The Pronk Pops Show 1303, August 7, 2019, Story 1: No Red Flag Laws — Should Trump Sign A Red Flag Law He Would Be Betraying His Supporters and Risk Losing His Reelection –Videos — Story 2: Gun Sales Surge As American People Exericise Their Second Amendment Rights — Videos — Story 3: Is The U.S. Economy Going Into a Recession? — Videos —

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1303 August 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1302 August 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1301 August 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1300 August 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1299 July 31, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1298 July 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1297 July 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1296 July 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1295 July 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1294 July 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1293 July 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1292 July 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1291 July 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1290 July 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1289 July 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1288 July 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1287 July 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1286 July 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1285 July 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1284 July 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1283 July 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1282 June 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1281 June 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1280 June 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1279 June 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1278 June 20, 2019 

Pronk Pops Show 1277 June 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1276 June 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1275 June 17, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1274 June 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1273 June 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1272 June 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1271 June 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1270 June 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1269 June 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1268 June 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1267 May 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1266 May 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1265 May 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1264 May 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1263 May 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1262 May 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1261 May 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1260 May 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1259 May 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1258 May 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1257 May 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1256 May 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1255 May 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1254 May 9, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1253 May 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1252 May 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1251 May 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1250 May 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1249 May 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1248 May 1, 2019

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Story 1: No Red Flag Laws or Extreme Risk Protection Orders — Should Trump Sign A Red Flag Law He Would Be Betraying His Supporters and Risk Losing His Reelection — Assault on Due Process and United States Constitution — Trump Is Wrong — Videos

Judge Napolitano: Red-Flag Laws Violate Due Process, Unconstitutional

Colorado enacts law to seize guns from people posing ‘threat’

Pres. Trump Calls For Similar Action To Colorado’s Red Flag Law

Former NYPD commissioner blasts New Jersey gun laws

Sheriff Elder explains opposition to the red flag bill

New Numbers On Maryland’s Red Flag Law Allowing Gun Seizures In Extreme Cases

USA: Pro-gun supporters rally against ‘Red Flag’ law in Maryland

RED FLAG LAWS: Don’t be FOOLED by the SHILLS!

Do ‘Red Flag’ Gun Laws Work?

Napolitano on Trump ‘due process’ comments: The Constitution doesn’t like it

President Donald Trump Says Take Guns ‘Early’ Without Due Process | CNBC

Red flag gun laws: Gun-rights advocates say they’ll lead to confiscations from law-abiding people

Are Red Flag Laws Coming? Lehto’s Law Ep. 5.108

Minnesota Republicans remain opposed to gun reforms

Trump Proposes ‘Red Flag’ Laws. What Are They And Do They Work?

Trump clashes with Republicans in gun control meeting

LIVE SENATE JUDICIARY HEARING ON RED FLAG LAWS 2

Ted Cruz: ‘Offensive’ That Democrats Are Calling For Gun Control After Orlando | NBC News

Red flag law

Psychiatrists and the pharma industry are to blame for the current ‘epidemic’ of mental disorders

Former NYPD commissioner blasts New Jersey gun laws

Jersey Matters – Gun Laws in New Jersey

NJ Attempts Confiscation Of My Friend’s Guns!!! Red Flag Law Gone Wrong!!!

FBI launches study on psychology of mass shooters

Former FBI profiler analyzes Florida shooting suspect

Former FBI agent on warning signs before deadly mass shooting

How the Las Vegas Gunman Planned a Massacre, in 7 Days of Video | NYT – Visual Investigations

Haunted by Columbine | Retro Report Documentary | The New York Times

Due Process of Law: Crash Course Government and Politics #28

What Ever Happened to the Constitution? | Andrew Napolitano

The Natural Law as a Restraint Against Tyranny | Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

How the Constitution Has Been Twisted to Undermine the Free Market | Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

Judge Napolitano: How Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson Destroyed Constitutional Freedom

Nation of Sheep | Andrew Napolitano

The challenge of preventing mass shootings through mental health records

School shooting renews gun control vs. mental health debate

Mass Shootings and Mental Health

Mayo psychiatrist: Taking guns away from mentally ill won’t eliminate mass shootings

