Archive for September 9th, 2019

The Pronk Pops Show 1315, September 9, 2019, Story 1: President Trump Cancels Meeting With Taliban At Camp David — Taliban Talks Are Dead and Terminated With Extreme Prejudice — What Was He Thinking? — After 18 Years The Time Has Come To End America’s Oldest War Now! — Soldiers Are Not Policemen Nor Nation Builders — Bring All The Troops Home and Have A Parade — Videos — Story 2: Catastrophic Damage and Destruction on Abaco and Grand Bahama Islands — How Many Bahamians Died From Category 5 Hurricane Dorian With Winds Over 185 Miles Per Hour? At Least 46 Dead, 1000s Missing and 70,000 Homeless — Videos —

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Pronk Pops Show 1315 September 9, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1312 August 27, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1311 August 26, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1310 August 21, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1309 August 20, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1308 August 19, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1307 August 15, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1306 August 14, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1305 August 12, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1304 August 8, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1303 August 7, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1302 August 6, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1301 August 5, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1299 July 31, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1296 July 25, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1292 July 18, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1278 June 20, 2019 

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Pronk Pops Show 1274 June 13, 2019

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Pronk Pops Show 1269 June 5, 2019

Pronk Pops Show 1268 June 3, 2019Image result for cartoons trump taliban at camp david

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Story 1: President Trump Cancels Meeting With Taliban At Camp David — Taliban Talks Are Dead and Terminated With Extreme Prejudice — What Was He Thinking? — After 18 Years The Time Has Come To End America’s Oldest War Now! — Soldiers Are Not Policemen Nor Nation Builders — Bring All The Troops Home and Have A Parade — Videos —

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President Donald Trump: Taliban Peace Talks Are ‘Dead’ | MSNBC

HEADING TO NC: President Trump on World Cup, the Taliban leaving the White House

CrossTalk: Quitting Afghanistan?

Agreement to End US Involvement in Afghanistan War, But War Will Continue

Published on Sep 6, 2019

The US and the Taliban are about to sign an agreement to withdraw 14,000 US troops from Afghanistan, potentially ending the longest war in US history. However, the Afghans will not see an end to fighting yet, says The Independent’s Patrick Cockburn

Afghanistan: What is the humanitarian cost of a never-ending war?

Afghanistan Explained: The war that never ends

 

Trump says Taliban peace talks are ‘dead’ and America is clobbering Afghanistan’s insurgents like never before after he canceled secret summit because of bombing that killed a U.S. soldier

  • President has decided to send the Taliban missiles instead of olive branches
  • He scrapped a secret Camp David peace summit after a suicide bomber killed 12
  • Trump told reporters on Monday that peace talks are ‘dead’ despite the U.S. still playing the role of police force after 19 years of fighting
  • ‘They did something that they sure as hell shouldn’t have done,’ he said 
  • Taliban says more Americans will die, vowing to ‘continue our jihad’
  • U.S. says it has taken out more than 1,000 Taliban fighters in the past 10 days

Donald Trump said Monday at the White House that planned talks between the U.S. and Afghanistan‘s Taliban leaders are now completely off the table.

‘They’re dead. They’re dead. As far as I’m concerned, they’re dead,’ Trump told reporters as he left for a campaign rally in North Carolina.

Trump said he had called off a Camp David peace summit because of a Taliban suicide bombing attack in Kabul that killed 12 people including an American soldier.

‘They did something that they sure as hell shouldn’t have done,’ he said.

The president also said he wanted to draw down U.S. troops in Afghanistan to ‘a very specific number,’ but he wouldn’t share what it is – saying only that the U.S. will ‘get out at the right time.’

As the president dismissed the idea of rescheduling his Taliban talks, he claimed the guerrilla government already regrets Thursday’s deadly bombing.

President Trump: Talks with the Taliban are dead after attacks

President Donald Trump said planned peace talks with the Taliban are 'dead' after a suicide bombing attack killed a U.S. soldier

The blast near the American embassy in the center of Kabul on Thursday also killed a Romanian service member and at least 10 civilians

The blast near the American embassy in the center of Kabul on Thursday also killed a Romanian service member and at least 10 civilians

The Taliban delegation arrives for talks in Moscow earlier this year; Trump has put further peace discussions on ice

The Taliban delegation arrives for talks in Moscow earlier this year; Trump has put further peace discussions on ice

‘The only reason I canceled that meeting was that they killed one of our soldiers,’ he said Monday, and ‘they’re very upset. They feel like they blew it. They said it loud and clear.’

Trump said he has ordered aggressive attacks in retaliation. ‘We hit the Taliban, and our enemy in Afghanistan, harder than we’ve hit them in over ten years,’ he said.

More than 1,000 Taliban fighters have been killed in Afghanistan in the last 10 days, according to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The insurgents are now promising more bloodshed, promising to keep fighting in Afghanistan ‘for 100 years’ and to ‘continue our jihad. They will have to pay a price.’

Afghans are now bracing for a possible new wave of Taliban violence as the insurgents vow to battle against the so-called ‘foreign occupation’ and warned that ‘more Americans will die.’

'They did something that they sure as hell shouldn't have done,' Trump said of the Taliban

‘They did something that they sure as hell shouldn’t have done,’ Trump said of the Taliban

American envoy Zalmay Khalilzad had been in negotiations for nearly a year with the Taliban’s political wing in Qatar.

The Trump administration has so far left 14,000 troops in Afghanistan but the president indicated in August that he intends to reduce that number to 8,600.

Pompeo has confirmed that the State Department has recalled Khalilzad.

The Taliban so far has refused to talk with the U.S.-recognized Afghan government, calling it a puppet regime.

Trump announced Saturday on Twitter that he had secretly invited Taliban leaders and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani for talks at Camp David.

The president said Saturday that he had 'called off peace negotiations' after the Taliban claimed credit for the Kabul attack

 

The president said Saturday that he had ‘called off peace negotiations’ after the Taliban claimed credit for the Kabul attack

He said in the same series of tweets that he had called it off, claiming that ‘if they cannot agree to a ceasefire during these very important peace talks, and would even kill 12 innocent people, then they probably don’t have the power to negotiate a meaningful agreement anyway.’

The Times in London spoke to a Taliban source who claimed that they ‘were invited to Camp David but refused to go.

‘The U.S. wanted us to announce a nationwide ceasefire, but again we refused. It is not possible for us.’

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7445195/Trump-says-peace-talks-dead-America-clobbering-Taliban-like-never-before.html

 

Story 2: Catastrophic Damage and Destruction on Abaco and Grand Bahama Islands — How Many Bahamians Died From Category 5 Hurricane Dorian With Winds Over 185 Miles Per Hour? At Least 46 Dead, 1000s Missing and 70,000 Homeless — Videos

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Nation Update: Residents displaced in The Bahamas

Mass Evacuations From Abaco Islands After Dorian’s Destruction In The Bahamas | NBC Nightly News

Hurricane Dorian: Nobody knows how many died at Ground Zero

Hurricane Dorian: Death toll in Bahamas expected to rise

Bahamians Are Desperate to Get Out After Hurricane Dorian

Round The Clock Search And Rescue Operations In The Bahamas

Miami’s Bahamian ties inspire Dorian relief effort

Bahamian government working to better process evacuees

Round The Clock Search And Rescue Operations In The Bahamas

Dorian’s Destruction of Treasure Cay, Abaco Bahamas

Bahamas Paradise cruise ship takes first responders to islands, brings back evacuees

He worried his wife was dead. See the moment he found her.

