The Pronk Pops Show 1225, March 19, 2019, Story 1: Send in The Clowns — Theme Song of Radical Extremist Democrat Socialists Running For President in 2020 or Lying Lunatic Leftist Losers — There Already Here — Maybe Next Year –Videos

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Pronk Pops Show 1218 March 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1217 February 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1216 February 26, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1205 February 11, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1203 February 7, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1195 January 17, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1191 December 19, 2018

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Story 1: Send in The Clowns — Theme Song of Radical Extremist Democrat Socialists (REDS with Red Old Deal aka Green New Deal –Running For President in 2020 or Lying Lunatic Leftist Losers — There Already Here — Maybe Next Year –Videos

Judy Collins Send in the Clowns

Send in the Clowns

Isn’t it rich?
Are we a pair?
Me here at last on the ground,
You in mid-air,
Where are the clowns?
Isn’t it bliss?
Don’t you approve?
One who keeps tearing around,
One who can’t move,
Where are the clowns?
There ought to be clowns?
Just when I’d stopped opening doors,
Finally knowing the one that I wanted was yours
Making my entrance again with my usual flair
Sure of my lines
No one is there
Don’t you love farce?
My fault, I fear
I thought that you’d want what I want
Sorry, my dear!
But where are the clowns
Send in the clowns
Don’t bother, they’re here
Isn’t it rich?
Isn’t it queer?
Losing my timing this late in my career
But where are the clowns?
There ought to be clowns
Well, maybe next year
Songwriters: Stephen Sondheim
Send in the Clowns lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc

Alysia – Send in the clowns (with movie)

Dame Judi Dench sings “Send in the Clowns” – BBC Proms 2010

Send in the Clowns

Jerry Lewis – Send In The Clowns Skit With Donny & Marie Osmond

Thelma & Louise” – Ending Scene HD

Critics mock Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal rollout

Judy Collins

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Judy Collins
Judy Collins by Bryan Ledgard 2 (cropped).jpg

Collins at the Cambridge Folk Festival, 2008
Background information
Birth name Judith Marjorie Collins
Born May 1, 1939 (age 79)
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Origin DenverColorado, U.S.
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Singer
  • songwriter
  • musician
  • actress
Instruments
Years active 1959–present
Labels
Associated acts
Website judycollins.com

Collins during a 1963 appearance on Hootenanny

Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter known for her eclectic tastes in the material she records (which has included folk musicshow tunespop musicrock and roll and standards) and for her social activism.

Collins’ debut album A Maid of Constant Sorrow was released in 1961, but it was the lead single from her 1967 album Wildflowers, “Both Sides, Now” — written by Joni Mitchell — that gave Collins international prominence. The single hit the Top 10 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart[2] and won Collins her first Grammy Award for Best Folk Performance.[3] She enjoyed further success with her recordings of “Someday Soon“, “Chelsea Morning“, “Amazing Grace“, and “Cook with Honey”.

Collins experienced the biggest success of her career with her recording of Stephen Sondheim‘s “Send in the Clowns” from her best-selling 1975 album Judith. The single charted on the Billboard Pop Singles chart in 1975 and then again in 1977, spending 27 non-consecutive weeks on the chart and earning Collins a Grammy Award nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, as well as a Grammy Award for Sondheim for Song of the Year.

 

Musical career

Collins was born the eldest of five siblings in Seattle, Washington, where she spent the first ten years of her life. Her father, a blind singer, pianist and radio show host, took a job in Denver, Colorado, in 1949, and the family moved there. Collins studied classical piano with Antonia Brico, making her public debut at age 13, performing Mozart’s Concerto for Two Pianos. Brico took a dim view, both then and later, of Collins’ developing interest in folk music, which led her to the difficult decision to discontinue her piano lessons. Years later, after she became known internationally, she invited Brico to one of her concerts in Denver. When they met after the performance, Brico took both of Collins’ hands into hers, looked wistfully at her fingers and said, “Little Judy—you really could have gone places.” Still later, Collins discovered that Brico herself had made a living when she was younger playing jazz and ragtime piano (Singing Lessons, pp. 71–72). In her early life, Collins had the good fortune of meeting many professional musicians through her father.[4]

It was the music of Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger and the traditional songs of the folk revival of the early 1960s, however, that kindled Collins’ interest and awoke in her a love of lyrics. Three years after her debut as a piano prodigy, she was playing guitar. Her first public appearances as a folk artist after her graduation from Denver’s East High School were at Michael’s Pub in Boulder, Colorado, and the folk club Exodus in Denver. Her music became popular at the University of Connecticut, where her husband taught. She performed at parties and for the campus radio station along with David Grisman and Tom Azarian.[5] She eventually made her way to Greenwich Village, New York City, where she played in clubs like Gerde’s Folk City until she signed with Elektra Records, a label she was associated with for 35 years. In 1961, Collins released her first album, A Maid of Constant Sorrow, at age 22.[6]

At first she sang traditional folk songs or songs written by others – in particular the protest songwriters of the time, such as Tom PaxtonPhil Ochs, and Bob Dylan. She recorded her own versions of important songs from the period, such as Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man” and Pete Seeger‘s “Turn, Turn, Turn“. Collins was also instrumental in bringing little-known musicians to a wider public. For example, she recorded songs by Canadian poet Leonard Cohen, who became a close friend over the years. She also recorded songs by singer-songwriters such as Eric AndersenFred NeilIan TysonJoni MitchellRandy NewmanRobin Williamson and Richard Fariña long before they gained national acclaim.[7][8]

While Collins’ first few albums consisted of straightforward guitar-based folk songs, with 1966’s In My Life, she began branching out and including work from such diverse sources as the BeatlesLeonard CohenJacques Brel, and Kurt Weill.[8] Mark Abramson produced and Joshua Rifkin arranged the album, adding lush orchestration to many of the numbers. The album was a major departure for a folk artist and set the course for Collins’ subsequent work over the next decade.[9]

With her 1967 album Wildflowers, also produced by Abramson and arranged by Rifkin, Collins began to record her own compositions, beginning with “Since You’ve Asked”. The album also provided Collins with a major hit and a Grammy award in Mitchell’s “Both Sides, Now“, which reached Number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100.[10] Two songs (“Who Knows Where The Time Goes” and “Albatross”) were featured in the 1968 film “The Subject Was Roses“).

Collins performing on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, 1968

Collins’ 1968 album Who Knows Where the Time Goes was produced by David Anderle, and featured back-up guitar by Stephen Stills (of Crosby, Stills & Nash), with whom she was romantically involved at the time. (She was the inspiration for Stills’s CSN classic “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes“.) Time Goes had a mellow country sound and included Ian Tyson‘s “Someday Soon” and the title track, written by the UK singer-songwriter Sandy Denny. The album also featured Collins’ composition “My Father” and one of the first covers of Leonard Cohen’s “Bird on the Wire“.[11]

By the 1970s Collins had a solid reputation as an art song singer and folksinger and had begun to stand out for her own compositions. She was also known for her broad range of material: her songs from this period include the traditional Christian hymn “Amazing Grace“, the Stephen Sondheim Broadway ballad “Send in the Clowns” (both of which were top 20 hits as singles), a recording of Joan Baez‘s “A Song for David“, and her own compositions, such as “Born to the Breed”.[12]

Collins guest starred on The Muppet Show in an episode broadcast in January 1978,[13] singing “Leather-Winged Bat”, “I Know An Old Lady who Swallowed a Fly”, “Do Re Mi”, and “Send in the Clowns”. She also appeared several times on Sesame Street, where she performed “Fishermen’s Song” with a chorus of Anything Muppet fishermen, sang a trio with Biff and Sully using the word “yes”, and even starred in a modern musical fairy tale skit called “The Sad Princess”.[14] She sang the music for the 1983 animated special The Magic of Herself the Elf, as well as the theme song of the Rankin-Bass TV movie The Wind in the Willows.[15] Collins’ 1979 album Hard Times for Lovers gained some extra publicity with the cover sleeve photograph of Collins in the nude.

In 1990, Collins released the album Fires of Eden under Columbia Records. The album spawned one single – “Fires of Eden”, written by Kit Hain and Mark Goldenberg. The single peaked at #31 on Billboard‘s Adult Contemporary chart. At the time of its release, Collins performed the song live on several occasions, including on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and The Joan Rivers Show. A music video promoting the song and featuring Collins was also released.[16]Later, Cher recorded “Fires of Eden” for her 1991 album Love Hurts. Other memorable songs from Collins’ Fires of Eden include “The Blizzard”, “Home Before Dark” and a cover of The Hollies song – “The Air That I Breathe“.