BTN11: The danger of connecting mass shootings to mental illness

Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr.: Psychiatry: New Explorations

Thomas Szasz Interview by Sheldon Richman

Thomas Szasz on Socialism in Health Care

Minority Report (2002) Official Trailer #1 – Tom Cruise Sci-Fi Action Movie

Minority Report – Final Scene

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Trump warned by NRA over background checks

 Published 

President Donald Trump has repeatedly told lawmakers and aides in private conversations that he is open to endorsing extensive background checks in the wake of two mass shootings, prompting a warning from the National Rifle Association and concerns among White House aides, according to lawmakers and administration officials.

Trump, speaking to reporters Wednesday before visiting Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, where weekend shootings left 31 dead, said there “was great appetite for background checks” amid an outcry over government inaction in the face of repeated mass shootings.

Trump’s previous declarations of support for tougher gun controls, including after the deadly Parkland, Florida, shooting in February 2018, have foundered without a sustained push from the president and support from the NRA or Republican lawmakers. Even Trump’s advisers question how far he will go on any effort.

NRA chief executive Wayne LaPierre spoke with Trump on Tuesday after the president expressed support for a background check bill and told him it would not be popular among Trump’s supporters, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to freely discuss internal talks. LaPierre also argued against the bill’s merits, the officials said.

The NRA, which opposes the legislation sponsored by Sens. Patrick Toomey, R-Pa., and Joe Manchin III, D-W.Va., declined to comment.

Advisers to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he would not bring any gun-control legislation to the floor without widespread Republican support. Trump has waffled, current and past White House officials say, between wanting to do more and growing concerned that doing so could prompt a revolt from his political base. Even some supporters of the Manchin-Toomey bill, which would expand background checks to nearly all firearm sales, say it is unlikely to pass.

“I don’t think the president or his Republican allies are going to become out of nowhere advocates of aggressive gun control,” said Matt Schlapp, who leads the American Conservative Union and is a close ally to Trump.

Trump has focused on guns extensively since the shootings, calling lawmakers and surveying aides about what he should do – outreach that began Sunday evening. White House officials say there have been a series of meetings on a response, convened by acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, including a session Tuesday morning. The president has discussed with aides the idea of a Rose Garden bill-signing ceremony for gun-control legislation, a notion that seems premature to many in the West Wing.

Trump also asked lawyers about what he could enact through an executive order, officials said.

“He seems determined to do something and believes there is space to get something done this time around,” said Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who said he had spoken to Trump “four or five times” since the shooting. “The president has a pretty common-sense point of view. He’s never been a sports or gun enthusiast. But he is more determined than ever to do something on his watch.”

Manchin said Trump called him at 6:30 a.m. Monday and that the two spoke again on Tuesday, when Trump said he wanted legislation before September, when the Senate is scheduled to return.

Trump did not express explicit support for the Manchin-Toomey bill but asked a range of questions. Most of the recent mass shootings were carried out with guns purchased legally.

“He was inquisitive, wanting to know why it hadn’t happened. He wanted to know all about it,” Manchin said. “I told him we couldn’t get enough Republicans to help us.”

Manchin said he told Trump that he would need to back any gun-control legislation or it would fail again. Those comments were mirrored by almost a dozen GOP and White House aides.

“If you don’t stand up and say, ‘This is a piece of legislation I support,’ we’re not going to get enough cover to have Republicans stand tall. They won’t be able to do it,” Manchin said.

On Tuesday, Trump outlined some NRA concerns in a second call with Manchin. “We talked about that,” Manchin said. “I told him, we don’t expect the NRA to be supportive. Mr. President, in all honesty, when you did the bump stocks, they weren’t for you. They were against that, too. You didn’t take any hit on that.”

In March, the administration administratively banned bump stocks, the devices used to make semiautomatic rifles fire rapidly like machine guns.

