The Pronk Pops Show 541, September 25, 2015, Story 1: Breaking News: House Speaker John Boehner Will Resign October 30 — Republican House Split Between Moderates and Progressives and Conservatives, Libertarians and Tea Party Patriots — Videos

Posted on September 25, 2015. Filed under: 2016 Presidential Campaign, 2016 Presidential Candidates, American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Business, Communications, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Economics, Education, Elections, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Foreign Policy, Free Trade, Government, Government Spending, History, House of Representatives, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, IRS, Law, Legal Immigration, Media, Monetary Policy, News, Philosophy, Politics, Polls, Progressives, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Scandals, Security, Senate, Taxation, Taxes, Ted Cruz, Unemployment, Videos, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 541: September 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 540: September 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 539: September 23, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 538: September 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 537: September 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 536: September 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 535: September 17, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 534: September 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 533: September 15, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 532: September 14, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 531: September 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 530: September 10, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 529: September 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 528: September 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 524: August 31, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 523: August 27, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 522: August 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 521: August 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 516: August 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 515: August 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 514: August 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 513: August 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 512: August 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 509: July 24, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 508: July 20, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 507: July 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 506: July 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 505: July 15, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 504: July 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 503: July 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 502: July 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 501: July 9, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 500: July 8, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 499: July 6, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 498: July 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 497: July 1, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 496: June 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 495: June 29, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 494: June 26, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 493: June 25, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 492: June 24, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 491: June 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 490: June 22, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 489: June 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 488: June 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 487: June 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 486; June 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 485: June 15, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 484: June 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 483: June 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 482; June 10, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 481: June 9, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 480: June 8, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 479: June 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 478: June 4, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 477: June 3, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 476: June 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 475: June 1, 2015

Story 1: Breaking News: House Speaker John Boehner Will Resign October 30 — Republican House Split Between Moderates and Progressives and Conservatives, Libertarians and Tea Party Patriots — Videos