Collins at a book signing in 1995

Collins first memoir, Trust Your Heart, was published in 1987 and a novel, Shameless, followed in 1995. A second memoir, Sanity and Grace (2003), recounts the death of her son Clark in January 1992. With help from her manager Katherine DePaul she founded Wildflower Records. Though her record sales are not what they once were, she still records and tours in the U.S., Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. She performed at President Bill Clinton‘s first inauguration in 1993, singing “Amazing Grace” and “Chelsea Morning“. (The Clintons have stated that they named their daughter, Chelsea, after Collins’ recording of the song.) In 2006, she sang “This Little Light of Mine” in a commercial for Eliot Spitzer.[17]

Various artists including Shawn ColvinRufus Wainwright and Chrissie Hynde covered her compositions for the tribute album Born to the Breed in 2008.[18] In the same year, Collins released her own covers collection of Beatles songs, and she received an honorary doctorate from Pratt Institute on May 18. In 2010, Collins sang “The Weight of the World” at the Newport Folk Festival, a song by Amy Speace.[19]

Collins joined the judging panel for The 7th, 9th, 10th,[20][21] 11th,[22] 12th, 13th and 14th Annual Independent Music Awards, and in doing so, greatly assisted independent musicians’ careers.

In July 2012, Collins appeared as a guest artist on the Australian SBS television programme RocKwiz.[23]

Activism

Like many other folk singers of her generation, Collins was drawn to social activism. Her political idealism also led her to compose a ballad entitled “Che” in honor of the 1960s Marxist icon Che Guevara.[24]

Collins sympathized with the Yippie movement and was friendly with its leaders, Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin. On March 17, 1968, she attended Hoffman’s press conference at the Americana Hotel in New York to announce the party’s formation. In 1969, she testified in Chicago in support of the Chicago Seven; during her testimony, she began singing Pete Seeger’s “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” and was admonished by prosecutor Tom Foran and judge Julius Hoffman.[25]

Collins wrote the anti-gun song “Shoot First” which she released in 1984.[26]

In the late 1990s, she was a representative for UNICEF and campaigns on behalf of the abolition of landmines.[27]

Later songs include “River of Gold” about the environment and “My Name Is Maria” about dreamers.[28]

Personal life

Collins contracted polio at the age of eleven and spent two months in isolation in a hospital.[29]

Collins has been married twice. Her first marriage in 1958 to Peter Taylor produced her only child, Clark C. Taylor, born the same year. The marriage ended in divorce in 1965.[30]

In 1962, shortly after her debut at Carnegie Hall, Collins was diagnosed with tuberculosis and spent six months recuperating in a sanatorium.[31]

Collins is the subject of the Stephen Stills composition “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes“, which appeared on the 1969 eponymous debut album of Crosby, Stills & Nash.

Collins later admitted having suffered from bulimia after she quit smoking in the 1970s. “I went straight from the cigarettes into an eating disorder“, she told People magazine in 1992. “I started throwing up. I didn’t know anything about bulimia, certainly not that it is an addiction or that it would get worse. My feelings about myself, even though I had been able to give up smoking and lose 20 lbs., were of increasing despair.” She has written at length of her years of addiction to alcohol, the damage it did to her personal and musical life and how it contributed to her feelings of depression.[32] Collins admits that although she tried other drugs in the 1960s, alcohol had always been her drug of first choice, just as it had been for her father. She entered a rehabilitation program in Pennsylvania in 1978 and has maintained her sobriety ever since, even through such traumatic events as the death of her only child, Clark, who committed suicide in 1992 at age 33 after a long bout with clinical depression and substance abuse. Since his death, she has also become an activist for suicide prevention.[33]

In April 1996, she married designer Louis Nelson, whom she had been seeing since April 1978. They live in Manhattan in New York City.[34]

Awards and recognition

Collins has received four Grammy Award nominations for Best Folk Performance or Folk Recording, one for Best Folk Album and one for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

Stephen Sondheim won the 1976 Grammy Award for Song of the Year based on the popularity of Collins’ performance of “Send In The Clowns” on her album Judith. (The song was named “Song of the Year”.[41])

Other awards

Discography

Charted singles

Year Song US US AC AUS Album
1967 “Hard Lovin’ Loser” 97 In My Life
1968 Both Sides, Now 8 3 37 Wildflowers
1969 Someday Soon 55 37 Who Knows Where the Time Goes
Chelsea Morning 78 25 (single only)
Turn! Turn! Turn!/To Everything There Is A Season 69 28 Recollections
1970 “Amazing Grace” 15 5 10 Whales & Nightingales
1971 “Open The Door (Song For Judith)” 90 23 Living
1973 “Cook With Honey” 32 10 True Stories and Other Dreams
“Secret Gardens” 122 True Stories and Other Dreams
1975 “Send in the Clowns” 36 8 13 Judith
1977 “Send in the Clowns” (re-release) 19 15 Judith
1979 “Hard Times For Lovers” 66 16 Hard Times for Lovers
1984 “Home Again” (duet with T. G. Sheppard) 42 Home Again
1990 “Fires of Eden” 31 Fires of Eden

Filmography

  • Baby’s Bedtime (1992)
  • Baby’s Morningtime (1992)
  • Junior (1994), as the operator of a spa for pregnant women
  • Christmas at the Biltmore Estate (1998)
  • A Town Has Turned to Dust (1998; a telefilm based on a Rod Serling science-fiction story)
  • The Best of Judy Collins (1999)
  • Intimate Portrait: Judy Collins (2000)
  • Judy Collins Live at Wolf Trap (2003)
  • Wildflower Festival (2003) (DVD with guest artists Eric AndersenArlo Guthrie, and Tom Rush)
  • Girls (TV, 2013), series 2, episode 8: “It’s Back”
  • Danny Says (2016)

Bibliography

  • Trust Your Heart (1987)
  • Amazing Grace (1991)
  • Shameless (1995)
  • Singing Lessons (1998)
  • Sanity and Grace: A Journey of Suicide, Survival and Strength (2003)
  • The Seven T’s: Finding Hope and Healing in the Wake of Tragedy (2007)
  • Sweet Judy Blue Eyes: My Life in Music (2011) ISBN 0-307-71734-8 OCLC 699763852

RIAA certifications

Album title Certification[46]
In My Life Gold
Wildflowers Gold
Who Knows Where the Time Goes Gold
Whales & Nightingales Gold
Colors of the Day Platinum
Judith Platinum