Bahamians lash out at government over disaster response: “We are on our own”

Hurricane Dorian survivor on Abaco Islands: “There was nothing left”

Geography Now! The Bahamas

Published on Mar 16, 2015

Interesting Facts About The Bahamas

 

Bahamian government denies it is suppressing Dorian death toll as latest official figures show just 44 – despite residents reporting seeing hundreds of bodies and that the ‘stench of death’ is oppressive

  • Health minister said he was ‘concerned that the focus had been on body count’ 
  • Duane Sands said the priority was to comfort and care for those still suffering 
  • On Sunday the death toll was raised from 43 to 44, but it will rise ‘significantly’ 
  • Last week the Prime Minister said the loss of life would be ‘catastrophic’

The Bahamian government has denied claims it is suppressing the Dorian death toll, as the latest official count of just 44 falls well below what residents have reported.

Last week Prime Minister Hubert Minnis warned the loss of of life would be ‘catastrophic and devastating.’

Locals say the latest official figure does not match with the oppressive stench and sight of the dead.

But health minister, Duane Sands, told the Miami Herald: ‘I am actually a bit concerned that the focus has been for some people the body count. It is not the priority.

A US Coast Guard helicopter surveys the damage after Hurricane Dorian ripped through the Bahamas last week - the death toll is expected to be 'staggering'

A man walks over what remains of homes in the area called The Mudd on Sunday after it was devastated by Hurricane Dorian on Abaco Island

A man walks over what remains of homes in the area called The Mudd on Sunday after it was devastated by Hurricane Dorian on Abaco Island

A child's bicycle is seen in a destroyed neighborhood in the wake of Hurricane Dorian in Marsh Harbour on Saturday

A child’s bicycle is seen in a destroyed neighborhood in the wake of Hurricane Dorian in Marsh Harbour on Saturday

‘The priority is find those people for their loved ones who are missing them; to take care, provide comfort to those people who are hurt, who are suffering, that’s the priority. To put food in people’s bellies, water in their throat.’

Health minister Duane Sands said an accurate death toll wasn't the 'priority'

Health minister Duane Sands said an accurate death toll wasn’t the ‘priority’

Hundreds or even thousands of people were still missing, officials said, as rescue teams continued their grim retrievals.

‘The language I have used and the language that the prime minister has used and all of the cabinet, and (the National Emergency Management Agency), has been a description of the number of confirmed deaths – these are people in the morgue.’

The health minister said all preparations had been made, that the government had stockpiled body bags and there are refrigeration units throughout the islands.

Medical chief of staff at Princess Margaret Hospital in Nassau, Dr. Caroline Burnett-Garraway, said two refrigerated, 40-foot trucks would be needed to hold the ‘staggering’ number of bodies that were expected to be found.

 A man carries clothes over what remains of homes in the area called The Mudd on Sunday

One week after Dorian hit the Bahamas, residents struggled amid the ruins on Sunday.

The lucky evacuees have begun reuniting with loved ones but the fate of many hundreds is still in doubt.

Prime Minister Hubert Minnis warned the death toll was likely to climb ‘significantly’.

A loosely coordinated armada of passenger planes, helicopters and both private and government boats and ships – including redirected cruise liners – converged on the horribly battered Abacos to help with evacuations, both to Nassau and to the US mainland.

Tropic Ocean Airways said it planned to fly supplies to hard-hit Marsh Harbour from Florida and bring out some 220 people to Nassau on a Delta Air Lines jet.

On Saturday, a cruise ship carrying 1,400 people docked in Riviera Beach, Florida, CNN reported. All had documents to enter the United States.

The Coast Guard said all Bahamian ports had now reopened. As of Sunday morning, it had five cutters providing support and five helicopters taking part in search and rescue operations. It said 308 people had been rescued.

A man searches for belongings amongst debris in a destroyed neighborhood

A man searches for belongings amongst debris in a destroyed neighborhood

Many of those still waiting to leave Marsh Harbour were Haitian workers. The area where they lived – The Mudd – was almost completely wiped out by Dorian.

Natasha Young was camped out at the Nassau port in a tent. She was evacuated from Marsh Harbour on Monday and is now waiting for her family.

‘Yesterday, I found my mum, my sister and aunt. Now we are waiting for my brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews, and my kids,’ she said.

The 24-year-old was adamant that she would not go to a shelter until her family arrived.

‘When we are all reunited, I don’t mind if they put all of us in a shelter,’ she said. ‘I’m not going from the dock until a find my family.’

Haitians who have arrived in Nassau have accused the government of prioritizing native-born Bahamians for evacuation from Marsh Harbour over Haitian nationals.

Dorval Darlier, a Haitian diplomat who flew from Nassau to Marsh Harbour on Sunday, defended the Bahamian government against the allegations.

‘Haitians have been treated well,’ he said. ‘Some get mad (that) they have been here since yesterday. But the government has first to find a shelter for them.’

Damaged homes yesterday after hurricane Dorian devastated Elbow Key Island

 

People line up to be evacuated to Nassau in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, from the port of Marsh Harbor

‘If I have to choose between my mother and my mother-in-law, you know who I have to choose first.’

The UN’s World Food Programme was sending food and supplies. A WFP team estimated that 90 percent of buildings in Marsh Harbour were damaged.

The Pan American Health Organization warned of the risk of water-borne and communicable diseases, but said no cholera cases had been detected, nor had there been any increase in communicable diseases.

The US Coast Guard, Britain’s Royal Navy and private organizations have been helping evacuate island residents to Nassau, hampered by damaged piers and airport runways.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7442915/Bahamian-government-denies-suppressing-Dorian-death-toll-latest-official-figure-44.html

 

Bahamas evacuees are left stranded on devastated islands after residents without a US visa are forced to disembark rescue ferry to Florida – days after lawmakers begged Trump to waive the rules

  • About 130 people fleeing the Bahamas were forced off a ferry before it left for Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday evening 
  • Bahamians were left stunned and confused after initially being told they could board with just a passport and police record 
  • But before the boat left, an announcement was made telling over 100 people without US visas that they needed to disembark 
  • This comes just days after Florida lawmakers Marco Rubio and Rick Scott urged President Trump to waive or suspend visa requirements for Bahama citizens
  • Footage from inside the rescue ferry shows hoards of people – including children – exiting the ferry and left stuck on the land devastated by Hurricane Dorian 
  • Dorian has killed at least 46 people after it struck the Bahamas last Sunday as a Category 5 storm with winds as fast as 185mph

More than 100 people attempting to flee the devastation in the Bahamas have been kicked off a rescue boat bound for Florida for not having a US visa.

About 130 Bahamians in Freeport were forced off a ferry before it left on Sunday evening after a surprise announcement was made on board barring those without a visa from entering the US for refuge.

‘Please, any person that doesn’t have a US visa please proceed to disembark,’ the announcement rang over the loudspeaker on board, leaving Bahamians stunned and confused after initially being told they could board with just a passport and police record.

This comes just days after Florida lawmakers Marco Rubio and Rick Scott urged President Trump to waive or suspend visa requirements for Bahama citizens who have relatives in the US and are seeking refuge after Hurricane Dorian swept through the islands.

Brian Entin

@BrianEntin

Big problems on the ferry from Freeport to Florida — announcement just made that any Bahamian without a visa must now get off. This is not normal. Nornally Bahamians can travel to USA with passport and a printout of their police record. This is a mess.

