The Pronk Pops Show 1250, May 3, 2019, Story 1: Average Jobs Report With 263,000 New Jobs Created With 3.6% Unemployment Rate (Lowest Since December 1969) However Labor Participation Rate Dropped By .2% to 62.8% With 646,000 Monthly Increase of Number of Americans Not In Labor to Record High of Force 96,223,000 — Another Day In Paradise Videos — Story 2: Vice President Pence Wants Fed To Reduce Targeted Federal Funds Rate — A Far Better Idea is For Federal Government To Cut Spending and Balance The Budget? — Videos –Story 3: Could A Change of Regime in Venezuela Could Cut Gasoline Prices? — Videos — Story 4: Catherine Herridge Interviews President Trump Goes on Offensive Taking No Prisoners — Videos 

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1250 May 3, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1249 May 2, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1248 May 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1247 April 30, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1246 April 29, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1245 April 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1244 April 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1243 April 24, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1242 April 23, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1241 April 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1240 April 16, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1239 April 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1238 April 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1237 April 10, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1236 April 9, 201

Pronk Pops Show 1235 April 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1234 April 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1233 April 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1232 April 1, 2019 Part 2

Pronk Pops Show 1232 March 29, 2019 Part 1

Pronk Pops Show 1231 March 28, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1230 March 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1229 March 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1228 March 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1227 March 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1226 March 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1225 March 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1224 March 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1223 March 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1222 March 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1221 March 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1220 March 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1219 March 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1218 March 1, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1217 February 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1216 February 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1215 February 25, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1214 February 22, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1213 February 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1212 February 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1211 February 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1210 February 18, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1209 February 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1208 February 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1207 February 13, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1206 February 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1205 February 11, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1204 February 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1203 February 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1202 February 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1201 February 4, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1200 February 1, 2019

 

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Story 1: Average Jobs Report With 263,000 New Jobs Created With 3.6% Unemployment Rate (Lowest Since December 1969) However Labor Participation Rate Dropped By .2% to 62.8% With 646,000 Monthly Increase of Number of Americans Not In Labor to Record High of Force 96,223,000 — Another Day In Paradise Videos —

http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts

See the source image

Watch five experts break down the robust April jobs report

Jobs report: U.S. adds 263,000 jobs in April, unemployment drops

Unemployment rate drops to lowest level in decades

Kudlow celebrates Trump economy’s booming job numbers

Unemployment Game Show – Are you Officially Unemployed? | Mint Personal Finance Software

Labor Force Participation

Wither the Work Ethic of American Men?

The Economic Impact When Baby Boomers Retire

Are baby boomers hurting the economy?

U.S. Faces ‘Explosion of Senior Citizens’: Will Baby Boomers Strain Economy?

Why Men Are Leaving The Workforce

Jordan Peterson: What Kind of Job Fits You?

Jordan Peterson – What is consciousness & how does it relate to the brain?

Jordan Peterson | Make Things Better Wherever You Are

[youtub=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jte6SSO532o]

Jordan Peterson – If you aren’t willing to be a fool you can’t be a master (Circumambulation)

Jordan Peterson | How to Have Better Conversations

Jordan Peterson | Using Money Productively

Jordan Peterson on the meaning of life for men. MUST WATCH

Jordan Peterson on taking responsibility for your life

The Truth About Unemployment Rates

Taxing Work

The Truth About America’s Survival | Demographics

The Truth About America’s Population Replacement

This animation puts the entire US population into perspective

Dr. Jordan B. Peterson On The Impact Of the Radical Left

10 Awkward Moments When You’re Unemployed

Helping Long-term Unemployed Workers | Carl Van Horn, Ph.D. | TEDxCapeMay

While the U.S. economy has largely recovered from the Great Recession, there are still nearly three million Americans—one in three unemployed workers and more than four in ten in New Jersey—who have been unemployed for more than six months. Dr. Van Horn explains the causes and consequences of long-term unemployment and highlight innovative, cost-effective solutions that Rutgers University and a broad coalition of employers, non-profit organizations, and volunteers are putting into practice to help the unemployed get back to work. Carl Van Horn is Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy and the founding Director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (www.heldrich.rutgers.edu). He is also a member of the graduate faculties of the Department of Political Science, the Graduate School of Education, and the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? | David Autor | TEDxCambridge

Why is Everyone So Fat, Broke and Busy? Jeff Gaines at TEDxAlbany 2010

TEDxAsheville – Adam Baker – Sell your crap. Pay your debt. Do what you love.

