The Pronk Pops Show 1308, August 19, 2019, Story 1: Jeffrey Epstein Signed New Will Two Days Before Committing Suicide — Estate Estimated Value of $577 Million — Videos — Story 2: U.S. Test Medium-Range Cruise Missile After Exiting The Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) — Videos — Story 3: Russian Nuclear Powered Cruise Missile Test Explosion Accident Released High Levels of Radiation and Killed 7 — Videos — Story 4: Trump Economic Team Dismisses Fears of Recession — Blames The Federal Reserve For Raised Interest Rates — Videos

Posted on August 21, 2019. Filed under: 2020 President Candidates, 2020 Republican Candidates, Addiction, American History, Applications, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Cartoons, Central Intelligence Agency, Communications, Computers, Congress, Countries, Cruise Missiles, Culture, Deep State, Defense Spending, Disasters, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Economics, Economics, Education, Empires, Employment, Energy, European History, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, Hardware, Health, Health Care Insurance, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Insurance, Killing, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Military Spending, MIssiles, Monetary Policy, National Security Agency, Natural Gas, Nuclear, Nuclear Weapons, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Progressives, Psychology, Public Relations, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Resources, Rule of Law, Russia, Senate, Servers, Social Networking, Social Science, Social Sciences, Software, Spying, Success, Tax Policy, Terror, Terrorism, Trade Policy, Transportation, United States of America, Videos, War, Wealth, Weapons, Weapons of Mass Destruction, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

 

 

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1308 August 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1307 August 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1306 August 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1305 August 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1304 August 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1303 August 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1302 August 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1301 August 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1300 August 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1299 July 31, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1298 July 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1297 July 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1296 July 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1295 July 24, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1293 July 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1292 July 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1291 July 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1290 July 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1289 July 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1288 July 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1287 July 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1286 July 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1285 July 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1284 July 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1283 July 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1282 June 27, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1278 June 20, 2019 

Pronk Pops Show 1277 June 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1276 June 18, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1274 June 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1273 June 12, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1270 June 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1269 June 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1268 June 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1267 May 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1266 May 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1265 May 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1264 May 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1263 May 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1262 May 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1261 May 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1260 May 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1259 May 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1258 May 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1257 May 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1256 May 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1255 May 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1254 May 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1253 May 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1252 May 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1251 May 6, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1249 May 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1248 May 1, 2019

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Real GDP: Percent change from preceding quarter, Q2 2019 Adv

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Experts said they suspected the explosion and the radiation release resulted from a mishap during the testing of a nuclear-powered cruise missile at a facility outside the village of Nyonoksa

 

Story 1: Jeffrey Epstein Signed New Will Two Days Before Committing Suicide — Estate Estimated Value of $577 Million — Videos

 

Jeffrey Epstein signed will two days before death, records show

Jeffrey Epstein signed a will just two days before he killed himself in the Manhattan federal jail, new court records show, opening a new legal front in what could be a years-long battle over the financier’s fortune.

Court papers filed last week in the US Virgin Islands list no details of beneficiaries but put the estate at more than 577 million US dollars (£475 million), including more than 56 million US dollars (£46 million) in cash.

The existence of the will, first reported by the New York Post, raised new questions about Epstein’s final days inside the Metropolitan Correctional Centre, where he was awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking and conspiracy charges.

His signing of the document foreshadowed his August 10 suicide, a jailhouse death that has prompted multiple federal inquiries and cast a harsh light on staffing shortages at the Manhattan facility.

Epstein died at the Metropolitan Correctional Centre (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Epstein died at the Metropolitan Correctional Centre (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

On Monday, prosecutors moved to dismiss the indictment against Epstein but said they were considering whether to charge others with facilitating his alleged abuse of dozens of girls.

The filing of the will, meanwhile, had been closely followed by lawyers representing women who claim they were sexually abused by Epstein years ago when they were teenagers and recruited into his residences to provide him massages.

Several lawyers vowed to go after his assets even if the will had named beneficiaries, as Epstein’s death means there will be no trial on the criminal charges against him.

“Give his entire estate to his victims. It is the only justice they can get,” one of those lawyers, Lisa Bloom, wrote in an email. “And they deserve it. And on behalf of the Epstein victims I represent, I intend to fight for it.”

Former federal prosecutor David S Weinstein, who is now in private practice in Miami but not involved in the Epstein case, said states and US territories have certain time frames within which to make a claim against someone’s estate.

“There are certainly going to be a lot of lawyers involved,” he said. “It’s not going to be over any time soon.”

A hedge fund manager who hobnobbed with the rich and famous, Epstein owned a Caribbean island, homes in Paris and New York City, a New Mexico ranch and a fleet of high-price cars.

He had more than 112 million US dollars (£92 million) worth of equities, according to the will, and nearly 200 million dollars (£165 million) in “hedge funds & private equity investments”.

Among the properties that will be subject to appraisal and valuation are his collection of fine arts, antiques and other collectables.

As part of his 2008 plea deal to Florida state charges, Epstein made undisclosed financial settlements with dozens of his victims.

It is unclear how those settlements might affect any new claims made on his estate.

William Blum, a lawyer for Epstein’s estate, said in a statement to The Associated Press that any debts or claims against the estate will be “fairly administered”.

He said the document was Epstein’s original last will.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-7373527/Jeffrey-Epstein-signed-two-days-death.html

 

Story 2: U.S. Test Medium-Range Cruise Missile After Exiting The Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF).

 

US tests medium-range cruise missile in the wake of INF treaty exit

 

U.S. tests first ground-launched cruise missile after INF treaty exit

 

The Pentagon said on Monday it tested a conventionally configured ground-launched cruise missile with a range of more than 500 km, the first such test since the United States pulled out of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF).

The United States formally withdrew from the landmark 1987 pact with Russia on Aug. 2 after determining that Moscow was violating the treaty, an accusation the Kremlin has denied.

The treaty, negotiated by then-U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, banned land-based missiles with a range of between 310 and 3,400 miles (500 to 5,500 km).

In a statement, the Pentagon said the test took place on Sunday at San Nicolas Island, California, and the missile hit its target after more than 500km of flight.

The test would have been prohibited by the INF treaty.

“The testing by (the) U.S. military of a land-based missile banned under INF treaty two weeks after the official termination of this treaty is a blatant cynicism and mockery of the international community,” the RIA news agency cited Russian lawmaker Frants Klintsevich as saying on Monday.

a close up of a flag: National flags of Russia and U.S. fly at Vnukovo International Airport in Moscow© Reuters/Maxim Shemetov National flags of Russia and U.S. fly at Vnukovo International Airport in Moscow

“We, of course, will do our best in the shortest period of time to ensure that the United States does not have superiority in these types of weapons,” he said, adding that Russia did not intend to enter into an arms race.

U.S. officials had said for a number of months that they planned to carry out the test in August. The United States plans to test an intermediate-range ballistic missile in November.

Moscow denies flouting the accord and has accused Washington of breaking the pact, allegations rejected by the United States.

The dispute is aggravating the worst U.S.-Russia friction since the Cold War ended in 1991. Some experts believe the treaty’s collapse could undermine other arms control agreements and speed an erosion of the global system designed to block the spread of nuclear arms.

A Pentagon spokesman told Reuters that Sunday’s test used an MK41 launcher, but the system tested was not the same as the Aegis Ashore missile defence system currently operating in Romania and under construction in Poland.

Russia’s Defense Ministry did not reply to a Reuters request for comment sent outside normal working hours.

“Russia had alleged for years that the land-based MK-41 could launch Tomahawks and therefore would violate the treaty,” said Kingston Reif, director for disarmament research at the Arms Control Association advocacy group.

“Even though this is the first test of the combination, Russia will no doubt claim vindication,” Reif said.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has said that while he is in favour of placing ground-launched, intermediate-range missiles in Asia, it could be years before such missiles are ready to be deployed.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/us-tests-first-ground-launched-cruise-missile-after-inf-treaty-exit/ar-AAG1N0S

Story 3: Russian Nuclear Powered Cruise Missile Test Explosion Accident Released High Levels of Radiation and Killed 7 — Videos

Kremlin on suspected missile explosion: ‘Accidents happen’

7 Killed In Explosion At Suspected Test Site For Secret Nuclear-Propelled Missile | NBC Nightly News

Russian nuclear reactor explosion shrouded in mystery

What we know about deadly radiation explosion at Russian military site

What’s behind Russia’s mysterious nuclear incident? | DW News

Five confirmed dead in explosion at military testing site in northern Russia

Radiation Containment A New Concern In Russian Nuclear Incident | Rachel Maddow | MSNBC

Russia Missile Explosion: Govt tells Nyonoksa residents to leave village

Top Secret Russian Nuclear Engine Explodes During Testing

Russia evacuates village near site of military blast as experts reveal radiation levels spiked by 16 times after rocket engine accident

  • Evacuation of village of Nyonoksa was ordered today after last Thursday’s blast
  • Five employees of Kremlin’s nuclear agency died in the missile engine explosion
  • Officials had previously claimed that no dangerous substances were released
  • This despite the nearby city of Severodvinsk seeing a 16-fold spike in radiation

Russia will evacuate a village tomorrow near the site of a military missile blast after experts revealed radiation levels had spiked 16-fold after the rocket accident.

Five employees of the Kremlin’s nuclear agency died when a rocket engine exploded at the far northern military base last Thursday outside the village of Nyonoksa.

Today’s Russia’s state weather service said radiation levels had spiked in the nearby city of Severodvinsk up to 16 times last week, despite officials previously claiming no dangerous substances had been released.

A pre-dawn train will evacuate all 500 villagers of Nyonksa on Wednesday, ahead of what the authorities claim were pre-planned activities by the military.

Norway's nuclear safety authority said it is studying radioactive iodine particles detected near the Russian border in the days after a suspected nuclear-powered missile exploded at the Nyonoksa military base (pictured)

A mysterious Russian military explosion that left five Russian scientists dead last week happened during tests on a new nuclear-powered rocket. Officials were seen wearing protective clothing as they transported casualties last week (pictured)

A mysterious Russian military explosion that left five Russian scientists dead last week happened during tests on a new nuclear-powered rocket. Officials were seen wearing protective clothing as they transported casualties last week (pictured)

The five victims of the Russian military ‘radiation explosion’ were buried yesterday in a sombre mourning ceremony in ‘closed’ nuclear research town Sarov

The five victims of the Russian military ‘radiation explosion’ were buried yesterday in a sombre mourning ceremony in ‘closed’ nuclear research town Sarov

The “national heroes” were given a military salute of gunfire over their heavy coffins at a local cemetery

The ‘national heroes’ were given a military salute of gunfire over their heavy coffins at a local cemetery

A cortège of black vehicles brought the five coffins to the mourning ceremony which was held at the institute and later the cemetery

A cortège of black vehicles brought the five coffins to the mourning ceremony which was held at the institute and later the cemetery

Today it was revealed, ten medics who provided treatment to the wounded last week had been dispatched to Moscow for urgent medical checks.

The front-line doctors were reported to be ‘depressed as to why they were not told what they were dealing with’ in the aftermath of the weapons test.

The medics were not informed that they needed special anti-radiation suits.

One surgeon’s clothing was checked after an operation using a radiation measuring device – and found to be seriously contaminated.

They have been sent to Burnazyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Centre which specialises in conditions caused by radiation, and where wounded scientists from the incident are also being treated.

US nuclear experts this weekend blamed the testing of a nuclear-powered cruise missile for the mysterious explosion.

The Russian Ministry of Defence, quoted by state-run news outlets, had reported the blast was from liquid propellant for a rocket engine.

Thousands of people attended the burials of the five nuclear engineers killed in the accident yesterday in the city of Sarov.

In February the Russian state news agency released a video claiming to show a test of the Burevetnik missile which the Kremlin says is designed to strike over 'unlimited' range and with with unprecedented ability to manoeuvre

A pre-dawn train will evacuate all 500 villagers of Nyonksa on Wednesday, ahead of what the authorities claim were pre-planned activities by the military

A pre-dawn train will evacuate all 500 villagers of Nyonksa on Wednesday, ahead of what the authorities claim were pre-planned activities by the military

Experts said they suspected the explosion and the radiation release resulted from a mishap during the testing of a nuclear-powered cruise missile at a facility outside the village of Nyonoksa

Experts said they suspected the explosion and the radiation release resulted from a mishap during the testing of a nuclear-powered cruise missile at a facility outside the village of Nyonoksa

Two of the men were blown into the sea at the top secret naval weapons testing zone in the White Sea.

Their bodies were initially lost but later found and funerals for all those killed were to be held in a secret closed nuclear research town in Sarov from where foreigners are banned.

According to one version, the troubling missile accident came as the scientists were working on the nuclear engine of deadly Burevestnik cruise missile with ‘unlimited range’ – nicknamed the ‘Flying Chernobyl’ – when it exploded.

One of the dead was Evgeny Korotaev, 50, a leading electronics engineer and also a popular DJ, whose second wife had given birth to twin girls just seven months ago.

Like the other dead, he worked for the classified Institute of Experimental Physics based in Sarov, 235 miles east of Moscow, known as Arzamas-16 in Soviet times.

Vyacheslav Lipshev, 40, was one of the experts killed in the blast. His widow Natalia Alexeeva, 40, posted a tribute: 'I love you my dear, how will I live without you? You are my everything.'

Vyacheslav Lipshev, 40, was one of the experts killed in the blast. His widow Natalia Alexeeva, 40, posted a tribute: ‘I love you my dear, how will I live without you? You are my everything.’

Software and hardware specialist Alexey Vyushin, 43, who had developed a high-energy photon spectrometer was also killed

Another killed was Vyasheslav Yanovsky, 71, one of Russia's most senior nuclear scientists, deputy head of research and testing at the institute

 

Software and hardware specialist Alexey Vyushin (left), 43, and Vyasheslav Yanovsky (right), 71, were both killed

His daughter from the first marriage, Oksana, 26, posted a childhood picture of her with her father and the caption: ‘Daddy, I love you so much.’

She only recently gave birth to his grandchild.

Another killed was Vyasheslav Yanovsky, 71, one of Russia’s most senior nuclear scientists, deputy head of research and testing at the institute.

He was an ‘honoured worker’ of Moscow’s nuclear industry, and died alongside Vyacheslav Lipshev, 40, head of the institute’s research and development team.

Lipishev’s widow Natalia Alexeeva, 40, posted a tribute: ‘I love you my dear, how will I live without you? You are my everything.’

Software and hardware specialist Alexey Vyushin, 43, who had developed a high-energy photon spectrometer, and Sergey Pichugin, 45, a testing engineer, were also killed.

One of the dead was Evgeny Korotaev, 50, a leading electronics engineer and also a popular DJ, whose second wife had given birth to twin girls just seven months ago.

One of the dead was Evgeny Korotaev, 50, a leading electronics engineer and also a popular DJ, whose second wife had given birth to twin girls just seven months ago.

Oksana Korataeva (pictured) is the eldest daughter of Evgney Korataev, who died in the blast

Oksana Korataeva (pictured) is the eldest daughter of Evgney Korataev, who died in the blast

Korotaev's daughter from the first marriage, Oksana, 26, posted a childhood picture of her with her father and the caption: 'Daddy, I love you so much.'

Korotaev’s daughter from the first marriage, Oksana, 26, posted a childhood picture of her with her father and the caption: ‘Daddy, I love you so much.’

All are expected to be honoured posthumously by Vladimir Putin.

President Donald Trump weighed in on the catastrophe yesterday, tweeting, ‘The United States is learning much from the failed missile explosion in Russia.

‘We have similar, though more advanced, technology. The Russian ‘Skyfall’ explosion has people worried about the air around the facility, and far beyond. Not good!’

The U.S. and the Soviet Union pondered nuclear-powered missiles in the 1960s, but they abandoned those projects as too unstable and dangerous.

While presenting the new missile, Putin claimed it will have an unlimited range, allowing it to circle the globe unnoticed, bypassing the enemy’s missile defense assets to strike undetected.

Nuclear centre deputy head Vyacheslav Solovyev admitted the scientists were killed by an explosion in a small nuclear reactor, part of the engine of the missile

Nuclear centre deputy head Vyacheslav Solovyev admitted the scientists were killed by an explosion in a small nuclear reactor, part of the engine of the missile

Some reports suggested previous tests of the Burevestnik missile had been conducted on the barren Arctic archipelago of Novaya Zemlya and the Kapustin Yar testing range in southern Russia before they were moved to Nyonoksa.

Moving the tests from sparsely populated areas to a range close to a big city may reflect the military’s increased confidence in the new weapon.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7352515/Russia-evacuates-village-near-site-military-blast-experts-reveal-radiation-levels-spiked.html

 

Story 4: Trump Economic Team Dismisses Fears of Recession — Blames The Federal Reserve For Raised Interest Rates — Economy Is Growing — Videos

See the source image

 

Perspective from the BEA Accounts

BEA produces some of the most closely watched economic statistics that influence decisions of government officials, business people, and individuals. These statistics provide a comprehensive, up-to-date picture of the U.S. economy. The data on this page are drawn from featured BEA economic accounts.

Gross Domestic Product, 2nd quarter 2019 (advance estimate), and annual update
2nd quarter 2019:
2.1 percent
1st quarter 2019:
3.1 percent

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 2.1 percent in the second quarter of 2019, according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the first quarter, real GDP increased 3.1 percent.

  • Current Release: July 26, 2019
  • Next Release: August 29, 2019

https://www.bea.gov/news/glance

 

White House downplays recession fears

White House dismisses fears of a recession l ABC News

Hogan Gidley echoes Trump: Media are pushing a recession

The Federal Reserve shouldn’t be manipulating interest rates: Steve Forbes

Milton Friedman on Money / Monetary Policy (Federal Reserve) Part 1

Milton Friedman on Money / Monetary Policy (Federal Reserve) Part 2

Milton Friedman Speaks: Money and Inflation (B1230) – Full Video

On Milton Friedman | Murray N. Rothbard

Does this line predict America’s next recession? | The Economist

Are we heading for a global recession? – BBC Newsnight

Banking 14: Fed Funds Rate

Banking 15: More on the Fed Funds Rate

Banking 16: Why target rates vs. money supply

What is RESERVE REQUIREMENT? What does RESERVE REQUIREMENT mean? RESERVE REQUIREMENT meaning

 

Reserve requirement

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The reserve requirement (or cash reserve ratio) is a central bank regulation employed by most, but not all, of the world’s central banks, that sets the minimum amount of reserves that must be held by a commercial bank. The minimum reserve is generally determined by the central bank to be no less than a specified percentage of the amount of deposit liabilities the commercial bank owes to its customers. The commercial bank’s reserves normally consist of cash owned by the bank and stored physically in the bank vault (vault cash), plus the amount of the commercial bank’s balance in that bank’s account with the central bank.

The required reserve ratio is sometimes used as a tool in monetary policy, influencing the country’s borrowing and interest rates by changing the amount of funds available for banks to make loans with.[1] Western central banks rarely increase the reserve requirements because it would cause immediate liquidity problems for banks with low excess reserves; they generally prefer to use open market operations (buying and selling government-issued bonds) to implement their monetary policy. The People’s Bank of China uses changes in reserve requirements as an inflation-fighting tool, and raised the reserve requirement ten times in 2007 and eleven times since the beginning of 2010.

An institution that holds reserves in excess of the required amount is said to hold excess reserves.

Contents

Effects on money supply

Conventional view

The theory that a reserve requirement can be used as a tool of monetary policy is frequently found in economics textbooks. Under the theory, the higher the reserve requirement is set, the less funds banks will have available to lend out,[citation needed] leading to lower money creation and perhaps to higher purchasing power of the money previously in use. Under this view, the effect is multiplied, because money obtained as loan proceeds can be re-deposited, and a portion of those deposits may again be lent out,[citation needed] and so on. Under this theory, the effect on the money supply is governed by the following formulas:

{\displaystyle M_{1}=MB*m\,} : definitional relationship between monetary base MB (bank reserves plus currency held by the non-bank public) and the narrowly defined money supply{\displaystyle M_{1}},
{\displaystyle m={\frac {(1+c)}{(c+R)}}={\frac {1+{\frac {C}{D}}}{{\frac {C}{D}}+R}}} : derived formula for the money multiplier m, the factor by which lending and re-lending leads {\displaystyle M_{1}} to be a multiple of the monetary base:

where notationally,

{\displaystyle c=} the currency ratio: the ratio of the public’s holdings of currency (undeposited cash) to the public’s holdings of demand deposits; and
{\displaystyle R=} the total reserve ratio (the ratio of legally required plus non-required reserve holdings of banks to demand deposit liabilities of banks).

However, in the United States (and other countries except Brazil, China, India, Russia), the reserve requirements are generally not frequently altered to implement monetary policy because of the short-term disruptive effect on financial markets.[citation needed]

Endogenous money view

Some economists dispute the conventional theory of the reserve requirement.[2] Criticisms of the conventional theory are usually associated with theories of endogenous money.

Jaromir Benes and Michael Kumhof of the IMF Research Department report that the “deposit multiplier” of the undergraduate economics textbook, where monetary aggregates are created at the initiative of the central bank, through an initial injection of high-powered money[clarification needed] into the banking system that gets multiplied through bank lending, turns the actual operation of the monetary transmission mechanism on its head. Benes and Kumhof assert that in most cases where banks ask for replenishment of depleted reserves, the central bank obliges.[3] Under this view, reserves therefore impose no constraints, as the deposit multiplier is simply, in the words of Kydland and Prescott (1990), a myth. Under this theory, private banks almost fully control the money creation process.[4]

Required reserves

United States

In the United States, a reserve requirement[5] (or liquidity ratio) is a minimum value, set by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, of the ratio of required reserves to a category of deposit liabilities (called the “Net Transaction Accounts” or “NTAs”) owed by depository institutions to their customers (e.g., owed by commercial banks including U.S. branches of a foreign bank, savings and loan associationsavings bankcredit union). The deposit liability categories currently subject to reserve requirements are mainly checking accounts. There is no reserve requirement on savings accounts and time deposit accounts owned by individuals.[6] The total amount of all NTAs held by customers with U.S. depository institutions, plus the U.S. paper currency and coin currency held by the nonbank public, is called M1.

A depository institution can satisfy its reserve requirements by holding either vault cash[7] or reserve deposits. An institution that is a member of the Federal Reserve System must hold its reserve deposits at a Federal Reserve Bank. Nonmember institutions can elect to hold their reserve deposits at a member institution on a pass-through basis.[8]

A depository institution’s reserve requirements vary by the dollar amount of NTAs held by customers of that institution. Effective January 18, 2018, institutions with net transactions accounts:

  • Of less than $16 million have no minimum reserve requirement;
  • Between $16 million and $122.3 million must have a liquidity ratio of 3% of NTAs;
  • Exceeding $122.3 million must have a liquidity ratio of 10% of NTAs.[8]

The threshold monetary amounts are recalculated annually according to a statutory formula.

Effective 27 December 1990, a liquidity ratio of zero has applied to CDs and time deposits, owned by entities other than households, and the Eurocurrency liabilities of depository institutions. Deposits owned by foreign corporations or governments are currently not subject to reserve requirements.[8]

When an institution fails to satisfy its reserve requirements, it can make up its deficiency with reserves borrowed from a Federal Reserve Bank or from an institution holding reserves in excess of reserve requirements. Such loans are typically due in 24 hours or less.

An institution’s overnight reserves, averaged over some maintenance period, must equal or exceed its average required reserves, calculated over the same maintenance period. If this calculation is satisfied, there is no requirement that reserves be held at any point in time. Hence reserve requirements play only a limited role in money creation in the United States. Since quantitative easing began in 2008, they have been even less important, as an enormous glut of excess reserves now exists (over the whole system, though in theory, individual banks may still run into temporary shortfalls).

The International Banking Act of 1978 requires branches of foreign banks operating in the United States to follow the same required reserve ratio standards.[9][10]

Countries without reserve requirements

Canada, the UK, New Zealand, Australia, Sweden and Hong Kong[11] have no reserve requirements.

This does not mean that banks can—even in theory—create money without limit. On the contrary, banks are constrained by capital requirements, which are arguably more important than reserve requirements even in countries that have reserve requirements.

It also does not mean that a commercial bank’s overnight reserves can become negative, in these countries. The central bank will always step in to lend the necessary reserves if necessary so that this does not happen; this is sometimes described as “defending the payment system”. Historically a central bank might once have run out of reserves to lend and so have had to suspend redemptions, but this can no longer happen to modern central banks because of the end of the gold standard worldwide, which means that all nations use a fiat currency.

A zero reserve requirement cannot be explained by a theory that holds that monetary policy works by varying the quantity of money using the reserve requirement.

Even in the United States, which retains formal (though now mostly irrelevant[citation needed]) reserve requirements, the notion of controlling the money supply by targeting the quantity of base money fell out of favor many years ago, and now the pragmatic explanation of monetary policy refers to targeting the interest rate to control the broad money supply.

United Kingdom

In the UK the term clearing banks is sometimes used, meaning banks that have direct access to the clearing system. However, for the purposes of clarity, the term commercial banks will be used for the remainder of this section.

The Bank of England, which is the central bank for the entire United Kingdom, previously held to a voluntary reserve ratio system, with no minimum reserve requirement set. In theory this meant that commercial banks could retain zero reserves. The average cash reserve ratio across the entire United Kingdom banking system, though, was higher during that period, at about 0.15% as of 1999.[12]

From 1971 to 1980, the commercial banks all agreed to a reserve ratio of 1.5%. In 1981 this requirement was abolished.[12]

From 1981 to 2009, each commercial bank set out its own monthly voluntary reserve target in a contract with the Bank of England. Both shortfalls and excesses of reserves relative to the commercial bank’s own target over an averaging period of one day[12] would result in a charge, incentivising the commercial bank to stay near its target, a system known as reserves averaging.

Upon the parallel introduction of quantitative easing and interest on excess reserves in 2009, banks were no longer required to set out a target, and so were no longer penalised for holding excess reserves; indeed, they were proportionally compensated for holding all their reserves at the Bank Rate (the Bank of England now uses the same interest rate for its bank rate, its deposit rate and its interest rate target).[13] In the absence of an agreed target, the concept of excess reserves does not really apply to the Bank of England any longer, so it is technically incorrect to call its new policy “interest on excess reserves”.

Canada

Canada abolished its reserve requirement in 1992.[12]

Other countries

Other countries have required reserve ratios (or RRRs) that are statutorily enforced:[14]

Country Required reserve (in %) Note
Australia None Statutory reserve deposits abolished in 1988, replaced with 1% non-callable deposits[15]
New Zealand None 1985[16]
Sweden None Effective 1 April 1994[17]
Eurozone 1.00 Effective 18 January 2012.[18] Down from 2% between January 1999 and January 2012.
Czech Republic 2.00 Since 7 October 2009
Hungary 2.00 Since November 2008
South Africa 2.50
Switzerland 2.50
Latvia 3.00 Just after the Parex Bank bailout (24.12.2008), Latvian Central Bank
decreased the RRR from 7% (?) down to 3%[19]
Poland 3.50 As of 31 December 2010 [20]
Romania 8.00 As of 24 May 2015 for lei. 10% for foreign currency as of 24 October 2016.[21]
Russia 4.00 Effective 1 April 2011, up from 2.5% in January 2011.[22]
Chile 4.50
India 4.00 June 2 2015, as per RBI.[23]
Bangladesh 6.00 Raised from 5.50, effective from 15 December 2010
Lithuania 6.00
Nigeria 20.00 Raised from 15.00, effective from 25 November 2014[24]
Pakistan 5.00 Since 1 November 2008
Taiwan 7.00 [25]
Turkey 8.50 Since 19 February 2013
Jordan 8.00
Zambia 8.00
Burundi 8.50
Ghana 9.00
Iceland 2.00 [26]
Israel 9.00 The required reserve ratio is called minimum capital ratio.[27]
Mexico 10.50
Sri Lanka 8.00 With effect from 29 April 2011. 8% of total rupee deposit liabilities.
Bulgaria 10.00 Banks shall maintain minimum required reserves to the amount of 10% of the deposit base (effective from 1 December 2008) with two exceptions (effective from 1 January 2009): 1. on funds attracted by banks from abroad: 5%; 2. on funds attracted from state and local government budgets: 0%.[28]
Croatia 14.00 Down from 17%, effective from 14 January 2009[29]
Costa Rica 15.00
Malawi 15.00
Nepal 6.00 From 20 July 2014 (for commercial banks)[30]
Hong Kong None [11]
Brazil 21.00 Term deposits have a 33% RRR and savings accounts a 20% ratio.[31]
China 17.00 China cut bank reserves again to counter slowdown as of 29 February 2016.[32]
Tajikistan 20.00
Suriname 25.00 Down from 27%, effective 1 January 2007[33]
Lebanon 30.00 [34]

Historical changes in reserve ratios

In some countries, the cash reserve ratios have decreased over time; in some countries they have increased:[35]

Country 1968 1978 1988 1998
United Kingdom 20.5 15.9 5.0 3.1
Turkey 58.3 62.7 30.8 18.0
Germany 19.0 19.3 17.2 11.9
United States 12.3 10.1 8.5 10.3
India[36] 3 6 10 10-11

(Ratios are expressed in percentage points.)