Republican Leadership Moderates

CA-23Rep. Kevin McCarthy R F 45% 8 2016

LA-1Rep. Steve Scalise R C 74% 7 2016

GA-6Rep. Tom Price R C 70% 10 2016

TX-32Rep. Pete Sessions R D 63% 18 2016

WA-5Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers R F 49% 10 2016

WI-1Rep. Paul Ryan R F 58% 16 2016

Conservative Representatives

VA-7Rep. Dave Brat R A 100% 0 2016

AL-6Rep. Gary Palmer R A 100% 0 2016

OK-1Rep. Jim Bridenstine R A 96% 2 2016

NC-11Rep. Mark Meadows R A 96% 2 2016

SC-3Rep. Jeff Duncan R A 95% 4 2016

MI-3Rep. Justin Amash R A 95% 4 2016

ID-1Rep. Raul Labrador R A 95% 4 2016

TX-1Rep. Louie Gohmert R A 94% 10 2016

SC-5Rep. Mick Mulvaney R A 93% 4 2016

AZ-6Rep. David Schweikert R A 92% 4 2016

OH-4Rep. Jim Jordan R A 92% 8 2016

KY-4Rep. Thomas Massie R A 92% 2 2016

FL-19Rep. Curt Clawson R A 90% 1 2016

KS-1Rep. Tim Huelskamp R A 90% 4 2016

CA-4Rep. Tom McClintock R A 90% 6 2016

NJ-5Rep. Scott Garrett R B 88% 12 2016

AZ-8Rep. Trent Franks R B 88% 12 2016

AZ-5Rep. Matt Salmon R B 87% 8 2016

FL-6Rep. Ron DeSantis R B 87% 2 2016

CO-4Rep. Ken Buck R B 86% 0 2016

SC-1Rep. Mark Sanford R B 86% 8 2016

IA-1Rep. Rod Blum R B 86% 0 2016

SC-4Rep. Trey Gowdy R B 85% 4 2016

TN-2Rep. John Duncan Jr. R B 84% 26 2016

CO-5Rep. Doug Lamborn R B 83% 8 2016

TX-14Rep. Randy Weber R B 83% 2 2016

WI-5Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner R B 82% 36 2016

LA-4Rep. John Fleming R B 82% 6 2016

IN-3Rep. Marlin Stutzman R B 81% 4 2016

TN-4Rep. Scott DesJarlais R B 81% 4 2016

CA-48Rep. Dana Rohrabacher R B 80% 26 2016

UT-3Rep. Jason Chaffetz R B 80% 6 2016

AL-5Rep. Mo Brooks R B 80% 4 2016

AZ-4Rep. Paul Gosar R B 80% 4 2016

TX-19Rep. Randy Neugebauer R B 80% 12 2016

OH-1Rep. Steven Chabot R B 80% 18 2016

– See more at: https://www.conservativereview.com/scorecard#sthash.2AeMKzH0.dpuf

John Boehner to resign as House Speaker

Boehner Resigns But Expect More Of The Same

Cruz addressing rumors about Boehner’s last deal with Pelosi

Ted Cruz at Values Voter Summit (HQ); speech; address; 9-25-2015

Watch Ted Cruz’s closing statement at GOP debate

Conservative Crowd Celebrates John Boehner’s Resignation; Values Voter Summit; 9-25-2015

House Speaker Boehner to resign

House Speaker John Boehner to Resign

House Speaker John Boehner to Resign From Congress

Donald Trump on Speaker Boehner resignation

Marco Rubio Responds To John Boehner’s Resignation At Values Voters Summit To Standing Ovation

Capitol Hill conservatives plot to remove Speaker Boehner

GOP rebellion tries to oust Speaker John Boehner

Rep Mark Meadows Files Motion to Oust House Speaker John Boehner – Mark Levin

Mark Meadows with Mark Levin: Oust John Boehner! (part 1)

Mark Meadows with Mark Levin: Oust John Boehner! (part 2)

 

John Boehner’s resignation spells trouble for Jeb Bush

John Boehner, House Speaker, Will Resign From Congress

By

Speaker John A. Boehner, an Ohio barkeeper’s son who rode a conservative wave to one of the highest positions in government, said Friday he would relinquish his gavel and resign from Congress, undone by the very Republicans who swept him into power.

Mr. Boehner, 65, made the stunning announcement in an emotional meeting with his fellow Republicans on Friday morning as lawmakers struggled to avert a government shutdown next week, a possibility made less likely by his decision.

Mr. Boehner told almost no one of his decision before making it Friday morning. “So before I went to sleep last night, I told my wife, I said, ‘You know, I might just make an announcement tomorrow,’” Mr. Boehner said a news conference in the Capitol. “This morning I woke up, said my prayers, as I always do, and thought, ‘This is the day I am going to do this.’”

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RELATED COVERAGE

Speaker John A. Boehner in Washington on Thursday. He is under pressure to stand up to the president on Planned Parenthood.John Boehner, Strong Abortion Foe, Is Imperiled by the Like-MindedSEPT. 17, 2015
Speaker John A. Boehner at a news conference on Capitol Hill this month. Mr. Boehner is again confronted with a rank-and-file uprising by Republican lawmakers who want to end financing of Planned Parenthood.With Possible Shutdown Nearing, Obama Looks to Take Budget Fight to G.O.P.SEPT. 16, 2015
Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid, the top Democrats in Congress, spoke outside the White House on Thursday after a strategy session with President Obama over the looming fight over abortion and the federal budget, which could result in a government shutdown.Abortion Bills Advance, Setting Up a ShowdownSEPT. 17, 2015
His downfall again highlighted the sinewy power of a Republican Party faction whose anthem is often to oppose government action. It also made vivid the increasingly precarious nature of a job in which the will and proclivities of politically divisive body must be managed. No House speaker since Thomas P. O’Neill Jr., who held the gavel from 1977 to 1986, has left the job willingly.

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6 Standoffs John Boehner Led
For Mr. Boehner, who has been pressured throughout his tenure to push for deeper spending cuts and more aggressive policy changes than were possible with President Obama in the White House, seemed both exhausted by the fight and yet at peace with his final move: to leave rather than face a potentially humiliating fight within his party.