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About 130 Bahamians in Freeport were forced off a ferry before it left for Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday evening

About 130 Bahamians in Freeport were forced off a ferry before it left for Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday evening

Brian Entin

@BrianEntin

Another announcement just made ordering any Bahamian without a US visa to disembark ferry — not allowed to evacuate. They were told before boarding it was ok with Bahamian passport and clean polce record. Something has now changed.

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Hundreds of evacuees lines up for hours to board the ferry to Fort Lauderdale.

But footage from inside the rescue ferry shows hoards of people – including children – exiting the ferry, leaving them stranded on the land devastated by Hurricane Dorian.

Bahamian government denies it is suppressing Dorian death toll as latest official figures show just 44 dead

The Bahamian government has denied claims it is suppressing the Dorian death toll, as the latest official count of just 44 falls well below what residents have reported.

Locals say the latest official figure does not match with the oppressive stench and sight of the dead.

But health minister, Duane Sands, told the Miami Herald: ‘I am actually a bit concerned that the focus has been for some people the body count. It is not the priority.

‘The priority is find those people for their loved ones who are missing them; to take care, provide comfort to those people who are hurt, who are suffering, that’s the priority. To put food in people’s bellies, water in their throat.’

Hundreds or even thousands of people were still missing, officials said, as rescue teams continued their grim retrievals.

Sands told the Herald: ‘We’ve heard the numbers, a 1,000, 200, 500, 600. We’ve heard all of the claims.

‘The language I have used and the language that the prime minister has used and all of the cabinet, and (the National Emergency Management Agency), has been a description of the number of confirmed deaths – these are people in the morgue.’

‘They originally said you can come with a police record and without a visa and now they’re taking that back,’ one woman on the ship told WSVN journalist Brian Entinas the boat pulled out of the dock. ‘That’s really ridiculous. That’s awful,’

Renard Oliver, who was forced off the ferry in Freeport, spoke as he held his daughter in his arms.

‘They got a call from CBP [Customs and Border Protection] and CBP told them that everyone who doesn’t have a US visa and who is traveling on police record has to come off,’ Oliver said.

‘Normally you can use police record by way of airplane at least. So I have to take my baby off. At the last minute like this is kind of disappointed. It’s hurtful watching my daughters cry.’

Entin said the ferry crew were initially told to accept Bahamian evacuees with a passport and a copy of police record, and so they boarded the boat without issue.

But ‘when they sent manifest to US Customs and Border Patrol – they were told those without visas would not be accepted,’ he said.

It’s not clear who ordered to have the evacuees without visas taken off the ship.

On Friday, the Grand Celebration cruise ship took as many as 1,000 hurricane refugees to the US without any issue regarding visas.

Hundreds were turned away only after the cruise ship was filled to capacity.

‘This is not normal. Normally Bahamians can travel to USA with passport and a printout of their police record. This is a mess,’ Etin said on Twitter.

Hurricane Dorian has killed at least 46 people after striking the Bahamas last Sunday as a Category 5 storm with winds as fast as 185mph.

Renard Oliver, who was forced off the ferry from Freeport to Florida, spoke as he held his daughter in his arms

Renard Oliver, who was forced off the ferry from Freeport to Florida, spoke as he held his daughter in his arms

Brian Entin

@BrianEntin

Hundreds like Renard Oliver and his baby now have to get off the ferry from Freeport, Bahamas to Florida. He was trying to evacuate — told he could leave with Bahamian passport and police record like normal but then ferry crew says US Goverment called and changed plan last minute

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Bahamians were left stunned and confused after initially being told they could board with just a passport and police record

Bahamians were left stunned and confused after initially being told they could board with just a passport and police record

Last week Florida lawmakers Marco Rubio and Rick Scott urged President Trump to waive or suspend visa requirements for Bahama citizens in this letter

People wait to be evacuated to Nassau via a ferry at Marsh Harbor Port, in Abaco Island, Bahamas, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019

 

Etymology

The name Bahamas is most likely derived from either the Taíno ba ha ma (“big upper middle land”), which was a term for the region used by the indigenous people,[13] or possibly from the Spanish baja mar (“shallow water or sea” or “low tide”) reflecting the shallow waters of the area. Alternatively, it may originate from Guanahani, a local name of unclear meaning.[14]

The word The constitutes an integral part of the short form of the name and is, therefore, capitalised. So – in contrast to “the Congo” and “the United Kingdom” – it is proper to write “The Bahamas”. The name The Bahamasis thus comparable with certain non-English names that also use the definite article, such as Las Vegas or Los Angeles. The Constitution of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the country’s fundamental law, capitalizes the “T” in “The Bahamas”.[15]

History

Pre-colonial era

The first inhabitants of the Bahamas were the Taino people, who moved into the uninhabited southern islands from Hispaniola and Cuba around the 800s–1000s AD, having migrated there from South America; they came to be known as the Lucayan people.[16] An estimated 30,000 Lucayans inhabited The Bahamas at the time of Christopher Columbus‘s arrival in 1492.[citation needed]

Arrival of the Spanish

A depiction of Columbus’s first landing, claiming possession of the New World for Spain in caravels; the Niña and the Pinta, on Watling Island, an island of the Bahamas that the natives called Guanahani and that he named San Salvador, on 12 October 1492.[17]

Columbus’s first landfall in what was to Europeans a ‘New World’ was on an island he named San Salvador (known to the Lucayans as Guanahani).[16] Whilst there is a general consensus that this island lay within the Bahamas, precisely which island Columbus landed on is a matter of scholarly debate.[16] Some researchers believe the site to be present-day San Salvador Island (formerly known as Watling’s Island), situated in the southeastern Bahamas, whilst an alternative theory holds that Columbus landed to the southeast on Samana Cay, according to calculations made in 1986 by National Geographic writer and editor Joseph Judge, based on Columbus’s log.[16] On the landfall island, Columbus made first contact with the Lucayans and exchanged goods with them, claiming the islands for Spain, before proceeding to explore the larger isles of the Greater Antilles.[16]

The 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas theoretically divided the new territories between Spain and Portugal, placing the Bahamas in the Spanish sphere; however they did little to press their claim on the ground.[16] The Spanish did however make use of the native Lucayan peoples, many of whom were enslaved and sent to Hispaniola for use as forced labour.[16] The slaves suffered from harsh conditions and most died from contracting diseases to which they had no immunity; half of the Taino died from smallpox alone.[18] As a result of these depredations the population of the Bahamas was severely diminished.[19]

Arrival of the English

The English had expressed an interest in the Bahamas as early as 1629,[16] however, it was not until 1648 that the first English settlers arrived on the islands.[16] Known as the Eleutherian Adventurers and led by William Sayle, they migrated to Bermuda seeking greater religious freedom.[16] These English Puritans established the first permanent European settlement on an island which they named ‘Eleuthera‘, Greek for ‘freedom’. They later settled New Providence, naming it Sayle’s Island. Life proved harder than envisaged however, and many – including Sayle – chose to return to Bermuda.[16] To survive, the remaining settlers salvaged goods from wrecks.