See also

References

  1. ^ “Monetary Policy Aims – Bank of Russia”archive.org. 7 July 2001.
  2. ^ Michael, McLeay. “Money creation in the modern economy”(PDF). Bank of England.
  3. ^ Benes, Jaromir, and Michael Kumhof. The chicago plan revisited. International Monetary Fund, 2012. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2012/wp12202.pdf
  4. ^ Benes, Kumhof. http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2012/wp12202.pdf
  5. ^ See generally Regulation D, at 12 C.F.R. sec. 204.4 and sec. 204.5
  6. ^ “eCFR — Code of Federal Regulations”http://www.ecfr.gov.
  7. ^ See 12 C.F.R. sec. 204.2(k).
  8. Jump up to:a b c “The Fed – Reserve Requirements”federalreserve.gov.
  9. ^ Ahorny, Joseph; Saunders, Anthony; Swary, Itzhak (1985). “The Effects of the International Banking Act on Domestic Bank Profitability and Risk”. Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking. JSTOR. 17: 493–506. JSTOR 1992444.
  10. ^ “International Banking Act of 1978”Banking Law 101.
  11. Jump up to:a b “Central banks’ exit strategies from quantitative easing”Hong Kong Monetary Authority. Retrieved 13 August 2009.
  12. Jump up to:a b c d Jagdish Handa (2008). Monetary Economics (2nd ed.). Routledge. p. 347.
  13. ^ “Sterling Operations – Implementation of Monetary Policy”. Bank of England. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  14. ^ Lecture 8, Slide 4: “Central Banking and the Money Supply” from the presentation Monetary Macroeconomics by Dr. Pinar YesinUniversity of Zurich, based on 2003 survey of CBC participants at the Study Center Gerzensee
  15. ^ “Inquiry into the Australian Banking Industry”, Reserve Bank of Australia, January 1991
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ Lotsberg, Kari “Archived copy” (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 December 2015. Retrieved 1 December2015. Penning- & valutapolitik, p. 45-47, 1994:2
  18. ^ Bank, European Central. “How to calculate the minimum reserve requirements”European Central Bank.
  19. ^ “Minimum Reserve Ratio”Bank of Latvia. Retrieved 29 December 2010.
  20. ^ “Narodowy Bank Polski – Internet Information Service”nbp.pl.
  21. ^ “Banca Naţională a României – Reserve requirements”http://www.bnr.ro.
  22. ^ Central bank of Russia Required reserve ratio on credit institutions’ liabilities to non-resident has been raised to 4.0%
  23. ^ [2] ndtv.com
  24. ^ http://businessdayonline.com/2014/11/banks-squeezed-further-as-n40bn-may-vanish-from-industry-wide-profits/#.VHbDB51fqUk
  25. ^ Liquidity ratio and liquid reserves of deposit money banks. Data released by Taiwan’s central bank in October 2010.
  26. ^ “Iceland Reserve Requirement Ratio | Economic Indicators”http://www.ceicdata.com. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  27. ^ “Minimum capital ratio” (PDF)Bank of Israel. Retrieved 29 December 2010.
  28. ^ “Ordinance No. 21 of the BNB on the Minimum Required Reserves Maintained with the Bulgarian National Bank by Banks” (PDF)Bulgarian National Bank.
  29. ^ Decision on Reserve RequirementsCroatian National Bank(in Croatian)
  30. ^ “Nepal Rastra Bank”http://www.nrb.org.np.
  31. ^ “Circular 3.632” (PDF)bcb.gov.br.
  32. ^ CNBC (29 February 2016). “China central bank cuts reserve requirement ratio”cnbc.com.
  33. ^ “Reserve base en Kasreserve”Centrale Bank van Suriname. Retrieved 21 December 2009.
  34. ^ “Lebanon ‘immune’ to financial crisis”. 5 December 2008 – via news.bbc.co.uk.
  35. ^ IMF Financial Statistic Yearbook
  36. ^ Chronology of Bankrate, CRR and SLR Changes Archived29 August 2011 at the Wayback MachineReserve Bank of India

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserve_requirement

 

 

Reserve Requirements

Reserve requirements are the amount of funds that a depository institution must hold in reserve against specified deposit liabilities. Within limits specified by law, the Board of Governors has sole authority over changes in reserve requirements. Depository institutions must hold reserves in the form of vault cash or deposits with Federal Reserve Banks.

The dollar amount of a depository institution’s reserve requirement is determined by applying the reserve ratios specified in the Federal Reserve Board’s Regulation D to an institution’s reservable liabilities (see table of reserve requirements). Reservable liabilities consist of net transaction accounts, nonpersonal time deposits, and Eurocurrency liabilities. Since December 27, 1990, nonpersonal time deposits and Eurocurrency liabilities have had a reserve ratio of zero.

The reserve ratio on net transactions accounts depends on the amount of net transactions accounts at the depository institution. The Garn-St Germain Act of 1982 exempted the first $2 million of reservable liabilities from reserve requirements. This “exemption amount” is adjusted each year according to a formula specified by the act. The amount of net transaction accounts subject to a reserve requirement ratio of 3 percent was set under the Monetary Control Act of 1980 at $25 million. This “low reserve tranche” is also adjusted each year (see table of low reserve tranche amounts and exemption amounts since 1982). Net transaction accounts in excess of the low reserve tranche are currently reservable at 10 percent.

For more history on the changes in reserve requirement ratios and the indexation of the exemption and low reserve tranche, see the annual review table. Additional details on reserve requirements can be found in the Reserve Maintenance Manual and in the article (119 KB PDF) in the Federal Reserve Bulletin, the appendix of which has tables of historical reserve ratios.

Reserve Requirements

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Liability Type Requirement
% of liabilities Effective date
Net transaction accounts 1
$0 to $16.3 million2 0 1-17-19
More than $16.3 million to $124.2 million3 3 1-17-19
More than $124.2 million 10 1-17-19
Nonpersonal time deposits 0 12-27-90
Eurocurrency liabilities 0 12-27-90

Return to text

Notes: Reserve requirements must be satisfied by holding vault cash and, if vault cash is insufficient, also by a deposit maintained with a Federal Reserve Bank. An institution may hold that deposit directly with a Reserve Bank or with another institution in a pass-through relationship. Reserve requirements are imposed on “depository institutions,” defined as commercial banks, savings banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks, Edge corporations, and agreement corporations.

1. Total transaction accounts consists of demand deposits, automatic transfer service (ATS) accounts, NOW accounts, share draft accounts, telephone or preauthorized transfer accounts, ineligible bankers acceptances, and obligations issued by affiliates maturing in seven days or less. Net transaction accounts are total transaction accounts less amounts due from other depository institutions and less cash items in the process of collection. For a more detailed description of these deposit types, see Form FR 2900 at http://www.federalreserve.gov/apps/reportforms/default.aspx Return to table

2. The amount of net transaction accounts subject to a reserve requirement ratio of zero percent (the “exemption amount”) is adjusted each year by statute. The exemption amount is adjusted upward by 80 percent of the previous year’s (June 30 to June 30) rate of increase in total reservable liabilities at all depository institutions. No adjustment is made in the event of a decrease in such liabilities. Return to table

3. The amount of net transaction accounts subject to a reserve requirement ratio of 3 percent is the low reserve tranche. By statute, the upper limit of the low reserve tranche is adjusted each year by 80 percent of the previous year’s (June 30 to June 30) rate of increase or decrease in net transaction accounts held by all depository institutions. Return to table

Low Reserve Tranche Amounts and Exemption Amounts since 1982

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Effective date
(beginning of maintenance period)
Low reserve tranche amount
(millions of U.S. dollars)
Exemption amount
(millions of U.S. dollars)
January 14, 1982 26.0 n.a.
December 23, 1982 n.a. 2.1
January 13, 1983 26.3 ***
January 12, 1984 28.9 2.2
January 3, 1985 29.8 2.4
January 2, 1986 31.7 2.6
January 1, 1987 36.7 2.9
December 31, 1987 40.5 3.2
December 29, 1988 41.5 3.4
December 28, 1989 40.4 3.4
December 27, 1990 41.1 3.4
December 26, 1991 42.2 3.6
December 24, 1992 46.8 3.8
December 23, 1993 51.9 4.0
December 22, 1994 54.0 4.2
December 21, 1995 52.0 4.3
December 31, 1996 49.3 4.4
January 1, 1998 47.8 4.7
December 31, 1998 46.5 4.9
December 30, 1999 44.3 5.0
December 28, 2000 42.8 5.5
December 27, 2001 41.3 5.7
December 26, 2002 42.1 6.0
December 25, 2003 45.4 6.6
December 23, 2004 47.6 7.0
December 22, 2005 48.3 7.8
December 21, 2006 45.8 8.5
December 20, 2007 43.9 9.3
January 1, 2009 44.4 10.3
December 31, 2009 55.2 10.7
December 30, 2010 58.8 10.7
December 29, 2011 71.0 11.5
December 27, 2012 79.5 12.4
January 23, 2014 89.0 13.3
January 22, 2015 103.6 14.5
January 21, 2016 110.2 15.2
January 19, 2017 115.1 15.5
January 18, 2018 122.3 16.0
January 17, 2019 124.2 16.3

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 *Not applicable Return to table
***No change Return to table

Regulatory Changes in Reserve Requirements and Indexation of the Low Reserve Tranche and the Reserve Requirement Exemption

The following list covers regulatory changes in reserve requirements and indexation of the low reserve tranche and the reserve requirement exemption beginning December 1, 1959, and their effects on required reserves.

105. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 27, 2012, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts will rise from $71.0 million to $79.5 million. The reserve requirement exemption will rise from $11.5 million to $12.4 million. These actions will lower total required reserves by an estimated $971 million.
104. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 29, 2011, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts will rise from $58.8 million to $71.0 million. The reserve requirement exemption will rise from $10.7 million to $11.5 million. These actions will lower total required reserves by an estimated $1.33 billion.
103. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 30, 2010, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was raised from $55.2 million to $58.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption remained at $10.7 million. These actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $353 million.
102. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 31, 2009, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was raised from $44.4 million to $55.2 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $10.3 million to $10.7 million. These actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $1.24 billion.
101. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning January 1, 2009, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was raised from $43.9 million to $44.4 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $9.3 million to $10.3 million. The actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $270 million.
100. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 20, 2007, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $45.8 million to $43.9 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $8.5 million to $9.3 million. The actions raised total required reserves by an estimated $57 million.
99. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 21, 2006, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $48.3 million to $45.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $7.8 million to $8.5 million. The actions raised total required reserves by an estimated $146 million.
98. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 22, 2005, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was increased from $47.6 million to $48.3 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $7.0 million to $7.8 million. The actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $369 million.
97. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 23, 2004, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was increased from $45.4 million to $47.6 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $6.6 million to $7.0 million. The actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $506 million.
96. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 25, 2003, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was increased from $42.1 million to $45.4 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $6.0 million to $6.6 million. The actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $689 million.
95. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 26, 2002, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was increased from $41.3 million to $42.1 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $5.57 million to $6.0 million. The actions lowered total required reserves by an estimated $201 million.
94. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 27, 2001, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $42.8 million to $41.3 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $5.5 million to $5.7 million. The actions raised total required reserves by an estimated $154 million.
93. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 28, 2000, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $44.3 million to $42.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $5.0 million to $5.5 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $60 million.
92. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 30, 1999, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $46.5 million to $44.3 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $4.9 million to $5.0 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $264 million.
91. Effective for the reserve maintenance period beginning December 31, 1998, the low reserve tranche for net transaction accounts was reduced from $47.8 million to $46.5 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $4.7 million to $4.9 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $104 million.
90. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning July 30, 1998, the required reserve system was shifted from CRR to new lagged reserve requirements (LRR) with reserve computation periods for weekly reporters starting thirty days before the corresponding reserve maintenance periods. Under the new LRR regime, the lag in counting vault cash toward required reserves was lengthened from sixteen days to thirty days for institutions reporting weekly on the FR2900. In other words, the average vault cash held during a reserve computation period would be applied toward required reserves in its corresponding reserve maintenance period.
89. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning January 1, 1998, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was reduced from $49.3 million to $47.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $4.4 million to $4.7 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $89 million.
88. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning December 31, 1996, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was reduced from $52.0 million to $49.3 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $4.3 million to $4.4 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $298 million.
87. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning December 21, 1995, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was reduced from $54.0 million to $52.0 million. The reserve requirement exemption was raised from $4.2 million to $4.3 million. The actions raised required reserves by an estimated $199 million.
86. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning December 22, 1994, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $51.9 million to $54.0 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $4.0 million to $4.2 million. The actions reduced required reserves by an estimated $318 million.
85. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning December 23, 1993, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $46.8 million to $51.9 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $3.8 million to $4.0 million. The actions reduced required reserves by an estimated $738 million.
84. Effective with the reserve maintenance period beginning December 24, 1992, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $42.2 million to $46.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $3.6 million to $3.8 million. The actions reduced required reserves by an estimated $699 million.
83. Effective November 12, 1992, the lag in counting vault cash toward required reserves was shortened from four weeks to two weeks for institutions reporting weekly on the FR2900, i.e. counting the average vault cash held during a reserve computation period toward required reserves in its corresponding reserve maintenance period.
82. Effective September 3, 1992, the carryover allowance for reserve balances, for institutions reporting weekly and quarterly on the FR2900, was doubled to the larger of $50,000 or 4 percent of required reserves plus required clearing balances less the institution’s required clearing balance penalty-free band.
81. Effective April 2, 1992, the 12 percent required reserve ratio against net transaction deposits above the low reserve tranche level was reduced to 10 percent. The action reduced required reserves by an estimated $8.9 billion.
80. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning December 26, 1991, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $41.1 million to $42.2 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $3.4 million to $3.6 million. The actions reduced required reserves by an estimated $255 million.
79. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning January 17, 1991, the 3 percent reserve requirement on nontransaction liabilities was reduced to zero for FR2900 quarterly reporters. The action reduced required reserves by an estimated $460 million.
78. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning December 27, 1990, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $40.4 million to $41.1 million. The reserve requirement exemption was kept at $3.4 million. The action lowered required reserves by an estimated $112 million.
77. Effective December 27, 1990, the 1-1/2 percent reserve requirement on nontransaction liabilities was reduced to zero for FR2900 weekly reporters. The action lowered required reserves by an estimated $6.5 billion.
76. Effective December 13, 1990, the 3 percent reserve requirement on nontransaction liabilities was reduced to 1-1/2 percent for FR2900 weekly reporters. The action lowered required reserves by an estimated $6.7 billion.
75. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning December 28, 1989, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was reduced from $41.5 million to $40.4 million. The reserve requirement exemption was kept at $3.4 million. The action raised required reserves by an estimated $190 million.
74. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning December 29, 1988, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $40.5 million to $41.5 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $3.2 million to $3.4 million. The actions reduced required reserves by an estimated $210 million.
73. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning December 31, 1987, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $36.7 million to $40.5 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $2.9 million to $3.2 million. The actions reduced required reserves by about $740 million.
72. Effective September 10, 1987, according to the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember depository institutions were increased about $1.70 billion.
71. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning January 1, 1987, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $31.7 million to $36.7 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $2.6 million to $2.9 million. These actions reduced required reserves by about $970 million.
70. Effective September 11, 1986, according to the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember depository institutions were increased about $1.58 billion.
69. Effective April 24, 1986, money market deposit accounts (MMDA), which had previously been subject to full reserve requirements, were made subject to the transitional phase-in program of the Monetary Control Act. In addition, the order of application of the exemption applied to reservable liabilities was changed. These actions reduced required reserves by about $260 million.
68. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning January 2, 1986, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $29.8 million to $31.7 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $2.4 million to $2.6 million. These actions reduced required reserves by about $340 million.
67. Effective September 12, 1985, according to the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember depository institutions were increased about $1.23 billion.
66. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning January 3, 1985, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts was raised from $28.9 million to $29.8 million. The reserve requirement exemption was also raised from $2.2 million to $2.4 million. These actions reduced required reserves by about $190 million.
65. Effective September 13, 1984, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember depository institutions increased about $1.08 billion.
64. Effective February 2, 1984, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks were reduced about $2.0 billion.
63. Effective February 2, 1984, Regulation D was amended as follows for institutions reporting weekly on the FR2900: (1) change the reserve computation and maintenance periods from weekly to biweekly, with the former ending on Monday and the latter ending on Wednesday; (2) compute required reserves against net transaction deposits based on average deposits over the computation period ending two days before the end of the maintenance period; (3) compute required reserves against nontransaction deposits based on average deposits over a computation period ending 17 days before the beginning of the maintenance period; and (4) count the average vault cash held during a reserve computation period ending 17 days before the beginning of the reserve maintenance period toward required reserves.
62. Effective with reserve maintenance period beginning January 12, 1984, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts at depository institutions was raised from $26.3 million to $28.9 million. Also, in accordance with the provisions of the Depository Institutions Act of 1982, the reserve requirement exemption was raised from $2.1 million to $2.2 million. These actions reduced required reserves a total of about $350 million.
61. Effective October 20, 1983, required reserves were reduced an estimated $100 million as a result of the elimination of reserve requirements on nonpersonal time deposits with maturities of 1-1/2 years to 2-1/2 years.
60. Effective September 1, 1983, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks were reduced about $2.0 billion, and required reserves of other depository institutions were increased about $0.9 billion.
59. Effective April 14, 1983, required reserves were reduced an estimated $80 million as a result of the elimination of reserve requirements on nonpersonal time deposits with maturities of 2-1/2 years to 3-1/2 years.
58. Effective March 3, 1983, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks were reduced by approximately $1.9 billion.
57. Effective January 13, 1983, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts at depository institutions was raised from $26.0 million to $26.3 million. This action reduced required reserves approximately $32 million.
56. Effective December 23, 1982, in accordance with provisions of the Depository Institutions Act of 1982 that exempted the first $2.1 million of reservable liabilities at all depository institutions from reserve requirements, required reserves were reduced by an estimated $800 million.
55. Effective October 28, 1982, in accordance with provisions of the Depository Institutions Act of 1982, required reserves of certain former member banks were reduced by approximately $100 million.
54. Effective September 2, 1982, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks were reduced about $2.1 billion, and required reserves of other depository institutions were increased about $0.9 billion.
53. Effective August 12, 1982, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased about $140 million.
52. Effective May 13, 1982, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased about $150 million.
51. Effective March 4, 1982, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks decreased by about $2.0 billion.
50. Effective February 11, 1982, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased about $170 million.
49. Effective January 14, 1982, the low reserve tranche for transaction accounts at depository institutions was raised from $25 million to $26 million. This action reduced required reserves approximately $60 million.
48. Effective November 12, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased about $210 million.
47. Effective September 3, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of member banks were reduced about $2.0 billion, and required reserves of other depository institutions were increased about $0.9 billion.
46. Effective August 13, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased approximately $230 million.
45. Effective May 14, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased by approximately $245 million.
44. Effective March 12, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of small nonmember “quarterly reporters” increased about $75 million.
43. Effective February 12, 1981, in conjunction with the transitional phase-in program under the Monetary Control Act, required reserves of certain nonmember banks and foreign-related institutions increased by approximately $245 million.
42. Effective November 13, 1980, required reserves of member banks and Edge Act corporations were reduced about $4.3 billion and required reserves of other depository institutions were increased about $1.4 billion due to the implementation of the Monetary Control Act of 1980.
41. Effective July 24, 1980, the 5 percent marginal reserve requirement on managed liabilities and the 2 percent supplementary reserve requirement against large time deposits were removed. These actions reduced required reserves about $3.2 billion.
40. Effective May 29, 1980, the marginal reserve requirement was reduced from 10 percent to 5 percent and the base upon which the marginal reserve requirement was calculated was raised. This action reduced required reserves about $980 million.
39. Effective March 12, 1980, the 8 percent marginal reserve requirement was raised to 10 percent. In addition, the base upon which the marginal reserve requirement was calculated was reduced. This action increased required reserves about $1.7 billion.
38. Effective October 11, 1979, a marginal reserve requirement of 8 percent was imposed on “managed liabilities” of member banks, Edge Act corporations, and U.S. agencies and branches of foreign banks above a base average for the two weeks ending September 26, 1979. Managed liabilities included large time deposits ($100,000 and over with maturities of less than one year), repurchase agreements against U.S. government and federal agency securities, Eurodollar borrowings, and federal funds borrowings from a nonmember institution. On October 25, required reserves and reserves held by Edge Act Corporations were included in member bank reserves. (Previously reserves held by these institutions were recorded as “other deposits” by Federal Reserve Banks.) These actions raised required reserves approximately $355 and $320 million, respectively.
37. Effective November 30, 1978, the 10 percent minimum requirement on the domestic deposits of Edges was removed but Edges continued to be subject to the same reserve requirements as member banks.
36. Effective November 16, 1978, a supplementary reserve requirement of 2 percent was imposed on time deposits of $100,000 or more. This action increased required reserves approximately $3.0 billion.
35. Effective December 30, 1976, the reserve requirement against net demand deposits up to $10 million was reduced by 1/2 percentage point, and the reserve requirement against net demand deposits over $10 million was reduced by 1/4 percentage point. This action reduced required reserves by approximately $550 million.
34. Effective January 8, 1976, the reserve requirement on time deposits maturing in 180 days to 4 years was reduced from 3 percent to 2-1/2 percent. This action reduced required reserves by approximately $500 million.
33. Effective October 30, 1975, the reserve requirement against member bank time deposits with an original maturity of four years or more was reduced from 3 percent to 1 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $360 million.
32. Effective May 22, 1975, the reserve requirement against foreign borrowings of member banks, primarily Eurodollars, was reduced from 8 percent to 4 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $80 million.
31. Effective February 13, 1975, the reserve requirements against all categories of net demand deposits up to $400 million were reduced by one-half of 1 percentage point, and the reserve requirement against net demand deposits of more than $400 million was reduced 1 percentage point. This action reduced required reserves approximately $1,065 million.
30. Effective December 12, 1974, the reserve requirement against all time deposits with an original maturity of six months or longer was reduced from 5 percent to 3 percent; the reserve requirement against all time deposits with an original maturity of less than six months was increased from 5 percent to 6 percent; and the reserve requirement against net demand deposits over $400 million was reduced from 18 percent to 17-1/2 percent. In addition, the 3 percent marginal reserve requirement on large certificates of deposit with an initial maturity of less than four months was removed. These actions reduced required reserves approximately $710 million.
29. Effective September 19, 1974, the marginal reserve requirement against time deposits in denomination greater than $100,000 and more than 4-month maturity was eliminated. This action reduced required reserves approximately $510 million.
28. Effective December 27, 1973, the marginal reserve requirement against certain time deposits was reduced from 11 percent to 8 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $360 million.
27. Effective October 4, 1973, the marginal reserve requirement against certain time deposits was increased from 8 percent to 11 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $465 million.
26. Effective July 19, 1973, the reserve requirement against all net demand deposits, except the first $2 million was increased 1/2 percentage point. This action increased required reserves approximately $760 million.
25. Effective July 12, 1973, reserve requirements were imposed against finance bills. This action increased required reserves approximately $90 million.
24. Effective June 21, 1973, the Board amended its Regulation D to establish a marginal reserve requirement of 8 percent against certain time deposits and to subject to the 8 percent reserve requirement certain deposits exempt from the rate limitations of the Board’s Regulation Q. In addition, reserves against certain foreign branch deposits were reduced from 10 percent to 8 percent. These changes had little effect on required reserves.
23. Effective November 9, 1972, Regulations D and J were revised to (1) adopt a system of reserve requirements against demand deposits of all member banks based on the amount of such deposits held by a member bank, and (2) to require banks–member and nonmember–to pay cash items presented by a Federal Reserve Bank on the day of presentation in funds available to the Reserve Bank on that day. These changes reduced required reserves approximately $2.5 billion, effective November 9; $1.0 billion, effective November 16; and increased required reserves $300 million, effective November 23.
22. Effective January 7, 1971, the reserve requirement on certain foreign borrowings, primarily Eurodollars, by member banks, and the sale of assets to their foreign branches was raised from 10 percent to 20 percent. This action had little effect on required reserves.
21. Effective October 1, 1970, the reserve requirement of all member banks against time deposits (other than savings deposits) in excess of $5 million was reduced from 6 percent to 5 percent. At the same time, a 5 percent reserve requirement was imposed against funds obtained by member banks through the issuance of commercial paper by their affiliates. This action reduced required reserves approximately $500 million (net).
20. Effective October 16, 1969 a 10 percent marginal reserve requirement was established on certain foreign borrowings, primarily Eurodollars, by member banks and on the sale of assets to their foreign branches. This action increased required reserves approximately $415 million.
19. Effective April 17, 1969, the reserve requirement of all member banks against net demand deposits was increased 1/2 percentage point. This action increased required reserves approximately $660 million.
18. Effective September 12, 1968, Regulation D was amended to: (1) reduce the reserve computation and maintenance periods for country banks from two weeks to one week to coincide with one-week periods for reserve city banks; (2) change contemporaneous reserve requirements to lagged reserve requirements (LRR), which required all banks to compute weekly average required reserves for the maintenance week on the basis of average daily deposits two weeks earlier; (3) count average vault cash held two weeks earlier toward the required reserves for the present week; and (4) allow either excesses or deficiencies averaging up to 2 percent of required reserves to be carried forward to the next maintenance week.
17. Effective January 18, 1968, the reserve requirement of country banks against net demand deposits in excess of $5 million was increased from 12 percent to 12-1/2 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $190 million.
16. Effective January 11, 1968, the reserve requirement of reserve city banks against net demand deposits in excess of $5 million was increased from 16-1/2 percent to 17 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $360 million.
15. Effective March 16, 1967, the reserve requirement of all member banks against savings deposits and the first $5 million of time deposits was reduced from 3-1/2 percent to 3 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $425 million.
14. Effective March 2, 1967, the reserve requirement of all member banks against savings deposits and the first $5 million of time deposits was reduced from 4 percent to 3-1/2 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $425 million.
13. Effective September 15, 1966, the reserve requirement of country banks against time deposits (other than savings deposits) in excess of $5 million was increased from 5 percent to 6 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $75 million.
12. Effective September 8, 1966, the reserve requirement of reserve city banks against time deposits (other than savings deposits) in excess of $5 million was increased from 5 percent to 6 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $370 million.
11. Effective July 21, 1966, the reserve requirement of country banks against time deposits (other than savings deposits) in excess of $5 million was increased from 4 percent to 5 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $70 million.
10. Effective July 14, 1966, the reserve requirement of reserve city banks against time deposits (other than savings deposits) in excess of $5 million was increased from 4 percent to 5 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $350 million.
9. Effective November 1, 1962, the reserve requirement of country banks against their time deposits was reduced from 5 percent to 4 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $360 million.
8. Effective October 25, 1962, the reserve requirement of reserve city banks against their time deposits was reduced from 5 percent to 4 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $410 million.
7. Effective July 28, 1962, the central reserve city classification was eliminated and the former central reserve city banks were reclassified as reserve city banks.
6. Effective December 1, 1960, the reserve requirement of central reserve city banks against their net demand deposits was reduced from 17-1/2 percent to 16-1/2 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $250 million.
5. Effective November 24, 1960, the reserve requirement of country banks against their net demand deposits was increased from 11 percent to 12 percent. This action increased required reserves approximately $380 million.
4. Effective November 24, 1960, member banks were allowed to count all vault cash as legal reserves.
3. Effective September 1, 1960, the reserve requirement of central reserve city banks against their net demand deposits was reduced from 18 percent to 17-1/2 percent. This action reduced required reserves approximately $120 million.
2. Effective January 1, 1960, the reserve computation and maintenance periods for country banks were changed from semi-monthly to biweekly. (The reserve computation and maintenance periods for central reserve city banks and reserve city banks continued to be one week; and all banks, including country banks, continued to compute and hold reserves contemporaneously.) In addition, beginning with the period ending January 13, 1960, the reserve computation and maintenance periods for all banks were made to end on Wednesday.
1. Effective December 1, 1959, member banks were allowed to count part of their vault cash as legal reserves.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/reservereq.htm

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 1288, July 11, 2019, Part 2: Story 1: Federal Reserve Will Cut the Federal Funds Target Rate Range in July By .25% or 25 Basis Points If Second Quarter Real Gross Domestic Product Rate of Growth Falls Below 3% — Otherwise No Change in Federal Funds Rate Target Range — Huge Uncertainty Generated By Rapidly Growing Annual Deficits in Federal Government Spending Resulting in Rising National Debt Approaching $23,000,000,000,000 and Unfunded Liabilities and and Obligations Over $230,000,000,000,000! — Bubbles Bubbles Everywhere — Beyond Bubbles — U.S. Government Bankrupt Now! — Make It Rain on The Blockchain — Trust and Truth — Videos

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Pronk Pops Show 1288 July 11, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1232 April 1, 2019 Part 2

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Part 2: Story 1: Federal Reserve Will Cut the Federal Funds Target Rate Range in July By .25% or 25 Basis Points If Second Quarter Real Gross Domestic Product Rate of Growth Falls Below 3% — Otherwise No Change in Federal Funds Rate Target Range — Huge Uncertainty Generated By Rapidly Growing Annual Deficits in Federal Government Spending Resulting in Rising National Debt Approaching $23,000,000,000,000 and Unfunded Liabilities and and Obligations Over $230,000,000,000,000! — Bubbles Bubbles Everywhere — Beyond Bubbles — Make It Rain on The Blockchain — Trust and Truth — Videos

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Fed Chair Jerome Powell testifies before Congress

Streamed live on Jul 10, 2019

House Financial Services Committee holds hearing on “Monetary Policy & the State of the Economy.” Fed Chair Powell testifies. All eyes will be on Powell when he testifies before a House panel on monetary policy in the first of his 2-day semiannual testimony to Congress. Investors are looking to Powell for what to expect at the next policy meeting at the end of July. FOX Business Network (FBN) is a financial news channel delivering real-time information across all platforms that impact both Main Street and Wall Street. Headquartered in New York — the business capital of the world — FBN launched in October 2007 and is the leading business network on television, topping CNBC in Business Day viewers for the second consecutive year. T he network is available in more than 80 million homes in all markets across the United States. Owned by FOX, FBN has bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and London.