“My first job as speaker is to protect the institution,” Mr. Boehner said. “It had become clear to me that this prolonged leadership turmoil would do irreparable harm to the institution.”

Looking poised and sounding rehearsed, Mr. Boehner became emotional as he recalled a moment alone on Thursday with Pope Francis when the pontiff asked the speaker to pray for him. Reflecting on that poignant scene and his unlikely ascent, Mr. Boehner said, “I never thought I’d be in Congress, let alone be speaker.”

Fond of saying “I’m a regular guy with a big job,” Mr. Boehner struggled almost from the moment he became speaker in 2011 to manage the challenges of divided government while holding together his fractious and increasingly conservative Republican members.

The tension has spilled over into the race for the Republican presidential nomination, in which several candidates have openly derided Republican leaders in Congress like Mr. Boehner. The loud and potent voices in the House largely reflect the steady shift of power in the Republican Party base from places like Mr. Boehner’s suburban Cincinnati district to areas that are largely Southern, rural and white.

Most recently, Mr. Boehner was trying to devise a solution to keep the government open through the rest of the year, but was under pressure from conservatives who told him that they would not vote for a bill that provided funding for Planned Parenthood.
U.S. & POLITICS By A.J. CHAVAR 1:36
Highlights from Boehner’s Tenure
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Highlights from Boehner’s Tenure
Speaker John A. Boehner, who announced that he would resign his House seat at the end of October, has presided over an era of great partisan battling. By A.J. CHAVAR on Publish Date September 25, 2015. Photo by Zach Gibson/The New York Times. Watch in Times Video »
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Mr. Boehner’s announcement lessened the chance of a government shutdown because Republican leaders joined by Democrats will almost certainly go forward with a short-term funding measure to keep the government operating, and the speaker will no longer be deterred by those who threatened his job.

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The leading candidate to replace Mr. Boehner is Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the majority leader, who is viewed more favorably by the House’s more conservative members both for his willingness to bend to their will and for his cheerful manner.

The preferred candidate among many Republicans, Representative Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, has said he does not want the job.

“John Boehner has been a great leader of the Republican Party and the House of Representatives,” Mr. Ryan said Friday in a statement. “This was an act of pure selflessness.”

Whoever replaces Mr. Boehner will inherit the complicated dynamics that have bedeviled him. Republicans lack the 60 votes needed to cut off a filibuster in the Senate, and also the two-thirds majority required in both chambers to override a presidential veto.

“There are anywhere from two to four dozen members who don’t have an affirmative sense of governance,” said Representative Charlie Dent, Republican of Pennsylvania. “They can’t get to yes. They just can’t get to yes, and so they undermine the ability of the speaker to lead. And not only do they undermine the ability of the speaker to lead, but they undermine the entire Republican conference and also help to weaken the institution of Congress itself.”

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Even Mr. Boehner’s most strident opponents will almost certainly miss him for his ability to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars, for his critics as well as his allies.

Mr. Obama said Friday that Mr. Boehner’s resignation took him by surprise. Saying he called Mr. Boehner moments before holding a news conference with President Xi Jinping of China, he praised the speaker as a “good man” and a “patriot.” The president said that though they had often disagreed, Mr. Boehner had “always conducted himself with civility and courtesy with me.”

Mr. Obama promised to “reach out immediately” to the next speaker.

Mr. Boehner’s announcement came just a day after Pope Francis visited the Capitol, fulfilling a 20-year dream for Mr. Boehner, who hails from a large Catholic family, of having a pontiff address Congress. Mr. Boehner wept openly as the pope addressed an audience gathered on the West Lawn of the Capitol on Thursday. He possibly understood that it was his last grand ceremony as speaker and a capstone to a long political career that began in the Ohio Statehouse and led to a seat in Congress in 1990.
Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the Democratic leader in the House, learned about Mr. Boehner’s resignation when she read a breaking news alert on a staff member’s phone. “God knows what’s next over there,” she told staff members. Ms. Pelosi, who had been privately negotiating on a plan to keep the government open, told reporters that Mr. Boehner’s resignation was “a stark indication of the disarray of House Republicans.”