In 1670, King Charles II granted the islands to the Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas in North America. They rented the islands from the king with rights of trading, tax, appointing governors, and administering the country from their base on New Providence.[20][16] Piracy and attacks from hostile foreign powers were a constant threat. In 1684, Spanish corsair Juan de Alcon raided the capital Charles Town (later renamed Nassau),[21] and in 1703, a joint Franco-Spanish expedition briefly occupied Nassau during the War of the Spanish Succession.[22][23]

18th century

Continental Marines land at New Providence during the Battle of Nassauin 1776

Sign at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park commemorating hundreds of African-American slaves who escaped to freedom in the early 1820s in the Bahamas

During proprietary rule, the Bahamas became a haven for pirates, including Blackbeard (circa 1680–1718).[24] To put an end to the ‘Pirates’ republic‘ and restore orderly government, Great Britain made the Bahamas a crown colony in 1718 under the royal governorship of Woodes Rogers.[16] After a difficult struggle, he succeeded in suppressing piracy.[25] In 1720, Rogers led local militia to drive off a Spanish attack during the War of the Quadruple Alliance.[26] In 1729, a local assembly was established giving a degree of self-governance for the English settlers.[16][27] The reforms had been planned by the previous Governor George Phenney and authorised in July 1728.[28]

During the American War of Independence in the late 18th century, the islands became a target for US naval forces under the command of Commodore Esek HopkinsUS Marines occupied Nassau for a brief period in 1776.[16] In 1782, following the British defeat at Yorktown, a Spanish fleet appeared off the coast of Nassau. The city surrendered without a fight.[16] Spain returned possession of the Bahamas to Great Britain the following year, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris.[16] Before the news was received however, the islands were recaptured by a small British force led by Andrew Deveaux.[16]

After US independence, the British resettled some 7,300 Loyalists with their African slaves in the Bahamas, including 2,000 from New York[29] and at least 1,033 whites, 2,214 blacks and a few Native American Creeks from East Florida. Most of the refugees resettled from New York had fled from other colonies, including West Florida, which the Spanish captured during the war.[30] The government granted land to the planters to help compensate for losses on the continent.[16] These Loyalists, who included Deveaux and also Lord Dunmore, established plantations on several islands and became a political force in the capital.[16] European Americans were outnumbered by the African-American slaves they brought with them, and ethnic Europeans remained a minority in the territory.

19th century

In 1807, the British abolished the slave trade.[16] During the following decades, the Royal Navy intercepted the trade; they resettled in The Bahamas thousands of Africans liberated from slave ships.

In the 1820s during the period of the Seminole Wars in Florida, hundreds of North American slaves and African Seminoles escaped from Cape Florida to The Bahamas. They settled mostly on northwest Andros Island, where they developed the village of Red Bays. From eyewitness accounts, 300 escaped in a mass flight in 1823, aided by Bahamians in 27 sloops, with others using canoes for the journey. This was commemorated in 2004 by a large sign at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park.[31][32] Some of their descendants in Red Bays continue African Seminole traditions in basket making and grave marking.[33]

In 1818,[34] the Home Office in London had ruled that “any slave brought to The Bahamas from outside the British West Indies would be manumitted.” This led to a total of nearly 300 slaves owned by US nationals being freed from 1830 to 1835.[35] The American slave ships Comet and Encomium used in the United States domestic coastwise slave trade, were wrecked off Abaco Island in December 1830 and February 1834, respectively. When wreckers took the masters, passengers and slaves into Nassau, customs officers seized the slaves and British colonial officials freed them, over the protests of the Americans. There were 165 slaves on the Cometand 48 on the Encomium. The United Kingdom finally paid an indemnity to the United States in those two cases in 1855, under the Treaty of Claims of 1853, which settled several compensation cases between the two countries.[36][37]

The lighthouse in Great Isaac Cay.

Slavery was abolished in the British Empire on 1 August 1834.[16] After that British colonial officials freed 78 North American slaves from the Enterprise, which went into Bermuda in 1835; and 38 from the Hermosa, which wrecked off Abaco Island in 1840.[38] The most notable case was that of the Creole in 1841: as a result of a slave revolt on board, the leaders ordered the US brig to Nassau. It was carrying 135 slaves from Virginia destined for sale in New Orleans. The Bahamian officials freed the 128 slaves who chose to stay in the islands. The Creole case has been described as the “most successful slave revolt in U.S. history”.[39]

These incidents, in which a total of 447 slaves belonging to US nationals were freed from 1830 to 1842, increased tension between the United States and the United Kingdom. They had been co-operating in patrols to suppress the international slave trade. However, worried about the stability of its large domestic slave trade and its value, the United States argued that the United Kingdom should not treat its domestic ships that came to its colonial ports under duress as part of the international trade.[citation needed] The United States worried that the success of the Creole slaves in gaining freedom would encourage more slave revolts on merchant ships.

During the American Civil War of the 1860s, the islands briefly prospered as a focus for blockade runners aiding the Confederate States.[40][41]

Early 20th century

The early decades of the 20th century were ones of hardship for many Bahamians, characterised by a stagnant economy and widespread poverty.[16] Many eked out a living via subsistence agriculture or fishing.[16]

The Duke of Windsor(briefly King Edward VIII) and Governor of the Bahamasfrom 1940 to 1945

In August 1940, the Duke of Windsor was appointed governor of the Bahamas. He arrived in the colony with his wife, the Duchess. Although disheartened at the condition of Government House, they “tried to make the best of a bad situation”.[42] He did not enjoy the position, and referred to the islands as “a third-class British colony”.[43] He opened the small local parliament on 29 October 1940. The couple visited the “Out Islands” that November, on Axel Wenner-Gren‘s yacht, which caused controversy;[44] the British Foreign Office strenuously objected because they had been advised by United States intelligence that Wenner-Gren was a close friend of the Luftwaffe commander Hermann Göring of Nazi Germany.[44][45]

The Duke was praised at the time for his efforts to combat poverty on the islands. A 1991 biography by Philip Ziegler, however, described him as contemptuous of the Bahamians and other non-European peoples of the Empire. He was praised for his resolution of civil unrest over low wages in Nassau in June 1942, when there was a “full-scale riot”.[46] Ziegler said that the Duke blamed the trouble on “mischief makers – communists” and “men of Central European Jewish descent, who had secured jobs as a pretext for obtaining a deferment of draft”.[47] The Duke resigned from the post on 16 March 1945.[48][49]

Post-Second World War

The Bahamas used to be a Crown colony until it gained independence in 1973

Modern political development began after the Second World War. The first political parties were formed in the 1950s, split broadly along ethnic lines – the United Bahamian Party (UBP) representing the English-descended Bahamians (known informally as the ‘Bay Street Boys’),[50] and the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP) representing the Afro-Bahamian majority.[16]

A new constitution granting The Bahamas internal autonomy went into effect on 7 January 1964, with Chief Minister Sir Roland Symonette of the UBP becoming the first Premier.[51]:p.73[52] In 1967, Lynden Pindling of the PLP became the first black Premier of the Bahamian colony; in 1968, the title of the position was changed to Prime Minister. In 1968, Pindling announced that The Bahamas would seek full independence.[53] A new constitution giving The Bahamas increased control over its own affairs was adopted in 1968.[54] In 1971, the UBP merged with a disaffected faction of the PLP to form a new party, the Free National Movement (FNM), a de-racialised, centre-right party which aimed to counter the growing power of Pindling’s PLP.[55]

The British House of Lords voted to give The Bahamas its independence on 22 June 1973.[56] Prince Charles delivered the official documents to Prime Minister Lynden Pindling, officially declaring The Bahamas a fully independent nation on 10 July 1973.[57] It joined the Commonwealth of Nations on the same day.[58] Sir Milo Butler was appointed the first governor-general of the Bahamas (the official representative of Queen Elizabeth II) shortly after independence.