A rich life with less stuff | The Minimalists | TEDxWhitefish

The Art of Letting Go | The Minimalists | TEDxFargo

Phil Collins – Another Day In Paradise (Official Music Video)

 

Civilian Labor Force Level

162,470,000

 

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155763(1) 155312 155005 155394 155536 155749 155599 155605 155687 154673 155265 155182
2014 155352(1) 155483 156028 155369 155684 155707 156007 156130 156040 156417 156494 156332
2015 157053(1) 156663 156626 157017 157616 157014 157008 157165 156745 157188 157502 158080
2016 158371(1) 158705 159079 158891 158700 158899 159150 159582 159810 159768 159629 159779
2017 159693(1) 159854 160036 160169 159910 160124 160383 160706 161190 160436 160626 160636
2018 161123(1) 161900 161646 161551 161667 162129 162209 161802 162055 162694 162821 163240
2019 163229(1) 163184 162960 162470
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employment Level

156,645,000

 

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138438(1) 138581 138751 139297 139241 139141 139179 139438 139396 139119 139044 139301
2011 139250(1) 139394 139639 139586 139624 139384 139524 139942 140183 140368 140826 140902
2012 141584(1) 141858 142036 141899 142206 142391 142292 142291 143044 143431 143333 143330
2013 143292(1) 143362 143316 143635 143882 143999 144264 144326 144418 143537 144479 144778
2014 145150(1) 145134 145648 145667 145825 146247 146399 146530 146778 147427 147404 147615
2015 148150(1) 148053 148122 148491 148802 148765 148815 149175 148853 149270 149506 150164
2016 150622(1) 150934 151146 150963 151074 151104 151450 151766 151877 151949 152150 152276
2017 152128(1) 152417 152958 153150 152920 153176 153456 153591 154399 153847 153945 154065
2018 154482(1) 155213 155160 155216 155539 155592 155964 155604 156069 156582 156803 156945
2019 156694(1) 156949 156748 156645
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Unemployment Level

5,824,000

Series Id:           LNS13000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 5708 5858 5733 5481 5758 5651 5747 5853 5625 5534 5639 5634
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7116 6927 6731 6850 6766 6979 7149 7067 7170 7237 7240 7645
2008 7685 7497 7822 7637 8395 8575 8937 9438 9494 10074 10538 11286
2009 12058 12898 13426 13853 14499 14707 14601 14814 15009 15352 15219 15098
2010 15046 15113 15202 15325 14849 14474 14512 14648 14579 14516 15081 14348
2011 14013 13820 13737 13957 13855 13962 13763 13818 13948 13594 13302 13093
2012 12797 12813 12713 12646 12660 12692 12656 12471 12115 12124 12005 12298
2013 12471 11950 11689 11760 11654 11751 11335 11279 11270 11136 10787 10404
2014 10202 10349 10380 9702 9859 9460 9608 9599 9262 8990 9090 8717
2015 8903 8610 8504 8526 8814 8249 8194 7990 7892 7918 7995 7916
2016 7749 7771 7932 7928 7626 7795 7700 7817 7933 7819 7480 7503
2017 7565 7437 7078 7019 6991 6948 6927 7115 6791 6588 6682 6572
2018 6641 6687 6486 6335 6128 6537 6245 6197 5986 6112 6018 6294
2019 6535 6235 6211 5824

U-3 Unemployment Rate

3.6%

 

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.2 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.1 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.6 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.1 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.8 4.9 4.8 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.7 4.7
2017 4.7 4.7 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.2 4.1 4.2 4.1
2018 4.1 4.1 4.0 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.9
2019 4.0 3.8 3.8 3.6

 

U-6 Unemployment Rate

7.3%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.6 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.5 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.6 12.6 12.3 12.2 12.0 12.1 12.0 11.7 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 10.0 9.9
2016 9.8 9.7 9.8 9.7 9.9 9.5 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.2
2017 9.3 9.1 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.6 8.3 8.0 8.0 8.1
2018 8.2 8.2 7.9 7.8 7.7 7.8 7.5 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.6
2019 8.1 7.3 7.3 7.3