 
In 2010, The Times traveled to the hometown of the Republican House Minority Leader John Boehner to get a sense of how growing up near Cincinnati may have shaped him. By Ben Werschkul on Publish Date October 14, 2010. Watch in Times Video »
At the Family Research Council’s Values Voter Summit, which was taking place a few blocks from the Capitol, many jumped to their feet and cheered when Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, announced that Mr. Boehner was resigning.

“It’s time to turn the page,” Mr. Rubio said, deviating from his prepared text in an assertion tailored to the audience, whose views align with many who wanted to oust Mr. Boehner.

Addressing reporters after his remarks at the conservative summit meeting, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas spoke harshly of Mr. Boehner.

“The early reports are discouraging,” Mr. Cruz said. “If it is correct that the speaker, before he resigns, has cut a deal with Nancy Pelosi to fund the Obama administration for the rest of this year, to fund Obamacare, to fund executive amnesty, to fund Planned Parenthood, to fund implementation of this Iran deal, and then presumably to land a cushy K Street job after joining with the Democrats to implement all of President Obama’s priorities, that is not the behavior one would expect from a Republican speaker of the House.”

For decades, Mr. Boehner legislated as a stalwart Republican institutionalist. He became speaker after a Tea Party wave in the 2010 election swept Republicans into the majority in the House on a call to drastically curb federal spending and the role of government.
It was an agenda Mr. Boehner supported, but he quickly found himself challenged by the new members of Congress who questioned his commitment.

That conflict resulted in a 16-day government shutdown in October 2013, the brink of default on the nation’s debt and the undoing of former Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, who was the House majority leader and was toppled in a primary by a Tea Party-backed challenger.

“Americans deserve a Congress that fights for opportunity for all and favoritism to none,” said Michael A. Needham, the chief executive of Heritage Action, a policy arm of the conservative Heritage Foundation. “Too often, Speaker Boehner has stood in the way.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/26/us/john-boehner-to-resign-from-congress.html

Starting gun fired in House Republican leadership race

By Scott Wong

The abrupt resignation of Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) Friday is setting off a four-way race for House majority leader, the No. 2 job in the GOP conference.

Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who is now the majority leader, is the prohibitive favorite to succeed Boehner when he relinquishes the Speaker’s gavel at the end of October, though Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) is considering a challenge.

Meanwhile, the race for GOP leader is shaping up to be a highly competitive contest between political heavyweights: Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), GOP Conference Committee Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-Texas) and Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price (R-Ga.).

While none of them have officially launched their bid for leader, Scalise and McMorris Rodgers — now the No. 3 and No. 4 leaders, respectively — have been jockeying for position in recent weeks. And just moments after Boehner’s surprise announcement, Sessions was reaching out to fellow GOP colleagues about “the race,” lawmakers said.

“What I’m hearing is that all four of those folks are focusing on leader,” said one GOP lawmaker with ties to leadership. “If those four folks run, those are four very strong people.”

The fact that both Scalise and McMorris Rodgers are eyeing the No. 2 job will open up more seats at the leadership table.

Four potential candidates have emerged in the race for majority whip, the No. 3 spot on the leadership ladder. Scalise’s ambitious chief deputy whip, Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.), was expected to seek his boss’s job. But he could face challenges from Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.) and former Chief Deputy Whip Pete Roskam (R-Ill.), who lost to Scalise last year in the race for GOP whip.

Rep. Dennis Ross (R-Fla.), who was elected as part of the Tea Party wave in 2010, on Friday added his name to the mix. Ross said he is reaching out to colleagues about running for whip if Scalise runs for leader.

It’s unclear at this point which lawmakers might run for GOP conference chair, the No. 4 spot. McMorris Rodgers could feasibly keep her current post if she is not elected GOP leader, sources said. GOP Policy Committee Chairman Luke Messer (R-Ind.), who holds the No. 5 job, is taking a looking at the race in the event McMorris Rodgers moves on, sources said.

But asked about his plans Friday, Messer said he was focused on his current role leading policy for House Republicans.

“Given all the scramble, I will take a day or two to think about it,” Messer said, “but my inclination is to stay where I am.”