Post-independence

Shortly after independence, the Bahamas joined the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank on 22 August 1973,[59] and later the United Nations on 18 September 1973.[60]

Politically, the first two decades were dominated by Pindling’s PLP, who went on to win a string of electoral victories.[16] Allegations of corruption, links with drug cartels and financial malfeasance within the Bahamian government failed to dent Pindling’s popularity.[16] Meanwhile, the economy underwent a dramatic growth period fuelled by the twin pillars of tourism and offshore finance, significantly raising the standard of living on the islands.[16] The Bahamas’ booming economy led to it becoming a beacon for immigrants, most notably from Haiti.[16]

In 1992, Pindling was unseated by Hubert Ingraham of the FNM.[51]:p.78 Ingraham went on to win the 1997 Bahamian general election, before being defeated in 2002, when the PLP returned to power under Perry Christie.[51]:p.82 Ingraham returned to power from 2007-2012, followed by Christie again from 2012-17.[16] With economic growth faltering, Bahamians re-elected the FNM in 2017, with Hubert Minnis becoming the fourth prime minister.[16]

Geography

Map of the Bahamas

The Bahamas consists of a chain of islands spread out over some 500 miles in the Atlantic Ocean, located to the east of Florida in the United States, north of Cuba and Hispaniola and west of the British Overseas Territory of the Turks and Caicos Islands (with which it forms the Lucayan archipelago). It lies between latitudes 20° and 28°N, and longitudes 72° and 80°W and straddles the Tropic of Cancer.[11] There are some 700 islands and cays in total (of which 30 are inhabited) with a total land area of 10,010 km2 (3,860 sq mi).[11][61]

Nassau, capital city of the Bahamas, lies on the island of New Providence; the other main inhabited islands are Grand BahamaEleutheraCat IslandRum CayLong IslandSan Salvador IslandRagged IslandAcklinsCrooked IslandExumaBerry IslandsMayaguana, the Bimini islands, Great Abaco and Great Inagua. The largest island is Andros.[61]

All the islands are low and flat, with ridges that usually rise no more than 15 to 20 m (49 to 66 ft). The highest point in the country is Mount Alvernia (formerly Como Hill) on Cat Island at 64m.[11]

Damaged homes in the Bahamas in the aftermath of Hurricane Wilma in 2005

Climate[edit]

The Bahamas map of Köppen climate classification.

The climate of the Bahamas is mostly tropical savannah climate or Aw according to Köppen climate classification. The low latitude, warm tropical Gulf Stream, and low elevation give the Bahamas a warm and winterless climate. The Bahamas have been free of snowfall, with the exception of snow mixed with rain reported in Freeport on the island of Grand Bahama on 19 January 1977.[62] Although every few decades low temperatures can fall below 10 °C (50 °F) for a few hours when a severe cold outbreak comes off the North American mainland, there is only a 7 °C difference between the warmest month and coolest month in most of the Bahama islands. As with most tropical climates, seasonal rainfall follows the sun, and summer is the wettest season. The Bahamas are often sunny and dry for long periods of time, and average more than 3,000 hours or 340 days[63] of sunlight annually.

Tropical storms and hurricanes can on occasion impact the Bahamas. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed over the northern portions of the islands, and Hurricane Floyd passed near the eastern portions of the islands in 1999. Hurricane Dorian of 2019 passed over the archipelago at destructive Category 5 strength with sustained winds of 185 mph (295 km/h) and wind gusts up to 220 mph (354 km/h), becoming the strongest tropical cyclone on record to impact the northwestern islands of Grand Bahama and Great Abaco.[64]

hideClimate data for Nassau
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 25.4
(77.7)
25.5
(77.9)
26.6
(79.9)
27.9
(82.2)
29.7
(85.5)
31.0
(87.8)
32.0
(89.6)
32.1
(89.8)
31.6
(88.9)
29.9
(85.8)
27.8
(82.0)
26.2
(79.2)
28.8
(83.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 21.4
(70.5)
21.4
(70.5)
22.3
(72.1)
23.8
(74.8)
25.6
(78.1)
27.2
(81.0)
28.0
(82.4)
28.1
(82.6)
27.7
(81.9)
26.2
(79.2)
24.2
(75.6)
22.3
(72.1)
24.8
(76.7)
Average low °C (°F) 17.3
(63.1)
17.3
(63.1)
17.9
(64.2)
19.6
(67.3)
21.4
(70.5)
23.3
(73.9)
24.0
(75.2)
24.0
(75.2)
23.7
(74.7)
22.5
(72.5)
20.6
(69.1)
18.3
(64.9)
20.8
(69.5)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 39.4
(1.55)
49.5
(1.95)
54.4
(2.14)
69.3
(2.73)
105.9
(4.17)
218.2
(8.59)
160.8
(6.33)
235.7
(9.28)
164.1
(6.46)
161.8
(6.37)
80.5
(3.17)
49.8
(1.96)
1,389.4
(54.70)
Average precipitation days 8 6 7 8 10 15 17 19 17 15 10 8 140
Mean monthly sunshine hours 220.1 220.4 257.3 276.0 269.7 231.0 272.8 266.6 213.0 223.2 222.0 213.9 2,886
Source: World Meteorological Organization (UN),[65] Hong Kong Observatory (sun only)[66]
Average Sea Temperature
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
23 °C73 °F 23 °C73 °F 24 °C75 °F 26 °C79 °F 27 °C81 °F 28 °C82 °F 28 °C82 °F 28 °C82 °F 28 °C82 °F 27 °C81 °F 26 °C79 °F 24 °C75 °F

Geology

The Blue Lagoon Island, Bahamas.

The Bahamas is part of the Lucayan Archipelago, which continues into the Turks and Caicos Islands, the Mouchoir Bank, the Silver Bank, and the Navidad Bank.[67]

The Bahamas Platform, which includes the Bahamas, Southern Florida, Northern Cuba, the Turks and Caicos, and the Blake Plateau, formed about 150 Ma, not long after the formation of the North Atlantic. The 6.4 km (4.0 mi) thick limestones, which predominately make up The Bahamas, date back to the Cretaceous. These limestones would have been deposited in shallow seas, assumed to be a stretched and thinned portion of the North American continental crust. Sediments were forming at about the same rate as the crust below was sinking due to the added weight. Thus, the entire area consisted of a large marine plain with some islands. Then, at about 80 Ma, the area became flooded by the Gulf Stream. This resulted in the drowning of the Blake Plateau, the separation of the Bahamas from Cuba and Florida, the separation of the southeastern Bahamas into separate banks, the creation of the Cay Sal Bank, plus the Little and Great Bahama Banks. Sedimentation from the “carbonate factory” of each bank, or atoll, continues today at the rate of about 2 cm per kyrCoral reefs form the “retaining walls” of these atolls, within which oolites and pellets form.[68]

Coral growth was greater through the Tertiary, until the start of the Ice Ages, and hence those deposits are more abundant below a depth of 36 m. In fact, an ancient extinct reef exists half a km seaward of the present one, 30 m below sea level. Oolites form when oceanic water penetrate the shallow banks, increasing the temperature about 3 °C and the salinity by 0.5 per cent. Cemented ooids are referred to as grapestone. Additionally, giant stromatolitesare found off the Exuma Cays.[68]:22,29–30

