The Bush administration invoked executive privilege on six occasions.

President George W. Bush first asserted executive privilege to deny disclosure of sought details regarding former Attorney General Janet Reno,[8] the scandal involving Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) misuse of organized-crime informants James J. Bulger and Stephen Flemmi in Boston, and Justice Department deliberations about President Bill Clinton’s fundraising tactics, in December 2001.[9]

Bush invoked executive privilege “in substance” in refusing to disclose the details of Vice PresidentDick Cheney‘s meetings with energy executives, which was not appealed by the GAO. In a separate Supreme Court decision in 2004, however, Justice Anthony Kennedy noted “Executive privilege is an extraordinary assertion of power ‘not to be lightly invoked.’ United States v. Reynolds, 345 U.S. 1, 7 (1953).

Further, on June 28, 2007, Bush invoked executive privilege in response to congressional subpoenas requesting documents from former presidential counsel Harriet Miers and former political director Sara Taylor,[10] citing that:

The reason for these distinctions rests upon a bedrock presidential prerogative: for the President to perform his constitutional duties, it is imperative that he receive candid and unfettered advice and that free and open discussions and deliberations occur among his advisors and between those advisors and others within and outside the Executive Branch.

On July 9, 2007, Bush again invoked executive privilege to block a congressional subpoena requiring the testimonies of Taylor and Miers. Furthermore, White House CounselFred F. Fielding refused to comply with a deadline set by the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee to explain its privilege claim, prove that the president personally invoked it, and provide logs of which documents were being withheld. On July 25, 2007, the House Judiciary Committee voted to cite Miers and White House Chief of StaffJoshua Bolten for contempt of Congress.[11][12]

On July 13, less than a week after claiming executive privilege for Miers and Taylor, Counsel Fielding effectively claimed the privilege once again, this time in relation to documents related to the 2004 death of Army RangerPat Tillman. In a letter to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Fielding claimed certain papers relating to discussion of the friendly-fire shooting “implicate Executive Branch confidentiality interests” and would therefore not be turned over to the committee.[13]

On August 1, 2007, Bush invoked the privilege for the fourth time in little over a month, this time rejecting a subpoena for Karl Rove. The subpoena would have required the President’s Senior Advisor to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in a probe over fired federal prosecutors. In a letter to Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy, Fielding claimed that “Mr. Rove, as an immediate presidential advisor, is immune from compelled congressional testimony about matters that arose during his tenure and that relate to his official duties in that capacity….”[14]

Leahy claimed that President Bush was not involved with the employment terminations of U.S. attorneys. Furthermore, he asserted that the president’s executive privilege claims protecting Josh Bolten, and Karl Rove are illegal. The Senator demanded that Bolten, Rove, Sara Taylor, and J. Scott Jennings comply “immediately” with their subpoenas, presumably to await a further review of these matters. This development paved the way for a Senate panel vote on whether to advance the citations to the full Senate. “It is obvious that the reasons given for these firings were contrived as part of a cover-up and that the stonewalling by the White House is part and parcel of that same effort”, Leahy concluded about these incidents.[15][16][17][18]

As of July 17, 2008, Rove still claimed executive privilege to avoid a congressional subpoena. Rove’s lawyer wrote that his client is “constitutionally immune from compelled congressional testimony.”[19]

House Investigation of the SEC

Leaders of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission testified on February 4, 2009 before the United States House Committee on Financial Services subcommittee including Linda Chatman Thomsen S.E.C. enforcement director, acting General CounselAndy Vollmer, Andrew Donohue, Erik Sirri, and Lori Richards and Stephen Luparello of FINRA. The subject of the hearings were on why the SEC had failed to act when Harry Markopolos, a private fraud investigator from Boston alerted the Securities and Exchange Commission; detailing his persistent and unsuccessful efforts to get the SEC to investigate Bernard Madoff, beginning in 1999.[20] Vollmer claimed executive privilege in declining to answer some questions.[21][22] Subcommittee chairmanPaul E. Kanjorski asked Mr. Vollmer if he had obtained executive privilege from the U.S. Attorney General.[21] “No … this is the position of the agency,” said Vollmer.[21] “Did the SEC instruct him not to respond to questions?” Mr. Kanjorski asked.[21] Vollmer replied that it was the position of the Commission and that “the answer is no.”[21] The SEC announced Vollmer would “leave the Commission and return to the private sector,” just 14 days after making the claim.[23]

Obama Administration

On June 20, 2012, President Barack Obama asserted executive privilege, his first, to withhold certain Department of Justice documents related to the ongoing Operation Fast and Furious controversy ahead of a United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform vote to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in Contempt of Congress for refusing to produce the documents.[24][25]

Later the same day, the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform voted 23–17 along party lines to hold Attorney General Holder in contempt of Congress over not releasing documents regarding Fast and Furious.[26]

Executive privilege was also used in a lawsuit stemming from the 2012 implementation of the “Net Worth Sweep” against Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Obama administration did not disclose roughly 11,000 documents from the plaintiffs in the discovery process as they related to the reasoning behind the 2012 actions.[citation needed]

Trump Administration

While investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, the Senate Intelligence Committee subpoenaed former FBI Director James Comey to testify. Comey was fired several weeks before being subpoenaed but had appeared before the committee once before in March while still serving as director. Less than a week before the scheduled hearing, it was reported that President Trump was considering invoking executive privilege to prevent Comey’s testimony. [27][28] According to attorney Page Pate, it seems unlikely that executive privilege will be applicable here, as Trump has publicly spoken about the encounters in question multiple times.[29]

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, a White house spokesman, released a statement on June 5th stating: “The president’s power to assert executive privilege is very well-established. However, in order to facilitate a swift and thorough examination of the facts sought by the Senate Intelligence Committee, President Trump will not assert executive privilege regarding James Comey’s scheduled testimony.”[30]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_privilege

Sideshow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elly del Sarto, a sideshow performer, in c. 1910

In America, a sideshow is an extra, secondary production associated with a circus, carnival, fair or other such attraction.

Types

See also: Sideshow attractions section on list of Circus skills page.

There are four main types of classic sideshow attractions:

  • The “Ten-in-One” offers a program of ten sequential acts under one tent for a single admission price. The ten-in-one might be partly a freak show exhibiting “human oddities” (including “born freaks” such as midgets, giants or persons with other deformities, or “made freaks” like tattooed people, fat people or “human skeletons”- extremely thin men often “married” to the fat lady, like Isaac W. Sprague). However, for variety’s sake, the acts in a ten-in-one would also include “working acts” who would perform magic tricks or daredevil stunts. In addition, the freak show performers might also perform acts or stunts, and would often sell souvenirs like “giant’s rings” or “pitch cards” with their photos and life stories. The ten-in-one would often end in a “blowoff” or “ding,” an extra act not advertised on the outside, which could be viewed for an additional fee. The blowoff act would be described provocatively, often as something deemed too strong for women and children, such as pickled punks.

A sideshow at the Erie County Fair Hamburg, New York

  • The “Single-O” is a single attraction, for example a single curiosity like the “Bonnie and Clyde Death Car” or Hitler’s staff car,[1][2] a “Giant Rat” (actually usually a nutria) or other unusual animal, a “What Is It?” (often a convincing but artificial monstrosity like the Fiji Mermaid) or a geek show often billed as “See the Victim of Drug Abuse.”
  • A “Museum Show” which might be deceptively billed as “World’s Greatest Freaks Past and Present,” is a sideshow in which the exhibits are usually not alive. It might include tanks of piranhas or cages with unusual animals, stuffed freak animals or other exotic items like the weapons or cars allegedly used by famous murderer