See also

References

  1. ^ William Ruhlmann “Judy Collins – Discography”“AllMusic.com” Retrieved Oct. 30, 2017.
  2. ^ “Judy Collins – Chart history”. Billboard. Retrieved 2015-07-30.
  3. ^ “Bio Synopsis”. Biograsphy.com. Retrieved 2015-07-31.
  4. ^ Malkoski, Paul A. (2012). The Denver Folk Music Tradition: An Unplugged History, from Harry Tuft to Swallow Hill and Beyond. The History Press. p. 52. ISBN 978-1609495329.
  5. ^ Time “Striking a Chord” Accessed April 12, 2008
  6. ^ “Reviews of new albums”. Billboard. November 27, 1961. p. 28.
  7. ^ Simmons, Sylvie (2012). I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen. McClelland & Stewart. ISBN 978-0771080401.
  8. Jump up to:a b Courrier, Kevin (2005). Randy Newman: American Dreams. ECW Press. pp. 65–66. ISBN 978-1550226904.
  9. ^ In My Life review at AllMusic. Retrieved March 16, 2013.
  10. ^ “Judy Collins”Billboard. Retrieved 2013-03-16.
  11. ^ “Judy Collins Concert: Has Fans Gentle on Her Mind”. Billboard. May 24, 1969. p. 22.
  12. ^ Santosuosso, Ernie (May 11, 1975). “Judy Collins’ flight of fancy”. Boston Globe.
  13. ^ Garlen, Jennifer C.; Graham, Anissa M. (2009). Kermit Culture: Critical Perspectives on Jim Henson’s Muppets. McFarland & Company. p. 218. ISBN 978-0786442591.
  14. ^ Ann, Lolordo (August 13, 1977). “Judy Collins changing styles”. Lodi News-Sentinel.
  15. ^ Woolery, George W. (1989). Animated TV Specials. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810821989.
  16. ^ Judy Collins – Fires of Eden (music video) on Dailymotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6c2f5
  17. ^ Clark, Eric (October 12, 2008). “After spinning others’ songs into gold, Judy Collins gets tribute album of her own works”. Gazette, The (Cedar Rapids-Iowa City, IA).
  18. ^ “Basking in the Afterglow of a Tribute Album” by John Soeder, Cleveland Plain Dealer, June 24, 2009.
  19. ^ “Amy Speace on Mountain Stage”. NPR Music. August 12, 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-26Judy Collins, who chose Speace as the first artist on her Wildflower label, has been singing her song “The Weight of the World” at prominent venues of late, including the 50th anniversary of the Newport Folk Festival and the Isle of Wight.
  20. ^ “Independent Music Awards”. Independent Music Awards. September 23, 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-13.
  21. ^ “Top40-Charts.com”. Top40-Charts.com. Retrieved 2010-10-13.
  22. ^ “11th Annual IMA Judges. Independent Music Awards. Retrieved on September 4, 2013.
  23. ^ Blundell, Graeme. “Bang a gong as Rockwiz turns 10”. The Australian. Retrieved March 16, 2013.
  24. ^ Collins doesn’t rest on laurels but looks for songs’ surprisesArchived June 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine by John Soeder, Cleveland Plain Dealer, June 26, 2009
  25. ^ “Testimony of Judy Collins in the Chicago Seven Trial”. Law.umkc.edu. August 19, 1968. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010. Retrieved September 8, 2010.
  26. ^ “Shoot First”.
  27. ^ Brozan, Nadine (July 9, 1996). “Chronicle”The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-08-01.Roos, John (January 26, 1996). “Taking a Novel Approach; A Grieving Judy Collins Finds Writing a Book Helps the Healing Process”Los Angeles Times. p. 30. Retrieved 2008-08-01.
  28. ^ “Stills & Collins bring decades of activism to Revolution Hall”.
  29. ^ Interview by Wendy Schuman (February 17, 2011). “Judy Collins tells Beliefnet how she used meditation and prayer to cope with illness and her son’s suicide”. Beliefnet.com. Retrieved 2012-10-16.
  30. ^ “Biography for Judy Collins”. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 2009-02-24.
  31. ^ Judy Collins (October 1998). Singing lessons: a memoir of love, loss, hope, and healing. Simon and Schuster. p. 127. ISBN 978-0-671-00397-5. Retrieved November 16, 2010.
  32. ^ Judy Collins (October 1998). Singing lessons: a memoir of love, loss, hope, and healing. Simon and Schuster. pp. 172–190, 238–240. ISBN 978-0-671-00397-5. Retrieved November 16,2010.
  33. ^ Hellmich, Nanci (June 18, 2007). “Son’s suicide prodded Collins to write”. USA Today. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  34. ^ Brady, Louis Smith (April 21, 1996). “Weddings: Vows; Judy Collins, Louis Nelson”The New York Times. Retrieved February 24, 2009.
  35. ^ “Grammy Award Nominees 1964 – Grammy Award Winners 1964”. Awardsandshows.com. May 12, 1964. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  36. ^ “Grammy Award Nominees 1968 – Grammy Award Winners 1968”. Awardsandshows.com. February 29, 1968. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  37. ^ “Grammy Awards Nominees 1969 – Grammy Award Winners 1969”. Awardsandshows.com. March 12, 1969. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  38. ^ “Grammy Award Ceremony 1970 – Grammy Award Winners 1970”. Awardsandshows.com. March 11, 1979. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  39. ^ “Grammy Award Nominees 1976 – Grammy Award Winners 1976”. Awardsandshows.com. February 28, 1976. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  40. ^ Barker, Andrew (February 8, 2017). “Judy Collins Talks Her First Grammy Nomination in 40 Years: ‘I’ve Been Working All This TimeVariety.com. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  41. ^ “Send in the Collins”. Times Press Recorder. Retrieved March 16, 2013.
  42. ^ “Judy Collins : Awards”. IMDb.com. Retrieved July 31, 2015.
  43. ^ “BBC – Press Office – 10th Radio 2 Folk Awards”.
  44. ^ “National Recording Registry Picks Are “Over the RainbowLibrary of Congress. March 29, 2016. Retrieved March 29, 2016.
  45. ^ “Collins Archives – Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame”Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  46. ^ “American album certifications – Judy Collins”Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH. 

External links

Beto O’Rourke has become problematic.

O’Rourke was 2018’s progressive golden boy, with record breaking small-dollar fundraising, a viral defense of kneeling NFL players, and the love of Richard Linklater. His merch littered the enclaves of liberal America. From Coachella to Crown Heights, you were more likely to see a Beto tee or yard sign than you were many of the local pols. He wowed Ellen and Oprah and was every Gen X lefty magazine writer’s favorite subject.

The grassroots enthusiasm that resulted from this national fame and an opponent the left found nothing short of vampiric jolted his campaigns well past what most political prognosticators thought possible in Texas. But of course didn’t get him enough votes to actually win. So as the calendar turned to 2019, without a Cruzian foil, the prog-cognoscenti began to turn on their toe-headed boy.

As Jonathan Chait observed, if America was going to get its first socialist president, the Bernie bros were going to have to crush Beto.

The aspirational socialists and the intersectional liberals suddenly found themselves in league against a common enemy: a white male capitalist who once took a road-trip with a . . . Republican. So when Beto formally announced his campaign last week, what he may not have realized is that he was firing the first presidential shot in the left’s internecine Woke Wars. And in this battle he is on the wrong side of some of the very people who were his base in 2018: center-left journalists and power twitter users.


Not only have these social media influencers cooled to Betomania 2.0, but many turned out to be actively hostile, treating him more along the line of how they handle conservatives.

The first salvo was fired by a CNN reporter back in January who knocked him for using his “white male privilege” in spending a few weeks traveling through rural America while attempting to have actual conversations with voters. The premise of her article was that a woman with kids would never be given the latitude to take a similar listening vision quest. The New York Times echoed this take arguing that a fictional “Betsy O’Rourke’s” road trip would have not gotten the same gauzy treatment. The Daily Beast wrote on the “unbearable male privilege” of Beto’s road-trip, citing the “collective eye roll” a woman would receive for such a stunt. These arguments were corrected by a progressive podcast host, who said the authors misidentified the privilege as male when it was, in reality, “dripping with ruling class privilege.”

What was weird about these criticisms is that just about everyone did pretty much roll their eyes at Beto’s Excellent Adventure. It’s not clear that Beto’s listening tour was any better received than Hillary Clinton’s great “Scooby van” road trip of 2015, and I’d argue the reviews were markedly worse. And it wasn’t just the media reaction. Democratic primary voters seemed either turned off by Brooding Beto, or more excited by the launches of other candidates. Beto’s road trip coincided with a noticeable drop in polls of both activists and all Democratic voters— from about 13 percent to 5 percent on average. So the special status that the left was so worked up about didn’t really seem to exist in the first place.

Which gets to the core of one of Beto’s political problem in the primary: If he rises in the polls, it’s evidence of his privilege. Yet since his privilege is already baked in, a drop in the polls doesn’t dispel the critique. For Beto, the privilege attack is non-falsifiable.

Notice how the privilege war drums continued to bang against Mr. 5 Percent when he announced his campaign last week with a Vanity Fair cover shot that, by the by, certainly didn’t help dispel the critique. (Note to candidates: I can tell you from experience, skip the Liebovitz photo shoot, it’s a trap.)

The New York Times wrote a story—not an opinion piece, but a news article about the fact that Beto’s wife Amy didn’t speak in the campaign’s announcement video, a degrading critique that was similar to the one Donald Trump leveled against Ghazala Khan following her husband’s convention speech. The reporter wrote that Beto was “appearing to revel in his advantages as a white male” and pegged this claim to five tweets by left-wing twitter users, including one who explained that her view was that Beto “sucks shit.” (Incidentally, Amy was a frequent surrogate in Beto’s 2018 campaign and did give an interview to the Vanity Fair reporter, pushing back against these attacks.)