 

Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s Senate testimony on monetary policy – 07/11/2019

Streamed live on Jul 11, 2019

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Published on May 10, 2010

Huge budget deficits and record levels of national debt are getting a lot of attention, but this video explains that unfunded liabilities for entitlement programs are Americas real red-ink challenge. More important, this CF&P mini-documentary reveals that deficits and debt are symptoms of the real problem of an excessive burden of government spending. http://www.freedomandprosperity.org

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How does a blockchain work – Simply Explained

Bitcoin: Beyond The Bubble – Full Documentary

Scott Adams’ Guide To Blockchain: The Technology That Will Change Everything

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How the blockchain is changing money and business | Don Tapscott

TED

Published on Sep 16, 2016

What is the blockchain? If you don’t know, you should; if you do, chances are you still need some clarification on how it actually works. Don Tapscott is here to help, demystifying this world-changing, trust-building technology which, he says, represents nothing less than the second generation of the internet and holds the potential to transform money, business, government and society. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate

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Understanding The Graduate 50 Years Later

What is Blockchain

Published on Jun 9, 2016

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Blockchain is Eating Wall Street | Alex Tapscott | TEDxSanFrancisco

How to Use Blockchain to Create a Better Future | Brian Condenanza | TEDxHautLacSchool

Our Lives in a Blockchain-Powered Smart Economy | Eddy Travia | TEDxINSEAD

Is Bitcoin the Future of Money? Peter Schiff vs. Erik Voorhees

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By appearing to buckle to Trump on rates, is the Fed chief creating problems down the road?

By appearing to buckle to Trump on rates, is the Fed chief creating problems down the road?
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell speaks at a news conference in Washington on June 19. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

In signaling that the Federal Reserve is almost certain to cut interest rates at the end of this month, Fed Chairman Jerome H. Powell may have given President Trump what he wants.

But the central bank now looks more vulnerable to criticism that it is caving to political pressures that will only grow as the election cycle heats up.

Powell, in testimony to lawmakers Wednesday, essentially argued that heightened uncertainty, from trade tensions and slowing global economic growth, along with low inflation, was enough to justify a cut in interest rates.

Historically, the Fed has lowered rates to ward off recession or when it sees substantial risks of a downturn.

The U.S. economy expanded at a nearly 3% pace last year and, although it has slowed in recent months, the Fed and most private forecasters see growth continuing at a decent rate. The latest jobs report for June showed hiring remains strong, and Trump recently agreed to a ceasefire in the trade war with China, tenuous as it may be.For those reasons, Powell’s remarks Wednesday came as a pleasant surprise to financial markets. Stocks rose to record highs.

Lowering the rate by a quarter point later this month may help borrowers a little. The Fed’s main rate is a benchmark for credit cards, auto loans and other short-term consumer lending, but long-term rates such as mortgages already have dropped in anticipation of a Fed rate cut, meaning it’s unlikely to provide much of a boost to the housing market or the broader economy.

“We’ve already gotten 90% of the benefit; it’s already priced into the market,” said Dean Baker, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Investors are expecting at least one more quarter-point rate cut after July, and some even two. Powell and his colleagues at the Fed will have their hands full managing investors’ expectations on future rate reductions, so they don’t set themselves up for a sharp fall.

“The issue that the Fed is going to run into … is just like parenting,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. “They can’t bend every time the markets throw a tantrum. At some point, you’ve got to put your foot down.”

Market expectations aside, Powell’s bigger challenge is likely to come from Trump. The president has been publicly hammering Powell to lower interest rates. Trump has criticized the Fed for raising rates four times last year, and no one thinks he will be satisfied if the Fed drops its benchmark rate by a quarter point on July 31, as it’s now expected to do.

Trump and his economic team have pressed the Fed to slash rates by a full point, and Trump isn’t likely to stop jawboning the Fed in the coming months.

Some economic experts say Trump already has succeeded in getting into the heads of Fed decision makers.

“Powell does seem to be going a little bit out of his way to reverse the rate hikes made last year,” said Chris Rupkey, managing director and chief economist at MUFG Union Bank in New York. “The president’s like another active member of the Fed board in the room. I wouldn’t tell him no, would you?”

Rupkey and some other Fed watchers say Powell is moving a bit too early in readying rate cuts, especially with job growth still running very strong. Only a few months ago, the Fed’s stance on interest rates was to wait and see.

“Should they cut rates at this time? Absolutely not!” said Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at Economic Outlook Group. “There is no economic justification to take that step now.

“For one, there is little to suggest this business cycle [is] struggling. The softness we see in some data points have little to do with economic fundamentals. The trade war with China and the havoc it has caused to global supply chain are the primary reasons those sectors have weakened.”

But other analysts argue that there’s good reason for the shift in the Fed’s posture. According to minutes from their last meeting in June, released Wednesday, Fed policymakers were feeling that the downside risks to the economy “had increased significantly over recent weeks.”

And in his testimony Wednesday to the House Financial Services Committee, Powell said that since May, crosscurrents that seemed to moderate earlier in the year “have reemerged, creating greater uncertainty.” Among other concerns, he said, business spending, trade and manufacturing activity have slowed.

“The issue really is more now on the business side where we see business confidence and business investment weakening a bit,” he told lawmakers, adding that there’s rising risk as well to consumer spending, which accounts for 70% of U.S. economic activity. “Household confidence has remained high, but over time uncertainty can cause households to hold back as well.”

Powell, sensitive to the political pressures bearing on the Fed, took pains in his prepared remarks to defend the integrity of the central bank and the basis for its policymaking.

“Congress has given us an important degree of independence so that we can effectively pursue our statutory goals based on objective analysis and data,” Powell said as he began his testimony.

Trump has reportedly considered firing Powell or demoting him, although it’s not clear whether the president has the legal authority to do so. Powell reiterated Wednesday that the law is on his side and that he intends to serve the full four-year term as Fed chair, which he assumed in February 2018.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have cautioned Trump against taking steps to remove Powell as Fed leader. And on Wednesday, Democratic lawmakers sought to drive home that point.

“Mr. Chairman, if you got a call from the president today or tomorrow, and he said, ‘I’m firing you. Pack up. It’s time to go,’ what would you do?” asked Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), chair of the Financial Services Committee.

“Well, of course I would not do that,” Powell responded, to which Waters added, “I can’t hear you,” eliciting laughter.

But the president’s unusually persistent and heavy pressure on the Fed is anything but a laughing matter.

Alan Blinder, a Fed vice chairman in the mid-1990s, said the concern about the bank’s independence stemming from the president’s attacks was such that it could legitimately be a factor in a Fed decision not to raise rates.

Apart from the potential harm to its credibility, a more immediate risk for the Fed in cutting rates is that it could limit the central bank’s arsenal in fighting the next recession. The Fed’s main benchmark rate is less than 2.5%, low by historical standards.

In response to lawmakers’ questioning, Powell said the resumption of trade talks between the United States and China was a “constructive step” but that doesn’t really change the outlook.

“I would say that the bottom line for me is that the uncertainties around global growth and trade continue to weigh on the outlook.”

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-jerome-powell-interest-rates-20190710-story.html

July 10, 2019

Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress

Chair Jerome H. Powell

Before the Committee on Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

 

Chair Powell submitted identical remarks to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, U.S. Senate, on July 11, 2019.

Chairwoman Waters, Ranking Member McHenry, and other members of the Committee, I am pleased to present the Federal Reserve’s semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.

Let me start by saying that my colleagues and I strongly support the goals of maximum employment and price stability that Congress has set for monetary policy. We are committed to providing clear explanations about our policies and activities. Congress has given us an important degree of independence so that we can effectively pursue our statutory goals based on objective analysis and data. We appreciate that our independence brings with it an obligation for transparency so that you and the public can hold us accountable.

Today I will review the current economic situation and outlook before turning to monetary policy. I will also provide an update of our ongoing public review of our framework for setting monetary policy.

Current Economic Situation and Outlook 
The economy performed reasonably well over the first half of 2019, and the current expansion is now in its 11th year. However, inflation has been running below the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) symmetric 2 percent objective, and crosscurrents, such as trade tensions and concerns about global growth, have been weighing on economic activity and the outlook.

The labor market remains healthy. Job gains averaged 172,000 per month from January through June. This number is lower than the average of 223,000 a month last year but above the pace needed to provide jobs for new workers entering the labor force. Consequently, the unemployment rate moved down from 3.9 percent in December to 3.7 percent in June, close to its lowest level in 50 years. Job openings remain plentiful, and employers are increasingly willing to hire workers with fewer skills and train them. As a result, the benefits of a strong job market have been more widely shared in recent years. Indeed, wage gains have been greater for lower-skilled workers. That said, individuals in some demographic groups and in certain parts of the country continue to face challenges. For example, unemployment rates for African Americans and Hispanics remain well above the rates for whites and Asians. Likewise, the share of the population with a job is higher in urban areas than in rural communities, and this gap widened over the past decade. A box in the July Monetary Policy Report provides a comparison of employment and wage gains over the current expansion for individuals with different levels of education.

Gross domestic product increased at an annual rate of 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2019, similar to last year’s pace. This strong reading was driven largely by net exports and inventories—components that are not generally reliable indicators of ongoing momentum. The more reliable drivers of growth in the economy are consumer spending and business investment. While growth in consumer spending was weak in the first quarter, incoming data show that it has bounced back and is now running at a solid pace. However, growth in business investment seems to have slowed notably, and overall growth in the second quarter appears to have moderated. The slowdown in business fixed investment may reflect concerns about trade tensions and slower growth in the global economy. In addition, housing investment and manufacturing output declined in the first quarter and appear to have decreased again in the second quarter.

After running close to our 2 percent objective over much of last year, overall consumer price inflation, measured by the 12-month change in the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE), declined earlier this year and stood at 1.5 percent in May. The 12-month change in core PCE inflation, which excludes food and energy prices and tends to be a better indicator of future inflation, has also come down this year and was 1.6 percent in May.

Our baseline outlook is for economic growth to remain solid, labor markets to stay strong, and inflation to move back up over time to the Committee’s 2 percent objective. However, uncertainties about the outlook have increased in recent months. In particular, economic momentum appears to have slowed in some major foreign economies, and that weakness could affect the U.S. economy. Moreover, a number of government policy issues have yet to be resolved, including trade developments, the federal debt ceiling, and Brexit. And there is a risk that weak inflation will be even more persistent than we currently anticipate. We are carefully monitoring these developments, and we will continue to assess their implications for the U.S economic outlook and inflation.

The nation also continues to confront important longer-run challenges. Labor force participation by those in their prime working years is now lower in the United States than in most other nations with comparable economies. As I mentioned, there are troubling labor market disparities across demographic groups and different parts of the country. The relative stagnation of middle and lower incomes and low levels of upward mobility for lower-income families are also ongoing concerns. In addition, finding ways to boost productivity growth, which leads to rising wages and living standards over the longer term, should remain a high national priority. And I remain concerned about the longer-term effects of high and rising federal debt, which can restrain private investment and, in turn, reduce productivity and overall economic growth. The longer-run vitality of the U.S. economy would benefit from efforts to address these issues.

Monetary Policy 
Against this backdrop, the FOMC maintained the target range for the federal funds rate at 2‑1/4 to 2-1/2 percent in the first half of this year. At our January, March, and May meetings, we stated that we would be patient as we determined what future adjustments to the federal funds rate might be appropriate to support our goals of maximum employment and price stability.

At the time of our May meeting, we were mindful of the ongoing crosscurrents from global growth and trade, but there was tentative evidence that these crosscurrents were moderating. The latest data from China and Europe were encouraging, and there were reports of progress in trade negotiations with China. Our continued patient stance seemed appropriate, and the Committee saw no strong case for adjusting our policy rate.

Since our May meeting, however, these crosscurrents have reemerged, creating greater uncertainty. Apparent progress on trade turned to greater uncertainty, and our contacts in business and agriculture report heightened concerns over trade developments. Growth indicators from around the world have disappointed on net, raising concerns that weakness in the global economy will continue to affect the U.S. economy. These concerns may have contributed to the drop in business confidence in some recent surveys and may have started to show through to incoming data.

In our June meeting statement, we indicated that, in light of increased uncertainties about the economic outlook and muted inflation pressures, we would closely monitor the implications of incoming information for the economic outlook and would act as appropriate to sustain the expansion. Many FOMC participants saw that the case for a somewhat more accommodative monetary policy had strengthened. Since then, based on incoming data and other developments, it appears that uncertainties around trade tensions and concerns about the strength of the global economy continue to weigh on the U.S. economic outlook. Inflation pressures remain muted.

The FOMC has made a number of important decisions this year about our framework for implementing monetary policy and our plans for completing the reduction of the Fed’s securities holdings. At our January meeting, we decided to continue to implement monetary policy using our current policy regime with ample reserves, and emphasized that we are prepared to adjust any of the details for completing balance sheet normalization in light of economic and financial developments. At our March meeting, we communicated our intention to slow, starting in May, the decline in the Fed’s aggregate securities holdings and to end the reduction in these holdings in September. The July Monetary Policy Report provides details on these decisions.

The July Monetary Policy Report also includes an update on monetary policy rules. The FOMC routinely looks at monetary policy rules that recommend a level for the federal funds rate based on inflation and unemployment rates. I continue to find these rules helpful, although using these rules requires careful judgment.

We are conducting a public review of our monetary policy strategy, tools, and communications—the first review of its kind for the FOMC. Our motivation is to consider ways to improve the Committee’s current policy framework and to best position the Fed to achieve maximum employment and price stability. The review has started with outreach to and consultation with a broad range of people and groups through a series of Fed Listens events. The FOMC will consider questions related to the review at upcoming meetings. We will publicly report the outcome of our discussions.

Thank you. I am happy to respond to your questions.

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Last Update: July 10, 2019

Financial Stability Oversight Council

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Financial Stability Oversight Council
FSOC Meeting.jpg
3rd FSOC Meeting (January 18, 2011)
Agency overview
Formed July 21, 2010
Jurisdiction United States Government
Website Treasury.gov/FSOC

The Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) is a United States federal government organization, established by Title I of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, which was signed into law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010.[1] The Office of Financial Research is intended to provide support to the council.

The Dodd-Frank Act provides the Council with broad authorities to identify and monitor excessive risks to the U.S. financial system arising from the distress or failure of large, interconnected bank holding companies or non-bank financial companies, or from risks that could arise outside the financial system; to eliminate expectations that any American financial firm is “too big to fail“; and to respond to emerging threats to U.S. financial stability.[2]

The Act also designates the Secretary of the Treasury as Chairperson. Inherent to the FSOC’s role as a consultative council is facilitation of communication among financial regulators. The FSOC has the authority to set aside certain financial regulations published by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau if those rules would threaten financial stability.

Contents

Purpose and duties

At minimum, it must meet quarterly.

Specifically, there are three purposes assigned to the Council:[3]

  1. identify the risks to the financial stability of the United States from both financial and non-financial organizations
  2. promote market discipline, by eliminating expectations that the Government will shield them from losses in the event of failure
  3. respond to emerging threats to the stability of the US financial system

Activities

On July 26, 2011, the First Annual Financial Stability Oversight Council Report [4] was issued by the Council fulfilling the Congressional mandate to report on the activities of the Council. The Report is intended to describe significant financial market and regulatory developments, analyze potential emerging threats, and make certain recommendations. The July 26, 2011 report warned that the United States faces potential losses connected with the European debt crisis.[5]

In September 2014, a group of Republican lawmakers accused U.S. regulators of “disparate treatment” of nonbank financial firms currently considered for tougher oversight. The lawmakers stated that the regulators should conduct the same level of analysis and due diligence for the insurance industry as it has for the asset management industry before formally considering whether to designate another insurance company.[6]

After much anticipation and debate about whether FSOC would and should designate individual asset managers (a nonbank financial firm) as systemically important financial institutions (SIFIs) which would subject them to greater oversight, FSOC announced in August, 2014, that rather than designating individual asset managers as SIFIs, it would focus on examining systemic risk posed by asset managers’ products, and activities. As a result of FSOC’s announcement the Securities and Exchange Commission is now expected and assumed to take a prudential supervisory role of individual asset managers, in addition to exercising its traditional mandate of investor protection.[7]

Since the inception of FSOC, the Council has designated select financial market utilities (FMUs) as “systemically important.” The designation of systemically important subjects the FMU to enhanced regulatory oversight. The three supervisory agencies charged with regulating systemically important FMUs are: the Federal Reserve Board, Securities and Exchange Commission, and Commodity Futures Trading Commission.[8]

Resources

The Federal Advisory Committee Act, which limits the powers of advisory committees, does not apply to the council. The council has an almost unlimited budget in that the Council may draw on virtually any resource of any department or agency of the federal government. Any employee of the federal government may be detailed to the Council without reimbursement and without interruption or loss of civil service status or privilege. Any member of the Council who is an employee of the federal government serves without additional compensation. In addition, “An employee of the Federal Government detailed to the Council shall report to and be subject to oversight by the Council during the assignment to the Council, and shall be compensated by the department or agency from which the employee was detailed.”[9] Additionally, “Any expenses of the Council shall be treated as expenses of, and paid by, the Office of Financial Research”.[10]

Authority

The Council has very broad powers to monitor, investigate and assess any risks to the US financial system. The Council has the authority to collect information from any state or federal financial regulatory agency, and may direct the Office of Financial Research, which supports the work of the Council, “to collect information from bank holding companies and nonbank financial companies”.[11] The Council monitors domestic and international regulatory proposals, including insurance and accounting issues, and advises Congress and the Federal Reserve on ways to enhance the integrity, efficiency, competitiveness and stability of the US financial markets. On a regular basis, the Council is required to make a report to Congress describing the state of the U.S. financial system. Each voting member of the Council is required to either affirm that the federal government is taking all reasonable steps to assure financial stability and mitigate systemic risk, or describe additional steps that need to be taken.[12] Under specific circumstances, the Chairman of the Council (who is also the Secretary of the Treasury), with the concurrence of 2/3 voting members, may place nonbank financial companies or domestic subsidiaries of international banks under the supervision of the Federal Reserve if it appears that these companies could pose a threat to the financial stability of the US.[13] The Federal Reserve may promulgate safe harbor regulations to exempt certain types of foreign banks from regulation, with approval of the Council.[14] Under certain circumstances, the Council may provide for more stringent regulation of a financial activity by issuing recommendations to the primary financial regulatory agency, which the primary financial agency is obliged to implement – the Council reports to Congress on the implementation or failure to implement such recommendations.[15]

Financial reporting to the Council

The Council may require any bank or non-bank financial institution with assets over $50 billion to submit certified reports as to the company’s:[16]

  • financial condition
  • systems in place to monitor and control any risks
  • transactions with subsidiaries that are regulated banks
  • the extent to which any of the company’s activities could have a potential disruptive impact on financial markets or the overall financial stability of the country

The Comptroller General of the United States may audit the Council or anyone working for the Council, and may have access to any information under the control of or used by the Council.[17]

Review 2017

On April 21, 2017, President Donald Trump signed one Executive Order13789;[18][19][20] and two Presidential memorandaOrderly Liquidation Authority Review and Financial Stability Oversight Council[21][22][23] to review the Council and parts of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Organization

Voting members

The Financial Stability Oversight Council has ten voting members:[24]

  1. Secretary of the Treasury (chairs the Council)
  2. Chairman of the Federal Reserve
  3. Comptroller of the Currency
  4. Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
  5. Chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
  6. Chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
  7. Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission
  8. Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency
  9. the Chairman of the National Credit Union Administration Board
  10. an independent member (with insurance expertise), appointed by the President

Current voters[edit]

Current Voters (sortable)
Agency Currently Party Appointed Removable Notes
Treasury Steven Mnuchin Republican Directly Any time
SEC Jay Clayton Independent From 5 Board Members After 5-year term
CFTC J. Christopher Giancarlo Republican From 5 Board Members After 5-year term
Fed Jerome Powell From 7 Board Members After 4-year term
OCC Joseph Otting Directly After 5-year term
CFPB Kathleen Kraninger Directly After 5 year term
FDIC Jelena McWilliams From 3 Board Members After 5-year term
FHFA Mel Watt Democratic Directly After 5-year term
NCUA J. Mark McWatters Republican From 3 Board Members After 6-year term
Insurance Thomas E. Workman Directly After 6-year term

Non-voting Members

There are five non-voting members:

  1. Director of the Office of Financial Research (an independent agency within the Treasury Department and established by the Dodd-Frank Act): Richard Berner
  2. Director of the Federal Insurance Office (part of the Treasury Department and established in this Act): Steven E. Seitz
  3. a state insurance commissioner, to be designated by a selection process determined by the state insurance commissioners (2-year term): Maine Superintendent Eric Cioppa web|url=http://naic.org/members_bios/missouri.htm%7Ctitle=Commissioner Bio – Missouri|publisher=}}</ref> delegate to the FSOC.[25]
  4. a state banking supervisor, to be designated by a selection process determined by the state banking supervisors (2-year term): John P. Ducrest, Commissioner of the Louisiana Office of Financial Institutions
  5. a state securities commissioner (or officer performing like function) to be designated by a selection process determined by such state security commissioners (2-year term): Melanie Senter Lubin, Maryland Securities Commissioner.

See also

References

  1. ^ “Bill Summary & Status – 111th Congress (2009–2010) – H.R.4173 – All Information – THOMAS (Library of Congress)”. Library of Congress. Retrieved July 22, 2010.
  2. ^ Stupak, Jeffrey M. (February 12, 2018). Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC): Structure and Activities(PDF). Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  3. ^ H.R. 4173, § 112(a)(1)
  4. ^ “2011 Annual Report”. U.S. Department of the Treasury. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  5. ^ The Center for Public Integrity. “U.S. Stock Market Plunge Followed Financial Stability Oversight Council Warning”. The National Law Review. Retrieved August 8, 2011.
  6. ^ Stephenson, Emily. “U.S. Republican lawmakers say regulators treat insurers unfairly”Reuters.
  7. ^ “Asset managers: FSOC stands down, SEC stands up”(PDF). PwC Financial Services Regulatory Practice. December 2014.
  8. ^ “A closer look: Financial market utilities: Is the system safer?”(PDF). PwC Financial Services Regulatory Practice. February 2015.
  9. ^ H.R. 4173 § 111(j)
  10. ^ H.R. 4173 § 118
  11. ^ H.R. 4173 § 112(a)(2)
  12. ^ H.R. 4173 § 112(b)
  13. ^ H.R. 4173 § 113
  14. ^ H.R. 4173 § 170
  15. ^ H.R. 4173 § 120
  16. ^ H.R. 4173, § 116
  17. ^ H.R. 4173 § 122
  18. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (April 21, 2017). “Presidential Memorandum on Orderly Liquidation Authority Review”whitehouse.govWashington, D.C.White House. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  19. ^ Tausche, Kayla; Javers, Eamon (April 20, 2017). “Trump to sign ‘financial-related’ executive actions on Friday”CNBCEnglewood Cliffs, New JerseyNBCUniversal (CNBC LLC). Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  20. ^ Boyd, Brecke (April 21, 2017). “POTUS Memo on Orderly Liquidation Review May Clear Path for Legislation Amending Bankruptcy Code”Baker BottsHouston: Baker Botts L.L.P. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  21. ^ Office of the Press Secretary (April 21, 2017). “Presidential Memorandum on the Financial Stability Oversight Council”whitehouse.govWashington, D.C.White House. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  22. ^ Lane, Sylvan (April 20, 2017). “Trump to sign executive order, memoranda on financial regulation at Treasury”The HillWashington, D.C.: Capitol Hill Publishing Corp. Retrieved May 3,2017.
  23. ^ Puzzanghera, Jim (April 21, 2017). “Trump targets Dodd-Frank rules designed to wall off risky banks”Los Angeles TimesTromc Inc. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  24. ^ H.R. 4173, § 111
  25. ^ “SPECIAL SECTION: Financial Stability Oversight Council”.

Further reading

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_Stability_Oversight_Council

The shift away from LIBOR: implications for retail lenders

OUT-LAW ANALYSIS | 28 Mar 2019 | 9:30 am | 4 min. read

ANALYSIS: Use of the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) as a benchmark interest rate is likely to come to an end in 2021 or shortly afterwards, with implications for millions of pounds-worth of retail banking contracts.

Financial services regulators and central banks around the world have been pushing for a transition away from the use of interbank offered rates (IBORs), given the previous attempted market manipulation, false reporting and the decline in liquidity in interbank unsecured funding markets. They include the New York Federal Reserve Bank, the Bank of England and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), whose director of markets and wholesale policy made the comments above in an industry speech in January 2019.

Whilst there has been understandable focus on the impact of LIBOR transition on the wholesale banking industry and especially on the £30 trillion global derivatives market, the impact of LIBOR transition on other parts of financial markets should not be forgotten. A variety of loan products reference LIBOR, such as auto finance, personal loans and credit cards, while loans and mortgages that reference LIBOR are still being issued in some parts of the market.

Those lending to consumers will have to consider how the transition affects their legacy contracts, as well as any new business still being written that still references LIBOR. There may also be other ways in which LIBOR is referenced in retail lending contracts, for example in relation to penalty rates or default rates. Retail lenders will need to consider how LIBOR transition affects funding models and risk mitigation techniques. The transition may also give rise to regulatory conduct risk and litigation risk. It is not inconceivable that more mis-selling cases connected to LIBOR could arise in the retail space.

What practical preparations can retail lenders make?

The first step is to identify contracts which are LIBOR-linked as well as any other contractual references to LIBOR, such as penalty rates. Firms should then plan their transition, taking appropriate steps from a legal, regulatory and operational perspective to transition legacy contracts and future business not only from LIBOR, but also from other IBORs, such as Euribor and the Tokyo Interbank Offered Rate (TIBOR).

Firms looking to replace LIBOR rates in legacy contracts should not underestimate the task ahead. The journey to an IBOR replacement begins with a detailed review of loan portfolios. It will be necessary to identify the relevant IBOR reference rate used and whether a fall-back position has been catered for in the contract if the reference rate ceases to be published. An assessment of whether the fall-back rate can be relied on for the remainder of the term would then need to be undertaken.

If no fall-back has been catered for, or the proposed fall-back cannot be used long term, firms are going to have to start looking to the variation terms in their contracts. Contractual variation rights will not be the end of the problem, as firms will then need to identify a risk-free rate (RFR) that is a suitable replacement (see below).

If variation terms need to be relied on, the FCA’s finalised guidance on the fairness of variation terms in financial services consumer contracts will be relevant for firms. If firms have not already done so, they should consider whether their existing variation terms are fair and if the firm has the power to unilaterally vary the contract terms in the way they need. Any suggestion of unfair variation terms and consequent unfair treatment of customers will certainly attract the attention of the regulator.

What alternative reference rates are available?

Global regulators have taken steps to adopt RFRs in place of IBORs. However, these rates do not provide an exact replacement for IBORs, while there has been little uniformity in the adoption of RFRs in relation to the different IBORs, jurisdictions and markets.