As for McCarthy, Messer said the majority leader would be the strong favorite in the Speaker’s race. McCarthy in recent years has been traveling the country, stumping and raising cash for GOP colleagues whose votes he’ll need in a competitive contest for the top job.

“Kevin is very good at his job and has worked very hard over a long time,” Messer said. “He has a lot of strong friendships. He would be very hard to beat.”

But McCarthy could face a red-state challenger who could make the case that McCarthy has been too cozy with Boehner and hails from the bluest of blue states, California.

Right now, the most likely challenger appears to be Hensarling, who is chairman of the House Financial Services Committee.

“Chairman Hensarling is considering his options and I expect he will have a decision early next week,” spokeswoman Sarah Rozier said.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, told reporters Friday he wouldn’t run for Speaker, as did Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), the conservative firebrand and Freedom Caucus co-founder who led the effort this summer to oust Boehner as Speaker.

Meadows’s Freedom Caucus colleague, Rep. Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho), has also said he won’t run for Speaker. McCarthy routed Labrador last year in the race for majority leader.

Another name being mentioned in the Speaker’s race is Rep. Daniel Webster (R-Fla.), the former Speaker of the Florida state House who is being recruited by conservatives to take on McCarthy. Webster lacks a whip operation, but he won 12 votes in the Speaker’s race against Boehner in January.

“Yesterday was the Pope’s day; today is Speaker Boehner’s day. Tomorrow is another day,” Webster said in a statement when asked about the Speaker’s race.

In the race for majority leader, Sessions would lean on his large Texas delegation for votes and point to his past experience as chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House GOP’s campaign arm.

Price is another Capitol Hill veteran. As chairman of the House Budget Committee, he was partially responsible for crafting the first bicameral GOP budget that passed both chambers in a decade earlier this year.

After former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) lost his primary election in 2014, Price wasfloated as a possible replacement and said at the time that he had considered a bid.

Instead, Price decided to pursue the gavel on the House Budget Committee, succeeding Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), who moved up as chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee.

Spokesmen for both Price and Sessions had no comment about the leadership race.

http://thehill.com/homenews/house/254981-starting-gun-fired-in-gop-leadership-race

Meadows Maneuvers to Remove Boehner as Speaker (Updated)

Rep. Mark Meadows spent his 56th birthday Tuesday taking steps to dethrone Speaker John A. Boehner.

The North Carolina Republican, who had a subcommittee gavel taken away and then given back to him last month, might have hurt his own effort, however, by filing a non-privileged form of the motion to vacate the chair, which would remove Boehner as speaker. The non-privileged form of the motion is referred to a committee and does not need to receive an immediate vote. A GOP leadership aide told CQ Roll Call Tuesday evening the motion would be referred to the Rules Committee, where it’s unlikely to be considered.

“This is the first I’m hearing about it,” Rules Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas, said Tuesday. “No one told me anything about this.”

Sessions said he would review the language and consider next steps, though the Rules Committee is also known as the “Speaker’s Committee” — as sure a sign as any the panel won’t be marking it up unless it has to.

Sessions wasn’t the only member left in the dark. Members on the House floor Tuesday night were also learning the news as it developed, whispering among one another and showing tweets and emails coming up on their smartphones. Indeed, even members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, of which Meadows is a founding member, were mostly left out of the loop.

It was not immediately clear what Meadows’ end game was in filing a motion that required no action. Any member can offer a privileged form of the resolution and get a vote. But even in the current form of Meadows’ resolution, the motion is a significant signal of conservative frustration with Boehner.