A White House official said Trump had asked some advisers and lawmakers this week about whether the NRA had enduring clout amid an internal leadership battle and allegations of improper spending, as well as what his supporters would think of the bill. The Washington Post reported this week that LaPierre sought to have the NRA buy him a $6 million mansion in a gated Dallas-area golf club after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which 17 students and staff members were killed.

Toomey said he has spoken with the president at least three times since the weekend shootings. He declined to elaborate on the conversations, although he stressed that Trump hasn’t specifically endorsed the bill. Their conversations have been more general, he said, but Toomey noted that they had been “encouraging” and “very recent.”

“I will just tell you generally the president is open-minded about this,” Toomey said.

Some measures – such as a ban on assault weapons – have been ruled out, White House officials and legislative aides say. Recent polls indicate a majority of Americans support some form of a ban on assault rifles, though there is a large partisan divide and fewer than half of Republicans support such measures. A July NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist poll found 57 percent of the public supported a ban on “the sale of semiautomatic assault guns, such as the AK-47 or the AR-15.” Fewer than 3 in 10 Republicans supported the proposal, rising to a slight majority of independents and more than 8 in 10 Democrats.

“There’s no political space for that,” Graham said. “So I don’t think he’s going to go down that road.”

However, about 9 in 10 Americans support requiring background checks for all gun purchases, including more than 8 in 10 Republicans, Democrats and independents, according to polling.

Trump was vague about what he would do in his comments Wednesday, and current and former White House officials said he is often ambivalent on what he should do after shootings.

After the Parkland shooting, Trump expressed support for background checks for gun purchases and greater police power to seize guns from mentally disturbed people. But he faced significant resistance from the NRA and Republicans and abandoned the ideas.

On Air Force One after the October 2017 shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 dead, Trump said he wanted to enact a law to keep such shootings from happening again and would question others for ideas but did not have specific proposals.

After shootings, Trump regularly would poll aides about what measures would have political support, but if they did not gain backing, he was not inclined to lead the charge.

“He would not be blocking it, but he’s not going to be the one forcing it to happen,” this official said.

Some of the president’s more moderate friends and donors have pressed for more-robust gun-control measures. But Trump has also told advisers that he cannot lose any members of his “base.”

“Republicans are headed for extinction in the suburbs if they don’t distance themselves from the NRA. The GOP needs to put forth solutions to help eradicate the gun violence epidemic,” said Dan Eberhart, a Republican donor.

In public, Trump has promoted “red flag” laws – also known as extreme risk protection orders – that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to ban gun access for someone they believe is an imminent threat to themselves or others. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have such laws already in place, according to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which advocates more restrictions on firearms.

White House aides said such a bill was the most likely outcome and had the most support in the West Wing. Schlapp said that Trump could convince Republicans to support some measures seen as less restrictive.

“It’s the best route forward because it can pass, the president will sign it and it can actually stop the next attack,” Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who drafted legislation to encourage more states to pass their own red flag laws, said in a phone interview Wednesday. He began working on the legislation after the Parkland shooting.

“If you look at all the studies that have been done, you see that invariably, with perhaps the exception of Las Vegas, they all exhibited signs and warnings to people around them that they could do something,” Rubio said.

Yet any effort on Capitol Hill to implement firearms restrictions is likely to face, at a minimum, skepticism from conservatives concerned about any measure viewed as restricting gun rights.

Early on in his administration, Trump moved to loosen restrictions on gun purchases by people with mental illnesses, signing legislation overturning an Obama-era regulation that barred certain people with mental health issues from purchasing firearms.

Some Republican officials have pointedly noted that Graham didn’t consult other GOP senators before forging ahead with Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., on a plan to advance red flag legislation through the Senate Judiciary Committee.

A handful of Republican members of the Judiciary Committee, through aides and in public comments, have indicated they are open to policies that would encourage states to implement such laws.

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., appeared the most skeptical, with a spokesman saying merely that Sasse has asked to review the legislative language from Graham. A spokesman for Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said the lawmaker “believes red flag laws are one of the tools states can consider, but that there are dangers depending on how a state implements these laws,” expressing concern about protecting “due process and our constitutional rights.”