 

Labor Participation Rate

62.8%

Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey

 

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.7 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.2 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8
2015 62.9 62.7 62.6 62.7 62.9 62.6 62.6 62.6 62.4 62.5 62.6 62.7
2016 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.7 62.7
2017 62.9 62.9 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.7 62.8 62.7
2018 62.7 63.0 62.9 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.9 62.9 63.1
2019 63.2 63.2 63.0 62.8

 

Not in Labor Force

96,223,000

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Series Id:           LNS15000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Not in Labor Force
Labor force status:  Not in labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 69142 69120 69338 69267 69853 69876 70398 70401 70645 70782 70579 70488
2001 70088 70409 70381 70956 71414 71592 71526 72136 71676 71817 71876 72010
2002 72623 72010 72343 72281 72260 72600 72827 72856 72554 73026 73508 73675
2003 73960 74015 74295 74066 74268 73958 74767 75062 75249 75324 75280 75780
2004 75319 75648 75606 75907 75903 75735 75730 76113 76526 76399 76259 76581
2005 76808 76677 76846 76514 76409 76673 76721 76642 76739 76958 77138 77394
2006 77339 77122 77161 77318 77359 77317 77535 77451 77757 77634 77499 77376
2007 77506 77851 77982 78818 78810 78671 78904 79461 79047 79532 79105 79238
2008 78554 79156 79087 79429 79102 79314 79395 79466 79790 79736 80189 80380
2009 80529 80374 80953 80762 80705 80938 81367 81780 82495 82766 82865 83813
2010 83349 83304 83206 82707 83409 84075 84199 84014 84347 84895 84590 85240
2011 85441 85637 85623 85603 85834 86144 86383 86111 85940 86308 86312 86589
2012 87888 87765 87855 88239 88100 88073 88405 88803 88613 88429 88836 88722
2013 88900 89516 89990 89780 89827 89803 90156 90355 90481 91708 91302 91563
2014 91563 91603 91230 92070 91938 92107 92016 92099 92406 92240 92350 92695
2015 92671 93237 93454 93249 92839 93649 93868 93931 94580 94353 94245 93856
2016 94026 93872 93689 94077 94475 94498 94470 94272 94281 94553 94911 94963
2017 94389 94392 94378 94419 94857 94833 94769 94651 94372 95330 95323 95473
2018 95657 95033 95451 95721 95787 95513 95633 96264 96235 95821 95886 95649
2019 95010 95208 95577 96223

 

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until	      USDL-19-0731
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, May 3, 2019

Technical information: 
 Household data:	(202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data:	(202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:	        (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov

	
                 THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- APRIL 2019


Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 263,000 in April, and the
unemployment rate declined to 3.6 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics reported today. Notable job gains occurred in professional
and business services, construction, health care, and social assistance.

This news release presents statistics from two monthly surveys. The
household survey measures labor force status, including unemployment,
by demographic characteristics. The establishment survey measures nonfarm
employment, hours, and earnings by industry. For more information about
the concepts and statistical methodology used in these two surveys, see
the Technical Note.

Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to 3.6 percent in
April, the lowest rate since December 1969. Over the month, the number
of unemployed persons decreased by 387,000 to 5.8 million. (See table
A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates declined in April
for adult men (3.4 percent), adult women (3.1 percent), Whites (3.1
percent), Asians (2.2 percent), and Hispanics (4.2 percent). The jobless
rates for teenagers (13.0 percent) and Blacks (6.7 percent) showed little
or no change. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

Among the unemployed, the number of job losers and persons who completed
temporary jobs declined by 186,000 over the month to 2.7 million. (See
table A-11.)

In April, the number of persons unemployed less than 5 weeks declined by
222,000 to 1.9 million. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless
for 27 weeks or more) was little changed at 1.2 million in April and
accounted for 21.1 percent of the unemployed. (See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to
62.8 percent in April but was unchanged from a year earlier. The employment-
population ratio was unchanged at 60.6 percent in April and has been either
60.6 percent or 60.7 percent since October 2018. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes
referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed at 4.7
million in April. These individuals, who would have preferred full-time
employment, were working part time because their hours had been reduced or
because they were unable to find full-time jobs. (See table A-8.)