The panel banks whose submissions currently inform the LIBOR rate have voluntarily agreed to continue to support it until the end of 2021, although other IBORs are likely to continue beyond this date. The Financial Stability Board, in its November 2018 progress report, said that “it is recognised that transition to RFRs may take longer and therefore maintaining IBORs is still necessary”. This may present a challenge not only in relation to fall-back triggers or fall-back rates in legacy retail lending contracts, but also as regards the most appropriate alternative rates for these contracts.

RFRs such as SONIA, an overnight rate administered by the Bank of England, are not an exact replacement for LIBOR – particularly three-month and six-month LIBOR. This is likely to present challenges for lenders requiring a term rate going forward, and where they seek to replace three and six-month LIBOR in legacy contracts.

For firms, participation in relevant consultations issued by industry-led bodies such as the Bank of England’s Working Group on Sterling Risk Free Reference Rates to assist in shaping transition away from IBORs in a way which is beneficial to your part of the market will be important.

What positions have the UK regulators taken?

The FCA and the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) set out their position on LIBOR transition in a joint ‘Dear CEO’ letter of 19 September 2018 (2-page / 277KB PDF). In that letter, to the largest UK banks and insurers, the regulators highlighted that insufficient preparation for LIBOR transition could negatively impact the safety and soundness of firms, their clients and the markets in which they operate. The letter sought assurances from those firms’ senior managers and boards that they were making suitable preparations for LIBOR transition.

Although this letter focused on the largest firms – the so-called ‘category 1’ firms – lenders outside of that group may still wish to reflect not only on their own preparations for LIBOR transition, but also any related conduct risk. Areas of focus should include risks in relation to the Senior Managers and Certification Regime (SMCR) and treating customers fairly, against a backdrop where mortgage debt accounts for over 80% of total UK household liabilities and the FCA has been undertaking a mortgage market review.

There is potential for consumer detriment in relation to mortgages or loans which reference LIBOR, where LIBOR transition has been handled poorly. Firm strategies for communicating their planned changes with consumers, clients, regulators and other stakeholders should be carefully considered and planned.

Charlotte Pope-Williams is a financial regulation expert at Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com.

https://www.pinsentmasons.com/out-law/analysis/shift-away-from-libor-implications-for-retail-lenders

Blockchain

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Blockchain formation. The main chain (black) consists of the longest series of blocks from the genesis block (green) to the current block. Orphan blocks (purple) exist outside of the main chain.

blockchain,[1][2][3] originally block chain,[4][5] is a growing list of records, called blocks, that are linked using cryptography.[1][6] Each block contains a cryptographic hash of the previous block,[6] a timestamp, and transaction data (generally represented as a Merkle tree).

By design, a blockchain is resistant to modification of the data. It is “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way”.[7] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for inter-node communication and validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires consensus of the network majority. Although blockchain records are not unalterable, blockchains may be considered secure by design and exemplify a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault toleranceDecentralized consensus has therefore been claimed with a blockchain.[8]

Blockchain was invented by a person (or group of people) using the name Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008 to serve as the public transaction ledger of the cryptocurrency bitcoin.[1] The identity of Satoshi Nakamoto is unknown. The invention of the blockchain for bitcoin made it the first digital currency to solve the double-spending problem without the need of a trusted authority or central server. The bitcoin design has inspired other applications,[1][3] and blockchains that are readable by the public are widely used by cryptocurrencies. Blockchain is considered a type of payment rail.[9] Private blockchains have been proposed for business use. Sources such as Computerworld called the marketing of such blockchains without a proper security model “snake oil“.[10]

Contents

History

Bitcoin transactions (January 2009 – September 2017)

The first work on a cryptographically secured chain of blocks was described in 1991 by Stuart Haber and W. Scott Stornetta.[6][11] They wanted to implement a system where document timestamps could not be tampered with. In 1992, Bayer, Haber and Stornetta incorporated Merkle trees to the design, which improved its efficiency by allowing several document certificates to be collected into one block.[6][12]

The first blockchain was conceptualized by a person (or group of people) known as Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. Nakamoto improved the design in an important way using a Hashcash-like method to add blocks to the chain without requiring them to be signed by a trusted party.[6] The design was implemented the following year by Nakamoto as a core component of the cryptocurrency bitcoin, where it serves as the public ledger for all transactions on the network.[1]

In August 2014, the bitcoin blockchain file size, containing records of all transactions that have occurred on the network, reached 20 GB (gigabytes).[13] In January 2015, the size had grown to almost 30 GB, and from January 2016 to January 2017, the bitcoin blockchain grew from 50 GB to 100 GB in size.

The words block and chain were used separately in Satoshi Nakamoto’s original paper, but were eventually popularized as a single word, blockchain, by 2016.

Smart contracts that run on a blockchain, for example ones that “creat[e] invoices that pay themselves when a shipment arrives or share certificates that automatically send their owners dividends if profits reach a certain level.”[1] require an off-chain oracle to access any “external data or events based on time or market conditions [that need] to interact with the blockchain.”[14]

According to Accenture, an application of the diffusion of innovations theory suggests that blockchains attained a 13.5% adoption rate within financial services in 2016, therefore reaching the early adopters phase.[15] Industry trade groups joined to create the Global Blockchain Forum in 2016, an initiative of the Chamber of Digital Commerce.

In May 2018, Gartner found that only 1% of CIOs indicated any kind of blockchain adoption within their organisations, and only 8% of CIOs were in the short-term ‘planning or [looking at] active experimentation with blockchain’.[16]

Structure

A blockchain is a decentralizeddistributed and public digital ledger that is used to record transactions across many computers so that any involved record cannot be altered retroactively, without the alteration of all subsequent blocks.[1][17] This allows the participants to verify and audit transactions independently and relatively inexpensively.[18] A blockchain database is managed autonomously using a peer-to-peer network and a distributed timestamping server. They are authenticated by mass collaboration powered by collective self-interests.[19] Such a design facilitates robust workflow where participants’ uncertainty regarding data security is marginal. The use of a blockchain removes the characteristic of infinite reproducibility from a digital asset. It confirms that each unit of value was transferred only once, solving the long-standing problem of double spending. A blockchain has been described as a value-exchange protocol.[20] A blockchain can maintain title rights because, when properly set up to detail the exchange agreement, it provides a record that compels offer and acceptance.

Blocks

Blocks hold batches of valid transactions that are hashed and encoded into a Merkle tree.[1] Each block includes the cryptographic hash of the prior block in the blockchain, linking the two. The linked blocks form a chain.[1] This iterative process confirms the integrity of the previous block, all the way back to the original genesis block.[21]

Sometimes separate blocks can be produced concurrently, creating a temporary fork. In addition to a secure hash-based history, any blockchain has a specified algorithm for scoring different versions of the history so that one with a higher score can be selected over others. Blocks not selected for inclusion in the chain are called orphan blocks.[21] Peers supporting the database have different versions of the history from time to time. They keep only the highest-scoring version of the database known to them. Whenever a peer receives a higher-scoring version (usually the old version with a single new block added) they extend or overwrite their own database and retransmit the improvement to their peers. There is never an absolute guarantee that any particular entry will remain in the best version of the history forever. Blockchains are typically built to add the score of new blocks onto old blocks and are given incentives to extend with new blocks rather than overwrite old blocks. Therefore, the probability of an entry becoming superseded decreases exponentially[22] as more blocks are built on top of it, eventually becoming very low.[1][23]:ch. 08[24] For example, bitcoin uses a proof-of-work system, where the chain with the most cumulative proof-of-work is considered the valid one by the network. There are a number of methods that can be used to demonstrate a sufficient level of computation. Within a blockchain the computation is carried out redundantly rather than in the traditional segregated and parallel manner.[25]

Block time

The block time is the average time it takes for the network to generate one extra block in the blockchain. Some blockchains create a new block as frequently as every five seconds. By the time of block completion, the included data becomes verifiable. In cryptocurrency, this is practically when the transaction takes place, so a shorter block time means faster transactions. The block time for Ethereum is set to between 14 and 15 seconds, while for bitcoin it is 10 minutes.[citation needed]

Hard forks

hard fork is a rule change such that the software validating according to the old rules will see the blocks produced according to the new rules as invalid. In case of a hard fork, all nodes meant to work in accordance with the new rules need to upgrade their software.

If one group of nodes continues to use the old software while the other nodes use the new software, a split can occur. For example, Ethereum has hard-forked to “make whole” the investors in The DAO, which had been hacked by exploiting a vulnerability in its code. In this case, the fork resulted in a split creating Ethereum and Ethereum Classic chains. In 2014 the Nxt community was asked to consider a hard fork that would have led to a rollback of the blockchain records to mitigate the effects of a theft of 50 million NXT from a major cryptocurrency exchange. The hard fork proposal was rejected, and some of the funds were recovered after negotiations and ransom payment. Alternatively, to prevent a permanent split, a majority of nodes using the new software may return to the old rules, as was the case of bitcoin split on 12 March 2013.[26]

Decentralization

By storing data across its peer-to-peer network, the blockchain eliminates a number of risks that come with data being held centrally.[1] The decentralized blockchain may use ad-hoc message passing and distributed networking.

Peer-to-peer blockchain networks lack centralized points of vulnerability that computer crackers can exploit; likewise, it has no central point of failure. Blockchain security methods include the use of public-key cryptography.[4]:5 A public key (a long, random-looking string of numbers) is an address on the blockchain. Value tokens sent across the network are recorded as belonging to that address. A private key is like a password that gives its owner access to their digital assets or the means to otherwise interact with the various capabilities that blockchains now support. Data stored on the blockchain is generally considered incorruptible.[1]

Every node in a decentralized system has a copy of the blockchain. Data quality is maintained by massive database replication[8] and computational trust. No centralized “official” copy exists and no user is “trusted” more than any other.[4] Transactions are broadcast to the network using software. Messages are delivered on a best-effort basis. Mining nodes validate transactions,[21] add them to the block they are building, and then broadcast the completed block to other nodes.[23]:ch. 08 Blockchains use various time-stamping schemes, such as proof-of-work, to serialize changes.[27] Alternative consensus methods include proof-of-stake.[21] Growth of a decentralized blockchain is accompanied by the risk of centralization because the computer resources required to process larger amounts of data become more expensive.[28]

Openness

Open blockchains are more user-friendly than some traditional ownership records, which, while open to the public, still require physical access to view. Because all early blockchains were permissionless, controversy has arisen over the blockchain definition. An issue in this ongoing debate is whether a private system with verifiers tasked and authorized (permissioned) by a central authority should be considered a blockchain.[29][30][31][32][33] Proponents of permissioned or private chains argue that the term “blockchain” may be applied to any data structure that batches data into time-stamped blocks. These blockchains serve as a distributed version of multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) in databases.[34] Just as MVCC prevents two transactions from concurrently modifying a single object in a database, blockchains prevent two transactions from spending the same single output in a blockchain.[35]:30–31 Opponents say that permissioned systems resemble traditional corporate databases, not supporting decentralized data verification, and that such systems are not hardened against operator tampering and revision.[29][31] Nikolai Hampton of Computerworld said that “many in-house blockchain solutions will be nothing more than cumbersome databases,” and “without a clear security model, proprietary blockchains should be eyed with suspicion.”[10][36]

Permissionless

The great advantage to an open, permissionless, or public, blockchain network is that guarding against bad actors is not required and no access control is needed.[22] This means that applications can be added to the network without the approval or trust of others, using the blockchain as a transport layer.[22]

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies currently secure their blockchain by requiring new entries to include a proof of work. To prolong the blockchain, bitcoin uses Hashcash puzzles. While Hashcash was designed in 1997 by Adam Back, the original idea was first proposed by Cynthia Dwork and Moni Naor and Eli Ponyatovski in their 1992 paper “Pricing via Processing or Combatting Junk Mail”.

Financial companies have not prioritised decentralized blockchains.[citation needed]

In 2016, venture capital investment for blockchain-related projects was weakening in the USA but increasing in China.[37] Bitcoin and many other cryptocurrencies use open (public) blockchains. As of April 2018, bitcoin has the highest market capitalization.

Permissioned (private) blockchain

Permissioned blockchains use an access control layer to govern who has access to the network.[38] In contrast to public blockchain networks, validators on private blockchain networks are vetted by the network owner. They do not rely on anonymous nodes to validate transactions nor do they benefit from the network effect.[citation needed] Permissioned blockchains can also go by the name of ‘consortium’ blockchains.[39][better source needed]

Disadvantages of private blockchain

Nikolai Hampton pointed out in Computerworld that “There is also no need for a ’51 percent’ attack on a private blockchain, as the private blockchain (most likely) already controls 100 percent of all block creation resources. If you could attack or damage the blockchain creation tools on a private corporate server, you could effectively control 100 percent of their network and alter transactions however you wished.”[10] This has a set of particularly profound adverse implications during a financial crisis or debt crisis like the financial crisis of 2007–08, where politically powerful actors may make decisions that favor some groups at the expense of others,[40][41] and “the bitcoin blockchain is protected by the massive group mining effort. It’s unlikely that any private blockchain will try to protect records using gigawatts of computing power — it’s time consuming and expensive.”[10] He also said, “Within a private blockchain there is also no ‘race’; there’s no incentive to use more power or discover blocks faster than competitors. This means that many in-house blockchain solutions will be nothing more than cumbersome databases.”[10]

Blockchain analysis

The analysis of public blockchains has become increasingly important with the popularity of bitcoinEthereumlitecoin and other cryptocurrencies.[42] A blockchain, if it is public, provides anyone who wants access to observe and analyse the chain data, given one has the know-how. The process of understanding and accessing the flow of crypto has been an issue for many cryptocurrencies, crypto-exchanges and banks.[43][44] The reason for this is accusations of blockchain enabled cryptocurrencies enabling illicit dark market trade of drugs, weapons, money laundering etc.[45] A common belief has been that cryptocurrency is private and untraceable, thus leading many actors to use it for illegal purposes. This is changing and now specialised tech-companies provide blockchain tracking services, making crypto exchanges, law-enforcement and banks more aware of what is happening with crypto funds and fiat crypto exchanges. The development, some argue, has led criminals to prioritise use of new cryptos such as Monero.[46][47][48] The question is about public accessibility of blockchain data and the personal privacy of the very same data. It is a key debate in cryptocurrency and ultimately in blockchain.[49]

Uses

Blockchain technology can be integrated into multiple areas. The primary use of blockchains today is as a distributed ledger for cryptocurrencies, most notably bitcoin. There are a few operational products maturing from proof of concept by late 2016.[37] Businesses have been thus far reluctant to place blockchain at the core of the business structure.[50]

Cryptocurrencies

Most cryptocurrencies use blockchain technology to record transactions. For example, the bitcoin network and Ethereum network are both based on blockchain. On 8 May 2018 Facebook confirmed that it is opening a new blockchain group[51] which will be headed by David Marcus who previously was in charge of Messenger. According to The Verge Facebook is planning to launch its own cryptocurrency for facilitating payments on the platform.[52]

Smart contracts

Blockchain-based smart contracts are proposed contracts that could be partially or fully executed or enforced without human interaction.[53] One of the main objectives of a smart contract is automated escrow. An IMF staff discussion reported that smart contracts based on blockchain technology might reduce moral hazards and optimize the use of contracts in general. But “no viable smart contract systems have yet emerged.” Due to the lack of widespread use their legal status is unclear.[54]

Financial services

Major portions of the financial industry are implementing distributed ledgers for use in banking,[55][56][57] and according to a September 2016 IBM study, this is occurring faster than expected.[58]

Banks are interested in this technology because it has potential to speed up back office settlement systems.[59]

Banks such as UBS are opening new research labs dedicated to blockchain technology in order to explore how blockchain can be used in financial services to increase efficiency and reduce costs.[60][61]

Berenberg, a German bank, believes that blockchain is an “overhyped technology” that has had a large number of “proofs of concept”, but still has major challenges, and very few success stories.[62]

Video games

A blockchain game CryptoKitties, launched in November 2017.[63] The game made headlines in December 2017 when a cryptokitty character – an in-game virtual pet – was sold for more than US$100,000.[64] CryptoKitties illustrated scalability problems for games on Ethereum when it created significant congestion on the Ethereum network with about 30% of all Ethereum transactions being for the game.[65]

Cryptokitties also demonstrated how blockchains can be used to catalog game assets (digital assets).[66]

Supply chain

There are a number of efforts and industry organizations working to employ blockchains in supply chain logistics and supply chain management.

The Blockchain in Transport Alliance (BiTA) works to develop open standards for supply chains.[citation needed]

Everledger is one of the inaugural clients of IBM’s blockchain-based tracking service.[67]

Walmart and IBM are running a trial to use a blockchain-backed system for supply chain monitoring — all nodes of the blockchain are administered by Walmart and are located on the IBM cloud.[68]

Hyperledger Grid develops open components for blockchain supply chain solutions.[69][70]

Other uses

Blockchain technology can be used to create a permanent, public, transparent ledger system for compiling data on sales, tracking digital use and payments to content creators, such as wireless users[71] or musicians.[72] In 2017, IBM partnered with ASCAP and PRS for Music to adopt blockchain technology in music distribution.[73] Imogen Heap‘s Mycelia service has also been proposed as blockchain-based alternative “that gives artists more control over how their songs and associated data circulate among fans and other musicians.”[74][75]

New distribution methods are available for the insurance industry such as peer-to-peer insuranceparametric insurance and microinsurance following the adoption of blockchain.[76][77] The sharing economy and IoT are also set to benefit from blockchains because they involve many collaborating peers.[78] Online voting is another application of the blockchain.[79][80]

Other designs include:

  • Hyperledger is a cross-industry collaborative effort from the Linux Foundation to support blockchain-based distributed ledgers, with projects under this initiative including Hyperledger Burrow (by Monax) and Hyperledger Fabric (spearheaded by IBM)[81]
  • Quorum – a permissionable private blockchain by JPMorgan Chase with private storage, used for contract applications[82]
  • Tezos, decentralized voting.[35]:94
  • Proof of Existence is an online service that verifies the existence of computer files as of a specific time[83]

Types

Currently, there are at least four types of blockchain networks — public blockchains, private blockchains, consortium blockchains and hybrid blockchains.

Public blockchains

A public blockchain has absolutely no access restrictions. Anyone with an Internet connection can send transactions to it as well as become a validator (i.e., participate in the execution of a consensus protocol).[84][self-published source?] Usually, such networks offer economic incentives for those who secure them and utilize some type of a Proof of Stake or Proof of Work algorithm.

Some of the largest, most known public blockchains are the bitcoin blockchain and the Ethereum blockchain.

Private blockchains

A private blockchain is permissioned.[38] One cannot join it unless invited by the network administrators. Participant and validator access is restricted.

This type of blockchains can be considered a middle-ground for companies that are interested in the blockchain technology in general but are not comfortable with a level of control offered by public networks. Typically, they seek to incorporate blockchain into their accounting and record-keeping procedures without sacrificing autonomy and running the risk of exposing sensitive data to the public internet.[citation needed]

Hybrid blockchains

A hybrid blockchain[85] simply explained is a combination between different characteristics both public and private blockchains have by design. It allows to determine what information stays private and what information is made public. Further decentralization in relation to primarily centralized private blockchains can be achieved in various ways. Instead of keeping transactions inside their own network of community run or private nodes, the hash (with or without payload) can be posted on completely decentralized blockchains such as bitcoin. Dragonchain uses Interchain[86] to host transactions on other blockchains. This allows users to operate on different blockchains, where they can selectively share data or business logic. Other blockchains like Wanchain use interoperability mechanisms such as bridges.[87][88] By submitting the hash of a transaction (with or without the sensitive business logic) on public blockchains like bitcoin or Ethereum, some of the privacy and blockchain concerns are resolved, as no personal identifiable information is stored on a public blockchain. Depending on the hybrid blockchain its architecture, multicloud solutions allow to store data in compliance with General Data Protection Regulation and other geographical limitations while also leveraging bitcoin’s global hashpower to decentralize transactions.

Academic research

Blockchain panel discussion at the first IEEE Computer Society TechIgnite conference

In October 2014, the MIT Bitcoin Club, with funding from MIT alumni, provided undergraduate students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology access to $100 of bitcoin. The adoption rates, as studied by Catalini and Tucker (2016), revealed that when people who typically adopt technologies early are given delayed access, they tend to reject the technology.[89]

Energy use of proof-of-work blockchains

External video
 Cryptocurrencies: looking beyond the hypeHyun Song ShinBank for International Settlements, 2:48[90]
 Blockchains and Cryptocurrencies: Burn It With Fire, Nicholas Weaver, Berkeley School of Information, 49:47, lecture begins at 3:05[91]

The Bank for International Settlements has criticized the public proof-of-work blockchains for high energy consumption.[92][90][93]

Nicholas Weaver, of the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley examines blockchain’s online security, and the energy efficiency of proof-of-work public blockchains, and in both cases finds it grossly inadequate.[91][94]

Journals

In September 2015, the first peer-reviewed academic journal dedicated to cryptocurrency and blockchain technology research, Ledger, was announced. The inaugural issue was published in December 2016.[95] The journal covers aspects of mathematicscomputer scienceengineeringlaweconomics and philosophy that relate to cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin.[96][97]

The journal encourages authors to digitally sign a file hash of submitted papers, which will then be timestamped into the bitcoin blockchain. Authors are also asked to include a personal bitcoin address in the first page of their papers.[98]

See also

References …

Further reading

  •  Media related to Blockchain at Wikimedia Commons

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockchain

What is Blockchain Technology? A Step-by-Step Guide For Beginners

Ameer Rosic

3 years ago
Was ist Blockchain-Technologie

What is Blockchain Technology? A Step-by-Step Guide For Beginners

[Updated – Mar 01 2019]

Is Blockchain Technology the New Internet?

The blockchain is an undeniably ingenious invention – the brainchild of a person or group of people known by the pseudonym, Satoshi Nakamoto. But since then, it has evolved into something greater, and the main question every single person is asking is: What is Blockchain?

By allowing digital information to be distributed but not copied, blockchain technology created the backbone of a new type of internet. Originally devised for the digital currencyBitcoin, (Buy Bitcoin) the tech community has now found other potential uses for the technology.

In thisguide, we are going to explain to you what the blockchain technology is, and what its properties are that make it so unique. So, we hope you enjoy this, What Is Blockchain Guide. And if you already know what blockchain is and want to become a blockchain developer please check out our in-depth blockchain tutorial and create your very first blockchain.

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand“The blockchain is an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value.” – Don & Alex Tapscott, authors Blockchain Revolution (2016).

A blockchain is, in the simplest of terms, a time-stamped series of immutable record of data that is managed by cluster of computers not owned by any single entity. Each of these blocks of data (i.e. block) are secured and bound to each other using cryptographic principles (i.e. chain).

So, what is so special about it and why are we saying that it has industry disrupting capabilities?

The blockchain network has no central authority — it is the very definition of a democratized system. Since it is a shared and immutable ledger, the information in it is open for anyone and everyone to see. Hence, anything that is built on the blockchain is by its very nature transparent and everyone involved is accountable for their actions.

Blockchain Explained

A blockchain carries no transaction cost. (An infrastructure cost yes, but no transaction cost.) The blockchain is a simple yet ingenious way of passing information from A to B in a fully automated and safe manner. One party to a transaction initiates the process by creating a block. This block is verified by thousands, perhaps millions of computers distributed around the net. The verified block is added to a chain, which is stored across the net, creating not just a unique record, but a unique record with a unique history. Falsifying a single record would mean falsifying the entire chain in millions of instances. That is virtually impossible. Bitcoin uses this model for monetary transactions, but it can be deployed in many others ways.

Blockchain is the most disruptive invention since the Internet itself

Think of a railway company. We buy tickets on an app or the web. The credit card company takes a cut for processing the transaction. With blockchain, not only can the railway operator save on credit card processing fees, it can move the entire ticketing process to the blockchain. The two parties in the transaction are the railway company and the passenger. The ticket is a block, which will be added to a ticket blockchain. Just as a monetary transaction on blockchain is a unique, independently verifiable and unfalsifiable record (like Bitcoin), so can your ticket be. Incidentally, the final ticket blockchain is also a record of all transactions for, say, a certain train route, or even the entire train network, comprising every ticket ever sold, every journey ever taken.

But the key here is this: it’s free. Not only can the blockchain transfer and store money, but it can also replace all processes and business models which rely on charging a small fee for a transaction. Or any other transaction between two parties.

Here is another example. The gig economy hub Fivver charges 0.5 dollars on a 5 transaction between individuals buying and selling services. Using blockchain technology the transaction is free. Ergo, Fivver will cease to exist. So will auction houses and any other business entity based on the market-maker principle.

Even recent entrants like Uber and AirBnB are threatened by blockchain technology. All you need to do is encode the transactional information for a car ride or an overnight stay, and again you have a perfectly safe way that disrupts the business model of the companies which have just begun to challenge the traditional economy. We are not just cutting out the fee-processing middle man, we are also eliminating the need for the match-making platform.

Because blockchain transactions are free, you can charge minuscule amounts, say 1/100 of a cent for a video view or article read. Why should I pay The Economist or National Geographic an annual subscription fee if I can pay per article on Facebook or my favorite chat app. Again, remember that blockchain transactions carry no transaction cost. You can charge for anything in any amount without worrying about third parties cutting into your profits.

Blockchain may make selling recorded music profitable again for artists by cutting out music companies and distributors like Apple or Spotify. The music you buy could even be encoded in the blockchain itself, making it a cloud archive for any song purchased. Because the amounts charged can be so small, subscription and streaming services will become irrelevant.

It goes further. Ebooks could be fitted with blockchain code. Instead of Amazon taking a cut, and the credit card company earning money on the sale, the books would circulate in encoded form and a successful blockchain transaction would transfer money to the author and unlock the book. Transfer ALL the money to the author, not just meager royalties. You could do this on a book review website like Goodreads, or on your own website. The marketplace Amazon is then unnecessary. Successful iterations could even include reviews and other third-party information about the book.

In the financial world the applications are more obvious and the revolutionary changes more imminent. Blockchains will change the way stock exchanges work, loans are bundled, and insurances contracted. They will eliminate bank accounts and practically all services offered by banks. Almost every financial institution will go bankrupt or be forced to change fundamentally, once the advantages of a safe ledger without transaction fees is widely understood and implemented. After all, the financial system is built on taking a small cut of your money for the privilege of facilitating a transaction. Bankers will become mere advisers, not gatekeepers of money. Stockbrokers will no longer be able to earn commissions and the buy/sell spread will disappear.

How Does Blockchain Work?

Picture a spreadsheet that is duplicated thousands of times across a network of computers. Then imagine that this network is designed to regularly update this spreadsheet and you have a basic understanding of the blockchain.

Information held on a blockchain exists as a shared — and continually reconciled — database. This is a way of using the network that has obvious benefits. The blockchain database isn’t stored in any single location, meaning the records it keeps are truly public and easily verifiable. No centralized version of this information exists for a hacker to corrupt. Hosted by millions of computers simultaneously, its data is accessible to anyone on the internet.

To go in deeper with the Google spreadsheet analogy, I would like you to read this piece from a blockchain specialist.


What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand“The traditional way of sharing documents with collaboration is to send a Microsoft Word document to another recipient, and ask them to make revisions to it. The problem with that scenario is that you need to wait until receiving a return copy before you can see or make other changes because you are locked out of editing it until the other person is done with it. That’s how databases work today. Two owners can’t be messing with the same record at once.That’s how banks maintain money balances and transfers; they briefly lock access (or decrease the balance) while they make a transfer, then update the other side, then re-open access (or update again).With Google Docs (or Google Sheets), both parties have access to the same document at the same time, and the single version of that document is always visible to both of them. It is like a shared ledger, but it is a shared document. The distributed part comes into play when sharing involves a number of people.

Imagine the number of legal documents that should be used that way. Instead of passing them to each other, losing track of versions, and not being in sync with the other version, why can’t *all* business documents become shared instead of transferred back and forth? So many types of legal contracts would be ideal for that kind of workflow. You don’t need a blockchain to share documents, but the shared documents analogy is a powerful one.” – William Mougayar, Venture advisor, 4x entrepreneur, marketer, strategist and blockchain specialist

The reason why the blockchain has gained so much admiration is that:

  • It is not owned by a single entity, hence it is decentralized
  • The data is cryptographically stored inside
  • The blockchain is immutable, so no one can tamper with the data that is inside the blockchain
  • The blockchain is transparent so one can track the data if they want to

The Three Pillars of Blockchain Technology

The three main properties of Blockchain Technology which has helped it gain widespread acclaim are as follows:

  • Decentralization
  • Transparency
  • Immutability

Pillar #1: Decentralization

Before Bitcoin and BitTorrent came along, we were more used to centralized services. The idea is very simple. You have a centralized entity which stored all the data and you’d have to interact solely with this entity to get whatever information you required.