Democrats, while generally supportive of red flag laws, questioned how much congressional efforts would actually help states – particularly conservative ones with Republican governors – enact them. Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said Wednesday that Democrats would demand a vote on legislation expanding background checks that had already passed the House and is opposed by the Trump administration in tandem with any Senate vote on red flag laws.

“The question is, what difference can the federal government make in what is largely a state decision?” said Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., one of the most vocal advocates of gun control in Congress. “I’m all for federal action on extreme risk protection orders. I’m just not sure it’s going to move the needle.”

https://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/Trump-warned-by-NRA-over-background-checks-14288843.php

 

Republican senators get behind first federal gun control law since 1994 after mass shootings with backing for ‘red flag’ laws to seize guns from dangerous people

  • Growing number of Republican senators say they back bipartisan bill for nationwide ‘red flag’ laws to seize guns from people who are dangerous 
  • Donald Trump signaled support for the plan Monday in address to the nation after El Paso and Dayton shootings, which claimed 32 lives
  • Bill is by Lindsey Graham, the Republican close to Trump, and Democrat Richard  Blumenthal
  • In sign of fear among Republicans that mass shootings will harm them, Congressman Adam Kinzinger, proposed more sweeping restrictions 
  • Kinzinger said there should be universal background checks, a raise in the legal age to purchase a gun, and ban on high capacity magazines 
  • A major donor also warned the GOP needs to move toward gun reform so it doesn’t lose the suburbs 
  • ‘Republicans are headed for extinction in the suburbs if they don’t distance themselves from the NRA,’ Dan Eberhart said
  • Democrats have also been pushing for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to call a special session to vote on universal background check legislation

A bipartisan proposal to encourage states to adopt ‘red flag’ laws to take guns away from people believed to be a danger to themselves or others was gaining support among Congressional Republicans Tuesday.

The still-emerging plan would create a federal grant program to encourage states to implement the laws.

The measure would be the first major federal gun control law since the 1994 assault weapons ban, which expired in 2004.

But it will go nowhere near as far as Democrats are demanding, with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer demanding a Senate vote on a universal background checks bill which has already passed the House.

The bipartisan proposal by Sens. Lindsey Graham, the Republican from South Carolina, and Richard Blumenthal, the Democrat from Connecticut, was gaining support among GOP senators Tuesday.

Donald Trump appeared to voice support for such a measure Monday when he spoke at the White House – but there has been no indication from Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell on how he will proceed.

The alleged El Paso shooter, 21-year-old Patrick Crusius (pictured) gunned down those shopping in a Walmart and the alleged Dayton shooter was 24-year-old Connor Betts who was shot dead by police less than a minute after he opened fire

The alleged El Paso shooter, 21-year-old Patrick Crusius (pictured) gunned down those shopping in a Walmart and the alleged Dayton shooter was 24-year-old Connor Betts who was shot dead by police less than a minute after he opened fire

Bipartisan move: Republican Lindsey Graham, the Republican from South Carolina, and Richard Blumenthal, believe they can get 'red flag' laws passed - the first major federal gun control move since 1994
Bipartisan move: Republican Lindsey Graham, the Republican from South Carolina, and Richard Blumenthal, believe they can get 'red flag' laws passed - the first major federal gun control move since 1994

Bipartisan move: Republican Lindsey Graham, the Republican from South Carolina, and Richard Blumenthal, believe they can get ‘red flag’ laws passed – the first major federal gun control  move since 1994

Move on guns: The last significant federal gun control legislation was the 1994 assault weapons ban, which expired in 2004. Since then Democratic attempts at more controls have been rebuffed

Nearly all Senate Democrats support red flag laws, along with a growing number of Republicans, including Pennsylvania’s Pat Toomey, Indiana’s Mike Braun and Iowa’s Chuck Grassley, a former Judiciary chairman.

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, told reporters Tuesday he is open to the proposal, noting that the alleged shooter in Dayton, Ohio, had so-called kill lists of intended targets.

‘Clearly people knew something was wrong with this guy, and yet nobody went to the proper authorities or the proper authorities didn’t respond,’ Portman said.

‘RED FLAG’ LAWS AND HOW THEY WORK

HOW DOES A RED FLAG LAW WORK?