In April, 1.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force,
little different from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.)
These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for
work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were
not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4
weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 454,000 discouraged workers in
April, about unchanged from a year earlier. (Data are not seasonally adjusted.)
Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they
believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 963,000 persons
marginally attached to the labor force in April had not searched for work for
reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 263,000 in April, compared with
an average monthly gain of 213,000 over the prior 12 months. In April, notable
jobs gains occurred in professional and business services, construction,
health care, and social assistance. (See table B-1.)

Professional and business services added 76,000 jobs in April. Within the
industry, employment gains occurred in administrative and support services
(+53,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+14,000). Over
the past 12 months, professional and business services has added 535,000 jobs.

In April, construction employment rose by 33,000, with gains in nonresidential
specialty trade contractors (+22,000) and in heavy and civil engineering
construction (+10,000). Construction has added 256,000 jobs over the past 12
months.
 
Employment in health care grew by 27,000 in April and 404,000 over the past
12 months. In April, job growth occurred in ambulatory health care services
(+17,000), hospitals (+8,000), and community care facilities for the elderly
(+7,000).

Social assistance added 26,000 jobs over the month, with all of the gain in
individual and family services.

Financial activities employment continued to trend up in April (+12,000). The
industry has added 110,000 jobs over the past 12 months, with almost three-
fourths of the growth in real estate and rental and leasing. 

Manufacturing employment changed little for the third month in a row (+4,000
in April). In the 12 months prior to February, the industry had added an
average of 22,000 jobs per month. 

Employment in retail trade changed little in April (-12,000). Job losses
occurred in general merchandise stores (-9,000), while motor vehicle and
parts dealers added 8,000 jobs.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade,
transportation and warehousing, information, leisure and hospitality, and
government, showed little change over the month.

In April, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm
payrolls rose by 6 cents to $27.77. Over the year, average hourly earnings
have increased by 3.2 percent. Average hourly earnings of private-sector
production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 7 cents to $23.31 in
April. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased
by 0.1 hour to 34.4 hours in April. In manufacturing, both the workweek and
overtime were unchanged (40.7 hours and 3.4 hours, respectively). The average
workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm
payrolls held at 33.7 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for February was revised up
from +33,000 to +56,000, and the change for March was revised down from
+196,000 to +189,000. With these revisions, employment gains in February and
March combined were 16,000 more than previously reported. (Monthly revisions
result from additional reports received from businesses and government agencies
since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal
factors.) After revisions, job gains have averaged 169,000 per month over the
last 3 months.

_____________
The Employment Situation for May is scheduled to be released on Friday,
June 7, 2019, at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

 

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Apr.
2018
Feb.
2019
Mar.
2019
Apr.
2019
Change from:
Mar.
2019-
Apr.
2019

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

257,272 258,392 258,537 258,693 156

Civilian labor force

161,551 163,184 162,960 162,470 -490

Participation rate

62.8 63.2 63.0 62.8 -0.2

Employed

155,216 156,949 156,748 156,645 -103

Employment-population ratio

60.3 60.7 60.6 60.6 0.0

Unemployed

6,335 6,235 6,211 5,824 -387

Unemployment rate

3.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 -0.2

Not in labor force

95,721 95,208 95,577 96,223 646

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

3.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 -0.2

Adult men (20 years and over)

3.7 3.5 3.6 3.4 -0.2

Adult women (20 years and over)