A Huffington Post reporter and MSNBC host tweeted that Beto’s claim that he’s “born to be in it”—which was either a brutal troll by the Vanity Fair cover artist or the most unaware part of their mash note—was something that Hillary Clinton couldn’t say. The Atlantic—also citing Beto’s privilege—said that he “launched his campaign like Trump.” It’s unclear how this analogy could possibly hold: Trump announced his campaign in front of a crowd of actors paid to show up to create the illusion of support and then delivered a bigoted stream-of-consciousness speech memorable mostly for its incoherence and claim that Mexico was sending rapists to America.

Politico summed up the Beto launch with an article citing the backlash to the Vanity Fair article and arguing that Elizabeth Warren wouldn’t get such treatment.

I can hear all the Republican flaks laughing over a drink at Bobby Van’s now: Welcome to the club, fella!


The same members of the media and the liberal twitter elite who did not find Beto’s privilege to be particularly problematic when he was trying to defeat a Hispanic Republican have suddenly discovered it now that he is challenging their ideological or identitarian preferences. And it’s hard to see a way out.

As his campaign progressed in Iowa over the weekend, Beto chose to kneel before the social(ist) justice warriors demands. First he slightly walked back his endorsement of capitalism, saying that while he is still a capitalist, he recognizes that it is a racist system.

And then he apologized for a joke that was offensive mostly in how hackneyed it was about how his wife has been raising their three kids, “sometimes with his help.”

“Not only will I not say that again, but I’ll be more thoughtful going forward in the way that I talk about our marriage, and also the way in which I acknowledge the truth of the criticism that I have enjoyed white privilege,” he said.

Beto’s political problem is that these apologias to the social justice left, earnest or not, will only reinforce the fact that there are intersectional candidates who offer the same message he does without the non-sectional baggage.

The question is, does this segment of the left and the media, which carries outsized influence in “The Narrative” have that much influence in elections? The best thing Beto has going for him is that there’s some evidence that they don’t. And that rank and file Democrats don’t actually care that much about the policing being done by the Very Online Left.

In 2018, for example, it seemed the only Democrat on Twitter who supported Andrew Cuomo was his feisty spokesperson—and my former sparring partner—Lis Smith. And yet Cuomo beat Cynthia Nixon by 30 points. Heck, he even carried Brooklyn by 24. Just yesterday, Beto announced that he brought in $6.1 million in the first 24 hours of his campaign—edging out Bernie for the out-of-the-gate fundraising lead. So at least 100,000 Democrats decided they didn’t care that much about lefty Twitter outrage.

At the end of the day, what matters in high-stakes political races is so simple and elemental that it’s amazing anyone ever loses sight of it: Does the candidate have the magic? Are they offering what voters are looking for in a given moment?

This is a question that is answered, at scale, in the real world. Not on Twitter, or the Mary Sue, or even in the pages of the Huffington Post. If a broad cross-section of Democrats like Beto, then he will be a tough out. If they don’t, his campaign will flame out.

Whatever the result of the Battle of Beto, the last few months have been an indication that the left’s woke wars are deeply pernicious and are in some ways undermining the progress being made in addressing the real structural advantages that white male candidates have enjoyed. That the social justice left will instead level these sorts of mindless, identitarian attacks even against an unequivocal ideological ally is discouraging because of what it signifies about what may be to come. For those attacks to be echoed so readily by mainstream news outlets is even more discouraging.

Because if the progressive hive mind can turn on Beto, then conservatives who appreciate the life-affirming parts of identity politics, want to champion diverse voices, and hope to find common ground with sensible liberals against the nationalist, white-grievance right are unlikely to be treated any better.

 

https://thebulwark.com/the-beto-woke-wars/

 

People want higher taxes on rich, better welfare – 21-country OECD survey

by Reuters
Tuesday, 19 March 2019 11:39 GMT

ABOUT OUR HUMANITARIAN COVERAGE

From major disaster, conflicts and under-reported stories, we shine a light on the world’s humanitarian hotspots

* More than half of people want higher taxes on the rich

* Survey finds discontent with welfare policies

* Majorities in favour of more government action

* Graphic: https://tmsnrt.rs/2OenwYL

By Leigh Thomas

PARIS, March 19 (Reuters) – A strong majority of people in wealthy countries want to tax the rich more and there is broad support for building up the welfare state in most countries, a survey conducted for the OECD showed on Tuesday.

In all of the 21 countries surveyed, more than half of those people polled said they were in favour when asked: “Should the government tax the rich more than they currently do in order to support the poor?” The OECD gave no definition of rich.

Higher taxation of the rich has emerged as a political lightning rod in many wealthy countries, with U.S Democrats proposing hikes and “yellow vest” protesters in France demanding the wealthy bear a bigger tax burden.

Support was highest in Portugal and Greece, both emerging from years of economic crisis, at nearly 80 percent compared with an average of 68 percent, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said.

The Paris-based forum’s survey of 22,000 people about perceived social and economic risks also found deep discontent with governments’ social welfare polices, which many people said were insufficient, the OECD said.

On average, only 20 percent said they could easily receive public benefits if needed while 56 percent thought it would be difficult to get benefits, the survey found.

People were on average particularly concerned about access to good quality, affordable long-term care for the elderly, housing and health services.

Not only did people say they were not getting their fair share given what they paid into the system, people in all countries except Canada, Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands did not think that their governments were heeding their views.

“These feelings spread across most social groups, and are not limited just to those deemed ‘left behind’,” the OECD said in an analysis of the survey’s results.

The feeling of injustice was even higher among the highly educated and high-income households, it added.

In light of the high level of discontent, a majority of people wanted their government to do more in all countries except France and Denmark, whose welfare systems are among the most generous in the world.

Most people said the top priority should be better pensions with 54 percent saying that would make them feel more economically secure.

Healthcare followed in second place at 48 percent while nearly 37 percent were in favour of a guaranteed basic income benefit, which has attracted international interest from policymakers but has yet to be tried at the national level.

(Reporting by Leigh Thomas; Editing by Richard Lough and Janet Lawrence)

http://news.trust.org/item/20190319112743-3136f

Green New Deal

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The Green New Deal (GND) is a set of proposed economic stimulus programs in the United States that aims to address climate change[1][2] and economic inequality.[3] The name refers to the New Deal, a set of social and economic reforms and public works projects undertaken by then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression.[4] The Green New Deal combines Roosevelt’s economic approach with modern ideas such as renewable energy and resource efficiency.[5][6]

In the 116th Congress, it is a pair of resolutions, H. Res. 109/ S. Res. 59, sponsored by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA).

History

Sustainable agriculture combined with renewable energy generation

An early use of the term “Green New Deal” was by journalist Thomas Friedman.[7] He argued in favor of the idea in two pieces that appeared in The New York Times and The New York Times Magazine.[8][9] In January 2007, Friedman wrote:

If you have put a windmill in your yard or some solar panels on your roof, bless your heart. But we will only green the world when we change the very nature of the electricity grid – moving it away from dirty coal or oil to clean coal and renewables. And that is a huge industrial project – much bigger than anyone has told you. Finally, like the New Deal, if we undertake the green version, it has the potential to create a whole new clean power industry to spur our economy into the 21st century.[9]

This approach was subsequently taken up by the Green New Deal Group,[10] which published its eponymous report on July 21, 2008.[11] The concept was further popularized and put on a wider footing when the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) began to promote it.