In general, red flag or ‘extreme risk protection order’ laws allow courts to issue temporary orders barring someone from possessing guns based on some showing of imminent danger or a risk of misuse.

State laws vary, but most stipulate that only specific people – usually family or household members – may petition a court for an extreme risk protection order. 

In some cases, a preliminary order may be granted without prior notice to the person who is the subject of the order.

Such an order typically is brief, ranging from a few days to about three weeks. 

Once the person who is alleged to pose a risk of gun violence has been given an opportunity to respond, a more permanent order may be granted, typically for up to a year.

Importantly to Graham and other supporters, before an order can be entered, some factual showing must be made that the subject of the order poses a risk of using a firearm to harm themselves or others.

WHAT IS THE NEW  PROPOSAL?

Lindsey Graham and Richard Blumenthal are still developing the plan, but a similar bill proposed last year by Florida Sens. Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson essentially would pay states to implement red flag law programs. 

A bid last year by Graham and Blumenthal to let federal courts keep guns away from people who show warning signs of violence failed to generate political support.

Blumenthal called the failed effort to create a federal program a learning experience and said the new proposal would set a national standard that states must meet in order to be eligible for federal grants. 

He compared it to federal highway laws where grants are dependent on states setting speed limits or drunk-driving standards.

‘If you have speed limits, you get the money,’ he said, adding that the red flag law would operate on the same principle.

A red flag law may ‘bridge this issue of the guns and the mental health issue, where you identify somebody who has a mental health history that might not be formally diagnosed, but that people know about,’ he said.

Many mass shootings ‘involved individuals who showed signs of violent behavior that are either ignored or not followed up on,’ said Graham, chairman of the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee.

‘State red flag laws will provide the tools for law enforcement to do something about many of these situations before it’s too late.’

In an interview Tuesday, Blumenthal said there’s ‘a growing wave of support on both sides of the aisle’ for the red-flag plan – more momentum in fact ‘than any other gun violence plan’ being debated in Congress, including a proposal Blumenthal supports to require universal background checks for gun purchases.

However McConnell, who has adopted the nickname the ‘Grim Reaper’ to celebrate his success at blocking Democratic bills, is widely considered the single biggest roadblock to changes in gun laws or any significant legislation in Congress.

The majority leader has not publicly indicated a position on red flag laws but said in a statement Monday that ‘Senate Republicans are prepared to do our part’ to address gun violence.

He said he has spoken with Graham and other committee chairs and asked them to consider ‘potential solutions to help protect our communities without infringing on Americans’ constitutional rights.’

Congress passed a modest measure last year to shore up the federal background checks system and approved a grant program to prevent school violence – signs that action on gun violence is possible, McConnell said.

A National Rifle Association spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In a statement, the group said it welcomes Trump’s call ‘to address the root causes of the horrific acts of violence that have occurred in our country. It has been the NRA’s long-standing position that those who have been adjudicated as a danger to themselves or others should not have access to firearms and should be admitted for treatment.’

However the organization is now significantly weakened by infighting, allegations of financial impropriety and litigation against it by New York State’s Democratic attorney general over whether it broke laws governing non-profits.

In a sign of concern in Republican ranks at the political impact of the weekend of mass shootings, Illinois Congressman Adam Kinzinger published an op/ed on Medium that demanded universal background checks and raising the legal age for those purchasing a gun to 21- and a ban on high-capacity magazines.

Connor Betts had two 100-round magazines when he opened fire in Dayton early Sunday morning.

Kinzinger said his proposal is offering a compromise between those who call for the total banning of firearms with those who advocate for loosening gun restrictions so the ‘good guys with guns’ can protect against ‘bad guys with guns.’