3.5 3.4 3.3 3.1 -0.2

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

13.0 13.4 12.8 13.0 0.2

White

3.5 3.3 3.4 3.1 -0.3

Black or African American

6.5 7.0 6.7 6.7 0.0

Asian

2.8 3.1 3.1 2.2 -0.9

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

4.8 4.3 4.7 4.2 -0.5

Total, 25 years and over

3.3 3.1 3.1 2.9 -0.2

Less than a high school diploma

5.8 5.3 5.9 5.4 -0.5

High school graduates, no college

4.3 3.8 3.7 3.5 -0.2

Some college or associate degree

3.4 3.2 3.4 3.1 -0.3

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.1 2.2 2.0 2.1 0.1

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

2,965 2,857 2,837 2,651 -186

Job leavers

812 840 779 737 -42

Reentrants

2,001 1,905 2,007 1,926 -81

New entrants

615 623 614 530 -84

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,121 2,194 2,126 1,904 -222

5 to 14 weeks

1,975 1,810 1,815 1,842 27

15 to 26 weeks

1,018 942 950 854 -96

27 weeks and over

1,311 1,271 1,305 1,230 -75

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

4,952 4,310 4,499 4,654 155

Slack work or business conditions

2,990 2,792 2,909 2,891 -18

Could only find part-time work

1,564 1,347 1,329 1,446 117

Part time for noneconomic reasons

21,295 21,153 21,297 21,322 25

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,362 1,424 1,357 1,417

Discouraged workers

408 428 412 454

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Apr.
2018
Feb.
2019
Mar.
2019(P)
Apr.
2019(P)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

196 56 189 263

Total private

184 46 179 236

Goods-producing

60 -19 21 34

Mining and logging

9 -4 1 -3

Construction

29 -23 20 33

Manufacturing

22 8 0 4

Durable goods(1)

17 5 -5 0

Motor vehicles and parts

-0.5 1.5 -6.3 -1.5

Nondurable goods

5 3 5 4

Private service-providing

124 65 158 202

Wholesale trade

-13.4 12.5 -0.1 9.9

Retail trade

3.7 -13.7 -15.7 -12.0

Transportation and warehousing

6.6 -6.3 2.4 11.1

Utilities

1.4 -1.3 1.3 -3.2

Information

5 -7 7 -1

Financial activities

4 5 13 12

Professional and business services(1)

62 54 24 76

Temporary help services

12.8 7.0 -5.8 17.9

Education and health services(1)

24 19 69 62

Health care and social assistance

20.6 35.8 64.6 52.6

Leisure and hospitality

18 -1 37 34

Other services

13 4 20 14

Government

12 10 10 27

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

236 198 186 169

Total private

220 189 174 154

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.6 49.8 49.8 49.8

Total private women employees

48.2 48.4 48.4 48.4

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.4 82.4 82.4 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.5 34.4 34.5 34.4

Average hourly earnings

$26.90 $27.66 $27.71 $27.77

Average weekly earnings

$928.05 $951.50 $956.00 $955.29

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

109.2 110.6 111.1 111.0

Over-the-month percent change

0.2 -0.3 0.5 -0.1

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

140.4 146.3 147.2 147.3

Over-the-month percent change

0.4 0.1 0.6 0.1

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (258 industries)

64.7 58.1 59.7 60.1

Manufacturing (76 industries)

63.8 52.6 53.9 48.0

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(P) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2018 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

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Costs of Inflation: Price Confusion and Money Illusion

Changes in Velocity

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Current U.S. Inflation Rate Statistics and News

Explanation and the Monthly Inflation Rate Statistics Since January 2007

The current inflation rate was 0.4 percent in March, according to the Consumer Price Index Summary. That’s bordering deflation. Rising gas prices offset decreases in other categories.

Gas prices increased by 6.5 percent due to rising oil prices. They contribute 70 percent of gas prices. The Energy Information Administration’s oil price forecast rose to $65 a barrel for 2019.

The prices of used cars and trucks fell 0.4 percent, while new vehicle prices rose 0.4 percent. Transportation services remained flat.

In the last 12 months, the cost of health care services rose 2.3 percent. Drug prices fell 0.6 percent during that time. Health care costs have risen more slowly since Obamacare took effect in 2014. Before that, prices rose 7 to 8 percent a year.

Current Core Inflation Rate

The core inflation rate was 2.0 percent year over year. The core rate eliminates the impact of oil and food prices. High oil prices will increase the prices of fertilizer and transportation costs. That will create high food prices

The core rate was exactly at the Federal Reserve’s 2 percent inflation target. Despite that, it’s unlikely that the Federal Open Market Committee would continue raising the fed funds rate in 2019. Its goal is to keep the rate at 2.5 percent in 2019. The Fed last raised the rate to 2.5 percent at its December 19, 2018, FOMC meeting.

In January 2012,  the Fed switched to the Personal Consumption Expenditures. The Fed considers it to be more reflective of true underlying inflation trends. Its core inflation rate was 1.8 percent year over year as of January 2019. That’s from the most recent release from the Personal Income and Outlays report.