Another example of a centralized system is banks. They store all your money, and the only way that you can pay someone is by going through the bank.

The traditional client-server model is a perfect example of this:

What is Blockchain

When you google search for something, you send a query to the server who then gets back at you with the relevant information. That is simple client-server.

Now, centralized systems have treated us well for many years, however, they have several vulnerabilities.

  • Firstly, because they are centralized, all the data is stored in one spot. This makes them easy target spots for potential hackers.
  • If the centralized system were to go through a software upgrade, it would halt the entire system
  • What if the centralized entity somehow shut down for whatever reason? That way nobody will be able to access the information that it possesses
  • Worst case scenario, what if this entity gets corrupted and malicious? If that happens then all the data that is inside the blockchain will be compromised.

So, what happens if we just take this centralized entity away?

In a decentralized system, the information is not stored by one single entity. In fact, everyone in the network owns the information.

In a decentralized network, if you wanted to interact with your friend then you can do so directly without going through a third party. That was the main ideology behind Bitcoins. You and only you alone are in charge of your money. You can send your money to anyone you want without having to go through a bank.

blockchain

Pillar #2: Transparency

One of the most interesting and misunderstood concepts in blockchain technology is “transparency.” Some people say that blockchain gives you privacy while some say that it is transparent. Why do you think that happens?

Well… a person’s identity is hidden via complex cryptography and represented only by their public address. So, if you were to look up a person’s transaction history, you will not see “Bob sent 1 BTC” instead you will see “1MF1bhsFLkBzzz9vpFYEmvwT2TbyCt7NZJ sent 1 BTC”.

The following snapshot of Ethereum transactions will show you what we mean:

Ethereum transactions

So, while the person’s real identity is secure, you will still see all the transactions that were done by their public address. This level of transparency has never existed before within a financial system. It adds that extra, and much needed, level of accountability which is required by some of these biggest institutions.

Speaking purely from the point of view of cryptocurrency, if you know the public address of one of these big companies, you can simply pop it in an explorer and look at all the transactions that they have engaged in. This forces them to be honest, something that they have never had to deal with before.

However, that’s not the best use-case. We are pretty sure that most of these companies won’t transact using cryptocurrencies, and even if they do, they won’t do ALL their transactions using cryptocurrencies. However, what if the blockchain technology was integrated…say in their supply chain?

You can see why something like this can be very helpful for the finance industry right?

Pillar #3: Immutability

Immutability, in the context of the blockchain, means that once something has been entered into the blockchain, it cannot be tampered with.

Can you imagine how valuable this will be for financial institutes?

Imagine how many embezzlement cases can be nipped in the bud if people know that they can’t “work the books” and fiddle around with company accounts.

The reason why the blockchain gets this property is that of cryptographic hash function.

In simple terms, hashing means taking an input string of any length and giving out an output of a fixed length. In the context of cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, the transactions are taken as an input and run through a hashing algorithm (bitcoin uses SHA-256) which gives an output of a fixed length.

Let’s see how the hashing process works. We are going to put in certain inputs. For this exercise, we are going to use the SHA-256 (Secure Hashing Algorithm 256).

hashing

As you can see, in the case of SHA-256, no matter how big or small your input is, the output will always have a fixed 256-bits length. This becomes critical when you are dealing with a huge amount of data and transactions. So basically, instead of remembering the input data which could be huge, you can just remember the hash and keep track.

A cryptographic hash function is a special class of hash functions which has various properties making it ideal for cryptography. There are certain properties that a cryptographic hash function needs to have in order to be considered secure. You can read about those in detail in our guide on hashing.

There is just one property that we want you to focus on today. It is called the “Avalanche Effect.”

What does that mean?

Even if you make a small change in your input, the changes that will be reflected in the hash will be huge. Let’s test it out using SHA-256:

blockchain hashing

You see that? Even though you just changed the case of the first alphabet of the input, look at how much that has affected the output hash. Now, let’s go back to our previous point when we were looking at blockchain architecture. What we said was:

The blockchain is a linked list which contains data and a hash pointer which points to its previous block, hence creating the chain. What is a hash pointer? A hash pointer is similar to a pointer, but instead of just containing the address of the previous block it also contains the hash of the data inside the previous block.

This one small tweak is what makes blockchains so amazingly reliable and trailblazing.

Imagine this for a second, a hacker attacks block 3 and tries to change the data. Because of the properties of hash functions, a slight change in data will change the hash drastically. This means that any slight changes made in block 3, will change the hash which is stored in block 2, now that in turn will change the data and the hash of block 2 which will result in changes in block 1 and so on and so forth. This will completely change the chain, which is impossible. This is exactly how blockchains attain immutability.

Maintaining the Blockchain – Network and Nodes

The blockchain is maintained by a peer-to-peer network. The network is a collection of nodes which are interconnected to one another. Nodes are individual computers which take in input and performs a function on them and gives an output. The blockchain uses a special kind of network called “peer-to-peer network” which partitions its entire workload between participants, who are all equally privileged, called “peers”. There is no longer one central server, now there are several distributed and decentralized peers.

Why do people use the peer-to-peer network?

One of the main uses of the peer-to-peer network is file sharing, also called torrenting. If you are to use a client-server model for downloading, then it is usually extremely slow and entirely dependent on the health of the server. Plus, like we said, it is prone to censorship.

However, in a peer-to-peer system, there is no central authority, and hence if even one of the peers in the network goes out of the race, you still have more peers to download from. Plus, it is not subject to the idealistic standards of a central system, hence it is not prone to censorship.

If we were to compare the two:

Image courtesy: Quora

The decentralized nature of a peer-to-peer system becomes critical as we move on to the next section. How critical? Well, the simple (at least on paper) idea of combining this peer-to-peer network with a payment system has completely revolutionized the finance industry by giving birth to cryptocurrency.

The use of networks and nodes in cryptocurrencies.

The peer-to-peer network structure in cryptocurrencies is structured according to the consensus mechanism that they are utilizing. For cryptos like Bitcoin and Ethereum which uses a normal proof-of-work consensus mechanism (Ethereum will eventually move on to Proof of Stake), all the nodes have the same privilege. The idea is to create an egalitarian network. The nodes are not given any special privileges, however, their functions and degree of participation may differ. There is no centralized server/entity, nor is there any hierarchy. It is a flat topology.

These decentralized cryptocurrencies are structured like that is because of a simple reason, to stay true to their philosophy. The idea is to have a currency system, where everyone is treated as an equal and there is no governing body, which can determine the value of the currency based on a whim. This is true for both bitcoin and Ethereum.

Now, if there is no central system, how would everyone in the system get to know that a certain transaction has happened? The network follows the gossip protocol. Think of how gossip spreads. Suppose Alice sent 3 ETH to Bob. The nodes nearest to her will get to know of this, and then they will tell the nodes closest to them, and then they will tell their neighbors, and this will keep on spreading out until everyone knows. Nodes are basically your nosy, annoying relatives.

What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand
So, what is a node in the context of Ethereum? A node is simply a computer that participates in the Ethereum network. This participation can be in three ways

  • By keeping a shallow-copy of the blockchain aka a Light Client
  • By keeping a full-copy of the blockchain aka a Full Node
  • By verifying the transactions aka Mining

 

However, the problem with this design is that it is not really that scalable. Which is why, a lot of new generation cryptocurrencies adopt a leader-based consensus mechanism. In EOS, Cardano, Neo etc. the nodes elect leader nodes or “super nodes” who are in charge of the consensus and overall network health. These cryptos are a lot faster but they are not the most decentralized of systems.

So, in a way, cryptos have to make the trade-off between speed and decentralization.

Who Will Use The Blockchain?

As web infrastructure, you don’t need to know about the blockchain for it to be useful in your life.

Currently, finance offers the strongest use cases for the technology. International remittances, for instance. The World Bank estimates that over $430 billion US in money transfers were sent in 2015. And at the moment there is a high demand for blockchain developers.

The blockchain potentially cuts out the middleman for these types of transactions. Personal computing became accessible to the general public with the invention of the Graphical User Interface (GUI), which took the form of a “desktop”. Similarly, the most common GUI devised for the blockchain are the so-called “wallet” applications, which people use to buy things with Bitcoin, and store it along with other cryptocurrencies.

Transactions online are closely connected to the processes of identity verification. It is easy to imagine that wallet apps will transform in the coming years to include other types of identity management.

What is Blockchain? And What New Applications Will It Bring Us?

The blockchain gives internet users the ability to create value and authenticates digital information. What new business applications will result from this?

#1 Smart contracts

Distributed ledgers enable the coding of simple contracts that will execute when specified conditions are met. Ethereum is an open source blockchain project that was built specifically to realize this possibility. Still, in its early stages, Ethereum has the potential to leverage the usefulness of blockchains on a truly world-changing scale.

At the technology’s current level of development, smart contracts can be programmed to perform simple functions. For instance, a derivative could be paid out when a financial instrument meets certain benchmark, with the use of blockchain technology and Bitcoin enabling the payout to be automated.

#2 The sharing economy

With companies like Uber and Airbnb flourishing, the sharing economy is already a proven success. Currently, however, users who want to hail a ride-sharing service have to rely on an intermediary like Uber. By enabling peer-to-peer payments, the blockchain opens the door to direct interaction between parties — a truly decentralized sharing economy results.

An early example, OpenBazaar uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer eBay. Download the app onto your computing device, and you can transact with OpenBazzar vendors without paying transaction fees. The “no rules” ethos of the protocol means that personal reputation will be even more important to business interactions than it currently is on eBay.

#3 Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding initiatives like Kickstarter and Gofundme are doing the advance work for the emerging peer-to-peer economy. The popularity of these sites suggests people want to have a direct say in product development. Blockchains take this interest to the next level, potentially creating crowd-sourced venture capital funds.

In 2016, one such experiment, the Ethereum-based DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization), raised an astonishing $200 million USD in just over two months. Participants purchased “DAO tokens” allowing them to vote on smart contract venture capital investments (voting power was proportionate to the number of DAO they were holding). A subsequent hack of project funds proved that the project was launched without proper due diligence, with disastrous consequences. Regardless, the DAO experiment suggests the blockchain has the potential to usher in “a new paradigm of economic cooperation.”

#4 Governance

By making the results fully transparent and publicly accessible, distributed database technology could bring full transparency to elections or any other kind of poll taking. Ethereum-based smart contracts help to automate the process.

The app, Boardroom, enables organizational decision-making to happen on the blockchain. In practice, this means company governance becomes fully transparent and verifiable when managing digital assets, equity or information.

#5 Supply chain auditing

Consumers increasingly want to know that the ethical claims companies make about their products are real. Distributed ledgers provide an easy way to certify that the backstories of the things we buy are genuine. Transparency comes with blockchain-based timestamping of a date and location — on ethical diamonds, for instance — that corresponds to a product number.

The UK-based Provenance offers supply chain auditing for a range of consumer goods. Making use of the Ethereum blockchain, a Provenance pilot project ensures that fish sold in Sushi restaurants in Japan has been sustainably harvested by its suppliers in Indonesia.

#6 File storage

Decentralizing file storage on the internet brings clear benefits. Distributing data throughout the network protects files from getting hacked or lost.

Inter Planetary File System (IPFS) makes it easy to conceptualize how a distributed web might operate. Similar to the way a BitTorrent moves data around the internet, IPFS gets rid of the need for centralized client-server relationships (i.e., the current web). An internet made up of completely decentralized websites has the potential to speed up file transfer and streaming times. Such an improvement is not only convenient. It’s a necessary upgrade to the web’s currently overloaded content-delivery systems.

#7 Prediction markets

The crowdsourcing of predictions on event probability is proven to have a high degree of accuracy. Averaging opinions cancels out the unexamined biases that distort judgment. Prediction markets that payout according to event outcomes are already active. Blockchains are a “wisdom of the crowd” technology that will no doubt find other applications in the years to come.

The prediction market application Augur makes share offerings on the outcome of real-world events. Participants can earn money by buying into the correct prediction. The more shares purchased in the correct outcome, the higher the payout will be. With a small commitment of funds (less than a dollar), anyone can ask a question, create a market based on a predicted outcome, and collect half of all transaction fees the market generates.

#8 Protection of intellectual property

As is well known, digital information can be infinitely reproduced — and distributed widely thanks to the internet. This has given web users globally a goldmine of free content. However, copyright holders have not been so lucky, losing control over their intellectual property and suffering financially as a consequence. Smart contracts can protect copyright and automate the sale of creative works online, eliminating the risk of file copying and redistribution.

Mycelia uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer music distribution system. Founded by the UK singer-songwriter Imogen Heap, Mycelia enables musicians to sell songs directly to audiences, as well as license samples to producers and divvy up royalties to songwriters and musicians — all of these functions being automated by smart contracts. The capacity of blockchains to issue payments in fractional cryptocurrency amounts (micropayments) suggests this use case for the blockchain has a strong chance of success.

#9 Internet of Things (IoT)

What is the IoT? The network-controlled management of certain types of electronic devices — for instance, the monitoring of air temperature in a storage facility. Smart contracts make the automation of remote systems management possible. A combination of software, sensors, and the network facilitates an exchange of data between objects and mechanisms. The result increases system efficiency and improves cost monitoring.

The biggest players in manufacturing, tech and telecommunications are all vying for IoT dominance. Think Samsung, IBM and AT&T. A natural extension of existing infrastructure controlled by incumbents, IoT applications will run the gamut from predictive maintenance of mechanical parts to data analytics, and mass-scale automated systems management.

#10 Neighbourhood Microgrids

Blockchain technology enables the buying and selling of the renewable energy generated by neighborhood microgrids. When solar panels make excess energy, Ethereum-based smart contracts automatically redistribute it. Similar types of smart contract automation will have many other applications as the IoT becomes a reality.

Located in Brooklyn, Consensys is one of the foremost companies globally that is developing a range of applications for Ethereum. One project they are partnering on is Transactive Grid, working with the distributed energy outfit, LO3. A prototype project currently up and running uses Ethereum smart contracts to automate the monitoring and redistribution of microgrid energy. This so-called “intelligent grid” is an early example of IoT functionality.

#11 Identity management

There is a definite need for better identity management on the web. The ability to verify your identity is the lynchpin of financial transactions that happen online. However, remedies for the security risks that come with web commerce are imperfect at best. Distributed ledgers offer enhanced methods for proving who you are, along with the possibility to digitize personal documents. Having a secure identity will also be important for online interactions — for instance, in the sharing economy. A good reputation, after all, is the most important condition for conducting transactions online.

Developing digital identity standards is proving to be a highly complex process. Technical challenges aside, a universal online identity solution requires cooperation between private entities and government. Add to that the need to navigate legal systems in different countries and the problem becomes exponentially difficult. E-Commerce on the internet currently relies on the SSL certificate (the little green lock) for secure transactions on the web. Netki is a startup that aspires to create an SSL standard for the blockchain. Having recently announced a $3.5 million seed round, Netki expects a product launch in early 2017.

#12 AML and KYC

Anti-money laundering (AML) and know your customer (KYC) practices have a strong potential for being adapted to the blockchain. Currently, financial institutions must perform a labour intensive multi-step process for each new customer. KYC costs could be reduced through cross-institution client verification, and at the same time increase monitoring and analysis effectiveness.

Startup Polycoin has an AML/KYC solution that involves analysing transactions. Those transactions identified as being suspicious are forwarded on to compliance officers. Another startup Tradle is developing an application called Trust in Motion (TiM). Characterized as an “Instagram for KYC”, TiM allows customers to take a snapshot of key documents (passport, utility bill, etc.). Once verified by the bank, this data is cryptographically stored on the blockchain.

#13 Data management

Today, in exchange for their personal data people can use social media platforms like Facebook for free. In future, users will have the ability to manage and sell the data their online activity generates. Because it can be easily distributed in small fractional amounts, Bitcoin — or something like it — will most likely be the currency that gets used for this type of transaction.

The MIT project Enigma understands that user privacy is the key precondition for creating of a personal data marketplace. Enigma uses cryptographic techniques to allow individual data sets to be split between nodes, and at the same time run bulk computations over the data group as a whole. Fragmenting the data also makes Enigma scalable (unlike those blockchain solutions where data gets replicated on every node). A Beta launch is promised within the next six months.

#14 Land title registration

As Publicly-accessible ledgers, blockchains can make all kinds of record-keeping more efficient. Property titles are a case in point. They tend to be susceptible to fraud, as well as costly and labour intensive to administer.

A number of countries are undertaking blockchain-based land registry projects. Honduras was the first government to announce such an initiative in 2015, although the current status of that project is unclear. This year, the Republic of Georgia cemented a deal with the Bitfury Group to develop a blockchain system for property titles. Reportedly, Hernando de Soto, the high-profile economist and property rights advocate, will be advising on the project. Most recently, Sweden announced it was experimenting with a blockchain application for property titles.

#15 Stock trading

The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.

Numerous stock and commodities exchanges are prototyping blockchain applications for the services they offer, including the ASX (Australian Securities Exchange), the Deutsche Börse (Frankfurt’s stock exchange) and the JPX (Japan Exchange Group). Most high profile because the acknowledged first mover in the area, is the Nasdaq’s Linq, a platform for private market trading (typically between pre-IPO startups and investors). A partnership with the blockchain tech company Chain, Linq announced the completion of it its first share trade in 2015. More recently, Nasdaq announced the development of a trial blockchain project for proxy voting on the Estonian Stock Market.

Ian Khan, TEDx SpeakerAs revolutionary as it sounds, Blockchain truly is a mechanism to bring everyone to the highest degree of accountability. No more missed transactions, human or machine errors, or even an exchange that was not done with the consent of the parties involved. Above anything else, the most critical area where Blockchain helps is to guarantee the validity of a transaction by recording it not only on a main register but a connected distributed system of registers, all of which are connected through a secure validation mechanism.” – Ian Khan, TEDx Speaker | Author | Technology Futurist

https://blockgeeks.com/guides/what-is-blockchain-technology/

Making sense of bitcoin, cryptocurrency and blockchain

Bitcoin, cryptocurrency, blockchain… So what does it all mean?

Some of the noise is hype, but some of it points to important forces in the financial services industry. To help you make sense of it, we’ve pulled together content explaining why a lot of industry observers are paying close attention.

Let’s start with some quick definitions. Blockchain is the technology that enables the existence of cryptocurrency (among other things). Bitcoin is the name of the best-known cryptocurrency, the one for which blockchain technology was invented. A cryptocurrency is a medium of exchange, such as the US dollar, but is digital and uses encryption techniques to control the creation of monetary units and to verify the transfer of funds.

A look at blockchain technology

What is it?

The blockchain is a decentralized ledger of all transactions across a peer-to-peer network. Using this technology, participants can confirm transactions without a need for a central clearing authority. Potential applications can include fund transfers, settling trades, voting and many other issues.

blockchain how it works
blockchain cyrptocurrency
blockchain benefits

 

Blockchain also has potential applications far beyond bitcoin and cryptocurrency.

Blockchain is, quite simply, a digital, decentralized ledger that keeps a record of all transactions that take place across a peer-to-peer network. The major innovation is that the technology allows market participants to transfer assets across the internet without the need for a centralized third party.

From a business perspective, it’s helpful to think of blockchain technology as a type of next-generation business process improvement software. Collaborative technology, such as blockchain, promises the ability to improve the business processes that occur between companies, radically lowering the “cost of trust.” For this reason, it may offer significantly higher returns for each investment dollar spent than most traditional internal investments.

Financial institutions are exploring how they could also use blockchain technology to upend everything from clearing and settlement to insurance.

For an overview of cryptocurrency, start with “Money is no object.” This paper, from PwC’s Financial Services Institute, focuses on cryptocurrency. We explain where it came from, how much consumers know about it and use it, what it will take for the market to grow and what the regulators think. We also look at how market participants, such as investors, technology providers and financial institutions, will be affected.

For some quick background on blockchain, take a look at our Top Trends in Financial Services page on Blockchain, where we discuss some of the ways FS firms are using blockchain, and how we expect the blockchain technology to develop in the future.

For a deeper dive into blockchain’s implications, read “A strategist’s guide to blockchain.” This article, from strategy+business, examines the potential benefits of this important innovation—and also suggests a way forward for financial institutions. Put simply, proceed deliberately. Explore how others might try to disrupt your business with blockchain technology and how your company could use it to leap ahead instead. In all cases, link your investments to your value proposition and give your business partners and your customers what they want most: speed, convenience and control over their transactions.

For a peek into the application of blockchains for smart contracts, check out “Blockchain and smart contract automation”. This short series of articles explore how blockchains, both public and private, have triggered a global hunt for ways to remove friction from transaction-related processes, including the process of reaching contractual agreements. Learn about the precursors, challenges and future outlook of implementing smart contracts. We also chat with Gideon Greenspan of Coin Sciences to learn about his views on the legal ramifications of public blockchains and why companies are seeking alternatives.

When a technology moves so quickly, it’s dangerous to sit on the sidelines. We’re watching blockchain move from a startup idea to an established technology in a tiny fraction of the time it took for the internet or even the PC to be accepted as a standard tool. Blockchain technology could result in a radically different competitive future for the financial services industry. These articles will help you understand these changes—and what you should do about them.

https://www.pwc.com/us/en/industries/financial-services/fintech/bitcoin-blockchain-cryptocurrency.html

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The Pronk Pops Show 1287, July 10, 2019, Part 1: Story 1: Federal Reserve Will Cut the Federal Funds Target Rate Range in July By .25% or 25 Basis Points If Second Quarter Real Gross Domestic Product Rate of Growth Falls Below 3% — Otherwise No Change in Federal Funds Rate Target Range — Huge Uncertainty Generated By Rapidly Growing Annual Deficits in Federal Government Spending Resulting in Rising National Debt Approaching $23,000,000,000,000 and Unfunded Liabilities and and Obligations Over $230,000,000,000,000! — Bubbles Bubbles Everywhere — Beyond Bubbles — U.S. Government Bankrupt Now! — Make It Rain on The Blockchain — Trust and Truth — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1287 July 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1286 July 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1285 July 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1284 July 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1283 July 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1282 June 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1281 June 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1280 June 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1279 June 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1278 June 20, 2019 

Pronk Pops Show 1277 June 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1276 June 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1275 June 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1274 June 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1273 June 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1272 June 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1271 June 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1270 June 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1269 June 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1268 June 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1267 May 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1266 May 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1265 May 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1264 May 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1263 May 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1262 May 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1261 May 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1260 May 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1259 May 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1258 May 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1257 May 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1256 May 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1255 May 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1254 May 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1253 May 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1252 May 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1251 May 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1250 May 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1249 May 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1248 May 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1247 April 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1246 April 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1245 April 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1244 April 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1243 April 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1242 April 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1241 April 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1240 April 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1239 April 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1238 April 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1237 April 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1236 April 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1235 April 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1234 April 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1233 April 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1232 April 1, 2019 Part 2

 

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Story 1: Federal Reserve Will Cut the Federal Funds Target Rate Range in July By .25% or 25 Basis Points If Second Quarter Real Gross Domestic Product Rate of Growth Falls Below 3% — Otherwise No Change in Federal Funds Rate Target Range — Huge Uncertainty Generated By Rapidly Growing Annual Deficits in Federal Government Spending Resulting in Rising National Debt Approaching $23,000,000,000,000 and Unfunded Liabilities and and Obligations Over $230,000,000,000,000! — Bubbles Bubbles Everywhere — Beyond Bubbles — Make It Rain on The Blockchain — Trust and Truth — Videos

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Fed Chair Jerome Powell testifies before Congress

Streamed live on Jul 10, 2019

House Financial Services Committee holds hearing on “Monetary Policy & the State of the Economy.” Fed Chair Powell testifies. All eyes will be on Powell when he testifies before a House panel on monetary policy in the first of his 2-day semiannual testimony to Congress. Investors are looking to Powell for what to expect at the next policy meeting at the end of July. FOX Business Network (FBN) is a financial news channel delivering real-time information across all platforms that impact both Main Street and Wall Street. Headquartered in New York — the business capital of the world — FBN launched in October 2007 and is the leading business network on television, topping CNBC in Business Day viewers for the second consecutive year. T he network is available in more than 80 million homes in all markets across the United States. Owned by FOX, FBN has bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and London.

 

Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s Senate testimony on monetary policy – 07/11/2019

Streamed live on Jul 11, 2019

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies before Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on the monetary policy and the U.S. economy.

Economy can sustain lower jobless rate than we thought, says Fed’s Powell

Larry Kudlow: AOC ‘nailed it’ with questions to Fed chair

Cryptocurrencies rally despite Trump’s rebuke | Money Talks

Fed keeps interest rates steady, signals possible cuts in 2019

Streamed live on Jun 19, 2019

Federal Open Market Cmte announces Fed Funds Interest Rates will remain unchanged.

The Pension Bomb

10 Myths About Government Debt

What Will Cause The Next Recession – Robert Shiller On Human Behavior

Economic Collapse Warning! $222 Trillion Dollar True Size Of Government Debt & Stock Market CRASH!

Dr. Laurence Kotlikoff on the Implications of Rising National Debt

Public Choice Theory: Why Government Often Fails

Howard Marks | The Impact of Debt, Demographics, and Unfunded Liabilities

Santelli Exchange: Underfunded pension liabilities

Bill Bonner Interview: hold on to your cash, the real financial crisis is yet to come

Published on Sep 16, 2015

MoneyWeek’s editor in chief Merryn Somerset Webb talks to Bill Bonner about economic cycles and the ‘cashless society’. Click here to find out how it could affect you: http://pro1.moneyweek.com/434014/

The Upcoming Financial Crisis That Will Dwarf That of 2008 – Expect Civil Unrest

Best Documentary of the Housing Market Crash (of 2019?) | Inside the Meltdown | Behind the Big Short

Exodus out of high tax states with unfunded pensions?

N.J. pension crisis explained with popsicle sticks

A Misalignment of Interests: The Politics of Pension Funding (Pension Pursuit)

A Thunderhead: Pensions and Unfunded Liabilities

Deficits, Debts and Unfunded Liabilities: The Consequences of Excessive Government Spending

Published on May 10, 2010

Huge budget deficits and record levels of national debt are getting a lot of attention, but this video explains that unfunded liabilities for entitlement programs are Americas real red-ink challenge. More important, this CF&P mini-documentary reveals that deficits and debt are symptoms of the real problem of an excessive burden of government spending. http://www.freedomandprosperity.org

Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency

Facebook’s plan to control the global financial system

Bitcoin vs. Gold Peter Schiff debates Max Keiser

Keiser Report: #DropGold: Peter Schiff Responds (E1381)

Digital Currency’s Role in the Future of Central Banks

Christine Lagarde: ‘Central Bank digital currency is coming alive’

Digital Currency Has Real Value — Here’s Why | CNBC

Japan made bitcoin a legal currency – now it’s more popular than ever | CNBC Reports

Blockchain and Crypto: Past, Present, and Future | Douglas Pepe | TEDxRanneySchool

Mr Bitcoin: “I don’t want money, I don’t want fame!” BBC News

Is This Man the Inventor of Bitcoin?

Blockchain Expert Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty | WIRED

How does a blockchain work – Simply Explained

Bitcoin: Beyond The Bubble – Full Documentary

Scott Adams’ Guide To Blockchain: The Technology That Will Change Everything

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How the blockchain is changing money and business | Don Tapscott

TED

Published on Sep 16, 2016

What is the blockchain? If you don’t know, you should; if you do, chances are you still need some clarification on how it actually works. Don Tapscott is here to help, demystifying this world-changing, trust-building technology which, he says, represents nothing less than the second generation of the internet and holds the potential to transform money, business, government and society. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate

What is Blockchain

Published on Jun 9, 2016

Blockchain explained. Shai Rubin, CTO of Citi Innovation Lab, explains in an easy and simple way the basics of blockchain.

Blockchains: how can they be used?

19 Industries The Blockchain Will Disrupt

How the blockchain will radically transform the economy | Bettina Warburg

Blockchain is Eating Wall Street | Alex Tapscott | TEDxSanFrancisco

How to Use Blockchain to Create a Better Future | Brian Condenanza | TEDxHautLacSchool

Our Lives in a Blockchain-Powered Smart Economy | Eddy Travia | TEDxINSEAD

Is Bitcoin the Future of Money? Peter Schiff vs. Erik Voorhees

The Convergence of Blockchain, Machine Learning, and the Cloud | Steve Lund | TEDxBYU

The Value Revolution: How Blockchain Will Change Money & the World | Galia Benartzi | TEDxWhiteCity

Blockchain Technology Explained (2 Hour Course)

How Bitcoin Works in 5 Minutes (Technical)

How Bitcoin Works Under the Hood

Why crypto regulation is doomed to fail | Marit Hansen | TEDxKielUniversity

Bitcoin scares central banks. Here’s why

George Gilder: Forget Cloud Computing, Blockchain is the Future

Why central banks are experimenting with blockchain

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Why Public Policy Always Ends in Disaster

It’s Hormeggedon! What Happens When Public Policy Passes the Point of No Return

Bill Bonner Interview: hold on to your cash, the real financial crisis is yet to come

Bill Bonner on the financial markets WORLD.MINDS INTERVIEW

Jim Simons on His Formula for Improving Math Education

Billionaire James Simons: Quantitative Investment Strategy, Career and Trading (2019)

Renaissance Man — Jim Simons

Billionaire Mathematician – Numberphile

The mathematician who cracked Wall Street | Jim Simons

James H. Simons: Mathematics, Common Sense and Good Luck

By appearing to buckle to Trump on rates, is the Fed chief creating problems down the road?