In the spring of 2008, author Jeff Biggers launched a series of challenges for a Green New Deal from the perspective of his writings from coal country in Appalachia and the heartland. Biggers wrote, “Obama should shatter these artificial racial boundaries by proposing a New “Green” Deal to revamp the region and bridge a growing chasm between bitterly divided Democrats, and call for an end to mountaintop removal policies that have led to impoverishment and ruin in the coal fields.”[12] Biggers followed up with other Green New Deal proposals on various media venues for the next four years.[13]

On October 22, 2008 UNEP’s Executive Director Achim Steiner unveiled the Global Green New Deal initiative that aims to create jobs in “green” industries, thus boosting the world economy and curbing climate change at the same time.[14] It was then turned into an extensive plan by the Green Party of the United States. It was a key part of the platform of Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein in 2012,[15] and 2016, as well as Howie Hawkins, who helped to write it, in his campaign for governor of New York.[16] The Green Party continued to suggest a Green New Deal in their rebuttal to the 2018 State of the Union speech.[17] The Green New Deal remains officially part of the platform of the Green Party of the United States.[18]

In the United States

Early efforts

A “Green New Deal” wing began to emerge in the Democratic Party after the November 2018 elections.[19][20]

A possible program in 2018 for a “Green New Deal” assembled by the think tank Data for Progress was described as “pairing labor programs with measures to combat the climate crisis.”[21][22]

A November 2018 article in Vogue stated, “There isn’t just one Green New Deal yet. For now, it’s a platform position that some candidates are taking to indicate that they want the American government to devote the country to preparing for climate change as fully as Franklin Delano Roosevelt once did to reinvigorating the economy after the Great Depression.”[23]

A week after the 2018 midterm elections, climate justice group Sunrise Movement organized a protest in Nancy Pelosi‘s office calling on Nancy Pelosi to support a Green New Deal. On the same day, freshman congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez launched a resolution to create a committee on the Green New Deal.[24] Following this, several candidates came out supporting a “Green New Deal”, including Deb HaalandRashida TlaibIlhan Omar, and Antonio Delgado.[25] They were joined in the following weeks by Reps. John LewisEarl BlumenauerCarolyn Maloney, and José Serrano.[26]

By the end of November, eighteen Democratic members of Congress were co-sponsoring a proposed House Select Committee on a Green New Deal, and incoming representatives Ayanna Pressley and Joe Neguse had announced their support.[27][28] Draft text would task this committee with a “’detailed national, industrial, economic mobilization plan’ capable of making the U.S. economy ‘carbon neutral’ while promoting ‘economic and environmental justice and equality,'” to be released in early 2020, with draft legislation for implementation within 90 days.[29][30]

Organizations supporting a Green New Deal initiative included 350.orgGreenpeaceSierra ClubExtinction Rebellion and Friends of the Earth.[31][32]

Sunrise Movement protest on behalf of a Green New Deal at the Capitol Hill offices of Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer on December 10, 2018 featured Lennox Yearwood and speakers as young as age 7, resulting in 143 arrests.[33] Euronews, the pan-European news organization, displayed video of youth with signs saying “Green New Deal,” “No excuses”, and “Do your job” in its “No Comment” section.[34]

On December 14, 2018, a group of over 300 local elected officials from 40 states issued a letter endorsing a Green New Deal approach.[35][36]

That same day, a poll released by Yale Program on Climate Change Communication indicated that although 82% of registered voters had not heard of the “Green New Deal,” it had strong bi-partisan support among voters. A non-partisan description of the general concepts behind a Green New Deal resulted in 40% of respondents saying they “strongly support”, and 41% saying they “somewhat support” the idea.[37]

On January 10, 2019 over 600 organizations submitted a letter to Congress declaring support for policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This includes ending fossil fuel extraction and subsidies, transitioning to 100% clean renewable energy by 2035, expanding public transportation, and strict emission reductions rather than reliance on carbon emission trading.[38]

Green New Deal Resolution

Ed Markey speaks on a Green New Deal in front of the Capitol Building in February 2019

Ocasio-Cortez’s first piece of sponsored legislation: H.Res.109 – 116th Congress (2019–2020) Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Ed Markey released a fourteen-page resolution[39] for their Green New Deal on February 7, 2019. According to The Washington Post (February 11, 2019), the resolution calls for a “10-year national mobilization” whose primary goals would be:[40]

“Guaranteeing a job with a family-sustaining wage, adequate family and medical leave, paid vacations, and retirement security to all people of the United States.”
“Providing all people of the United States with — (i) high-quality health care; (ii) affordable, safe, and adequate housing; (iii) economic security; and (iv) access to clean water, clean air, healthy and affordable food, and nature.”
“Providing resources, training, and high-quality education, including higher education, to all people of the United States.”
“Meeting 100 percent of the power demand in the United States through clean, renewable, and zero-emission energy sources.”
“Repairing and upgrading the infrastructure in the United States, including . . . by eliminating pollution and greenhouse gas emissions as much as technologically feasible.”
“Building or upgrading to energy-efficient, distributed, and ‘smart’ power grids, and working to ensure affordable access to electricity.”
“Upgrading all existing buildings in the United States and building new buildings to achieve maximal energy efficiency, water efficiency, safety, affordability, comfort, and durability, including through electrification.”
“Overhauling transportation systems in the United States to eliminate pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector as much as is technologically feasible, including through investment in — (i) zero-emission vehicle infrastructure and manufacturing; (ii) clean, affordable, and accessible public transportation; and (iii) high-speed rail.”
“Spurring massive growth in clean manufacturing in the United States and removing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from manufacturing and industry as much as is technologically feasible.”
“Working collaboratively with farmers and ranchers in the United States to eliminate pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector as much as is technologically feasible.”

The approach pushes for transitioning the United States to use 100% renewable, zero-emission energy sources, including investment into electric cars and high-speed rail systems, and implementing the “social cost of carbon” that has been part of Obama administration’s plans for addressing climate change within 10 years. Besides providing new jobs, this Green New Deal is also aimed to address poverty by aiming much of the improvements in the “frontline and vulnerable communities” which include the poor and disadvantaged people. To gain additional support, the resolution includes calls for universal health care, increased minimum wages, and preventing monopolies.[41]

House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

Various perspectives emerged in late 2018 as to whether to form a committee dedicated to climate, what powers such a committee might be granted, and whether the committee would be specifically tasked with developing a Green New Deal.

Incoming House committee chairs Frank Pallone and Peter DeFazio indicated a preference for handling these matters in the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.[31][42] (Writing in Gentleman’s Quarterly, Jay Willis responded that despite the best efforts of Pallone and De Fazio over many years, “the planet’s prognosis has failed to improve,” providing “pretty compelling evidence that it is time for legislators to consider taking a different approach.”[30])

In contrast, Representative Ro Khanna thought that creating a Select Committee specifically dedicated to a Green New Deal would be a “very commonsense idea”, based on the recent example of the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming (2007-2011), which had proven effective in developing a 2009 bill for cap-and-trade legislation.[31][42]

Proposals for the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis did not contain “Green New Deal” language and lacked the powers desired by Green New Deal proponents, such as the ability to subpoena documents or deposewitnesses.[43][44][45]

Rep. Kathy Castor of Florida was appointed to chair the committee.[45][46]

January 2019 letter to Congress from environmental groups

On January 10, 2019, a letter signed by 626 organizations in support of a Green New Deal was sent to all members of Congress. It called for measures such as “an expansion of the Clean Air Act; a ban on crude oil exports; an end to fossil fuel subsidies and fossil fuel leasing; and a phase-out of all gasoline-powered vehicles by 2040.”[47][48]

The letter also indicated that signatories would “vigorously oppose” … “market-based mechanisms and technology options such as carbon and emissions trading and offsetscarbon capture and storagenuclear powerwaste-to-energy and biomass energy.”[47]

Six major environmental groups did not sign on to the letter: the Sierra Club, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Environmental Defense Fund, Mom’s Clean Air Force, Environment America, and the Audubon Society.[49]

An article in The Atlantic quoted Greg Carlock, who prepared “a different Green New Deal plan for the left-wing think tank Data for Progress” as responding, “There is no scenario produced by the IPCC or the UN where we hit mid-century decarbonization without some kind of carbon capture.”[47]

The MIT Technology Review responded to the letter with an article titled, “Let’s Keep the Green New Deal Grounded in Science.” The MIT article states that, although the letter refers to the “rapid and aggressive action” needed to prevent the 1.5 ˚C of warming specified in the UN climate panel’s latest report, simply acknowledging the report’s recommendation is not sufficient. If the letter’s signatories start from a position where the options of carbon pricing, carbon capture for fossil plants, hydropower, and nuclear power, are not even on the table for consideration, there may be no feasible technical means to reach the necessary 1.5 ˚C climate goal.[50]

A report in Axios suggested that the letter’s omission of a carbon tax, which has been supported by moderate Republicans, did not mean that signatories would oppose carbon pricing.[51][48]

The Director of the Center for Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy at George Mason University was quoted as saying, “As long as organizations hold onto a rigid set of ideas about what the solution is, it’s going to be hard to make progress … And that’s what worries me.”[50]

Models for implementation

As of January 2019, models for structuring a Green New Deal remain in the initial stages of discussion.