Sea level changes resulted in a drop in sea level, causing wind blown oolite to form sand dunes with distinct cross-bedding. Overlapping dunes form oolitic ridges, which become rapidly lithified through the action of rainwater, called eolianite. Most islands have ridges ranging from 30 to 45 m, though Cat Island has a ridge 60 m in height. The land between ridges is conducive to the formation of lakes and swamps.[68]:41–59,61–64

Solution weathering of the limestone results in a “Bahamian Karst” topography. This includes potholesblue holes such as Dean’s Blue Holesinkholesbeachrock such as the Bimini Road (“pavements of Atlantis”), limestone crust, caves due to the lack of rivers, and sea caves. Several blue holes are aligned along the South Andros Fault line. Tidal flats and tidal creeks are common, but the more impressive drainage patterns are formed by troughs and canyons such as Great Bahama Canyon with the evidence of turbidity currents and turbidite deposition.[68]:33–40,65,72–84,86

The stratigraphy of the islands consists of the Middle Pleistocene Owl’s Hole Formation, overlain by the Late Pleistocene Grotto Beach Formation, and then the Holocene Rice Bay Formation. However, these units are not necessarily stacked on top of each other but can be located laterally. The oldest formation, Owl’s Hole, is capped by a terra rosa paleosoil, as is the Grotto Beach, unless eroded. The Grotto Beach Formation is the most widespread.[67]

Government and politics

The Bahamian Parliament, located in Nassau

The Bahamas is a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, with the queen of the Bahamas (Elizabeth II) as head of state represented locally by a governor-general.[11] Political and legal traditions closely follow those of the United Kingdom and the Westminster system.[61] The Bahamas is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and shares its head of state with other Commonwealth realms.

The prime minister is the head of government and is the leader of the party with the most seats in the House of Assembly.[11][61] Executive power is exercised by the Cabinet, selected by the prime minister and drawn from his supporters in the House of Assembly. The current governor-general is The Honourable Cornelius A. Smith, and the current prime minister is The Rt. Hon. Hubert Minnis MP.[11]

Legislative power is vested In a bicameral parliament, which consists of a 38-member House of Assembly (the lower house), with members elected from single-member districts, and a 16-member Senate, with members appointed by the governor-general, including nine on the advice of the Prime Minister, four on the advice of the leader of Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition, and three on the advice of the prime minister after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition. As under the Westminster system, the prime minister may dissolve Parliament and call a general election at any time within a five-year term.[69]

Constitutional safeguards include freedom of speechpressworshipmovement and association. The Judiciary of the Bahamas is independent of the executive and the legislature. Jurisprudence is based on English law.[11]

Political culture

Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis with U.S. President Donald Trump on 22 March 2019

The Bahamas has a two-party system dominated by the centre-left Progressive Liberal Party and the centre-right Free National Movement. A handful of other political parties have been unable to win election to parliament; these have included the Bahamas Democratic Movement, the Coalition for Democratic Reform, Bahamian Nationalist Party and the Democratic National Alliance.

Foreign relations

The Bahamas has strong bilateral relationships with the United States and the United Kingdom, represented by an ambassador in Washington and High Commissioner in London. The Bahamas also associates closely with other nations of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).

Armed forces

The Bahamanian military is the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF),[11] the navy of the Bahamas which includes a land unit called Commando Squadron (Regiment) and an Air Wing (Air Force). Under the Defence Act, the RBDF has been mandated, in the name of the queen, to defend the Bahamas, protect its territorial integrity, patrol its waters, provide assistance and relief in times of disaster, maintain order in conjunction with the law enforcement agencies of the Bahamas, and carry out any such duties as determined by the National Security Council. The Defence Force is also a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM)’s Regional Security Task Force.

The RBDF came into existence on 31 March 1980. Its duties include defending the Bahamas, stopping drug smuggling, illegal immigration and poaching, and providing assistance to mariners. The Defence Force has a fleet of 26 coastal and inshore patrol craft along with 3 aircraft and over 1,100 personnel including 65 officers and 74 women.[citation needed]

Administrative divisions

Districts of the Bahamas

The districts of the Bahamas provide a system of local government everywhere except New Providence (which holds 70% of the national population), whose affairs are handled directly by the central government. In 1996, the Bahamian Parliament passed the “Local Government Act” to facilitate the establishment of family island administrators, local government districts, local district councillors and local town committees for the various island communities. The overall goal of this act is to allow the various elected leaders to govern and oversee the affairs of their respective districts without the interference of the central government. In total, there are 32 districts, with elections being held every five years. There are 110 councillors and 281 town committee members elected to represent the various districts.[70]

Each councillor or town committee member is responsible for the proper use of public funds for the maintenance and development of their constituency.

The districts other than New Providence are:

National flag

The national flag of the Bahamas

The Bahamian flag was adopted in 1973. Its colours symbolise the strength of the Bahamian people; its design reflects aspects of the natural environment (sun and sea) and economic and social development.[11] The flag is a black equilateral triangle against the mast, superimposed on a horizontal background made up of three equal stripes of aquamarine, gold and aquamarine.[11]

Coat of arms

Bahamian Coat of Arms

The coat of arms of the Bahamas contains a shield with the national symbols as its focal point. The shield is supported by a marlin and a flamingo, which are the national animals of the Bahamas. The flamingo is located on the land, and the marlin on the sea, indicating the geography of the islands.

On top of the shield is a conch shell, which represents the varied marine life of the island chain. The conch shell rests on a helmet. Below this is the actual shield, the main symbol of which is a ship representing the Santa María of Christopher Columbus, shown sailing beneath the sun. Along the bottom, below the shield appears a banner upon which is the national motto:[71]

“Forward, Upward, Onward Together.”

National flower

The yellow elder was chosen as the national flower of the Bahamas because it is native to the Bahama islands, and it blooms throughout the year.

Selection of the yellow elder over many other flowers was made through the combined popular vote of members of all four of New Providence’s garden clubs of the 1970s—the Nassau Garden Club, the Carver Garden Club, the International Garden Club and the YWCA Garden Club. They reasoned that other flowers grown there—such as the bougainvilleahibiscus and poinciana—had already been chosen as the national flowers of other countries. The yellow elder, on the other hand, was unclaimed by other countries (although it is now also the national flower of the United States Virgin Islands) and also the yellow elder is native to the family islands.[72]

Economy

By the terms of GDP per capita, the Bahamas is one of the richest countries in the Americas.[73] Its currency (the Bahamian dollar) is kept at a 1-to-1 peg with the US dollar.[12] It was revealed in the Panama Papers that the Bahamas is the jurisdiction with the most offshore entities or companies.[74]

Tourism

The Atlantis Paradise Island in Nassau

The Bahamas relies heavily on tourism to generate most of its economic activity. Tourism as an industry not only accounts for about 50% of the Bahamian GDP, but also provides jobs for about half of the country’s workforce.[12][75] The Bahamas attracted 5.8 million visitors in 2012, more than 70% of whom were cruise visitors.[citation needed]

Financial services

After tourism, the next most important economic sector is banking and offshore international financial services, accounting for some 15% of GDP.[12]

The government has adopted incentives to encourage foreign financial business, and further banking and finance reforms are in progress. The government plans to merge the regulatory functions of key financial institutions, including the Central Bank of the Bahamas (CBB) and the Securities and Exchange Commission.[citation needed] The Central Bank administers restrictions and controls on capital and money market instruments. The Bahamas International Securities Exchange consists of 19 listed public companies. Reflecting the relative soundness of the banking system (mostly populated by Canadian banks), the impact of the global financial crisis on the financial sector was limited.[citation needed]

A proportional representation of the Bahamas exports.