‘[T]hose of us not in those two mindsets are left feeling helpless, frustrated, and at a loss,’ Kinzinger wrote. ‘We have a gun violence epidemic, and to address it, we need to change some laws and change some hearts.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7327315/GOP-congressman-calls-universal-background-checks-amid-warning-party-faces-suburban-extinction.html

 

Red flag law

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 States with red flag laws

In the United States, a red flag law is a gun violence prevention law that permits police or family members to petition a state court to order the temporary removal of firearms from a person who may present a danger to others or themselves.[1] A judge makes the determination to issue the order based on statements and actions made by the gun owner in question.[2] Refusal to comply with the order is punishable as a criminal offense.[3][4] After a set time, the guns are returned to the person from whom they were seized unless another court hearing extends the period of confiscation.[5][6]

Such orders are known by various names, including “Extreme Risk Protection Orders” (ERPO) (in OregonWashingtonMaryland, and Vermont); “Risk Protection Orders” (in Florida); “Gun Violence Restraining Orders” (in California); “risk warrants” (in Connecticut); and “Proceedings for the Seizure and Retention of a Firearm” (in Indiana).[7] As of August 2019, 17 states and the District of Columbia have passed some form of red-flag law. The specifics of the laws, and the degree to which they are enforced, vary from state to state.[8]

History and adoption

In 1999, Connecticut was the first to enact a red flag law,[9] following a rampage shooting at the Connecticut Lottery.[10] It was followed by Indiana (2005), California (2014), Washington (2016), and Oregon (2017).[9] California was the first state to pass a red flag law allowing family members to petition courts to take weapons from persons deemed a threat, after Elliot Rodger committed a mass shooting in Isla Vista, California; the California law also permits law enforcement officials to petition for an order for the removal of guns from an individual for up to twelve months.[10]

Before 2018, five states had some version of red flag laws.[11] After the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida, in 2018, that number more than doubled, as more states enacted such laws:[12][13] Florida,[14] Vermont,[15] Maryland,[16] Rhode Island,[17] New Jersey,[18] Delaware,[19] Massachusetts,[20] Illinois,[21] and the District of Columbia.[22] In 2019, New York enacted a red-flag law as part of a broader package of gun-control legislation that overwhelmingly passed the state legislature.[23][24] In addition to allowing police and family members to petition for entry of an extreme risk protection order,[23][24] the law also allows teachers and school administrations to file such petitions, making New York the first state to include such a provision.[25] Three other states also enacted red-flag laws in 2019: Colorado,[26] Nevada,[27] and Hawaii.[28][29]

Pending legislation

Other state legislatures considered similar legislation.[30][6][31][32] In 2019, legislatures in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and North Carolina are considering such legislation.[8]

The Virginia General Assembly voted down red flag legislation in its January 2019 session, and then after being convened for a special session after the Virginia Beach shooting to consider gun control legislation, opted to refer the legislation to the State Crime Commission for study. The bill is scheduled to be taken up again in another special session after the November elections.[33]

A red-flag bill previously died in the Arizona Legislature, but in 2019, Governor Doug Ducey renewed pressure on legislative Republicans to pass the law in the wake of the shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio.[34] A red-flag bill has been introduced in the Tennessee Legislature, but in 2019 the Republican-controlled has legislature declined to take up the bill, and Governor Bill Lee has not committed to support it.[35]

Provisions

The specific provisions of red-flag laws differ from state-to-state, on issues such as who may petition for a risk protection order.[36] For example, in Indiana, only law enforcement may petition for an order.[36] In contrast, in Oregon, any person living with the person of concern may file a petition.[36] The California Legislature passed a measure in 2016 to allow high school and college employees, co-workers and mental health professionals to file such petitions, but this legislation was vetoed by Governor Jerry Brown.[10]

Effects

A 2016 study published in the journal Law and Contemporary Problems analyzed data from the 762 gun removals under Connecticut’s “risk warrant” law from October 1999 through June 2013 and determined that there was “one averted suicide for every ten to eleven gun seizure cases.”[37] The researchers concluded that “enacting and implementing laws like Connecticut’s civil risk warrant statute in other states could significantly mitigate the risk posed by that small proportion of legal gun owners who, at times, may pose a significant danger to themselves or others.”[37]