Although Chuck Schumer has indicated that measures to address climate change and renewable energy must be included in a 2019 infrastructure package, as of December 2018, articles describing his position referred to it as “green infrastructure” rather than as a Green New Deal.[52][53]

On January 17, 2019, prospective presidential candidate Jay Inslee called for Green New Deal goals of “net-zero carbon pollution by midcentury” and creating “good-paying jobs building a future run on clean energy” in a Washington Post op-ed. However, he framed these efforts in terms of national mobilization, saying “Confronting climate change will require a full-scale mobilization — a national mission that must be led from the White House.”[54]

Economic policy and planning for environment and climate

An article in The Intercept characterizes a Green New Deal more broadly, as economic planning and industrial policy measures which would enable mobilization for the environment, similar to the economic mobilization for World War II, and similar to the internal planning of large corporations.[55]

Economist Stephanie Kelton (a proponent of Modern Monetary Policy) and others [56] argue that natural resources, including a stable, livable climate, are limited resources, whereas money -following the abandonment of the gold standard- is really just a legal and social tool that should be marshaled to provide for sustainable public policies. To this end, a mix of policies and programs could be adopted, including tax incentives and targeted taxes, reformed construction and zoning standards, transportation fleet electrification, coastal shoreline hardening, Farm Bill subsidies linked to carbon capture and renewables generation, and much more. Practically, Kelton argues that the key to implementation is garnering enough political support, rather than becoming fixated on specific “pay-fors.” Many proposed Green New Deal programs would generate significant numbers of new jobs.[56]

One proposed model for funding says that “funding would come primarily from certain public agencies, including the U.S. Federal Reserve and ‘a new public bank or system of regional and specialized public banks.'” This model, which has been endorsed by over 40 House members, has been compared to the work of the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW, or “Reconstruction Credit Institute,” a large German public sector development bank), the China Development Bank, and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.[57]

Employment programs coupled with business investment for environment and climate

New Deal improvisation as a model

Although the non-specific nature of current GND proposals has become a concern for some Greens,[58] one writer from the Columbia University Earth Institute views the lack of specificity as a strength, noting that: “FDR’s New Deal was a series of improvisations in response to specific problems that were stalling economic development. There was no master plan, many ideas failed, and some were ended after a period of experimentation. But some, like social security and the Security and Exchange Commission’s regulation of the stock market, became permanent American institutions.”[59]

Green skills worker training programs

Existing programs training workers in green skills include a program called Roots of Success, founded in 2008 to bring low-income people into living wage professions. Funding for Roots of Success came from the $90 billion in green initiatives incorporated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.[60]

Green stimulus under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

About 12% of ARRA funding went to green investment,[61] and some of these initiatives were successful. A Jan. 2019 article in Politico stated that, “U.S. wind capacity has more than tripled since 2008, while solar capacity is up more than sixfold. LEDs were 1 percent of the lighting market in 2008; now they’re more than half the market. There were almost no plug-in electric vehicles in 2008; now there are more than 1 million on U.S. roads.”[62]

Although ARRA’s green stimulus projects are of interest for developing proposals for a Green New Deal, its mixed results included both “boosting innovative firms” such as Tesla, and the $535 million failure of the Solyndra solar company.”[62][63] These initial efforts at green stimulus are described as a “cautionary tale.” It remains necessary to develop mechanisms for promoting large-scale green business development, as it is unclear whether focusing on job creation programs alone will result in optimizing the climate impact of new jobs.[62]

Criticism

Many who support some goals of the Green New Deal express doubt about feasibility of one or more parts of it. John P. Holdren, former science advisor to Obama, thinks the 2030 goal is too optimistic, saying that 2045 or 2050 would be more realistic.[64]

Paul Bledsoe of the Progressive Policy Institute, the think tank affiliated with the conservative Democratic Leadership Council, expressed concern that setting unrealistic “aspirational” goals of 100% renewable energy could undermine “the credibility of the effort” against climate change.[31]

Economist Edward Barbier, who developed the “Global Green New Deal” proposal for the United Nations Environment Programme in 2009, opposes “a massive federal jobs program,” saying “The government would end up doing more and more of what the private sector and industry should be doing.” Barbier prefers carbon pricing, such as a carbon tax or cap-and-trade system, in order to “address distortions in the economy that are holding back private sector innovation and investments in clean energy.”[61]

When Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) was confronted by youth associated with the Sunrise Movement on why she doesn’t support the Green New Deal, she told them “there’s no way to pay for it” and that it could not pass a Republican controlled Senate. In a tweet following the confrontation, Feinstein said that she remains committed “to enact real, meaningful climate change legislation.”[65]

In February 2019, the centre-right American Action Forum, estimated that the plan could cost between $51–$93 trillion over the next decade.[66] They estimate its potential cost at $600,000 per household.[67] The organization estimated the cost for eliminating carbon emissions from the transportation system at $1.3–$2.7 trillion; guaranteeing a job to every American $6.8–$44.6 trillion; universal health care estimated close to $36 trillion.[68] According to Bloomberg Businessweek, Wall Street is willing to invest significant resources toward GND programs, but not unless Congress commits to moving it forward.[69]

The AFL-CIO, in a letter to Ocasio-Cortez, expressed strong reservations about the GND, saying, “We welcome the call for labor rights and dialogue with labor, but the Green New Deal resolution is far too short on specific solutions that speak to the jobs of our members and the critical sections of our economy.” [70]

Criticism of FAQ document

Republican politicians have criticized a “Frequently Asked Questions” document once posted to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s website (later removed but still viewable on the Wayback Machine.)[71] Many criticisms centred on a line promising economic security to those “unwilling to work”. (Green New Deal advisor Robert C. Hockett stated that this line was present only in “doctored” versions of the FAQ, but later said he had been mistaken.[72])

Supporters

Individuals

Organizations

Detractors

Individuals

  • On February 9, 2019, United States President Donald Trump voiced his opposition using sarcasm via Twitter as follows: “I think it is very important for the Democrats to press forward with their Green New Deal. It would be great for the so-called “Carbon Footprint” to permanently eliminate all Planes, Cars, Cows, Oil, Gas & the Military – even if no other country would do the same. Brilliant!”[101]
  • Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein objected to the plan saying “there’s no way to pay for it” and is drafting her own narrowed down version. Democratic Senator Joe Manchin criticized the plan as a “dream” adding that ‘it would hurt regions dependent on reliable, affordable energy.”[102]
  • Republican White House aide Sebastian Gorka has referred to the deal as “what Stalin dreamed about but never achieved” and that “they [proponents of the deal] want to take your pickup truck. They want to rebuild your home. They want to take away your hamburgers.” The comments about hamburgers are a common criticism of the deal by conservatives, who have gone on to criticize Representative Ocasio-Cortez for allowing her Chief of Staff to eat a hamburger with her at a Washington restaurant.[103]
  • On February 13, 2019, Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) released a parody video on his verified Twitter account comparing the Green New Deal to the failed Fyre Festival, using the hashtag #GNDisFyre.[104][105][106]
  • On March 14, 2019, Rep. Rob Bishop, a Republican representing Utah’s 1st congressional district, said that the legislation was “tantamount to genocide,” adding shortly afterward that his comment was “maybe an overstatement, but not by a lot.”[107]