By appearing to buckle to Trump on rates, is the Fed chief creating problems down the road?
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell speaks at a news conference in Washington on June 19. (Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images)

In signaling that the Federal Reserve is almost certain to cut interest rates at the end of this month, Fed Chairman Jerome H. Powell may have given President Trump what he wants.

But the central bank now looks more vulnerable to criticism that it is caving to political pressures that will only grow as the election cycle heats up.

Powell, in testimony to lawmakers Wednesday, essentially argued that heightened uncertainty, from trade tensions and slowing global economic growth, along with low inflation, was enough to justify a cut in interest rates.

Historically, the Fed has lowered rates to ward off recession or when it sees substantial risks of a downturn.

The U.S. economy expanded at a nearly 3% pace last year and, although it has slowed in recent months, the Fed and most private forecasters see growth continuing at a decent rate. The latest jobs report for June showed hiring remains strong, and Trump recently agreed to a ceasefire in the trade war with China, tenuous as it may be.For those reasons, Powell’s remarks Wednesday came as a pleasant surprise to financial markets. Stocks rose to record highs.

Lowering the rate by a quarter point later this month may help borrowers a little. The Fed’s main rate is a benchmark for credit cards, auto loans and other short-term consumer lending, but long-term rates such as mortgages already have dropped in anticipation of a Fed rate cut, meaning it’s unlikely to provide much of a boost to the housing market or the broader economy.

“We’ve already gotten 90% of the benefit; it’s already priced into the market,” said Dean Baker, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

Investors are expecting at least one more quarter-point rate cut after July, and some even two. Powell and his colleagues at the Fed will have their hands full managing investors’ expectations on future rate reductions, so they don’t set themselves up for a sharp fall.

“The issue that the Fed is going to run into … is just like parenting,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. “They can’t bend every time the markets throw a tantrum. At some point, you’ve got to put your foot down.”

Market expectations aside, Powell’s bigger challenge is likely to come from Trump. The president has been publicly hammering Powell to lower interest rates. Trump has criticized the Fed for raising rates four times last year, and no one thinks he will be satisfied if the Fed drops its benchmark rate by a quarter point on July 31, as it’s now expected to do.

Trump and his economic team have pressed the Fed to slash rates by a full point, and Trump isn’t likely to stop jawboning the Fed in the coming months.

Some economic experts say Trump already has succeeded in getting into the heads of Fed decision makers.

“Powell does seem to be going a little bit out of his way to reverse the rate hikes made last year,” said Chris Rupkey, managing director and chief economist at MUFG Union Bank in New York. “The president’s like another active member of the Fed board in the room. I wouldn’t tell him no, would you?”

Rupkey and some other Fed watchers say Powell is moving a bit too early in readying rate cuts, especially with job growth still running very strong. Only a few months ago, the Fed’s stance on interest rates was to wait and see.

“Should they cut rates at this time? Absolutely not!” said Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at Economic Outlook Group. “There is no economic justification to take that step now.

“For one, there is little to suggest this business cycle [is] struggling. The softness we see in some data points have little to do with economic fundamentals. The trade war with China and the havoc it has caused to global supply chain are the primary reasons those sectors have weakened.”

But other analysts argue that there’s good reason for the shift in the Fed’s posture. According to minutes from their last meeting in June, released Wednesday, Fed policymakers were feeling that the downside risks to the economy “had increased significantly over recent weeks.”

And in his testimony Wednesday to the House Financial Services Committee, Powell said that since May, crosscurrents that seemed to moderate earlier in the year “have reemerged, creating greater uncertainty.” Among other concerns, he said, business spending, trade and manufacturing activity have slowed.

“The issue really is more now on the business side where we see business confidence and business investment weakening a bit,” he told lawmakers, adding that there’s rising risk as well to consumer spending, which accounts for 70% of U.S. economic activity. “Household confidence has remained high, but over time uncertainty can cause households to hold back as well.”

Powell, sensitive to the political pressures bearing on the Fed, took pains in his prepared remarks to defend the integrity of the central bank and the basis for its policymaking.

“Congress has given us an important degree of independence so that we can effectively pursue our statutory goals based on objective analysis and data,” Powell said as he began his testimony.

Trump has reportedly considered firing Powell or demoting him, although it’s not clear whether the president has the legal authority to do so. Powell reiterated Wednesday that the law is on his side and that he intends to serve the full four-year term as Fed chair, which he assumed in February 2018.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have cautioned Trump against taking steps to remove Powell as Fed leader. And on Wednesday, Democratic lawmakers sought to drive home that point.

“Mr. Chairman, if you got a call from the president today or tomorrow, and he said, ‘I’m firing you. Pack up. It’s time to go,’ what would you do?” asked Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), chair of the Financial Services Committee.

“Well, of course I would not do that,” Powell responded, to which Waters added, “I can’t hear you,” eliciting laughter.

But the president’s unusually persistent and heavy pressure on the Fed is anything but a laughing matter.

Alan Blinder, a Fed vice chairman in the mid-1990s, said the concern about the bank’s independence stemming from the president’s attacks was such that it could legitimately be a factor in a Fed decision not to raise rates.

Apart from the potential harm to its credibility, a more immediate risk for the Fed in cutting rates is that it could limit the central bank’s arsenal in fighting the next recession. The Fed’s main benchmark rate is less than 2.5%, low by historical standards.

In response to lawmakers’ questioning, Powell said the resumption of trade talks between the United States and China was a “constructive step” but that doesn’t really change the outlook.

“I would say that the bottom line for me is that the uncertainties around global growth and trade continue to weigh on the outlook.”

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-jerome-powell-interest-rates-20190710-story.html

July 10, 2019

Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress

Chair Jerome H. Powell

Before the Committee on Financial Services, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

 

Chair Powell submitted identical remarks to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, U.S. Senate, on July 11, 2019.

Chairwoman Waters, Ranking Member McHenry, and other members of the Committee, I am pleased to present the Federal Reserve’s semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.

Let me start by saying that my colleagues and I strongly support the goals of maximum employment and price stability that Congress has set for monetary policy. We are committed to providing clear explanations about our policies and activities. Congress has given us an important degree of independence so that we can effectively pursue our statutory goals based on objective analysis and data. We appreciate that our independence brings with it an obligation for transparency so that you and the public can hold us accountable.

Today I will review the current economic situation and outlook before turning to monetary policy. I will also provide an update of our ongoing public review of our framework for setting monetary policy.

Current Economic Situation and Outlook 
The economy performed reasonably well over the first half of 2019, and the current expansion is now in its 11th year. However, inflation has been running below the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) symmetric 2 percent objective, and crosscurrents, such as trade tensions and concerns about global growth, have been weighing on economic activity and the outlook.

The labor market remains healthy. Job gains averaged 172,000 per month from January through June. This number is lower than the average of 223,000 a month last year but above the pace needed to provide jobs for new workers entering the labor force. Consequently, the unemployment rate moved down from 3.9 percent in December to 3.7 percent in June, close to its lowest level in 50 years. Job openings remain plentiful, and employers are increasingly willing to hire workers with fewer skills and train them. As a result, the benefits of a strong job market have been more widely shared in recent years. Indeed, wage gains have been greater for lower-skilled workers. That said, individuals in some demographic groups and in certain parts of the country continue to face challenges. For example, unemployment rates for African Americans and Hispanics remain well above the rates for whites and Asians. Likewise, the share of the population with a job is higher in urban areas than in rural communities, and this gap widened over the past decade. A box in the July Monetary Policy Report provides a comparison of employment and wage gains over the current expansion for individuals with different levels of education.

Gross domestic product increased at an annual rate of 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2019, similar to last year’s pace. This strong reading was driven largely by net exports and inventories—components that are not generally reliable indicators of ongoing momentum. The more reliable drivers of growth in the economy are consumer spending and business investment. While growth in consumer spending was weak in the first quarter, incoming data show that it has bounced back and is now running at a solid pace. However, growth in business investment seems to have slowed notably, and overall growth in the second quarter appears to have moderated. The slowdown in business fixed investment may reflect concerns about trade tensions and slower growth in the global economy. In addition, housing investment and manufacturing output declined in the first quarter and appear to have decreased again in the second quarter.

After running close to our 2 percent objective over much of last year, overall consumer price inflation, measured by the 12-month change in the price index for personal consumption expenditures (PCE), declined earlier this year and stood at 1.5 percent in May. The 12-month change in core PCE inflation, which excludes food and energy prices and tends to be a better indicator of future inflation, has also come down this year and was 1.6 percent in May.

Our baseline outlook is for economic growth to remain solid, labor markets to stay strong, and inflation to move back up over time to the Committee’s 2 percent objective. However, uncertainties about the outlook have increased in recent months. In particular, economic momentum appears to have slowed in some major foreign economies, and that weakness could affect the U.S. economy. Moreover, a number of government policy issues have yet to be resolved, including trade developments, the federal debt ceiling, and Brexit. And there is a risk that weak inflation will be even more persistent than we currently anticipate. We are carefully monitoring these developments, and we will continue to assess their implications for the U.S economic outlook and inflation.

The nation also continues to confront important longer-run challenges. Labor force participation by those in their prime working years is now lower in the United States than in most other nations with comparable economies. As I mentioned, there are troubling labor market disparities across demographic groups and different parts of the country. The relative stagnation of middle and lower incomes and low levels of upward mobility for lower-income families are also ongoing concerns. In addition, finding ways to boost productivity growth, which leads to rising wages and living standards over the longer term, should remain a high national priority. And I remain concerned about the longer-term effects of high and rising federal debt, which can restrain private investment and, in turn, reduce productivity and overall economic growth. The longer-run vitality of the U.S. economy would benefit from efforts to address these issues.

Monetary Policy 
Against this backdrop, the FOMC maintained the target range for the federal funds rate at 2‑1/4 to 2-1/2 percent in the first half of this year. At our January, March, and May meetings, we stated that we would be patient as we determined what future adjustments to the federal funds rate might be appropriate to support our goals of maximum employment and price stability.

At the time of our May meeting, we were mindful of the ongoing crosscurrents from global growth and trade, but there was tentative evidence that these crosscurrents were moderating. The latest data from China and Europe were encouraging, and there were reports of progress in trade negotiations with China. Our continued patient stance seemed appropriate, and the Committee saw no strong case for adjusting our policy rate.

Since our May meeting, however, these crosscurrents have reemerged, creating greater uncertainty. Apparent progress on trade turned to greater uncertainty, and our contacts in business and agriculture report heightened concerns over trade developments. Growth indicators from around the world have disappointed on net, raising concerns that weakness in the global economy will continue to affect the U.S. economy. These concerns may have contributed to the drop in business confidence in some recent surveys and may have started to show through to incoming data.

In our June meeting statement, we indicated that, in light of increased uncertainties about the economic outlook and muted inflation pressures, we would closely monitor the implications of incoming information for the economic outlook and would act as appropriate to sustain the expansion. Many FOMC participants saw that the case for a somewhat more accommodative monetary policy had strengthened. Since then, based on incoming data and other developments, it appears that uncertainties around trade tensions and concerns about the strength of the global economy continue to weigh on the U.S. economic outlook. Inflation pressures remain muted.

The FOMC has made a number of important decisions this year about our framework for implementing monetary policy and our plans for completing the reduction of the Fed’s securities holdings. At our January meeting, we decided to continue to implement monetary policy using our current policy regime with ample reserves, and emphasized that we are prepared to adjust any of the details for completing balance sheet normalization in light of economic and financial developments. At our March meeting, we communicated our intention to slow, starting in May, the decline in the Fed’s aggregate securities holdings and to end the reduction in these holdings in September. The July Monetary Policy Report provides details on these decisions.

The July Monetary Policy Report also includes an update on monetary policy rules. The FOMC routinely looks at monetary policy rules that recommend a level for the federal funds rate based on inflation and unemployment rates. I continue to find these rules helpful, although using these rules requires careful judgment.

We are conducting a public review of our monetary policy strategy, tools, and communications—the first review of its kind for the FOMC. Our motivation is to consider ways to improve the Committee’s current policy framework and to best position the Fed to achieve maximum employment and price stability. The review has started with outreach to and consultation with a broad range of people and groups through a series of Fed Listens events. The FOMC will consider questions related to the review at upcoming meetings. We will publicly report the outcome of our discussions.

Thank you. I am happy to respond to your questions.

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Last Update: July 10, 2019

Blockchain

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Blockchain formation. The main chain (black) consists of the longest series of blocks from the genesis block (green) to the current block. Orphan blocks (purple) exist outside of the main chain.

blockchain,[1][2][3] originally block chain,[4][5] is a growing list of records, called blocks, that are linked using cryptography.[1][6] Each block contains a cryptographic hash of the previous block,[6] a timestamp, and transaction data (generally represented as a Merkle tree).

By design, a blockchain is resistant to modification of the data. It is “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way”.[7] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for inter-node communication and validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires consensus of the network majority. Although blockchain records are not unalterable, blockchains may be considered secure by design and exemplify a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault toleranceDecentralized consensus has therefore been claimed with a blockchain.[8]

Blockchain was invented by a person (or group of people) using the name Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008 to serve as the public transaction ledger of the cryptocurrency bitcoin.[1] The identity of Satoshi Nakamoto is unknown. The invention of the blockchain for bitcoin made it the first digital currency to solve the double-spending problem without the need of a trusted authority or central server. The bitcoin design has inspired other applications,[1][3] and blockchains that are readable by the public are widely used by cryptocurrencies. Blockchain is considered a type of payment rail.[9] Private blockchains have been proposed for business use. Sources such as Computerworld called the marketing of such blockchains without a proper security model “snake oil“.[10]

Contents

History

Bitcoin transactions (January 2009 – September 2017)

The first work on a cryptographically secured chain of blocks was described in 1991 by Stuart Haber and W. Scott Stornetta.[6][11] They wanted to implement a system where document timestamps could not be tampered with. In 1992, Bayer, Haber and Stornetta incorporated Merkle trees to the design, which improved its efficiency by allowing several document certificates to be collected into one block.[6][12]

The first blockchain was conceptualized by a person (or group of people) known as Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. Nakamoto improved the design in an important way using a Hashcash-like method to add blocks to the chain without requiring them to be signed by a trusted party.[6] The design was implemented the following year by Nakamoto as a core component of the cryptocurrency bitcoin, where it serves as the public ledger for all transactions on the network.[1]

In August 2014, the bitcoin blockchain file size, containing records of all transactions that have occurred on the network, reached 20 GB (gigabytes).[13] In January 2015, the size had grown to almost 30 GB, and from January 2016 to January 2017, the bitcoin blockchain grew from 50 GB to 100 GB in size.

The words block and chain were used separately in Satoshi Nakamoto’s original paper, but were eventually popularized as a single word, blockchain, by 2016.

Smart contracts that run on a blockchain, for example ones that “creat[e] invoices that pay themselves when a shipment arrives or share certificates that automatically send their owners dividends if profits reach a certain level.”[1] require an off-chain oracle to access any “external data or events based on time or market conditions [that need] to interact with the blockchain.”[14]

According to Accenture, an application of the diffusion of innovations theory suggests that blockchains attained a 13.5% adoption rate within financial services in 2016, therefore reaching the early adopters phase.[15] Industry trade groups joined to create the Global Blockchain Forum in 2016, an initiative of the Chamber of Digital Commerce.

In May 2018, Gartner found that only 1% of CIOs indicated any kind of blockchain adoption within their organisations, and only 8% of CIOs were in the short-term ‘planning or [looking at] active experimentation with blockchain’.[16]

Structure

A blockchain is a decentralizeddistributed and public digital ledger that is used to record transactions across many computers so that any involved record cannot be altered retroactively, without the alteration of all subsequent blocks.[1][17] This allows the participants to verify and audit transactions independently and relatively inexpensively.[18] A blockchain database is managed autonomously using a peer-to-peer network and a distributed timestamping server. They are authenticated by mass collaboration powered by collective self-interests.[19] Such a design facilitates robust workflow where participants’ uncertainty regarding data security is marginal. The use of a blockchain removes the characteristic of infinite reproducibility from a digital asset. It confirms that each unit of value was transferred only once, solving the long-standing problem of double spending. A blockchain has been described as a value-exchange protocol.[20] A blockchain can maintain title rights because, when properly set up to detail the exchange agreement, it provides a record that compels offer and acceptance.

Blocks

Blocks hold batches of valid transactions that are hashed and encoded into a Merkle tree.[1] Each block includes the cryptographic hash of the prior block in the blockchain, linking the two. The linked blocks form a chain.[1] This iterative process confirms the integrity of the previous block, all the way back to the original genesis block.[21]

Sometimes separate blocks can be produced concurrently, creating a temporary fork. In addition to a secure hash-based history, any blockchain has a specified algorithm for scoring different versions of the history so that one with a higher score can be selected over others. Blocks not selected for inclusion in the chain are called orphan blocks.[21] Peers supporting the database have different versions of the history from time to time. They keep only the highest-scoring version of the database known to them. Whenever a peer receives a higher-scoring version (usually the old version with a single new block added) they extend or overwrite their own database and retransmit the improvement to their peers. There is never an absolute guarantee that any particular entry will remain in the best version of the history forever. Blockchains are typically built to add the score of new blocks onto old blocks and are given incentives to extend with new blocks rather than overwrite old blocks. Therefore, the probability of an entry becoming superseded decreases exponentially[22] as more blocks are built on top of it, eventually becoming very low.[1][23]:ch. 08[24] For example, bitcoin uses a proof-of-work system, where the chain with the most cumulative proof-of-work is considered the valid one by the network. There are a number of methods that can be used to demonstrate a sufficient level of computation. Within a blockchain the computation is carried out redundantly rather than in the traditional segregated and parallel manner.[25]

Block time

The block time is the average time it takes for the network to generate one extra block in the blockchain. Some blockchains create a new block as frequently as every five seconds. By the time of block completion, the included data becomes verifiable. In cryptocurrency, this is practically when the transaction takes place, so a shorter block time means faster transactions. The block time for Ethereum is set to between 14 and 15 seconds, while for bitcoin it is 10 minutes.[citation needed]

Hard forks

hard fork is a rule change such that the software validating according to the old rules will see the blocks produced according to the new rules as invalid. In case of a hard fork, all nodes meant to work in accordance with the new rules need to upgrade their software.

If one group of nodes continues to use the old software while the other nodes use the new software, a split can occur. For example, Ethereum has hard-forked to “make whole” the investors in The DAO, which had been hacked by exploiting a vulnerability in its code. In this case, the fork resulted in a split creating Ethereum and Ethereum Classic chains. In 2014 the Nxt community was asked to consider a hard fork that would have led to a rollback of the blockchain records to mitigate the effects of a theft of 50 million NXT from a major cryptocurrency exchange. The hard fork proposal was rejected, and some of the funds were recovered after negotiations and ransom payment. Alternatively, to prevent a permanent split, a majority of nodes using the new software may return to the old rules, as was the case of bitcoin split on 12 March 2013.[26]

Decentralization

By storing data across its peer-to-peer network, the blockchain eliminates a number of risks that come with data being held centrally.[1] The decentralized blockchain may use ad-hoc message passing and distributed networking.

Peer-to-peer blockchain networks lack centralized points of vulnerability that computer crackers can exploit; likewise, it has no central point of failure. Blockchain security methods include the use of public-key cryptography.[4]:5 A public key (a long, random-looking string of numbers) is an address on the blockchain. Value tokens sent across the network are recorded as belonging to that address. A private key is like a password that gives its owner access to their digital assets or the means to otherwise interact with the various capabilities that blockchains now support. Data stored on the blockchain is generally considered incorruptible.[1]

Every node in a decentralized system has a copy of the blockchain. Data quality is maintained by massive database replication[8] and computational trust. No centralized “official” copy exists and no user is “trusted” more than any other.[4] Transactions are broadcast to the network using software. Messages are delivered on a best-effort basis. Mining nodes validate transactions,[21] add them to the block they are building, and then broadcast the completed block to other nodes.[23]:ch. 08 Blockchains use various time-stamping schemes, such as proof-of-work, to serialize changes.[27] Alternative consensus methods include proof-of-stake.[21] Growth of a decentralized blockchain is accompanied by the risk of centralization because the computer resources required to process larger amounts of data become more expensive.[28]

Openness

Open blockchains are more user-friendly than some traditional ownership records, which, while open to the public, still require physical access to view. Because all early blockchains were permissionless, controversy has arisen over the blockchain definition. An issue in this ongoing debate is whether a private system with verifiers tasked and authorized (permissioned) by a central authority should be considered a blockchain.[29][30][31][32][33] Proponents of permissioned or private chains argue that the term “blockchain” may be applied to any data structure that batches data into time-stamped blocks. These blockchains serve as a distributed version of multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) in databases.[34] Just as MVCC prevents two transactions from concurrently modifying a single object in a database, blockchains prevent two transactions from spending the same single output in a blockchain.[35]:30–31 Opponents say that permissioned systems resemble traditional corporate databases, not supporting decentralized data verification, and that such systems are not hardened against operator tampering and revision.[29][31] Nikolai Hampton of Computerworld said that “many in-house blockchain solutions will be nothing more than cumbersome databases,” and “without a clear security model, proprietary blockchains should be eyed with suspicion.”[10][36]

Permissionless

The great advantage to an open, permissionless, or public, blockchain network is that guarding against bad actors is not required and no access control is needed.[22] This means that applications can be added to the network without the approval or trust of others, using the blockchain as a transport layer.[22]

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies currently secure their blockchain by requiring new entries to include a proof of work. To prolong the blockchain, bitcoin uses Hashcash puzzles. While Hashcash was designed in 1997 by Adam Back, the original idea was first proposed by Cynthia Dwork and Moni Naor and Eli Ponyatovski in their 1992 paper “Pricing via Processing or Combatting Junk Mail”.

Financial companies have not prioritised decentralized blockchains.[citation needed]

In 2016, venture capital investment for blockchain-related projects was weakening in the USA but increasing in China.[37] Bitcoin and many other cryptocurrencies use open (public) blockchains. As of April 2018, bitcoin has the highest market capitalization.

Permissioned (private) blockchain

Permissioned blockchains use an access control layer to govern who has access to the network.[38] In contrast to public blockchain networks, validators on private blockchain networks are vetted by the network owner. They do not rely on anonymous nodes to validate transactions nor do they benefit from the network effect.[citation needed] Permissioned blockchains can also go by the name of ‘consortium’ blockchains.[39][better source needed]

Disadvantages of private blockchain

Nikolai Hampton pointed out in Computerworld that “There is also no need for a ’51 percent’ attack on a private blockchain, as the private blockchain (most likely) already controls 100 percent of all block creation resources. If you could attack or damage the blockchain creation tools on a private corporate server, you could effectively control 100 percent of their network and alter transactions however you wished.”[10] This has a set of particularly profound adverse implications during a financial crisis or debt crisis like the financial crisis of 2007–08, where politically powerful actors may make decisions that favor some groups at the expense of others,[40][41] and “the bitcoin blockchain is protected by the massive group mining effort. It’s unlikely that any private blockchain will try to protect records using gigawatts of computing power — it’s time consuming and expensive.”[10] He also said, “Within a private blockchain there is also no ‘race’; there’s no incentive to use more power or discover blocks faster than competitors. This means that many in-house blockchain solutions will be nothing more than cumbersome databases.”[10]

Blockchain analysis

The analysis of public blockchains has become increasingly important with the popularity of bitcoinEthereumlitecoin and other cryptocurrencies.[42] A blockchain, if it is public, provides anyone who wants access to observe and analyse the chain data, given one has the know-how. The process of understanding and accessing the flow of crypto has been an issue for many cryptocurrencies, crypto-exchanges and banks.[43][44] The reason for this is accusations of blockchain enabled cryptocurrencies enabling illicit dark market trade of drugs, weapons, money laundering etc.[45] A common belief has been that cryptocurrency is private and untraceable, thus leading many actors to use it for illegal purposes. This is changing and now specialised tech-companies provide blockchain tracking services, making crypto exchanges, law-enforcement and banks more aware of what is happening with crypto funds and fiat crypto exchanges. The development, some argue, has led criminals to prioritise use of new cryptos such as Monero.[46][47][48] The question is about public accessibility of blockchain data and the personal privacy of the very same data. It is a key debate in cryptocurrency and ultimately in blockchain.[49]

Uses

Blockchain technology can be integrated into multiple areas. The primary use of blockchains today is as a distributed ledger for cryptocurrencies, most notably bitcoin. There are a few operational products maturing from proof of concept by late 2016.[37] Businesses have been thus far reluctant to place blockchain at the core of the business structure.[50]

Cryptocurrencies

Most cryptocurrencies use blockchain technology to record transactions. For example, the bitcoin network and Ethereum network are both based on blockchain. On 8 May 2018 Facebook confirmed that it is opening a new blockchain group[51] which will be headed by David Marcus who previously was in charge of Messenger. According to The Verge Facebook is planning to launch its own cryptocurrency for facilitating payments on the platform.[52]

Smart contracts

Blockchain-based smart contracts are proposed contracts that could be partially or fully executed or enforced without human interaction.[53] One of the main objectives of a smart contract is automated escrow. An IMF staff discussion reported that smart contracts based on blockchain technology might reduce moral hazards and optimize the use of contracts in general. But “no viable smart contract systems have yet emerged.” Due to the lack of widespread use their legal status is unclear.[54]

Financial services

Major portions of the financial industry are implementing distributed ledgers for use in banking,[55][56][57] and according to a September 2016 IBM study, this is occurring faster than expected.[58]

Banks are interested in this technology because it has potential to speed up back office settlement systems.[59]

Banks such as UBS are opening new research labs dedicated to blockchain technology in order to explore how blockchain can be used in financial services to increase efficiency and reduce costs.[60][61]

Berenberg, a German bank, believes that blockchain is an “overhyped technology” that has had a large number of “proofs of concept”, but still has major challenges, and very few success stories.[62]

Video games

A blockchain game CryptoKitties, launched in November 2017.[63] The game made headlines in December 2017 when a cryptokitty character – an in-game virtual pet – was sold for more than US$100,000.[64] CryptoKitties illustrated scalability problems for games on Ethereum when it created significant congestion on the Ethereum network with about 30% of all Ethereum transactions being for the game.[65]

Cryptokitties also demonstrated how blockchains can be used to catalog game assets (digital assets).[66]

Supply chain

There are a number of efforts and industry organizations working to employ blockchains in supply chain logistics and supply chain management.

The Blockchain in Transport Alliance (BiTA) works to develop open standards for supply chains.[citation needed]

Everledger is one of the inaugural clients of IBM’s blockchain-based tracking service.[67]

Walmart and IBM are running a trial to use a blockchain-backed system for supply chain monitoring — all nodes of the blockchain are administered by Walmart and are located on the IBM cloud.[68]

Hyperledger Grid develops open components for blockchain supply chain solutions.[69][70]

Other uses

Blockchain technology can be used to create a permanent, public, transparent ledger system for compiling data on sales, tracking digital use and payments to content creators, such as wireless users[71] or musicians.[72] In 2017, IBM partnered with ASCAP and PRS for Music to adopt blockchain technology in music distribution.[73] Imogen Heap‘s Mycelia service has also been proposed as blockchain-based alternative “that gives artists more control over how their songs and associated data circulate among fans and other musicians.”[74][75]

New distribution methods are available for the insurance industry such as peer-to-peer insuranceparametric insurance and microinsurance following the adoption of blockchain.[76][77] The sharing economy and IoT are also set to benefit from blockchains because they involve many collaborating peers.[78] Online voting is another application of the blockchain.[79][80]

Other designs include:

  • Hyperledger is a cross-industry collaborative effort from the Linux Foundation to support blockchain-based distributed ledgers, with projects under this initiative including Hyperledger Burrow (by Monax) and Hyperledger Fabric (spearheaded by IBM)[81]
  • Quorum – a permissionable private blockchain by JPMorgan Chase with private storage, used for contract applications[82]
  • Tezos, decentralized voting.[35]:94
  • Proof of Existence is an online service that verifies the existence of computer files as of a specific time[83]

Types

Currently, there are at least four types of blockchain networks — public blockchains, private blockchains, consortium blockchains and hybrid blockchains.