The 260-word resolution reads as a blistering indictment of the Ohio Republican from a member of his own party:

Whereas the Speaker of the House of Representatives for the 114th Congress has endeavored to consolidate power and centralize decision-making, bypassing the majority of the 435 Members of Congress and the people they represent;

Whereas the Speaker has, through inaction, caused the power of Congress to atrophy, thereby making Congress subservient to the Executive and Judicial branches, diminishing the voice of the American People;

Whereas the Speaker uses the power of the office to punish Members who vote according to their conscience instead of the will of the Speaker; Whereas the Speaker has intentionally provided for voice votes on consequential and controversial legislation to be taken without notice and with few Members present;

Whereas the Speaker uses the legislative calendar to create crises for the American People, in order to compel Members to vote for legislation; Whereas the Speaker does not comply with the spirit of the rules of the House of Representatives, which provide that Members shall have three days to review legislation before voting;

Whereas the Speaker continues to direct the Rules Committee to limit meaningful amendments, to limit debate on the House floor, and to subvert a straightforward legislative process;

and Whereas the House of Representatives, to function effectively in the service of all citizens of this country, requires the service of a Speaker who will endeavor to follow an orderly and inclusive process without imposing his or her will upon any Member thereof: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the office of Speaker of the House of Representatives is hereby declared to be vacant.

As House Freedom Caucus members walked back to their offices from Tuesday evening votes, the conservative Republicans confirmed one by one that Meadows had never spoken to the group about his intention to bring forward such a resolution.

“First I’m hearing about it,” HFC member Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee told CQ Roll Call.

Alabama Republican Mo Brooks, another HFC member who said Meadows never brought up the subject to the group, said he needed “some time to think about the pros and cons” of such a motion.

“The key is always what happens next,” Brooks said of booting Boehner. “Do we elect someone who is more liberal, or someone who is more conservative as speaker of the House?”

Brooks said he would go with the most conservative option, and in January, when the House held its speaker election, “that was John Boehner.”

Yet another HFC member, Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, said he had just heard about Meadows offering the motion, “and I was like, whoooaaaa-kay.”

“Quite honestly I’m curious, like, what’s the point, what’s the point here?” Perry continued. “I like Mark. I don’t know what’s going to happen. I don’t know what the point of this is.”

Meanwhile, a House Republican close to leadership speaking to reporters on background speculated the reason it was not offered as a privileged motion was “deliberate.” The Republican speculated that it was a tactic to let it simmer over August recess, at which time the measure could amass more GOP support, culminating perhaps in a floor vote in September.

Either way, Republican leadership will probably ignore this particular motion, unless it gets 218 signatures in a discharge petition. But, as members noted to CQ Roll Call Tuesday night, any member can get a vote on a motion to vacate the chair. It’s just a matter of whether there’s support for such a tactic. And the August recess, when members return to their districts, is a good time to find out.

http://blogs.rollcall.com/218/meadows-wants-boehner-fired-as-speaker/

Tea Party Caucus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the U.S. Congressional caucus. For the movement, see Tea Party movement. For the protest events themselves, see Tea Party protests.
Tea Party Caucus
Founder Michele Bachmann
Chairs Michele Bachmann
Tim Huelskamp
Founded July 19, 2010; 5 years ago
Ideology Fiscal conservatism
Social conservatism[1]
Political position Right-wing[1]
National affiliation Republican Party
Website
Official website
Politics of United States
Political parties
Elections

The Tea Party Caucus (TPC) is a congressional caucus of conservative members of the Republican Party in theUnited States House of Representatives. The now largely inactive Caucus is chaired by Rep. Tim Huelskamp (KS),[2]and was founded and first chaired by Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann in July 2010.[3] Though the primary functions of the Caucus have varied from year to year, it is dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility, including significant cuts in non-defense spending, adherence to the movement‘s interpretation of the Constitution, and advocated socially conservative legislation, supported the right to keep and bear arms, and promoted limited government.

The idea of a Tea Party Caucus originated from Rand Paul (KY) when he was campaigning for the U.S. Senate in2010.[4] The Caucus was approved as an official congressional member organization by the House Administration Committee on July 19, 2010,[5] and held its first meeting and public event, a press conference on the grounds of theU.S. Capitol, on July 21.[6] A similar informal Caucus was formed in the Senate by four Senators on January 27, 2011.[1][note 1]

History

Tea Party movement

Chairs of the House Tea Party Caucus
Michele Bachmann
(2010–2015)
Tim Huelskamp
(2015–present)