How the Current Inflation Rate Affects You

The inflation rate is an important economic indicator. It tells you how fast prices are changing in the current phase of the business cycle.

It’s measured by the Consumer Price Index which is reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics each month.

Moderate inflation is actually good for economic growth. When consumers expect prices to rise, they are more likely to buy now, rather than wait. This increases demand.  As pointed out by former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke inflation is usually driven by expectations of inflation. This means that, if people and investors think prices will go up, they will buy things now, increasing demand and actually driving the prices further up. In other words, inflation is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

The Federal Open Market Committee reviews the core inflation rate when it decides at its eight FOMC meetings whether to raise the fed funds rate. The core rate removes the volatile effects of gas, food, and oil prices. The Federal Reserve sets a target rate of 2 percent for the core rate. When the rate is lower than the target, the Fed may use expansionary monetary policy. It will lower the fed funds rate to boost economic growth. That’s done to prevent any possible recession.

When the rate is higher than the 2 percent target, the Fed uses contractionary monetary policy. It raises rates to keep prices from rising faster than your paycheck. Some critics worry that higher interest rates would weaken consumer demand. That would slow economic growth, reducing its ability to create jobs.

Some people worry that inflation will skyrocket, causing hyperinflation. They are concerned that price increases could be like that seen during the Weimar Republic in Germany. When that happens, gold bugs can cause a rally in the precious metal as a hedge. But to have hyperinflation, prices must rise 50 percent a month.

    • 01

       2018: 1.9 Percent. 2.2 Percent Core Inflation.

      woman grocery shopping
      Photo by Tassii/Getty Images

      January: Up 0.5 percent. The cause was an increase in gas prices. That offset a drop in used vehicles.

      Gasoline, fuel oil, and natural gas prices drop in the spring. That’s when refineries finish their maintenance and reopen for the summer driving season. Expect inflation to remain even less of a threat.

      February: Up 0.5 percent. Despite a drop in gasoline prices, prices increased in energy services, especially piped gas. Prices also rose in apparel and transportation.

      March: Up 0.2 percent. Gas prices fell because OPEC and U.S. shale oil producers continued to flood the market with supply. Lower gas prices offset slightly rising prices in shelter, food, and transportation. The cost of medical care services rose 0.5 percent. That’s still less of an increase than before Obamacare.

      April: Up 0.4 percentHigh gas prices offset mild price decreases in vehicles, prescription drugs, and transportation.

      May: Up 0.4 percent.  Higher gas prices offset a decline in used car and truck prices. Gas prices are volatile since they’re based upon commodities trading. They rise in the spring in anticipation of higher demand from summer vacationers.

      June: Up 0.1 percent. Higher gas prices offset declines in electricity, piped gas, and apparel.

      July: No increase.  Higher used cars and truck prices were offset by lower gas and drug prices.

      August: Up 0.1 percent. Higher gas prices were almost offset by a drop in apparel and drug prices.

      September: Up 0.1 percent. Used car and truck sales and gas prices fell.

      October: Up 0.3 percent. Prices of gas and used vehicles rose.

      November: Prices were flat. Rising car prices offset falling gas prices.

      December: Prices were flat.  Prices of used vehicles, drugs, and transportation fell along with gas prices.

    • 02

       2017: 2.1 Percent. 1.8 Percent Core Inflation.

      groceries-dad.jpg
      Photo: Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

      January: Up 0.6 percent due to a 7.8 percent increase in gas prices. That offset a 0.4 percent drop in used vehicles. Healthy inflation made it more likely the Fed would end its expansive monetary policy in the near future. The confirmation of a strong economy is good for the stock market.

      February: Up 0.3 percent. Upticks in transportation services and clothing barely offset declines in gas  and vehicle prices. Health care supplies fell.

      March: Up 0.1 percent.  Price drops  in almost every category. Gas prices dropped.

      April: Up 0.3 percent. Increase in gas prices offset deflation in almost every other category including health care.

      May: Up 0.1 percent. Gas prices drove it, but prices also fell in cars, apparel, and medical care services.

      June: Up 0.1 percent.  Prices fell for almost every category. But they were offset by increases in health care, transportation services, shelter, and apparel.