Public blockchains

A public blockchain has absolutely no access restrictions. Anyone with an Internet connection can send transactions to it as well as become a validator (i.e., participate in the execution of a consensus protocol).[84][self-published source?] Usually, such networks offer economic incentives for those who secure them and utilize some type of a Proof of Stake or Proof of Work algorithm.

Some of the largest, most known public blockchains are the bitcoin blockchain and the Ethereum blockchain.

Private blockchains

A private blockchain is permissioned.[38] One cannot join it unless invited by the network administrators. Participant and validator access is restricted.

This type of blockchains can be considered a middle-ground for companies that are interested in the blockchain technology in general but are not comfortable with a level of control offered by public networks. Typically, they seek to incorporate blockchain into their accounting and record-keeping procedures without sacrificing autonomy and running the risk of exposing sensitive data to the public internet.[citation needed]

Hybrid blockchains

A hybrid blockchain[85] simply explained is a combination between different characteristics both public and private blockchains have by design. It allows to determine what information stays private and what information is made public. Further decentralization in relation to primarily centralized private blockchains can be achieved in various ways. Instead of keeping transactions inside their own network of community run or private nodes, the hash (with or without payload) can be posted on completely decentralized blockchains such as bitcoin. Dragonchain uses Interchain[86] to host transactions on other blockchains. This allows users to operate on different blockchains, where they can selectively share data or business logic. Other blockchains like Wanchain use interoperability mechanisms such as bridges.[87][88] By submitting the hash of a transaction (with or without the sensitive business logic) on public blockchains like bitcoin or Ethereum, some of the privacy and blockchain concerns are resolved, as no personal identifiable information is stored on a public blockchain. Depending on the hybrid blockchain its architecture, multicloud solutions allow to store data in compliance with General Data Protection Regulation and other geographical limitations while also leveraging bitcoin’s global hashpower to decentralize transactions.

Academic research

Blockchain panel discussion at the first IEEE Computer Society TechIgnite conference

In October 2014, the MIT Bitcoin Club, with funding from MIT alumni, provided undergraduate students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology access to $100 of bitcoin. The adoption rates, as studied by Catalini and Tucker (2016), revealed that when people who typically adopt technologies early are given delayed access, they tend to reject the technology.[89]

Energy use of proof-of-work blockchains

External video
 Cryptocurrencies: looking beyond the hypeHyun Song ShinBank for International Settlements, 2:48[90]
 Blockchains and Cryptocurrencies: Burn It With Fire, Nicholas Weaver, Berkeley School of Information, 49:47, lecture begins at 3:05[91]

The Bank for International Settlements has criticized the public proof-of-work blockchains for high energy consumption.[92][90][93]

Nicholas Weaver, of the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley examines blockchain’s online security, and the energy efficiency of proof-of-work public blockchains, and in both cases finds it grossly inadequate.[91][94]

Journals

In September 2015, the first peer-reviewed academic journal dedicated to cryptocurrency and blockchain technology research, Ledger, was announced. The inaugural issue was published in December 2016.[95] The journal covers aspects of mathematicscomputer scienceengineeringlaweconomics and philosophy that relate to cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin.[96][97]

The journal encourages authors to digitally sign a file hash of submitted papers, which will then be timestamped into the bitcoin blockchain. Authors are also asked to include a personal bitcoin address in the first page of their papers.[98]

See also

References …

Further reading

  •  Media related to Blockchain at Wikimedia Commons

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockchain

What is Blockchain Technology? A Step-by-Step Guide For Beginners

Ameer Rosic

3 years ago
Was ist Blockchain-Technologie

What is Blockchain Technology? A Step-by-Step Guide For Beginners

[Updated – Mar 01 2019]

Is Blockchain Technology the New Internet?

The blockchain is an undeniably ingenious invention – the brainchild of a person or group of people known by the pseudonym, Satoshi Nakamoto. But since then, it has evolved into something greater, and the main question every single person is asking is: What is Blockchain?

By allowing digital information to be distributed but not copied, blockchain technology created the backbone of a new type of internet. Originally devised for the digital currencyBitcoin, (Buy Bitcoin) the tech community has now found other potential uses for the technology.

In thisguide, we are going to explain to you what the blockchain technology is, and what its properties are that make it so unique. So, we hope you enjoy this, What Is Blockchain Guide. And if you already know what blockchain is and want to become a blockchain developer please check out our in-depth blockchain tutorial and create your very first blockchain.

What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand“The blockchain is an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value.” – Don & Alex Tapscott, authors Blockchain Revolution (2016).

A blockchain is, in the simplest of terms, a time-stamped series of immutable record of data that is managed by cluster of computers not owned by any single entity. Each of these blocks of data (i.e. block) are secured and bound to each other using cryptographic principles (i.e. chain).

So, what is so special about it and why are we saying that it has industry disrupting capabilities?

The blockchain network has no central authority — it is the very definition of a democratized system. Since it is a shared and immutable ledger, the information in it is open for anyone and everyone to see. Hence, anything that is built on the blockchain is by its very nature transparent and everyone involved is accountable for their actions.

Blockchain Explained

A blockchain carries no transaction cost. (An infrastructure cost yes, but no transaction cost.) The blockchain is a simple yet ingenious way of passing information from A to B in a fully automated and safe manner. One party to a transaction initiates the process by creating a block. This block is verified by thousands, perhaps millions of computers distributed around the net. The verified block is added to a chain, which is stored across the net, creating not just a unique record, but a unique record with a unique history. Falsifying a single record would mean falsifying the entire chain in millions of instances. That is virtually impossible. Bitcoin uses this model for monetary transactions, but it can be deployed in many others ways.

Blockchain is the most disruptive invention since the Internet itself

Think of a railway company. We buy tickets on an app or the web. The credit card company takes a cut for processing the transaction. With blockchain, not only can the railway operator save on credit card processing fees, it can move the entire ticketing process to the blockchain. The two parties in the transaction are the railway company and the passenger. The ticket is a block, which will be added to a ticket blockchain. Just as a monetary transaction on blockchain is a unique, independently verifiable and unfalsifiable record (like Bitcoin), so can your ticket be. Incidentally, the final ticket blockchain is also a record of all transactions for, say, a certain train route, or even the entire train network, comprising every ticket ever sold, every journey ever taken.

But the key here is this: it’s free. Not only can the blockchain transfer and store money, but it can also replace all processes and business models which rely on charging a small fee for a transaction. Or any other transaction between two parties.

Here is another example. The gig economy hub Fivver charges 0.5 dollars on a 5 transaction between individuals buying and selling services. Using blockchain technology the transaction is free. Ergo, Fivver will cease to exist. So will auction houses and any other business entity based on the market-maker principle.

Even recent entrants like Uber and AirBnB are threatened by blockchain technology. All you need to do is encode the transactional information for a car ride or an overnight stay, and again you have a perfectly safe way that disrupts the business model of the companies which have just begun to challenge the traditional economy. We are not just cutting out the fee-processing middle man, we are also eliminating the need for the match-making platform.

Because blockchain transactions are free, you can charge minuscule amounts, say 1/100 of a cent for a video view or article read. Why should I pay The Economist or National Geographic an annual subscription fee if I can pay per article on Facebook or my favorite chat app. Again, remember that blockchain transactions carry no transaction cost. You can charge for anything in any amount without worrying about third parties cutting into your profits.

Blockchain may make selling recorded music profitable again for artists by cutting out music companies and distributors like Apple or Spotify. The music you buy could even be encoded in the blockchain itself, making it a cloud archive for any song purchased. Because the amounts charged can be so small, subscription and streaming services will become irrelevant.

It goes further. Ebooks could be fitted with blockchain code. Instead of Amazon taking a cut, and the credit card company earning money on the sale, the books would circulate in encoded form and a successful blockchain transaction would transfer money to the author and unlock the book. Transfer ALL the money to the author, not just meager royalties. You could do this on a book review website like Goodreads, or on your own website. The marketplace Amazon is then unnecessary. Successful iterations could even include reviews and other third-party information about the book.

In the financial world the applications are more obvious and the revolutionary changes more imminent. Blockchains will change the way stock exchanges work, loans are bundled, and insurances contracted. They will eliminate bank accounts and practically all services offered by banks. Almost every financial institution will go bankrupt or be forced to change fundamentally, once the advantages of a safe ledger without transaction fees is widely understood and implemented. After all, the financial system is built on taking a small cut of your money for the privilege of facilitating a transaction. Bankers will become mere advisers, not gatekeepers of money. Stockbrokers will no longer be able to earn commissions and the buy/sell spread will disappear.

How Does Blockchain Work?

Picture a spreadsheet that is duplicated thousands of times across a network of computers. Then imagine that this network is designed to regularly update this spreadsheet and you have a basic understanding of the blockchain.

Information held on a blockchain exists as a shared — and continually reconciled — database. This is a way of using the network that has obvious benefits. The blockchain database isn’t stored in any single location, meaning the records it keeps are truly public and easily verifiable. No centralized version of this information exists for a hacker to corrupt. Hosted by millions of computers simultaneously, its data is accessible to anyone on the internet.

To go in deeper with the Google spreadsheet analogy, I would like you to read this piece from a blockchain specialist.


What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand“The traditional way of sharing documents with collaboration is to send a Microsoft Word document to another recipient, and ask them to make revisions to it. The problem with that scenario is that you need to wait until receiving a return copy before you can see or make other changes because you are locked out of editing it until the other person is done with it. That’s how databases work today. Two owners can’t be messing with the same record at once.That’s how banks maintain money balances and transfers; they briefly lock access (or decrease the balance) while they make a transfer, then update the other side, then re-open access (or update again).With Google Docs (or Google Sheets), both parties have access to the same document at the same time, and the single version of that document is always visible to both of them. It is like a shared ledger, but it is a shared document. The distributed part comes into play when sharing involves a number of people.

Imagine the number of legal documents that should be used that way. Instead of passing them to each other, losing track of versions, and not being in sync with the other version, why can’t *all* business documents become shared instead of transferred back and forth? So many types of legal contracts would be ideal for that kind of workflow. You don’t need a blockchain to share documents, but the shared documents analogy is a powerful one.” – William Mougayar, Venture advisor, 4x entrepreneur, marketer, strategist and blockchain specialist

The reason why the blockchain has gained so much admiration is that:

  • It is not owned by a single entity, hence it is decentralized
  • The data is cryptographically stored inside
  • The blockchain is immutable, so no one can tamper with the data that is inside the blockchain
  • The blockchain is transparent so one can track the data if they want to

The Three Pillars of Blockchain Technology

The three main properties of Blockchain Technology which has helped it gain widespread acclaim are as follows:

  • Decentralization
  • Transparency
  • Immutability

Pillar #1: Decentralization

Before Bitcoin and BitTorrent came along, we were more used to centralized services. The idea is very simple. You have a centralized entity which stored all the data and you’d have to interact solely with this entity to get whatever information you required.

Another example of a centralized system is banks. They store all your money, and the only way that you can pay someone is by going through the bank.

The traditional client-server model is a perfect example of this:

What is Blockchain

When you google search for something, you send a query to the server who then gets back at you with the relevant information. That is simple client-server.

Now, centralized systems have treated us well for many years, however, they have several vulnerabilities.

  • Firstly, because they are centralized, all the data is stored in one spot. This makes them easy target spots for potential hackers.
  • If the centralized system were to go through a software upgrade, it would halt the entire system
  • What if the centralized entity somehow shut down for whatever reason? That way nobody will be able to access the information that it possesses
  • Worst case scenario, what if this entity gets corrupted and malicious? If that happens then all the data that is inside the blockchain will be compromised.

So, what happens if we just take this centralized entity away?

In a decentralized system, the information is not stored by one single entity. In fact, everyone in the network owns the information.

In a decentralized network, if you wanted to interact with your friend then you can do so directly without going through a third party. That was the main ideology behind Bitcoins. You and only you alone are in charge of your money. You can send your money to anyone you want without having to go through a bank.

blockchain

Pillar #2: Transparency

One of the most interesting and misunderstood concepts in blockchain technology is “transparency.” Some people say that blockchain gives you privacy while some say that it is transparent. Why do you think that happens?

Well… a person’s identity is hidden via complex cryptography and represented only by their public address. So, if you were to look up a person’s transaction history, you will not see “Bob sent 1 BTC” instead you will see “1MF1bhsFLkBzzz9vpFYEmvwT2TbyCt7NZJ sent 1 BTC”.

The following snapshot of Ethereum transactions will show you what we mean:

Ethereum transactions

So, while the person’s real identity is secure, you will still see all the transactions that were done by their public address. This level of transparency has never existed before within a financial system. It adds that extra, and much needed, level of accountability which is required by some of these biggest institutions.

Speaking purely from the point of view of cryptocurrency, if you know the public address of one of these big companies, you can simply pop it in an explorer and look at all the transactions that they have engaged in. This forces them to be honest, something that they have never had to deal with before.

However, that’s not the best use-case. We are pretty sure that most of these companies won’t transact using cryptocurrencies, and even if they do, they won’t do ALL their transactions using cryptocurrencies. However, what if the blockchain technology was integrated…say in their supply chain?

You can see why something like this can be very helpful for the finance industry right?

Pillar #3: Immutability

Immutability, in the context of the blockchain, means that once something has been entered into the blockchain, it cannot be tampered with.

Can you imagine how valuable this will be for financial institutes?

Imagine how many embezzlement cases can be nipped in the bud if people know that they can’t “work the books” and fiddle around with company accounts.

The reason why the blockchain gets this property is that of cryptographic hash function.

In simple terms, hashing means taking an input string of any length and giving out an output of a fixed length. In the context of cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, the transactions are taken as an input and run through a hashing algorithm (bitcoin uses SHA-256) which gives an output of a fixed length.

Let’s see how the hashing process works. We are going to put in certain inputs. For this exercise, we are going to use the SHA-256 (Secure Hashing Algorithm 256).

hashing

As you can see, in the case of SHA-256, no matter how big or small your input is, the output will always have a fixed 256-bits length. This becomes critical when you are dealing with a huge amount of data and transactions. So basically, instead of remembering the input data which could be huge, you can just remember the hash and keep track.

A cryptographic hash function is a special class of hash functions which has various properties making it ideal for cryptography. There are certain properties that a cryptographic hash function needs to have in order to be considered secure. You can read about those in detail in our guide on hashing.

There is just one property that we want you to focus on today. It is called the “Avalanche Effect.”

What does that mean?

Even if you make a small change in your input, the changes that will be reflected in the hash will be huge. Let’s test it out using SHA-256:

blockchain hashing

You see that? Even though you just changed the case of the first alphabet of the input, look at how much that has affected the output hash. Now, let’s go back to our previous point when we were looking at blockchain architecture. What we said was:

The blockchain is a linked list which contains data and a hash pointer which points to its previous block, hence creating the chain. What is a hash pointer? A hash pointer is similar to a pointer, but instead of just containing the address of the previous block it also contains the hash of the data inside the previous block.

This one small tweak is what makes blockchains so amazingly reliable and trailblazing.

Imagine this for a second, a hacker attacks block 3 and tries to change the data. Because of the properties of hash functions, a slight change in data will change the hash drastically. This means that any slight changes made in block 3, will change the hash which is stored in block 2, now that in turn will change the data and the hash of block 2 which will result in changes in block 1 and so on and so forth. This will completely change the chain, which is impossible. This is exactly how blockchains attain immutability.

Maintaining the Blockchain – Network and Nodes

The blockchain is maintained by a peer-to-peer network. The network is a collection of nodes which are interconnected to one another. Nodes are individual computers which take in input and performs a function on them and gives an output. The blockchain uses a special kind of network called “peer-to-peer network” which partitions its entire workload between participants, who are all equally privileged, called “peers”. There is no longer one central server, now there are several distributed and decentralized peers.

Why do people use the peer-to-peer network?

One of the main uses of the peer-to-peer network is file sharing, also called torrenting. If you are to use a client-server model for downloading, then it is usually extremely slow and entirely dependent on the health of the server. Plus, like we said, it is prone to censorship.

However, in a peer-to-peer system, there is no central authority, and hence if even one of the peers in the network goes out of the race, you still have more peers to download from. Plus, it is not subject to the idealistic standards of a central system, hence it is not prone to censorship.

If we were to compare the two:

Image courtesy: Quora

The decentralized nature of a peer-to-peer system becomes critical as we move on to the next section. How critical? Well, the simple (at least on paper) idea of combining this peer-to-peer network with a payment system has completely revolutionized the finance industry by giving birth to cryptocurrency.

The use of networks and nodes in cryptocurrencies.

The peer-to-peer network structure in cryptocurrencies is structured according to the consensus mechanism that they are utilizing. For cryptos like Bitcoin and Ethereum which uses a normal proof-of-work consensus mechanism (Ethereum will eventually move on to Proof of Stake), all the nodes have the same privilege. The idea is to create an egalitarian network. The nodes are not given any special privileges, however, their functions and degree of participation may differ. There is no centralized server/entity, nor is there any hierarchy. It is a flat topology.

These decentralized cryptocurrencies are structured like that is because of a simple reason, to stay true to their philosophy. The idea is to have a currency system, where everyone is treated as an equal and there is no governing body, which can determine the value of the currency based on a whim. This is true for both bitcoin and Ethereum.

Now, if there is no central system, how would everyone in the system get to know that a certain transaction has happened? The network follows the gossip protocol. Think of how gossip spreads. Suppose Alice sent 3 ETH to Bob. The nodes nearest to her will get to know of this, and then they will tell the nodes closest to them, and then they will tell their neighbors, and this will keep on spreading out until everyone knows. Nodes are basically your nosy, annoying relatives.

What is Blockchain Technology? A step-by-step guide than anyone can understand
So, what is a node in the context of Ethereum? A node is simply a computer that participates in the Ethereum network. This participation can be in three ways

  • By keeping a shallow-copy of the blockchain aka a Light Client
  • By keeping a full-copy of the blockchain aka a Full Node
  • By verifying the transactions aka Mining

 

However, the problem with this design is that it is not really that scalable. Which is why, a lot of new generation cryptocurrencies adopt a leader-based consensus mechanism. In EOS, Cardano, Neo etc. the nodes elect leader nodes or “super nodes” who are in charge of the consensus and overall network health. These cryptos are a lot faster but they are not the most decentralized of systems.

So, in a way, cryptos have to make the trade-off between speed and decentralization.

Who Will Use The Blockchain?

As web infrastructure, you don’t need to know about the blockchain for it to be useful in your life.

Currently, finance offers the strongest use cases for the technology. International remittances, for instance. The World Bank estimates that over $430 billion US in money transfers were sent in 2015. And at the moment there is a high demand for blockchain developers.

The blockchain potentially cuts out the middleman for these types of transactions. Personal computing became accessible to the general public with the invention of the Graphical User Interface (GUI), which took the form of a “desktop”. Similarly, the most common GUI devised for the blockchain are the so-called “wallet” applications, which people use to buy things with Bitcoin, and store it along with other cryptocurrencies.

Transactions online are closely connected to the processes of identity verification. It is easy to imagine that wallet apps will transform in the coming years to include other types of identity management.

What is Blockchain? And What New Applications Will It Bring Us?

The blockchain gives internet users the ability to create value and authenticates digital information. What new business applications will result from this?

#1 Smart contracts

Distributed ledgers enable the coding of simple contracts that will execute when specified conditions are met. Ethereum is an open source blockchain project that was built specifically to realize this possibility. Still, in its early stages, Ethereum has the potential to leverage the usefulness of blockchains on a truly world-changing scale.

At the technology’s current level of development, smart contracts can be programmed to perform simple functions. For instance, a derivative could be paid out when a financial instrument meets certain benchmark, with the use of blockchain technology and Bitcoin enabling the payout to be automated.

#2 The sharing economy

With companies like Uber and Airbnb flourishing, the sharing economy is already a proven success. Currently, however, users who want to hail a ride-sharing service have to rely on an intermediary like Uber. By enabling peer-to-peer payments, the blockchain opens the door to direct interaction between parties — a truly decentralized sharing economy results.

An early example, OpenBazaar uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer eBay. Download the app onto your computing device, and you can transact with OpenBazzar vendors without paying transaction fees. The “no rules” ethos of the protocol means that personal reputation will be even more important to business interactions than it currently is on eBay.

#3 Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding initiatives like Kickstarter and Gofundme are doing the advance work for the emerging peer-to-peer economy. The popularity of these sites suggests people want to have a direct say in product development. Blockchains take this interest to the next level, potentially creating crowd-sourced venture capital funds.

In 2016, one such experiment, the Ethereum-based DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization), raised an astonishing $200 million USD in just over two months. Participants purchased “DAO tokens” allowing them to vote on smart contract venture capital investments (voting power was proportionate to the number of DAO they were holding). A subsequent hack of project funds proved that the project was launched without proper due diligence, with disastrous consequences. Regardless, the DAO experiment suggests the blockchain has the potential to usher in “a new paradigm of economic cooperation.”

#4 Governance

By making the results fully transparent and publicly accessible, distributed database technology could bring full transparency to elections or any other kind of poll taking. Ethereum-based smart contracts help to automate the process.

The app, Boardroom, enables organizational decision-making to happen on the blockchain. In practice, this means company governance becomes fully transparent and verifiable when managing digital assets, equity or information.

#5 Supply chain auditing

Consumers increasingly want to know that the ethical claims companies make about their products are real. Distributed ledgers provide an easy way to certify that the backstories of the things we buy are genuine. Transparency comes with blockchain-based timestamping of a date and location — on ethical diamonds, for instance — that corresponds to a product number.

The UK-based Provenance offers supply chain auditing for a range of consumer goods. Making use of the Ethereum blockchain, a Provenance pilot project ensures that fish sold in Sushi restaurants in Japan has been sustainably harvested by its suppliers in Indonesia.

#6 File storage

Decentralizing file storage on the internet brings clear benefits. Distributing data throughout the network protects files from getting hacked or lost.

Inter Planetary File System (IPFS) makes it easy to conceptualize how a distributed web might operate. Similar to the way a BitTorrent moves data around the internet, IPFS gets rid of the need for centralized client-server relationships (i.e., the current web). An internet made up of completely decentralized websites has the potential to speed up file transfer and streaming times. Such an improvement is not only convenient. It’s a necessary upgrade to the web’s currently overloaded content-delivery systems.

#7 Prediction markets

The crowdsourcing of predictions on event probability is proven to have a high degree of accuracy. Averaging opinions cancels out the unexamined biases that distort judgment. Prediction markets that payout according to event outcomes are already active. Blockchains are a “wisdom of the crowd” technology that will no doubt find other applications in the years to come.

The prediction market application Augur makes share offerings on the outcome of real-world events. Participants can earn money by buying into the correct prediction. The more shares purchased in the correct outcome, the higher the payout will be. With a small commitment of funds (less than a dollar), anyone can ask a question, create a market based on a predicted outcome, and collect half of all transaction fees the market generates.

#8 Protection of intellectual property

As is well known, digital information can be infinitely reproduced — and distributed widely thanks to the internet. This has given web users globally a goldmine of free content. However, copyright holders have not been so lucky, losing control over their intellectual property and suffering financially as a consequence. Smart contracts can protect copyright and automate the sale of creative works online, eliminating the risk of file copying and redistribution.

Mycelia uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer music distribution system. Founded by the UK singer-songwriter Imogen Heap, Mycelia enables musicians to sell songs directly to audiences, as well as license samples to producers and divvy up royalties to songwriters and musicians — all of these functions being automated by smart contracts. The capacity of blockchains to issue payments in fractional cryptocurrency amounts (micropayments) suggests this use case for the blockchain has a strong chance of success.

#9 Internet of Things (IoT)

What is the IoT? The network-controlled management of certain types of electronic devices — for instance, the monitoring of air temperature in a storage facility. Smart contracts make the automation of remote systems management possible. A combination of software, sensors, and the network facilitates an exchange of data between objects and mechanisms. The result increases system efficiency and improves cost monitoring.

The biggest players in manufacturing, tech and telecommunications are all vying for IoT dominance. Think Samsung, IBM and AT&T. A natural extension of existing infrastructure controlled by incumbents, IoT applications will run the gamut from predictive maintenance of mechanical parts to data analytics, and mass-scale automated systems management.

#10 Neighbourhood Microgrids

Blockchain technology enables the buying and selling of the renewable energy generated by neighborhood microgrids. When solar panels make excess energy, Ethereum-based smart contracts automatically redistribute it. Similar types of smart contract automation will have many other applications as the IoT becomes a reality.

Located in Brooklyn, Consensys is one of the foremost companies globally that is developing a range of applications for Ethereum. One project they are partnering on is Transactive Grid, working with the distributed energy outfit, LO3. A prototype project currently up and running uses Ethereum smart contracts to automate the monitoring and redistribution of microgrid energy. This so-called “intelligent grid” is an early example of IoT functionality.

#11 Identity management

There is a definite need for better identity management on the web. The ability to verify your identity is the lynchpin of financial transactions that happen online. However, remedies for the security risks that come with web commerce are imperfect at best. Distributed ledgers offer enhanced methods for proving who you are, along with the possibility to digitize personal documents. Having a secure identity will also be important for online interactions — for instance, in the sharing economy. A good reputation, after all, is the most important condition for conducting transactions online.

Developing digital identity standards is proving to be a highly complex process. Technical challenges aside, a universal online identity solution requires cooperation between private entities and government. Add to that the need to navigate legal systems in different countries and the problem becomes exponentially difficult. E-Commerce on the internet currently relies on the SSL certificate (the little green lock) for secure transactions on the web. Netki is a startup that aspires to create an SSL standard for the blockchain. Having recently announced a $3.5 million seed round, Netki expects a product launch in early 2017.

#12 AML and KYC

Anti-money laundering (AML) and know your customer (KYC) practices have a strong potential for being adapted to the blockchain. Currently, financial institutions must perform a labour intensive multi-step process for each new customer. KYC costs could be reduced through cross-institution client verification, and at the same time increase monitoring and analysis effectiveness.

Startup Polycoin has an AML/KYC solution that involves analysing transactions. Those transactions identified as being suspicious are forwarded on to compliance officers. Another startup Tradle is developing an application called Trust in Motion (TiM). Characterized as an “Instagram for KYC”, TiM allows customers to take a snapshot of key documents (passport, utility bill, etc.). Once verified by the bank, this data is cryptographically stored on the blockchain.

#13 Data management

Today, in exchange for their personal data people can use social media platforms like Facebook for free. In future, users will have the ability to manage and sell the data their online activity generates. Because it can be easily distributed in small fractional amounts, Bitcoin — or something like it — will most likely be the currency that gets used for this type of transaction.

The MIT project Enigma understands that user privacy is the key precondition for creating of a personal data marketplace. Enigma uses cryptographic techniques to allow individual data sets to be split between nodes, and at the same time run bulk computations over the data group as a whole. Fragmenting the data also makes Enigma scalable (unlike those blockchain solutions where data gets replicated on every node). A Beta launch is promised within the next six months.

#14 Land title registration

As Publicly-accessible ledgers, blockchains can make all kinds of record-keeping more efficient. Property titles are a case in point. They tend to be susceptible to fraud, as well as costly and labour intensive to administer.

A number of countries are undertaking blockchain-based land registry projects. Honduras was the first government to announce such an initiative in 2015, although the current status of that project is unclear. This year, the Republic of Georgia cemented a deal with the Bitfury Group to develop a blockchain system for property titles. Reportedly, Hernando de Soto, the high-profile economist and property rights advocate, will be advising on the project. Most recently, Sweden announced it was experimenting with a blockchain application for property titles.

#15 Stock trading

The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.

Numerous stock and commodities exchanges are prototyping blockchain applications for the services they offer, including the ASX (Australian Securities Exchange), the Deutsche Börse (Frankfurt’s stock exchange) and the JPX (Japan Exchange Group). Most high profile because the acknowledged first mover in the area, is the Nasdaq’s Linq, a platform for private market trading (typically between pre-IPO startups and investors). A partnership with the blockchain tech company Chain, Linq announced the completion of it its first share trade in 2015. More recently, Nasdaq announced the development of a trial blockchain project for proxy voting on the Estonian Stock Market.

Ian Khan, TEDx SpeakerAs revolutionary as it sounds, Blockchain truly is a mechanism to bring everyone to the highest degree of accountability. No more missed transactions, human or machine errors, or even an exchange that was not done with the consent of the parties involved. Above anything else, the most critical area where Blockchain helps is to guarantee the validity of a transaction by recording it not only on a main register but a connected distributed system of registers, all of which are connected through a secure validation mechanism.” – Ian Khan, TEDx Speaker | Author | Technology Futurist

https://blockgeeks.com/guides/what-is-blockchain-technology/

Making sense of bitcoin, cryptocurrency and blockchain

Bitcoin, cryptocurrency, blockchain… So what does it all mean?