The economy has a very competitive tax regime (classified by some as a tax haven). The government derives its revenue from import tariffs, VAT, licence fees, property and stamp taxes, but there is no income tax, corporate tax, capital gains tax, or wealth tax. Payroll taxes fund social insurance benefits and amount to 3.9% paid by the employee and 5.9% paid by the employer.[76] In 2010, overall tax revenue as a percentage of GDP was 17.2%.[1]

Agriculture and manufacturing

Agriculture and manufacturing form the third largest sector of the Bahamian economy, representing 5–7% of total GDP.[12] An estimated 80% of the Bahamian food supply is imported. Major crops include onionsokratomatoesorangesgrapefruitcucumberssugar canelemonslimes, and sweet potatoes.[citation needed]

Demographics

Demographics of Bahamas, data of FAO; number of inhabitants in thousands

The Bahamas has an estimated population of 391,232, of which 25.9% are 14 or under, 67.2% 15 to 64 and 6.9% over 65. It has a population growth rate of 0.925% (2010), with a birth rate of 17.81/1,000 population, death rate of 9.35/1,000, and net migration rate of −2.13 migrant(s)/1,000 population.[77] The infant mortality rate is 23.21 deaths/1,000 live births. Residents have a life expectancy at birth of 69.87 years: 73.49 years for females, 66.32 years for males. The total fertility rate is 2.0 children born/woman (2010).[1]

The most populous islands are New Providence, where Nassau, the capital and largest city, is located;[78] and Grand Bahama, home to the second largest city of Freeport.[79]

Racial and ethnic groups

According to the 99% response rate obtained from the race question on the 2010 Census questionnaire, 90.6% of the population identified themselves as being Black, 4.7% White and 2.1% of a mixed race (African and European).[80] Three centuries prior, in 1722 when the first official census of the Bahamas was taken, 74% of the population was native European and 26% native African.[80]

Afro-Bahamian children at a local school

Since the colonial era of plantations, Africans or Afro-Bahamians have been the largest ethnic group in the Bahamas, whose primary ancestry was based in West Africa. The first Africans to arrive to the Bahamas were freed slaves from Bermuda; they arrived with the Eleutheran Adventurers looking for new lives.

The Haitian community in the Bahamas is also largely of African descent and numbers about 80,000. Due to an extremely high immigration of Haitians to the Bahamas, the Bahamian government started deporting illegal Haitian immigrants to their homeland in late 2014.[81]

White Bahamians on the island of New Providence

The white Bahamian population are mainly the descendants of the English Puritans and American Loyalists escaping the American Revolution who arrived in 1649 and 1783, respectively.[82]Many Southern Loyalists went to the Abaco Islands, half of whose population was of European descent as of 1985.[83] The term white is usually used to identify Bahamians with Anglo ancestry, as well as “light-skinned” Afro-Bahamians. Sometimes Bahamians use the term Conchy Joe to describe people of Anglo descent.[84]

A small portion of the Euro-Bahamian population are Greek Bahamians, descended from Greek labourers who came to help develop the sponging industry in the 1900s.[85] They make up less than 2% of the nation’s population, but have still preserved their distinct Greek Bahamian culture.[86][87]

Bahamians typically identify themselves simply as either black or white.[84]

Religion

  Protestant (80%)
  Roman Catholic (14.5%)
  Other Christian (1.3%)
  Unaffiliated (3.1%)
  Other religion (1.1%)

The islands’ population is predominantly Christian.[12][61] Protestant denominations collectively account for more than 70% of the population, with Baptists representing 35% of the population, Anglicans 15%, Pentecostals 8%, Church of God 5%, Seventh-day Adventists 5% and Methodists 4%. There is also a significant Roman Catholic community accounting for about 14%.[89] There are also smaller communities of JewsMuslimsBaha’isHindusRastafarians and practitioners of traditional African religions such as Obeah.

Languages

The official language of The Bahamas is English. Many people speak an English-based creole language called Bahamian dialect (known simply as “dialect”) or “Bahamianese”.[90] Laurente Gibbs, a Bahamian writer and actor, was the first to coin the latter name in a poem and has since promoted its usage.[91][92] Both are used as autoglossonyms.[93] Haitian Creole, a French-based creole language is spoken by Haitians and their descendants, who make up of about 25% of the total population. It is known simply as Creole[1] to differentiate it from Bahamian English.[94]

Culture

Junkanoo celebration in Nassau

The culture of the islands is a mixture of African (Afro-Bahamians being the largest ethnicity), British (as the former colonial power) and American (as the dominant country in the region and source of most tourists).[61]

A form of African-based folk magic (obeah) is practised by some Bahamians, mainly in the Family Islands (out-islands) of the Bahamas.[95] The practice of obeah is illegal in the Bahamas and punishable by law.[96]

In the less developed outer islands (or Family Islands), handicrafts include basketry made from palm fronds. This material, commonly called “straw”, is plaited into hats and bags that are popular tourist items. Another use is for so-called “Voodoo dolls”, even though such dolls are the result of foreign influences and not based in historic fact.[97]

Junkanoo is a traditional Afro-Bahamian street parade of ‘rushing’, music, dance and art held in Nassau (and a few other settlements) every Boxing Day and New Year’s Day. Junkanoo is also used to celebrate other holidays and events such as Emancipation Day.[61]

Regattas are important social events in many family island settlements. They usually feature one or more days of sailing by old-fashioned work boats, as well as an onshore festival.

Many dishes are associated with Bahamian cuisine, which reflects Caribbean, African and European influences. Some settlements have festivals associated with the traditional crop or food of that area, such as the “Pineapple Fest” in Gregory Town, Eleuthera or the “Crab Fest” on Andros. Other significant traditions include story telling.

Bahamians have created a rich literature of poetry, short stories, plays and short fictional works. Common themes in these works are (1) an awareness of change, (2) a striving for sophistication, (3) a search for identity, (4) nostalgia for the old ways and (5) an appreciation of beauty. Some major writers are Susan Wallace, Percival Miller, Robert Johnson, Raymond Brown, O.M. Smith, William Johnson, Eddie Minnis and Winston Saunders.[98][99]

Bahamas culture is rich with beliefs, traditions, folklore and legend. The best-known folklore and legends in the Bahamas include the lusca and chickcharney creatures of Andros, Pretty Molly on Exuma Bahamas and the Lost City of Atlantis on Bimini Bahamas.

Sport

Sport is a significant part of Bahamian culture. The national sport is cricket. Cricket has been played in the Bahamas from 1846,[100] the oldest sport being played in the country today. The Bahamas Cricket Association was formed in 1936, and from the 1940s to the 1970s, cricket was played amongst many Bahamians. Bahamas is not a part of the West Indies Cricket Board, so players are not eligible to play for the West Indies cricket team. The late 1970s saw the game begin to decline in the country as teachers, who had previously come from the United Kingdom with a passion for cricket, were replaced by teachers who had been trained in the United States. The Bahamian physical education teachers had no knowledge of the game and instead taught track and fieldbasketballbaseballsoftball,[101] volleyball[102] and Association football[103] where primary and high schools compete against each other. Today cricket is still enjoyed by a few locals and immigrants in the country, usually from JamaicaGuyanaHaiti and Barbados. Cricket is played on Saturdays and Sundays at Windsor Park and Haynes Oval.