      Many people had worried that higher interest rates would suppress the housing market. The BLS reports on rent prices as a proxy for housing prices. This means it can miss some extreme jumps in price if rentals don’t keep up with housing prices. This happened in 2005, which is one reason the Fed missed that asset bubble.

      July: Down 0.1 percent. Medical care commodities rose. That was almost offset by a drop in new and used vehicle prices.

      August: Up 0.3 percent. Gas prices rose.

      September: Up 0.5 percent. Gas prices rose thanks to shortages caused by Hurricane Harvey.

      October: Down 0.1 percent. Cause was a drop in gas prices. That helped boost Halloween sales. Low inflation allowed the FOMC to end Quantitative Easing. It announced it would no longer buy new Treasurys as its holdings expired.

      November: No price increase. Gas prices rebounded.

      December: Down 0.1 percent.

    • 03

       2016: 2.1 Percent. 2.2 Percent Core Inflation.

      January: Up 0.2 percent. Prices fell in gasoline, home heating oil, and electricity.

      February: Up 0.1 percent. Gas prices fell.

      March: Up 0.4 percent. Gas prices rose while apparel prices fell as the dollar weakened.

      April: Up 0.5 percent. Gas prices rose while auto prices fell.

      May: Up 0.4 percent. Used car and truck prices fell while gas prices rose.

      June: Up 0.3 percent. Gas prices rose.

      July: Down 0.2 percent. Declines in gas prices were almost offset by mild increases in the cost of health care.

      August Up 0.1 percent.  Falling auto and gas prices were more than offset by rising health care costs.

      September: Up 0.2 percent. A huge rise in gas prices. It offset price drops in restaurants, new and used vehicles, and apparel. The cost of medical care services was flat.

      October: Up 02. percent. Gas prices skyrocketed. Slightly lower prices in restaurants, used vehicles, and transportation services offset the spike.

      November: Up 0.1 percent. Gasoline prices rose while medical care commodities fell.

      December: No price increase. Gas prices and transportation services rose.

BLS Inflation Calculator

The BLS inflation calculator quickly shows how inflation eats away at your purchasing power. For example, a 2.5 percent inflation rate means that something that cost $100 last year now costs $102.50. It also means you need a 2.5 percent raise just to stay even. Not to make you feel bad, but if you were celebrating your hard-earned 3.5 percent raise, thanks to inflation it is really only worth 1.0 percent in additional buying power.

Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)

 

What Is Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)?

Personal consumption expenditures (PCE), or the PCE Index, measures price changes in consumer goods and services. Expenditures included in the index are actual U.S. household expenditures. Data that pertains to services, durables and non-durables are measured by the index. Similar to the consumer price index(CPI), the PCE is part of the personal income report issued by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the Department of Commerce.

Personal Consumption Expenditures

 

Understanding Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)

The PCE is often considered predictable, and many analysts prefer to use the CPI because of its ability to determine economic stability using the fixed basket of goods.

The PCE index can reveal household buying and shopping habits. For example, sharp price increases may cause shoppers to buy less, which would be reflected in a change in the index. PCE reveals the elasticity of demand; when demand for a good or service is elastic, people cut back even if the price goes up slightly, and when demand is inelastic, people continue to buy the same amount despite big price increases.

 

Inflation

When gauging inflation and the overall economic stability of the United States, the Federal Reserve prefers to use the PCE Index. The CPI is the most well-known economic indicator, and the PCE is largely forgotten. However, the Federal Reserve prefers the PCE index when reviewing economic conditions and fiscal policy, inflation, and employment.

The PCE is preferred because it is composed of a broad range of expenditures. While the CPI helps to depict shifts or changes in consumer expenditures, it only reveals changes in those expenditures that fall within the pre-established fixed basket. The PCE, on the other hand, includes a broad range of household expenses. The PCE is also weighted by data acquired through business surveys, which tend to be more reliable than the consumer surveys used by the CPI.

In addition, the PCE uses a formula that allows for changes in consumer behavior and changes occurring in the short term, which are adjustments not made in the CPI formula. These factors result in a more comprehensive metric for measuring inflation. The Federal Reserve depends on the nuances that the PCE reveals because even minimal inflation is considered an indicator of a growing and healthy economy.