An article in Politico stated that many Tea Party activists see the Caucus as an effort by the Republican Party to hijack the movement. Utah congressman Jason Chaffetz refused to join the Caucus, saying “Structure and formality are the exact opposite of what the Tea Party is, and if there is an attempt to put structure and formality around it, or to co-opt it by Washington, D.C., it’s going to take away from the free-flowing nature of the true tea party movement.”[7]

In an attempt to quell fears that Washington insiders were attempting to co-opt the Tea Party movement, Michele Bachmann stated “We’re not the mouthpiece. We are not taking the Tea Party and controlling it from Washington, D.C. We are also not here to vouch for the Tea Party or to vouch for any Tea Party organizations or to vouch for any individual people or actions, or billboards or signs or anything of the Tea Party. We are the receptacle.”[8][9]

Additionally, Senators Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Marco Rubio ofFlorida, all Tea Party supporters, refused to join the caucus.[10][11] Toomey said he would be “open” to joining, and spoke at the first meeting, but did not ultimately join.[12] Johnson said that he declined to join because he wanted to “work towards a unified Republican Conference, so that’s where I will put my energy.”[13] Rubio criticized the caucus, saying “My fear has always been that if you start creating these little clubs or organizations in Washington run by politicians, the movement starts to lose its energy.”[14]

Current status

From July 2012 to April 2013 the Tea Party Caucus neither met nor posted news on its webpage, leading observers to describe it as “dead,” “inactive,” and “defunct.”[15][16] In April 2013, Mick Mulvaney of South Carolina filed paperwork to create a new Tea Party Caucus, but found that Michele Bachmann intended to continue the caucus, starting with an event on April 25, 2013.[17] On June 19, 2014, Tea Party Caucus member Steve Scalise of Louisiana was elected as the House Majority Whip.[18] The Caucus was reconstituted in the 114th Congress in January 2015.[19]

Ideology

Senator’s Rand Paul (L) and Ted Cruz (R), both members of the Senate’s informal Tea Party Caucus, address aTea Party Express rally.

The Tea Party Caucus is often viewed as taking conservative positions, and advocating for both social and fiscal conservatism.[20] Analysis of voting patterns confirm that Caucus members are more conservative than other House Republican’s, especially on fiscal matters.[20][21] Voting trends to the right of the median Republican, and Tea Party Caucus members represent more conservative, southern and affluent districts.[21][22] Supporters of the Tea Party movement itself are largely economic driven.[23][24][25]

Despite the Caucus members differing degrees of economic and social conservatism, they generally work to promote positions within the House of Representatives that are to the right-of those of the House Republican Conference.[26] Caucus members are an important swing vote on spending bills and as a result have gained influence in Congress out of proportion to their numbers.[27][28] They are frequently sought after to broker compromises amongst the Republican leadership, generally lending a more right-wing character to U.S. politics.[29] Since the advent of the Tea Party Caucus in 2010, party-line voting has increased for both Democrats and Republicans.[30]

Funding

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the top contributors to the Tea Party Caucus members are health professionals, retirees, the real estate industry and oil and gas interests. The Center said the contributions to Caucus members from these groups, plus those from Republican and conservative groups, are on average higher than those of House members in general and also those of other Republicans. The average Tea Party Caucus member received more than $25,000 from the oil and gas industry, compared to about $13,000 for the average House member and $21,500 for the average House Republican.[31]

List of current and previous members

House

The Caucus chair was Michele Bachmann of Minnesota between 2010 and her retirement in 2015. Tim Huelskamp was elected as the Caucus’ second chair in January 2015.[19] Of a possible 435 Representatives, as of January 6, 2013, the committee had 48 members, all Republicans.[32] At its height, the Caucus had 60 members in 2011.

All 66 former members of the Tea Party Caucus are members of the Republican Party. Three of them are part of the Republican leadership. Thomas E. Priceserves as chairman of the Republican Policy Committee, making him the seventh ranking Republican in the House, John R. Carter is the Secretary of the House Republican Conference, ranking him the ninth ranking Republican, and Pete Sessions is the number six Republican as the chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee. Other former members of the Tea Party Caucus hold committee chairmanships such as Lamar S. Smith, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.

112th Congress Tea Party Caucus membership map.