The only other sporting event that began before cricket was horse racing, which started in 1796. The most popular spectator sports are those imported from the United States, such as basketball,[104] American football,[105] and baseball,[106] rather than from the British Isles, due to the country’s close proximity to the United States, unlike their other Caribbean counterparts, where cricket, rugby, and netball have proven to be more popular.

Dexter CambridgeRick FoxIan LockhartMagnum RolleBuddy Hield and Deandre Ayton are a few Bahamians who joined Bahamian Mychal Thompson of the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA ranks.[107][108] Over the years American football has become much more popular than soccer, though not implemented in the high school system yet. Leagues for teens and adults have been developed by the Bahamas American Football Federation.[109] However soccer, as it is commonly known in the country, is still a very popular sport amongst high school pupils. Leagues are governed by the Bahamas Football Association. Recently,[when?] the Bahamian government has been working closely with Tottenham Hotspur of London to promote the sport in the country as well as promoting the Bahamas in the European market. In 2013, ‘Spurs’ became the first Premier League club to play an exhibition match in the Bahamas, facing the Jamaican national teamJoe Lewis, the owner of the club, is based in the Bahamas.[110][better source needed]

Other popular sports are swimming,[111] tennis[112] and boxing,[113] where Bahamians have enjoyed some degree of success at the international level. Other sports such as golf,[114] rugby league,[115] rugby union,[116] beach soccer,[117] and netball are considered growing sports. Athletics, commonly known as ‘track and field’ in the country, is the most successful sport by far amongst Bahamians. Bahamians have a strong tradition in the sprints and jumps. Track and field is probably the most popular spectator sport in the country next to basketball due to their success over the years. Triathlons are gaining popularity in Nassau and the Family Islands.

Bahamians have gone on to win numerous track and field medals at the Olympic GamesIAAF World Championships in AthleticsCommonwealth Games and Pan American GamesFrank Rutherford is the first athletics olympic medallist for the country. He won a bronze medal for triple jump during the 1992 Summer Olympics.[118] Pauline Davis-ThompsonDebbie FergusonChandra SturrupSavatheda Fynes and Eldece Clarke-Lewis teamed up for the first athletics Olympic Gold medal for the country when they won the 4 × 100 m relay at the 2000 Summer Olympics. They are affectionately known as the “Golden Girls”.[119] Tonique Williams-Darling became the first athletics individual Olympic gold medallist when she won the 400m sprint in 2004 Summer Olympics.[120] In 2007, with the disqualification of Marion JonesPauline Davis-Thompson was advanced to the gold medal position in the 200 metres at the 2000 Olympics, predating William-Darling.

The Bahamas were hosts of the first men’s senior FIFA tournament to be staged in the Caribbean, the 2017 FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup.[121] The Bahamas also hosted the first 3 editions of the IAAF World Relays.

Education

According to 1995 estimates, 98.2% of the Bahamian adult population are literate.[citation needed]

The University of the Bahamas (UB) is the national higher education/tertiary system. Offering baccalaureate, masters and associate degrees, UB has three campuses, and teaching and research centres throughout the Bahamas. The University of the Bahamas was chartered on 10 November 2016.[citation needed]

Transport

Leonard M. Thompson International Airport

The Bahamas contains about 1,620 km (1,010 mi) of paved roads.[11] Inter-island transport is conducted primarily via ship and air. The country has 61 airports, the chief of which are Lynden Pindling International Airport on New Providence, Grand Bahama International Airport on Grand Bahama Island and Leonard M. Thompson International Airport (formerly Marsh Harbour Airport) on Abaco Island.

See also

References …

Sources

Further reading

General history

  • Cash Philip et al. (Don Maples, Alison Packer). The Making of The Bahamas: A History for Schools. London: Collins, 1978.
  • Miller, Hubert W. The Colonization of The Bahamas, 1647–1670, The William and Mary Quarterly 2 no.1 (January 1945): 33–46.
  • Craton, Michael. A History of The Bahamas. London: Collins, 1962.
  • Craton, Michael and Saunders, Gail. Islanders in the Stream: A History of the Bahamian People. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992
  • Collinwood, Dean. “Columbus and the Discovery of Self,” Weber Studies, Vol. 9 No. 3 (Fall) 1992: 29–44.
  • Dodge, Steve. Abaco: The History of an Out Island and its Cays, Tropic Isle Publications, 1983.
  • Dodge, Steve. The Compleat Guide to Nassau, White Sound Press, 1987.
  • Boultbee, Paul G. The Bahamas. Oxford: ABC-Clio Press, 1990.
  • Wood, David E., comp., A Guide to Selected Sources to the History of the Seminole Settlements of Red Bays, Andros, 1817–1980, Nassau: Department of Archives

Economic history

  • Johnson, Howard. The Bahamas in Slavery and Freedom. Kingston: Ian Randle Publishing, 1991.
  • Johnson, Howard. The Bahamas from Slavery to Servitude, 1783–1933. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1996.
  • Alan A. Block. Masters of Paradise, New Brunswick and London, Transaction Publishers, 1998.
  • Storr, Virgil H. Enterprising Slaves and Master Pirates: Understanding Economic Life in the Bahamas. New York: Peter Lang, 2004.

Social history

  • Johnson, Wittington B. Race Relations in the Bahamas, 1784–1834: The Nonviolent Transformation from a Slave to a Free Society, Fayetteville: University of Arkansas, 2000.
  • Shirley, Paul. “Tek Force Wid Force”, History Today 54, no. 41 (April 2004): 30–35.
  • Saunders, Gail. The Social Life in the Bahamas 1880s–1920s. Nassau: Media Publishing, 1996.
  • Saunders, Gail. Bahamas Society After Emancipation. Kingston: Ian Randle Publishing, 1990.
  • Curry, Jimmy. Filthy Rich Gangster/First Bahamian Movie. Movie Mogul Pictures: 1996.
  • Curry, Jimmy. To the Rescue/First Bahamian Rap/Hip Hop Song. Royal Crown Records, 1985.
  • Collinwood, Dean. The Bahamas Between Worlds, White Sound Press, 1989.
  • Collinwood, Dean and Steve Dodge. Modern Bahamian Society, Caribbean Books, 1989.
  • Dodge, Steve, Robert McIntire and Dean Collinwood. The Bahamas Index, White Sound Press, 1989.
  • Collinwood, Dean. “The Bahamas,” in The Whole World Handbook 1992–1995, 12th ed., New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994.
  • Collinwood, Dean. “The Bahamas,” chapters in Jack W. Hopkins, ed., Latin American and Caribbean Contemporary Record, Vols. 1,2,3,4, Holmes and Meier Publishers, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986.
  • Collinwood, Dean. “Problems of Research and Training in Small Islands with a Social Science Faculty,” in Social Science in Latin America and the Caribbean, UNESCO, No. 48, 1982.
  • Collinwood, Dean and Rick Phillips, “The National Literature of the New Bahamas,” Weber Studies, Vol.7, No. 1 (Spring) 1990: 43–62.
  • Collinwood, Dean. “Writers, Social Scientists and Sexual Norms in the Caribbean,” Tsuda Review, No. 31 (November) 1986: 45–57.
  • Collinwood, Dean. “Terra Incognita: Research on the Modern Bahamian Society,” Journal of Caribbean Studies,Vol. 1, Nos. 2–3 (Winter) 1981: 284–297.
  • Collinwood, Dean and Steve Dodge. “Political Leadership in the Bahamas,” The Bahamas Research Institute, No.1, May 1987.

External links

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bahamas

 

 

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