Some of the noise is hype, but some of it points to important forces in the financial services industry. To help you make sense of it, we’ve pulled together content explaining why a lot of industry observers are paying close attention.

Let’s start with some quick definitions. Blockchain is the technology that enables the existence of cryptocurrency (among other things). Bitcoin is the name of the best-known cryptocurrency, the one for which blockchain technology was invented. A cryptocurrency is a medium of exchange, such as the US dollar, but is digital and uses encryption techniques to control the creation of monetary units and to verify the transfer of funds.

A look at blockchain technology

What is it?

The blockchain is a decentralized ledger of all transactions across a peer-to-peer network. Using this technology, participants can confirm transactions without a need for a central clearing authority. Potential applications can include fund transfers, settling trades, voting and many other issues.

blockchain how it works
blockchain cyrptocurrency
blockchain benefits

 

Blockchain also has potential applications far beyond bitcoin and cryptocurrency.

Blockchain is, quite simply, a digital, decentralized ledger that keeps a record of all transactions that take place across a peer-to-peer network. The major innovation is that the technology allows market participants to transfer assets across the internet without the need for a centralized third party.

From a business perspective, it’s helpful to think of blockchain technology as a type of next-generation business process improvement software. Collaborative technology, such as blockchain, promises the ability to improve the business processes that occur between companies, radically lowering the “cost of trust.” For this reason, it may offer significantly higher returns for each investment dollar spent than most traditional internal investments.

Financial institutions are exploring how they could also use blockchain technology to upend everything from clearing and settlement to insurance.

For an overview of cryptocurrency, start with “Money is no object.” This paper, from PwC’s Financial Services Institute, focuses on cryptocurrency. We explain where it came from, how much consumers know about it and use it, what it will take for the market to grow and what the regulators think. We also look at how market participants, such as investors, technology providers and financial institutions, will be affected.

For some quick background on blockchain, take a look at our Top Trends in Financial Services page on Blockchain, where we discuss some of the ways FS firms are using blockchain, and how we expect the blockchain technology to develop in the future.

For a deeper dive into blockchain’s implications, read “A strategist’s guide to blockchain.” This article, from strategy+business, examines the potential benefits of this important innovation—and also suggests a way forward for financial institutions. Put simply, proceed deliberately. Explore how others might try to disrupt your business with blockchain technology and how your company could use it to leap ahead instead. In all cases, link your investments to your value proposition and give your business partners and your customers what they want most: speed, convenience and control over their transactions.

For a peek into the application of blockchains for smart contracts, check out “Blockchain and smart contract automation”. This short series of articles explore how blockchains, both public and private, have triggered a global hunt for ways to remove friction from transaction-related processes, including the process of reaching contractual agreements. Learn about the precursors, challenges and future outlook of implementing smart contracts. We also chat with Gideon Greenspan of Coin Sciences to learn about his views on the legal ramifications of public blockchains and why companies are seeking alternatives.

When a technology moves so quickly, it’s dangerous to sit on the sidelines. We’re watching blockchain move from a startup idea to an established technology in a tiny fraction of the time it took for the internet or even the PC to be accepted as a standard tool. Blockchain technology could result in a radically different competitive future for the financial services industry. These articles will help you understand these changes—and what you should do about them.

https://www.pwc.com/us/en/industries/financial-services/fintech/bitcoin-blockchain-cryptocurrency.html

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The Pronk Pops Show 1006, November 27, 2017, Story 1: Downsizing Big Government By Abolishing The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, Fannie May & Freddie Mac, and Departments of Agriculture, Education, Commerce, Energy, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Labor, and Transportation For Starters — Neither Big Government Democratic or Republican Parties  Will Do This — Two Party Tyranny —  Time for New Political Party — Repeal Dodd-Frank Law — Videos — Story 2: Competition Lowers Prices and Provides Greater Choice and Quality — Net Neutrality Is Government Controlling, Licensing, Regulating, and Taxing of The Internet Including Prices and Content — Repeal Net Neutrality In December 2017 — Let Consumer Sovereignty with Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Reign –Videos

Posted on November 27, 2017. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Cartoons, Communications, Congress, Constitutional Law, Countries, Culture, Defense Spending, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Economics, Education, Employment, Fiscal Policy, Freedom of Speech, Government Spending, History, House of Representatives, Human, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Insurance, Investments, Law, Legal Immigration, Life, Media, Medicare, Monetary Policy, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Trump, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Rule of Law, Scandals, Security, Senate, Social Security, Success, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, United States of America, Videos, War, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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See the source imageSee the source imageImage result for quotes on government intervention

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Story 1: Downsizing Big Government By Abolishing The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Reserve, Internal Revenue Service, Fannie May &amp; Freddie Mac, and Departments of Agriculture, Education, Commerce, Energy, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Labor, and Transportation For Starters — Neither Big Government Democratic or Republican Parties  Will Do This — Two Party Tyranny —  Time for New Political Party — Repeal Dodd-Frank Law — Videos —

Lawsuit filed to determine CFPB acting director

Showdown over Consumer Financial Protection Bureau leader

Mick Mulvaney CFPB Press Brief. Very Interesting.

Consumer Head Responds To Calls For His Removal (Exclusive) | Morning Joe | MSNBC

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau actually hurting consumer lending?

Republicans Propose Cutting Funds To Consumer Financial Protection Bureau – Forbes On Fox

Who Benefits From a Dodd-Frank Regulation Reboot?

Tom Easton on Dodd-Frank: “A Terrible Law”

Trump takes aim at Dodd-Frank

What is all the Dodd Frank talk really about?

Janet Yellen on Dodd-Frank: ‘I wouldn’t want to see the clock turned back’

Greenspan: Repeal Dodd-Frank, Return to Square One

Ralph Nader on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Government: Is it Ever Big Enough?

Can the government ever be too big? How much spending is enough spending? And if there can be too much spending, where is that point? William Voegeli, Senior Editor of the Claremont Review of Books, explores these complex questions and offers some clear answers.

There Is Only One Way Out of Poverty

How Housing Policy Caused the Financial Crisis

How This Government Agency Hurts Us All

The Future of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac

Mick Mulvaney Trashes Consumer Protection Agency At January Confirmation Hearing | NBC News

TAKE IT TO THE LIMITS: Milton Friedman on Libertarianism

Downsizing the Federal Government

John Stossel – Downsizing Government

Uncommon Knowledge: John Stossel on Why the Media Hates Business and Why Governments Fail

Dan Mitchell Commenting on Downsizing Government and Federal Bureaucracy

Types of Bureaucracies: Crash Course Government and Politics #16

The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad

he Financial Crisis of 2008 – the most dangerous crisis since the Great Depression (Documentary)

Dennis Prager’s Top 10 Ways Liberalism Makes America Worse

Why You’ve Never Heard of the Great Depression of 1920 | Thomas E. Woods, Jr.

 

Peter J. Wallison

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Peter Wallison
Peter Wallison 1986.jpg
White House Counsel
In office
May 23, 1986 – March 20, 1987
President Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Fred Fielding
Succeeded by Arthur Culvahouse
Personal details
Born June 6, 1941 (age 76)
New York CityNew YorkU.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Frieda Wallison
Children 3
Education Harvard University(BALLB)
[1]

Peter J. Wallison (born June 6, 1941) is a lawyer and the Arthur F. Burns Fellow in Financial Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute. He specializes in financial markets deregulation. He was White House Counselduring the Tower Commission‘s inquiry into the Iran Contra Affair.[1] He was a dissenting member of the 2010 Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, frequent commentator in the mass media on the federal takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the financial crisis of 2007–2008 and wrote Hidden in Plain Sight (2015) about the crisis and its legacy.

Personal

Wallison was born in New York City, and educated at the Capitol Page School and Harvard University (A.B. 1963, LL.B. 1966), where he was President of the Young Republicans.[2] He was admitted to the bar of New York state in 1967.[3][4]

Emanuel Celler appointed him a United States House of Representatives Page when he was about 14, and he served for most of his high school years. The Democrats controlled the patronage, but assigned some pages, such as Wallison, to the minority party. This experience helped him become a Republican.[2]

He was a Rockefeller Republican before becoming a Reagan Republican.

On November 24, 1966, he married the former Frieda Koslow (born in New York January 15, 1943, A.B. Smith College 1963, LL.B. Harvard Law School 1966 admitted to New York bar in 1967, D.C. bar 1982). They have three children, Ethan S., Jeremy L., Rebecca K. Mrs. Wallison develops real estate in Snowmass, Colorado.[5][6][7][8][9]

They split their time between homes in Colorado and in Washington, D.C.

Career

Other

In 1999, Wallison told New York Times reporter Steven A. Holmes that the expansion of mortgage loans by reducing the amount borrowers have to put down and extending loans to so-called subprime borrowers was creating a situation where Fannie Mae was taking on significantly more risk. “From the perspective of many people, including me, this is another thrift industry growing up around us,” he said. “If they fail, the government will have to step up and bail them out the way it stepped up and bailed out the thrift industry.”[10] The article pointed out that the Clinton Administration had put pressure on Fannie Mae to lower standards “to expand loans among low and moderate income people.”

Wallison gave a eulogy at a memorial service for Don Regan in June 2003.[2]

Wallison’s writing on the cause of the Financial crisis of 2007–08 have brought much comment. In December, 2011, the New York Times financial columnist Joe Nocera stated that Wallison had “almost single-handedly created the myth that Fannie Mae and Freddie Maccaused the financial crisis.” [11] Calling it “a big lie,” Nocera suggested that Wallison had engaged in a deliberate deception. Economist Paul Krugman has also accused Wallison of deception,[12] criticizing him for—among other things—attacking Fannie and Freddie in a magazine article just a year before the subprime mortgage collapse for not doing a “better job of providing affordable home financing to a neglected portion of the mortgage market.” This neglected portion consisted of “African-American … Hispanic”, and “low-income borrowers”.[13][14][15] Wallison cites New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson exposing how “Democratic political operative Jim Johnson turned Fannie Mae into a political machine”, and dismisses the exoneration of the GSEs as “the big lie.”[16]

Memberships

Writings

“Elitist Protection Consumers Don’t Need”The Washington Post. 2009-07-13. Retrieved 2009-07-14.
“Obama Voted ‘Present’ on Mortgage Reform. The only banking ‘deregulation’ in recent years was that of Fan and Fred”Opinion Journal. 2008-10-15. Archived from the original on 2008-10-15. Retrieved 2008-01-30.
“How Paulson Would Save Fannie Mae”The Wall Street Journal. 2008-09-12. Archived from the original on 2008-09-14. Retrieved 2009-07-14.
“Reagan and McCain”American Spectator. 2008-01-08. Archived from the original on 2008-10-24. Retrieved 2008-01-30.
“What We Pre-Empted – Today’s world would be far worse if Saddam were still in power”Opinion JournalWall Street Journal. 2007-07-11. Retrieved 2008-01-30.
“Reagan, Iraq, and Neoconservatism”American Spectator. 2004-04-16. Archived from the original on 2008-10-23. Retrieved 2008-01-30.
“Bush’s Reagan Moment”The New York Times. 2003-10-26. Archived from the original on January 19, 2011. Retrieved 2009-07-13.

References

Story 2: Competition Lowers Prices and Provides Greater Choice and Quality — Net Neutrality Is Government Controlling, Licensing, Regulating, and Taxing of The Internet Including Prices and Content — Repeal Net Neutrality In December 2017 — Let Consumer Sovereignty with Free Enterprise Market Capitalism Reign –Videos

FCC chairman: Repealing net neutrality will benefit the market

How will rolling back net neutrality affect consumers? You’ll have to read the fine print.

What is Net Neutrality?

The Truth About Net Neutrality

Net Neutrality is Orwellian

The Truth About Net Neutrality

Net Neutrality Explained

Net Neutrality: What You Absolutely Need to Know and What No One’s Telling You

FCC’s Ajit Pai: Net Neutrality is a “Solution That Won’t Work to a Problem That Doesn’t Exist”

George Gilder: Net Neutrality Is a ‘Ludicrous’ Idea That Will Shrink the Economy

Two Minutes on Why Net Neutrality is Terrible – Mark Cuban Explains

Net Neutrality Neuters the Internet

Net Neutrality is a disaster. The better the name of the legislation the scarier it is.

The pitfalls of Title I versus II Net Neutrality and other oxymorons to fear ‒ Lionel

The Lies of Net Neutrality

Peter Klein: The Net Neutrality Lie

Net Neutrality Explained. Simply and Accurately!

The Truth About ‘Net Neutrality,’ The Left, And Google

I play in the intersection of law and technology.  Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

As soon as FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced his intention to roll back Obama’s net neutrality rules, the Left’s net neutrality faithful began chanting their well-worn mantras about “big corporations” taking over the internet. Their mantras are based on fear mongering, not fact.

Shutterstock

In their net neutrality fairy tale, internet service providers (ISPs) are the ‘big bad wolf,’ bent on creating paid ‘fast lanes’ and blocking the websites of entrepreneurs (who invariably work out of their garages). It sounds like a frightful tale, except that ISPs have never offered paid fast lanes or blocked small business owners’ web sites (run out of garages or otherwise). Meanwhile, the biggest baddest wolf the world has ever known — Google — swallowed the internet ecosystem whole and spit out its bones.

According to Democratic leaders in the Senate, net neutrality is the principle that “what you read, see or watch online shouldn’t be favored, blocked or slowed down based on where that content is coming from.” Google became the world’s largest corporation by trampling on this principle while the Left cheered (or turned a blind eye) .

For one, Google uses its monopoly position in internet search markets to systematically favor its own products in its search results. People might think that Google’s search service uses an objective algorithm that gives them the most relevant responses to their search inquiries. What really happens is that Google shows its own products in the most prominent positions on the screen in order to artificially divert traffic from rival services to Google’s own. As former Google designer Tristan Harris describes it, “if you control the menu, you control the choices.”

Second, Google uses its monopoly position in mobile operating systems (Android is dominant worldwide) to preserve and strengthen its dominance in general internet search and over consumer data collection by:

  • Forcing manufacturers to pre-install Google Search and Google’s Chrome browser and set Google Search as the default search service on their devices as a condition to licensing Google’s proprietary apps,
  • Blocking manufacturers from selling mobile devices that use competing operating systems that are based on Android’s supposedly “open source” code (like Amazon’s Kindle Fire), and
  • Giving financial incentives to manufacturers and mobile network operators on condition that they exclusively pre-install Google Search on their devices (a form of paid prioritization).

Google uses these tactics to ‘control the menu’ on the vast majority of the world’s mobile devices like Google controls the menu on its search products themselves.

Third, Google uses its dominant position in internet advertising to favor its own search and advertising services. A substantial portion of Google’s revenue from search advertising comes from a limited number of third-parties with whom Google has exclusive deals. For a decade, these deals required third-parties to:

  • Refuse to source search ads from Google’s competitors,
  • Take a minimum number of ads from Google and reserve premium space for Google search ads, and
  • Obtain approval from Google before making any changes to the display of competing search ads.

None of these Google practices are consistent with the Left’s net neutrality principles or fair competition. In 2012, staff at the Federal Trade Commission concluded that Google’s anticompetitive conduct had strengthened its monopolies and caused “real harm to consumers and to innovation” that “will have lasting negative effects on consumer welfare.” Yet the Obama administration decided to focus its energy on ISPs while letting Google run wild. Obama appointees at the FTC gave short shrift to the findings of the agency’s professional staff while the Obama-led Federal Communications Commission exempted Google’s monopolies from the current net neutrality rules.

The results were predictable: Google is now the largest company in the world and has unprecedented power to control what we read, see, or watch online. Rather than reign Google in, the net neutrality rules the Left wants to preserve have served to strengthen Google’s control over the media.

The current net neutrality debate is just “fighting the last war.” It’s time to have an honest conversation about today’s real internet monopolies and the future of a free media in this country.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/fredcampbell/2017/05/03/the-truth-about-net-neutrality-the-left-and-google/#40c2c6583745

Q&A-Explaining the fight over U.S. ‘net neutrality’ regulations

WASHINGTON, Nov 22 (Reuters) – The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is poised to vote on Dec. 14 to rescind the so-called net neutrality rules championed by former President Barack Obama.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal would repeal rules that bar internet service providers (ISPs) from blocking, slowing access to or charging more for certain content.

Here are some questions and answers about net neutrality and the FCC’s plans.

What is in the proposal and what happens next?

The FCC, an independent U.S. government agency that regulates interstate and international communications by radio, TV, wire, satellite and cable, has three Republican commissioners including Pai and two Democrats and is all but certain to approve Pai’s proposal. That would undo regulations put in place in 2015 at Democrat Obama’s urging that treat ISPs like public utilities to guarantee the open nature of the internet. It would also roll back the FCC’s significant oversight over the providers and their conduct.

Pai’s proposal would require ISPs to disclose if they allow content blocking, slowing though so-called throttling, or paid prioritization in which a third-party owner pays an ISP to have their content move more quickly. It would also eliminate the internet conduct standard that gives the FCC broad discretion to bar ISP practices it deems improper.

The new rules could into effect as early as January, although a court challenge is expected.

What does this mean for consumers?

Consumers could see changes, but any shift would likely take a long time. A major concern raised by consumer advocates is that ISPs could block or slow traffic to websites or services of their choosing, playing an outsized role in what users can and cannot access. Providers could also give preferential treatment to their own content or websites that pay extra fees, consumer advocates said.

ISPs could impede video streaming services and consumers’ ability to make free or inexpensive phone calls over the internet, advocates said.

The nonprofit Consumers Union said a repeal could lead to higher consumer prices for existing internet access and speeds. The telecommunications industry trade group USTelecom, which represents some leading ISPs, disputed that idea and said broadband prices in the United States had been trending downward before the Obama-era rules, and repealing the regulations would allow that to continue.

What businesses support the repeal?

ISPs including AT&amp;T Inc, Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications Inc favored a repeal.

USTelecom said Pai’s move would boost broadband network investment, expansion and upgrades. It said the 2015 rules applied utility-style regulations designed for the 1930s telephone system to ISPs but no other internet companies. It said repealing the rules would strengthen consumer protections by giving authority regarding the internet to a single U.S. regulator, the Federal Trade Commission.

What businesses oppose the repeal?

The Internet Association, representing major technology firms, had urged the FCC to retain the 2015 regulations. The group includes Google parent Alphabet Inc, Facebook Inc, Amazon.com Inc, video streaming service Netflix Inc, Microsoft Corp, ride-hailing company Uber, reviews business Yelp Inc, payments company PayPal Holdings Inc and others.

The group said the 2015 rules protect a “virtuous circle” of innovation that helps the broader U.S. economy as businesses turn to cloud-based technology. It added that Pai’s plan would subject startups to discrimination from ISP-owned or preferred content.

The group said paid prioritization would cause a “cable-ization” of the internet in which businesses that provide content, application or services would have to negotiate carriage deals on ISP networks.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuters/article-5109217/Q-A-Explaining-fight-U-S-net-neutrality-regulations.html#ixzz4zg9qbV1G

 

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The Pronk Pops Show 749, September 2, 2016, Story 1: Friday FBI Document Dump Redacted Pages Entirely Empty — Hillary Clinton’s Failing Memory and Selective Amnesia Regarding Her Criminal Activity — How Convenient — Unbelieable — Try To Remember — Time For Special Prosecutor — Videos — Story 2: Only 151,000 Nonfarm Payroll Jobs Created in August, Labor Participation Rate 62.8 Percent — Fed Will Most Likely Increase Federal Fund Rate Target By .25 Percent in September — Videos — Part 2: Story 3: Trump Game Changing Immigration Speech Will Resonate with American People — Trump Tells Truth Puts Hillary In Hell — Videos — Story 4: Reactions to Trump Speech Very Positive — Trump Poll Numbers Will Rise and Surpass Clinton Before First Debate — Videos

Posted on September 2, 2016. Filed under: 2016 Presidential Campaign, 2016 Presidential Candidates, American History, Benghazi, Blogroll, Breaking News, Coal, Communications, Constitutional Law, Countries, Crime, Currencies, Disasters, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Drugs, Economics, Education, Elections, Employment, European History, Fast and Furious, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Federal Government, Free Trade, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, High Crimes, Hillary Clinton, Hillary Clinton, History, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Drugs, Illegal Immigration, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Impeachment, Independence, Iran Nuclear Weapons Deal, Labor Economics, Law, Legal Drugs, Legal Immigration, Life, Lying, Media, Middle East, Monetary Policy, National Security Agency, Natural Gas, News, Obama, Oil, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, President Barack Obama, Progressives, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Resources, Scandals, Security, Success, Taxation, Taxes, Trade Policy, U.S. Dollar, United States of America, War, Wealth, Weapons, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 749: September 2, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 748: September 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 747: August 31, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 746: August 30, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 745: August 29, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 744: August 26, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 743: August 25, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 742: August 24, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 741: August 23, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 740: August 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 739: August 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 738: August 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 737: August 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 736: August 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 735: August 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 734: August 11, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 733: August 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 732: August 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 731: August 4, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 730: August 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 729: August 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 728: July 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 727: July 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 726: July 27, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 724: July 25, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 719: July 18, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 714: July 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 713: July 6, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 710: June 30, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 709: June 29, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 701: June 17, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 699: June 15, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 693: June 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 692: June 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 691: June 2, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 690: June 1, 2016

 

Story 1: Friday FBI Document Dump Redacted Pages Entirely Empty — Hillary Clinton’s Failing Memory and Selective Amnesia Regarding Her Criminal Activity — How Convenient — Unbelievable — Try To Remember — Time For Special Prosecutor — Videos

Hillary ‘Couldn’t Recall’ Training About Handling Classified Info

Try To Remember — Andy Williams

FBI releases documents in Clinton email probe

FBI releases documents in Clinton email investigation

Hillary Now The Most Unpopular Democratic Nominee In History!

FBI DISCOVERS 15,000 NEW EMAILS Hillary didn’t disclose to State Dept!!

Donald Trump calls for special prosecutor for Clinton Foundation

161 FBI Director James Comey make a statement About Hillary Clinton Investigation

LOCK HER UP !! • TREY GOWDY VS HILLARY CLINTON • FBI LIES

CBS: Trump call for special prosecutor ‘strikes fear’ in hearts of Clinton allies

Story 2: Only 151,000 Non-farm Payroll Jobs Created in August, Labor Participation Rate 62.8 Percent — Fed Will Most Likely Increase Fed Fund Rate By .25 Percent in September — Videos

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

Gross: Sept. Fed Move ‘Close to 100%’ After Jobs Report

August jobs report disappoints

Doug Butler on NECN September 2 2016

Peter Schiff Strong Jobs Report More Politics Than Economics

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed until                  USDL-16-1771
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, September 2, 2016

Technical information:
 Household data:      (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:  (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:	(202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                         THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- AUGUST 2016


Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 151,000 in August, and the unemployment
rate remained at 4.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.
Employment continued to trend up in several service-providing industries.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons was essentially unchanged at 7.8 million in August, and
the unemployment rate was 4.9 percent for the third month in a row. Both measures have
shown little movement over the year, on net. (See table A-1.) 

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (4.5 percent),
adult women (4.5 percent), teenagers (15.7 percent), Whites (4.4 percent), 
Blacks (8.1 percent), Asians (4.2 percent), and Hispanics (5.6 percent) showed 
little change in August. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially
unchanged at 2.0 million in August. These individuals accounted for 26.1 percent of the
unemployed. (See table A-12.)

Both the labor force participation rate, at 62.8 percent, and the employment-population
ratio, at 59.7 percent, were unchanged in August. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to
as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 6.1 million in August. These
individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time
because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time
job. (See table A-8.)

In August, 1.7 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, about the
same as a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were
not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job
sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had
not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 576,000 discouraged workers in August, little
different from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged
workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are
available for them. The remaining 1.1 million persons marginally attached to the labor
force in August had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or
family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 151,000 in August, compared with an average
monthly gain of 204,000 over the prior 12 months. Employment continued to trend up in
several service-providing industries. (See table B-1.)

Employment in food services and drinking places continued to trend up over the month
(+34,000). Over the year, the industry has added 312,000 jobs.

Social assistance added 22,000 jobs over the month, with most of the growth in individual
and family services (+17,000).

In August, employment in professional and technical services edged up (+20,000), about
in line with its average monthly gain over the prior 12 months (+24,000).

Financial activities employment continued on an upward trend in August (+15,000), with
a gain in securities, commodity contracts, and investments (+6,000). Over the year,
financial activities has added 167,000 jobs.

Health care employment continued to trend up in August (+14,000), but at a slower pace
than the average monthly gain over the prior 12 months (+39,000). In August, hospitals
added 11,000 jobs, and employment in ambulatory health care services trended up
(+13,000). A job loss in nursing and residential care facilities (-9,000) offset a
gain in July.

Employment in mining continued to trend down in August (-4,000). Since reaching a peak
in September 2014, employment in mining has declined by 223,000, with losses concentrated
in support activities for mining.

Employment in several other industries--including construction, manufacturing, wholesale
trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, temporary help services, and
government--changed little over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour
to 34.3 hours in August. In manufacturing, the workweek declined by 0.2 hour to 40.6
hours, while overtime was unchanged at 3.3 hours. The average workweek for production and
nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour to 33.6 hours.
(See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In August, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by
3 cents to $25.73. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 2.4 percent.
Average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees
increased by 4 cents to $21.64 in August. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for June was revised down from +292,000 to
+271,000, and the change for July was revised up from +255,000 to +275,000. With these
revisions, employment gains in June and July combined were 1,000 less than previously
reported. Over the past 3 months, job gains have averaged 232,000 per month.

_____________
The Employment Situation for September is scheduled to be released on Friday,
October 7, 2016, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



 

 

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Aug.
2015
June
2016
July
2016
Aug.
2016
Change from:
July
2016-
Aug.
2016

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

251,096 253,397 253,620 253,854 234

Civilian labor force

157,061 158,880 159,287 159,463 176

Participation rate

62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 0.0

Employed

149,043 151,097 151,517 151,614 97

Employment-population ratio

59.4 59.6 59.7 59.7 0.0

Unemployed

8,018 7,783 7,770 7,849 79

Unemployment rate

5.1 4.9 4.9 4.9 0.0

Not in labor force

94,035 94,517 94,333 94,391 58

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

5.1 4.9 4.9 4.9 0.0

Adult men (20 years and over)

4.7 4.5 4.6 4.5 -0.1

Adult women (20 years and over)

4.7 4.5 4.3 4.5 0.2

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

16.8 16.0 15.6 15.7 0.1

White

4.4 4.4 4.3 4.4 0.1

Black or African American

9.4 8.6 8.4 8.1 -0.3

Asian

3.5 3.5 3.8 4.2 0.4

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

6.6 5.8 5.4 5.6 0.2

Total, 25 years and over

4.2 4.0 4.0 4.1 0.1

Less than a high school diploma

7.7 7.5 6.3 7.2 0.9

High school graduates, no college

5.5 5.0 5.0 5.1 0.1

Some college or associate degree

4.4 4.2 4.3 4.3 0.0

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.5 2.5 2.5 2.7 0.2

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

4,014 3,776 3,739 3,791 52

Job leavers

787 828 824 885 61

Reentrants

2,344 2,268 2,298 2,271 -27

New entrants

846 902 826 861 35

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,106 2,418 2,160 2,290 130

5 to 14 weeks

2,354 2,140 2,266 2,329 63

15 to 26 weeks

1,254 1,129 1,150 1,056 -94

27 weeks and over

2,189 1,979 2,020 2,006 -14

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

6,481 5,843 5,940 6,053 113

Slack work or business conditions

3,826 3,443 3,642 3,727 85

Could only find part-time work

2,229 2,062 1,981 1,929 -52

Part time for noneconomic reasons

19,772 20,505 20,717 20,523 -194

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,812 1,779 1,950 1,713

Discouraged workers

624 502 591 576

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Aug.
2015
June
2016
July
2016(p)
Aug.
2016(p)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

150 271 275 151

Total private

123 238 225 126

Goods-producing

-23 -5 11 -24

Mining and logging

-9 -7 -6 -4

Construction

4 -6 11 -6

Manufacturing

-18 8 6 -14

Durable goods(1)

-6 -5 4 -16

Motor vehicles and parts

6.1 -3.0 5.3 -5.6

Nondurable goods

-12 13 2 2

Private service-providing

146 243 214 150

Wholesale trade

3.4 1.3 1.4 3.9

Retail trade

3.9 22.2 11.1 15.1

Transportation and warehousing

5.7 -6.5 15.1 14.9

Utilities

1.2 2.2 0.5 -0.8

Information

-3 41 -4 4

Financial activities

13 17 19 15

Professional and business services(1)

35 48 80