See also

References

  1. ^ Meyer, Robinson. “The Green New Deal Hits Its First Major Snag”The Atlantic. Retrieved January 31, 2019There’s not a single, official Green New Deal. Much like “Medicare for All,” “Green New Deal” refers more to a few shared goals than to a completed legislative package. (The original New Deal basically worked the same way.) Now a number of environmental groups are trying to make those goals more specific. But they’re running into a snag: The bogeymen that haunted old progressive climate policies are suddenly back again. And the fights aren’t just about nuclear power.
  2. Jump up to:a b Harder, Amy (December 13, 2019). “Why Al Gore is on board with the Green New Deal”AxiosArchived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2018.
  3. ^ Whyte, Chelsea (February 12, 2019). “Green New Deal proposal includes free higher education and fair pay”NewScientist. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  4. ^ Jeremy Lovell (July 21, 2008) “Climate report calls for green ‘New Deal'”, Reuters.
  5. ^ A Green New Deal: Discursive Review and Appraisal. Social Science Research Network (SSRN). Notes on the 21st Century. Accessed March 14, 2019.
  6. ^ Hilary French, Michael Renner and Gary Gardner: Toward a Transatlantic Green New Deal Archived March 29, 2014, at the Wayback Machine The authors state: “Support is growing around the world for an integrated response to the current economic and environmental crises, increasingly referred to as the “Green New Deal”. The term is a modern-day variation of the U.S. New Deal, an ambitious effort launched by President Franklin Roosevelt to lift the United States out of the Great Depression. The New Deal of that era entailed a strong government role in economic planning and a series of stimulus packages launched between 1933 and 1938 that created jobs through ambitious governmental programs, including the construction of roads, trails, dams, and schools. Today’s Green New Deal proposals are also premised on the importance of decisive governmental action, but incorporate policies to respond to pressing environmental challenges through a new paradigm of sustainable economic progress.”
  7. ^ Kaufman, Alexander C (June 30, 2018). “What’s the ‘Green New Deal’? The surprising origins behind a progressive rallying cry”GristArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  8. ^ Thomas L. Friedman, The Power of Green ArchivedJanuary 17, 2017, at the Wayback MachineThe New York Times Magazine, April 15, 2007
  9. Jump up to:a b Friedman, Thomas L. (January 19, 2007). “Opinion – A Warning From the Garden”The New York Times.
  10. ^ Mark Lynas: A Green New Deal Archived April 19, 2016, at the Wayback MachineNew Statesman, July 17, 2008
  11. ^ Larry Elliott, Colin Hines, Tony Juniper, Jeremy Leggett, Caroline Lucas, Richard Murphy, Ann Pettifor, Charles Secrett & Andrew Simms, A Green New Deal: Joined-up policies to solve the triple crunch of the credit crisis, climate change and high oil prices. new economics foundation, July 2008
  12. ^ Huffington Post[when?]
  13. ^ See for example: CNN, Al Jazeera
  14. ^ Paul Eccleston, UN announces green “New Deal” plan to rescue world economies Archived September 22, 2012, at the Wayback MachineThe Daily Telegraph, October 22, 2008
  15. ^ Friedersdorf, Conor (May 21, 2012). “The 3 Green Party Candidates and Their Disappointing Platforms”The AtlanticArchived from the original on November 15, 2018. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  16. ^ “Green New Deal”http://www.gp.org.
  17. ^ “Green Party Rebuttal to President Trump’s 2018 State of the Union Address”Common DreamsArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  18. ^ “Green New Deal”GPUSArchived from the original on November 17, 2018. Retrieved November 17, 2018.
  19. ^ Kaufman, Alexander C. (November 7, 2018). “Democrats’ Green New Deal Wing Takes Shape Amid Wave Of Progressive Climate Hawk Wins”Huffington PostArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  20. ^ Carlock, Greg; McElwee, Sean. “Why the Best New Deal Is a Green New Deal”The NationISSN 0027-8378Archivedfrom the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13,2018.
  21. ^ Kahn, Brian. “Most Americans Think We Can Save the Planet and Create Jobs at the Same Time”EartherArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13,2018.
  22. ^ “Green New Deal Report”Data For Progress. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  23. Jump up to:a b Read, Bridget (November 2, 2018). “Watch Bria Vinaite Explain the Green New Deal”VogueArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  24. ^ Roberts, David (November 15, 2018). “Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is already pressuring Nancy Pelosi on climate change”VoxArchived from the original on November 28, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  25. ^ Corbett, Jessica (November 7, 2018). “Saving Planet With ‘Green New Deal’ Proves Popular as Climate Hawks Celebrate Midterm Victories”Common DreamsArchived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  26. ^ Burke, Michael (November 18, 2018). “John Lewis joins Ocasio-Cortez on climate change push”TheHillArchived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  27. ^ Germanos, Andrea (November 30, 2018). “As Number of Dems Backing Green New Deal Swells to 18, Campaigners Demand All of Party ‘Stand Up to Fossil Fuel BillionairesCommon DreamsArchived from the original on December 2, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  28. ^ Gamboa, Suzanne (November 30, 2018). “Ocasio-Cortez, diverse lawmakers prioritize climate change with ‘Green New DealNBC NewsArchived from the original on December 2, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  29. ^ Klein, Naomi (November 27, 2018). “The Game-Changing Promise of a Green New Deal”The InterceptArchived from the original on November 27, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  30. Jump up to:a b Willis, Jay (December 6, 2018). “How Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s “Green New Deal” Might Help Save the Planet”GQArchived from the original on December 7, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  31. Jump up to:a b c d Homan, Timothy R. (November 24, 2018). “Five things to know about Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Green New DealTheHillArchived from the original on November 26, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  32. Jump up to:a b Golden, Hannah. “The Green New Deal Is Challenging This Old Myth About Fighting Climate Change”Elite DailyArchived from the original on December 8, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  33. ^ Colón, Christina (December 10, 2018). “Nearly 150 Climate Activists Arrested in Mass Demonstration for Green New Deal”SojournersArchived from the original on December 17, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  34. ^ “Climate protest at Pelosi’s office spurs arrests”Euronews. December 11, 2018. Archived from the original on December 17, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  35. ^ Keck, Catie. “Earther – Hundreds of Local and State Officials Just Endorsed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal”GizmodoArchived from the original on December 16, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  36. ^ “At COP24 Climate Talks in Katowice, 300+ Elected Officials from 40 States Call for Phasing Out Fossil Fuels, Green New Deal Approach”Elected Officials to Protect America. December 14, 2018. Archived from the original on December 17, 2018. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  37. ^ Gustafson, Abel (December 14, 2018). “The Green New Deal has Strong Bipartisan Support”Yale Program on Climate Change CommunicationArchived from the original on December 18, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  38. ^ “Progressive Green New Deal Letter to Congress” (PDF).
  39. ^ https://ocasio-cortez.house.gov/sites/ocasio-cortez.house.gov/files/Resolution%20on%20a%20Green%20New%20Deal.pdf
  40. ^ Rizzo, Salvador (February 11, 2019). “Fact Checker: What’s actually in the ‘Green New Deal’ from Democrats?”Washington Post. Retrieved March 2, 2019As a reader service, we’re going to summarize what’s actually in the Green New Deal from Democrats, and how we ended up with all this confusion.
  41. ^ “Resolution: Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal” (PDF)United States House of Representatives. February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  42. Jump up to:a b Cama, Timothy (November 30, 2018). “Dems rally for Green New Deal”TheHillArchived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  43. ^ Cama, Timothy (January 2, 2019). “House Dems formalize climate committee plans without Green New Deal language”TheHill. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  44. ^ Meyer, Robinson (December 28, 2018). “Democrats Establish a New House ‘Climate Crisis’ Committee”The Atlantic. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  45. Jump up to:a b “Climate change: Meet the Florida congresswoman leading the House charge”USA TODAY. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  46. ^ Gonyea, Don (December 30, 2018). “House Democrats Form New ‘Climate Crisis’ Committee”National Public Radio. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  47. Jump up to:a b c Meyer, Robinson (January 18, 2019). “The Green New Deal Hits Its First Major Snag”The Atlantic. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  48. Jump up to:a b Kahn, Brian. “More Than 600 Environmental Groups Just Backed Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal”Earther. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  49. ^ Atkin, Emily (January 15, 2019). “Some of the Biggest Green Groups Have Cold Feet Over the “Green New DealThe New RepublicISSN 0028-6583. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  50. Jump up to:a b Temple, James. “Let’s keep the Green New Deal grounded in science”MIT Technology Review. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  51. ^ Geman, Ben (January 10, 2019). “Environmental groups pressure House for “visionary” measures to support the Green New Deal”Axios. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  52. ^ Mali, Meghashyam (December 7, 2018). “Overnight Energy: Schumer demands climate measures in infrastructure bill | OPEC, Russia to cut oil output | EPA looks to ease Obama water rule”The HillArchived from the original on December 8, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  53. ^ Levitz, Eric. “Schumer to Trump: Give Us Green Infrastructure, or We’ll Give You None”New York Magazine – IntellegencerArchived from the original on December 9, 2018.