 

Durables Versus Non-Durables

The PCE is broken down into two categories: goods and services. Goods are then further broken down into durables and non-durables. Durable goods are items that last a household for more than three years and typically carry a larger price tag. Examples of durable goods include cars, televisions, refrigerators, furniture and other similar items. Non-durable goods are considered “transitory,” meaning that their life expectancy is typically less than three years. These items are also typically less costly and include products such as makeup, gasoline, and clothing.

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/pce.asp

Vice President Pence says the Fed should cut interest rates, reconsider its dual mandate policy

  
  • “I think it might be time for us to consider lowering interest rates,” Pence tells CNBC’s Eamon Javers.
  • Pence’s comments fall squarely in line with the rest of President Trump’s confidantes.

He also raised the idea that the Fed perhaps should focus on a single mandate to make monetary policy, instead of its current dual mandate of inflation and full employment. Pence added, however, that a single mandate for the Fed focusing on inflation is not something he and Trump have talked about.

“Back when I was in Congress we had a whole debate about the dual mandate of the Federal Reserve and it might be time for us to consider that again,” Pence said. “By just looking at inflation you make clear … this is exactly the time, not only to not raise interest rates, but we ought to consider cutting them.”

He suggested that the Fed “just focus again on monetary policy and recognize their job is to essentially manage that and watch inflation.”

Trump is also looking to fill two vacant seats on the Federal Reserve board. But so far the nominees Trump has seriously considered have withdrawn. Conservative pundit Stephen Moore was the latest to step back from Fed consideration on Thursday, following the same path as Herman Cain, who withdrew last month.

“I think the president is very interested in bringing fresh ideas to the Federal Reserve board,” Pence said. “What the president’s really looking for is people that understand the dynamic approach to this economy that he’s been putting into practice.”

Pence added that the president is looking for nominees “who are as fiercely committed to the free market as he is.”

“We’re seeing jobs being created all over the country … [and that] should be an encouragement to every American and also to people that operate our monetary policies,” Pence said.

Correction: An earlier version misstated which of the Fed’s two mandates that Pence suggested should be prioritized. He suggested it should be inflation.

 

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$5 gas? California gas prices soar as national average approaches $3

Gas prices can vary widely depending on when you fill up. USA TODAY

Brace yourself, Californians.

The statewide average price of gasoline has soared over $4 per gallon in recent weeks – and now at least four stations there are charging more than $5, according to fuel-savings app GasBuddy.

That comes as the national average price of gas continues its customary spring climb as Memorial Day approaches.

The national average hit $2.90 on Friday, up 20 cents from a month ago and 8 cents more than a year ago, according to AAA.

California is a big reason for the spike in the national average. The state’s average price of $4.09 is up 44 cents from a month ago and 46 cents from a year ago, according to AAA.

On the state’s east side, Mono County is averaging $4.85, according to AAA. GasBuddy reports that two stations in that county are charging more than $5.

In the San Francisco area, prices are averaging $4.21. In the Los Angeles-Long Beach region, prices are averaging $4.12.

No wonder hybrid and electric vehicles are popular in California.

What’s the best day to fill up?: Try Monday mornings (and never on Friday afternoons)

Summer gas prices: Don’t fill up in these states on your road trip

Refinery outages, increased taxes and the national uptick in gas prices have fueled California’s surge, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, which tracks real-time data from more than 150,000 gas stations throughout the country.

“California’s right on the cusp of hitting a peak,” he said.

Nationally, the average is “knocking on the doorstep” of hitting $3 for the first time since October 2014, though it’s likely to fall short, DeHaan said

In California, it’s bad, but not as bad as it could be. The state’s record high average was $4.65 at one point in 2012, according to GasBuddy. The national record high was $4.11 in July 2008, according to AAA.

Looking to save? Think carefully about when you fill up.

Nationally, Monday is the cheapest day to get fuel, while Friday is the most expensive, according to a recent GasBuddy study.

In California, Monday is the best, and Sunday is the worst.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/05/03/gas-prices/3661261002/

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Why Women REALLY Reject Men – Jordan Peterson | Understanding Women

Jordan Peterson on the worst thing about Donald Trump

Jordan Peterson on Trump’s Intelligence

Jordan Peterson | The Most Terrifying IQ Statistic

Jordan Peterson On The Vilification Of Trump Supporters | Q&A

Angry Student Calls Jordan Peterson “MORON”, Watch How He Responds

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