A 2018 study published in the journal Psychiatric Services utilized CDC data from all suicides in all 50 states from 1981-2015 to “examine the effects of Connecticut and Indiana’s risk-based firearm seizure law on state-level firearm suicide rates.”[38] The researchers concluded that “Indiana’s firearm seizure law was associated with a 7.5% reduction in firearm suicides in the ten years following its enactment, an effect specific to suicides with firearms and larger than that seen in any comparison state by chance alone. Enactment of Connecticut’s law was associated with a 1.6% reduction in firearm suicides immediately after its passage and a 13.7% reduction in firearm suicides in the post–Virginia Tech period, when enforcement of the law substantially increased.” The study also found that “Whereas Indiana demonstrated an aggregate decrease in suicides, Connecticut’s estimated reduction in firearm suicides was offset by increased nonfirearm suicides.”[38]

Usage

In the first four months after Florida’s risk protection law took effect, a total of 467 risk protection cases were filed in Florida. Slightly over one-fourth of the cases involved holders of concealed-carry firearm licenses; when an order is granted against a license-holder, the license-holder’s license is temporarily suspended.[39]

In California in 2016 and 2017, 189 petitions for gun violence restraining orders were granted. Of these, 12 petitions were filed by family members, while the rest were filed by law enforcement.[40][41]

In Maryland, the courts reviewed 302 petitions for a gun removal order in the first three months of the state’s law; the petition was granted in 148 cases (about half the time). About 60% of petitions were filed by family or household members, one petition was filed by a healthcare worker, and the rest were filed by police.[42] In November 2018, a Maryland man was killed by Anne Arundel County police officers serving a removal order after refusing to surrender his firearms; police said that there was a struggle over the gun and a shot was fired before officers fatally shot the man.[43]

In Marion County, Indiana (which contains Indianapolis, and the most of the uses of Indiana’s ERPO law), a 2015 study published in the journal Behavioral Sciences & the Law found that seizure petitions were filed in court 404 times between 2006 and 2013, from persons identified at being a risk of suicide (68%), violence (21%), or psychosis (16%). The study found that 28% of firearm-seizure cases involved a domestic dispute and 26% involved intoxication. The study found that “The seized firearms were retained by the court at the initial hearing in 63% of cases; this retention was closely linked to the defendant’s failure to appear at the hearing. The court dismissed 29% of cases at the initial hearing, closely linked to the defendant’s presence at the hearing. In subsequent hearings of cases not dismissed, the court ordered the destruction of the firearms in 72% of cases, all when the individual did not appear in court, and dismissed 24% of the cases, all when the individual was present at the hearing.”[44]

In Connecticut, some 764 “imminent risk” gun seizures were served between October 1999 and July 2013, according to a 2014 study in the Connecticut Law Review.[45] Of gun seizure orders served, 91.5% were directed at men and 8.5% were directed to women, and the average age of the individuals was 47.4 years old.[45] Police reports associated with the Connecticut gun seizures in 1999 to 2013 indicated that at the time of confiscation, about 30% of the subject gun owners “showed evidence of alcohol consumption” and about 10% “indicated using prescribed pain medications.”[45] At the time the warrants were served, the majority of gun owners (60% of men and 80% of women) were sent to a local hospital emergency department for an emergency evaluation; a minority (20%) were arrested.[45] The study noted that “In over 70% of the cases, the outcome of the hearings was unknown. For the cases with outcomes reported, the judges ruled that the weapons needed to be held by the state 68% of the time. Weapons were returned in only twenty of the reported cases. In fifteen other cases, guns were given to a family member; in thirty cases, the guns were destroyed.”[45]

Federal legislative proposals

Senator Dianne FeinsteinDemocrat of California, introduced a bill, the Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, which would allow states to use grants to develop red flag laws and make it a federal felony under 18 U.S. Code § 922(g) to possess a firearm in violation of a state red flag law. The legislation is supported by 25 Democratic senators and two Democratic-aligned independent senators.[46][47] Senator Marco RubioRepublican of Florida, introduced a separate bipartisan bill that would use grants to encourage the passage of state red-flag laws.[46] Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, said in 2019 that he also planned to introduce legislation to encourage states to pass red flag laws.[36]