  54. ^ Inslee, Jay (January 17, 2019). “The next president must make climate change the top priority”Washington Post. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  55. ^ Aronoff, Kate (December 5, 2018). “With a Green New Deal, Here’s What the World Could Look Like for the Next Generation”The InterceptArchived from the original on December 5, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  56. Jump up to:a b Kelton, Stephanie; Bernal, Andres; Carlock, Greg (November 30, 2018). “We Can Pay For A Green New Deal” – via Huff Post.
  57. ^ Brown, Ellen (January 25, 2019). “The Financial Secret Behind Germany’s Green Energy Revolution”Common Dreams. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  58. ^ Siegel, Josh (January 24, 2019). “Greens want 2020 Democrats to go beyond vague ‘Green New Deal’ support”Washington Examiner. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  59. ^ Cohen, Steve (January 14, 2019). “The Politics of a Green New Deal”State of the Planet. The Earth Institute, Columbia University. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  60. ^ Dembicki, Geoff; Cheadle, Harry (December 7, 2018). “The Left Thinks a ‘Green New Deal’ Could Save Earth and Destroy the GOP”ViceArchived from the original on December 8, 2018. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  61. Jump up to:a b Lavelle, Marianne (January 3, 2019). “New Congress Members See Climate Solutions and Jobs in a Green New Deal”InsideClimate News. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  62. Jump up to:a b c Grunwald, Michael. “The Trouble With the ‘Green New DealPOLITICO Magazine. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  63. ^ Schallhorn, Kaitlyn (January 11, 2019). “What is the Green New Deal? A look at the economic and climate concept pushed by progressives”Fox News. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  64. ^ Friedman, Lisa; Gabriel, Trip (February 21, 2019). “A New Deal at Once Possible and Problematic”The New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved March 11, 2019Holdren, who is now a professor of environmental policy at Harvard University, said the Green New Deal’s timeline of achieving that goal around 2030 is not feasible. “As a technologist studying this problem for 50 years, I don’t think we can do it,” he said. “There’s hope we could do it by 2045 or 2050 if we get going now,” he added.
  65. ^ Beckett, Lois (February 23, 2019). You didn’t vote for me’: Senator Dianne Feinstein responds to young green activists”The Guardian. Retrieved February 24, 2019.
  66. ^ Natter, Ari (February 25, 2019). “Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal Could Cost $93 Trillion, Group Says”Bloomberg. Retrieved March 2, 2019The so-called Green New Deal may tally between $51 trillion and $93 trillion over 10-years, concludes American Action Forum, which is run by Douglas Holtz-Eakin, who directed the non-partisan CBO from 2003 to 2005. That includes between $8.3 trillion and $12.3 trillion to meet the plan’s call to eliminate carbon emissions from the power and transportation sectors and between $42.8 trillion and $80.6 trillion for its economic agenda including providing jobs and health care for all.
  67. ^ Henney, Megan (February 26, 2019). “Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal could cost $93 trillion, group says”FOXBusiness. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  68. ^ “The Green New Deal: Scope, Scale, and Implications”AAF. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  69. ^ Dmietrieva, Katia (February 14, 2019). “Wall Street Is More Than Willing to Fund the Green New Deal”Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved March 11, 2019The plan’s greatest flaw, critics say, is that it would be too costly. Ocasio-Cortez advocates deficit spending, and she’s floated a 70 percent marginal tax rate for high earners that would generate some of the necessary revenue. But those worried about where the rest of the money will come from are forgetting one major, surprisingly enthusiastic player: Wall Street.
  70. ^ “AFL-CIO criticizes Green New Deal, calling it ‘not achievable or realisticWashington Post. 2019-03-12. Retrieved 2019-03-12.
  71. ^ “Green New Deal FAQ | Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez”archive.org. February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 14,2019.
  72. ^ Stein, Jeff; Weigel, David (February 11, 2019). “Ocasio-Cortez retracts erroneous information about Green New Deal backed by 2020 Democratic candidates”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  73. ^ Kaufman, Alexander C. (January 25, 2019). “Former U.N. leader Ban Ki-moon just endorsed Democrats’ fight for a Green New Deal”Grist. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  74. ^ Santus, Rex (February 7, 2019). “AOC’s Green New Deal has the backing of every major 2020 candidate”Vice. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  75. ^ Teirstein, Zoya (January 25, 2019). “Kirsten Gillibrand doesn’t just support the ‘idea’ of a Green New Deal, she’s wholly behind it”Grist. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  76. ^ Burke, Michael (January 25, 2019). “Kamala Harris endorses Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Green New DealThe Hill. Retrieved February 8, 2019.
  77. ^ Henderson, Bruce (December 11, 2018). “Rep. Kennedy announces support for the Green New Deal”Village 14. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  78. ^ LaChance, Naomi (November 30, 2018). “Naomi Klein on the Urgency of a ‘Green New Deal’ for Everyone”Truthdig: Expert Reporting, Current News, Provocative ColumnistsArchivedfrom the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 2,2018.
  79. ^ Paul Krugman (January 1, 2019). “Hope for a Green New Year”The New York Times. p. A18. Retrieved January 1, 2019.
  80. ^ Evans, Greg (February 1, 2019). “Bill Maher Sees “Glimmer Of Hope” For Climate Change: Americans Less Stupid”. Deadline. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  81. ^ “Sign the petition: support a Green New Deal for America and our planet”http://www.jeffmerkley.com. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  82. ^ Schlanger, Zoë. “Ocasio-Cortez’s climate plan is the only one that matches scientific consensus on the environment”QuartzArchived from the original on July 1, 2018. Retrieved July 3,2018.
  83. ^ “Dems rally for Green New Deal”. November 30, 2018. Archived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved November 30, 2018.
  84. ^ “Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Are Pushing a Bold New Plan to Tackle Climate Change”. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  85. ^ Bernie Sanders, “Elizabeth Warren Backs Idea of Green New Deal”
  86. ^ “Elizabeth Warren backs the “idea” of a Green New Deal”AxiosArchived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  87. ^ Peele, Anna (February 19, 2019). “Marianne Williamson Wants to Be Your Healer in Chief”The Washington Post Magazine. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  88. ^ Wyden, Ron (January 10, 2019). “It’s Time for a ‘Green New DealPolitico. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  89. ^ Yang, Andrew (January 9, 2019). “Aligned and on board”. Twitter. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  90. ^ “Europe now has a Green New Deal and it’s coming to a ballot box near you in May”.
  91. ^ “Search”. Retrieved December 1, 2018.
  92. ^ “Search”Archived from the original on November 17, 2018. Retrieved November 17, 2018.
  93. ^ Hilary French, Michael Renner and Gary Gardner, Toward a Transatlantic Green New Deal Archived July 4, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, PDF, 2009
  94. ^ “Protests for Social Justice: A Green New Deal for Israel?”boell.de. Heinrich Böll Foundation. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved October 12, 2016.
  95. ^ “Green New Deal in Ukraine? The Energy Sector and modernizing a National Economy”boell.de. Heinrich Böll Foundation. Archived from the original on July 4, 2018. Retrieved October 12, 2016.
  96. ^ http://origin.lcv.org/article/lcv-supports-green-new-deal-resolution/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  97. ^ “Search”neweconomics.org. Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved October 12, 2016.
  98. ^ “How are we doing on a ‘Green New Deal?Open Democracy. October 7, 2018. Archived from the original on November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  99. ^ Paul Eccleston, UN announces green ‘New Deal’ plan to rescue world economies Archived October 29, 2008, at the Wayback Machine The Daily Telegraph, October 22, 2008
  100. ^ “in 1 minuten”Global Marshall Plan (in German). Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  101. ^ Trump, Donald (February 2019). “US Presidential Twitter Feed”Twitter.comArchived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  102. ^ King, Ledyard. “Biggest obstacle to passage of Green New Deal? Democratic lawmakers”USA Today. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
  103. ^ They want to take away your hamburgers. March 1, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  104. ^ Representative Mark Walker (February 13, 2019), The Green New Deal is on Fyre, retrieved February 14, 2019
  105. ^ Walker, Rep Mark (February 13, 2019). “After the success of the Fyre Festival, we bring you the Green New Deal. #GNDisFyrepic.twitter.com/uNzT42ZbNV”@RepMarkWalker. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  106. ^ Shaw, Adam (February 13, 2019). “Green New Deal mocked in Fyre Festival parody, as GOP turns plan into punching bag”Fox News. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  107. ^ https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/14/green-new-deal-genocide-1270839

External links

Past projects referred to as “Green New Deal

Green New Deal proposal in 116th Congress

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Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1-9

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