Senate

The Senate has an informal Tea Party Caucus,[note 1] founded in 2011.[35][36]

Affiliated organizations

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b In the Senate, there is only one officially recognized caucus: the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control, as established by law in 1985. Unlike House caucuses, Senate groups receive neither official recognition nor funding from the chamber.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_Party_Caucus

Libertarian Republican

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A libertarian Republican is a politician or Republican party member who has advocated libertarian policies while typically voting for and being involved with the United States Republican Party.

Sometimes the terms Republitarian or liberty Republican are used as well. Libertarian Republicans’ views are similar to Libertarian Party members, but differ in regard to the strategy used to implement libertarian policies.[citation needed]

Principles

Libertarian Republicans represent a political faction within the Republican Party. They are strong believers in the traditional Republican principle of economiclibertarianism that was advocated by past and present presidential candidates such as former Senator Robert A. Taft, former Senator Barry Goldwater and former Representative Ron Paul and his son, current Senator Rand Paul. Individuals who self-identify as libertarian Republicans do not necessarily share the same political beliefs across the spectrum, though there do seem to be several issues that bind them together, including beliefs in fiscal conservatism, personal responsibility, andpersonal liberty.[citation needed]

The most common belief libertarian Republicans share is fiscal conservatism – specifically, advocating for lower taxes at every level of government, a reduction in the level of spending in the federal budget, easing the burden of federal regulations on business interests, the reform of the entitlement system, and ending or making significant cuts to the welfare state. Additionally, they oppose budget deficits and deficit spending and work to minimize it as much as possible. Libertarian Republicans tend to support more fiscal conservatism than their mainstream counterparts in the party, and are less willing to abandon these principles for political expediency.[citation needed]

Libertarian Republicans often differ from traditional Republicans in their emphasis on protection of civil liberties.[1] It is distinct from the Republican Party because it sees state-enforced conservative social policies as encroachments on personal privacy and individual liberties.[1] Libertarian Republicans disagree with the activities of mainstream Republicans with regard to civil liberties since the September 11 attacks in 2001, opposing the PATRIOT Act, REAL ID, and President George W. Bush‘s domestic intelligence program.[2]

Opposition to the use of the term libertarian Republican comes from the libertarian adherence to the Non-Aggression Principle, its core philosophy of voluntarismand lack of force against individuals, to which the Republican Party platform or philosophy does not adhere to.[3]

Organizations

The Republican Liberty Caucus was founded in 1991 at a meeting of a group of Florida members of the Libertarian Republican Organizing Committee attending a Young Republicans Convention. They included Philip Blumel, Tom Walls, Eric Rittberg, and Rex Curry and decided to develop a national Republican Liberty Caucusorganization.[4] The group represents the GOP’s libertarian wing.

Public figures

U.S. Representatives

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_Republican

Freedom Caucus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the U.S. Congressional organization. For the Democratic political action organization, see Democratic Freedom Caucus.
House Freedom Caucus
Chairman Jim Jordan
Founded 2015
Split from Republican Study Committee
Ideology Conservatism
Fiscal conservatism
Political position Right-wing to Far-right[1][2][3][4][5]
Seats in theHouse

42 / 435

Politics of the United States
Political parties
Elections

The House Freedom Caucus is a congressional caucus consisting of conservative Republican members of the United States House of Representatives.[6] It was formed by a group of Congressmen as a “smaller, more cohesive, more agile and more active” group of conservatives. Many members are also part of the conservative House group theRepublican Study Committee.[7][8] According to its mission statement, “The House Freedom Caucus gives a voice to countless Americans who feel that Washington does not represent them. We support open, accountable and limited government, the Constitution and the rule of law, and policies that promote the liberty, safety and prosperity of all Americans.”[9] The group has been linked to the Tea Party movement.[10]

During the crisis over the funding of the Department of Homeland Security in early 2015, the Caucus offered four plans for resolution, but all were rejected by the Republican leadership. POLITICO reported that one of the caucus leaders, Rep. Raúl Labrador of Idaho, said the Caucus will offer an alternative that the most conservative Republican members could support.[11]

Known members

Former Members

See also

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