Support and opposition

An April 2018 poll found that 85% of registered voters support laws that would “allow the police to take guns away from people who have been found by a judge to be a danger to themselves or others” (71% “strongly supported” while 14% “somewhat supported” such laws).[48][49] State-level polling in Colorado and Michigan has shown similar levels of support.[50][51]

Democrats and some Republicans are receptive to this law.[2] Such laws are supported by groups that support gun control, such as Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and Everytown for Gun Safety. The latter group conducted a nationwide study showing that the perpetrators of mass shootings showed warning signs before the event 42% of the time.[13]

Opponents of red flag laws argue that such legislation infringes on the constitutional right to bear arms and the right to due process of law, and object to ex parte hearings.[52][53][54] There has been debate about how soon after the ex parte hearing the adversarial hearing should be held; for example, in Virginia, state senator Glen Sturtevant argued that instead of 14 days, he “would think that for an important issue like this, we would want to have that hearing within 48 hours.”[55]

The National Rifle Association (NRA) had previously argued that red flag laws unnecessarily hamper the right to due process of individuals who are restrained by them,[30] and worked to defeat such legislation in Utah and Maryland.[56] In a March 2018 policy reversal, the NRA suggested that it might support such laws, but conditioned any openness to such laws on an extensive list of conditions,[31][56] including a judicial finding by “clear and convincing evidence” that the person poses a significant risk of danger.[56] The NRA did not identify any federal or state red flag laws that it supported,[56] and even after its March 2018 announcement continued to work to defeat or weaken red flag bills introduced in state legislatures.[57] In summer 2018, the NRA mobilized to defeat red-flag legislation proposed in Pennsylvania because it objected to allowing initial hearings ex parte.[57] In Arizona in 2019, the NRA ghostwrote an opinion piece for sheriffs to submit to the local press stating their opposition to the legislation.[58] A 2019 study by gun rights advocate John Lott found red flag laws have no significant effect on murder, suicide, the number of people killed in mass public shootings, robbery, aggravated assault, or burglary.[59]

Some counties and cities have adopted “Second Amendment sanctuary” resolutions in opposition to red flag laws.[58][60][61] As of 2019, some 75 jurisdictions have declared themselves sanctuaries that oppose emergency protection orders and enforcement of gun background checks, at times with assistance from the NRA.[58]

In the wake of the El Paso, Texas shooting and Dayton, Ohio shooting of August 4 and 5, 2019, President Donald Trump called on states to implement red flag laws to help remove guns from “those judged to pose a grave risk to public safety.”[36]

See also

References …

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_flag_law

Story 2: Gun Sales Surge As American People Exercise Their Second Amendment Rights — Videos

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I need the ability to defend myself;’ Local gun shops likely to see increase in sales after mass

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Story 3: Is The U.S. Economy Going Into a Recession?

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Catarina Saraiva

Growth in the world’s biggest economy will average 2.3% this year, down from 2.5% seen in a July survey. Gross domestic product expansion is forecast to slow to a 1.8% annualized pace in the third quarter, from 3.1% in the first three months of the year and 2.1% in the second quarter.

“Trade tensions are needlessly roiling financial markets, which could eventually destabilize a stable economy,” Parul Jain, chief investment strategist at Macrofin Analytics LLC in Wayne, New Jersey, said in comments attached to her survey response.

President Donald Trump last week announced new tariffs on imported Chinese goods, to take effect on Sept. 1, causing steep declines in global stock markets. The S&P 500 index of U.S. stocks has fallen more than 3% since July 31. That was the day the Federal Reserve cut interest rates for the first time since 2008, to a range of 2% to 2.25%, in a bid to support the economy.

Economists moved up expectations for the next Fed interest-rate cut to September from December and now see a 25-basis-point reduction in the benchmark rate, to a range of 1.75% to 2%, at the next meeting, according to the poll.

Global growth forecasts for 2019 were also cut, to 3.2% from 3.3%. Bloomberg’s survey was conducted Aug. 2 to Aug. 7.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/recession-odds-rise-as-economists-cut-growth-estimates/ar-AAFwDzK

 

 

 

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