The Pronk Pops Show 1148, September 28, 2018, Breaking News — Story 1: Profiles in Infamy — Political Character Assassination and Smear Campaign of Judge Brett Kavanaugh By Democrats, Big Lie Media and Lying Lunatic Left Losers — Expect Massive Backlash in Midterm Elections By Fair Minded American Voters — Videos — Story 2: Senate Judiciary Committee Vote 11 to 10 Along Party Lines to Send Judge Kavanagh Nomination To Full Senate — Waiting For Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Decision For Date of Confirmation Vote — Videos — Story 3: President Trump Orders Supplemental FBI Investigation Delaying Confirmation Vote For One More Week — Videos — Story 4: Prospects for Tax Reform — Videos

Posted on September 27, 2018. Filed under: Addiction, American History, Blogroll, Breaking News, Communications, Congress, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Deep State, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Elections, Employment, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Federal Government, Freedom of Speech, Government, Government Spending, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Investments, Law, Life, Lying, Media, National Interest, Networking, News, People, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Privacy, Public Corruption, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Senate, Tax Fraud, Terror, Terrorism, Trump Surveillance/Spying, United States of America, United States Supreme Court, Videos, Violence, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , |

 

 Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 1148, September 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1147, September 27, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1146, September 25, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1145, September 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1144, September 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1143, September 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1142, September 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1141, September 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1140, September 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1139, September 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1138, September 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1137, September 7, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1136, September 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1135, September 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1134, September 4, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1133, August 29, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1132, August 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1131, August 27, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1130, August 22, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1129, August 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1128, August 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1127, August 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1126, August 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1125, August 15, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1124, August 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1123, August 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1122, August 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1121, August 8, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1120, August 6, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1119, August 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1118, August 1, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1117, July 31, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1116, July 30, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1115, July 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1114, July 25, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1113, July 24, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1112, July 23, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1111, July 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1110, July 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1109, July 17, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1108, July 16, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1107, July 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1106, July 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1105, July 10, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1104, July 9, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1103, July 5, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1102, JUly 3, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1101, July 2, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1100, June 28, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1099, June 26, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1098, June 25, 2018 

Pronk Pops Show 1097, June 21, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1096, June 20, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1095, June 19, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1094, June 18, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1093, June 14, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1092, June 13, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1091, June 12, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1090, June 11, 2018

Pronk Pops Show 1089, June 7, 2018

See the source image

Image result for trump tweet on kavanuagh testimonySee the source imageSee the source imageImage result for branco cartoons kavanaughSee the source image

 

Story 1: Profiles in Infamy — Political Character Assassination and Smear Campaign of Judge Brett Kavanaugh By Democrats, Big Lie Media and Lying Lunatic Left Losers — Expect Massive Backlash in Midterm Elections By Fair Minded American Voters — Videos — 

Graham on Kavanaugh: ‘Never heard a more compelling defense’ in my life

Graham Questions Judge Kavanaugh

Sen. Lindsey Graham: “God help anybody else who gets nominated”

All Of Her Witnesses Denied Her Story” Ted Cruz RIPS Democrats For Mud Slinging Kavanaugh’s Name

RAW: FIRST HALF of Brett Kavanaugh full testimony

RAW: SECOND PART of Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony

Brett Kavanaugh’s FULL statement to U.S. Senate on allegations of sexual assault

Kavanaugh And Christine Blasey Ford’s Testimony Recapped

Graham recalls his fiery speech at Kavanaugh hearing

Hannity: Dems have turned SCOTUS process into a sham

Sean Hannity 9\27\18 | FOX NEWS | September 27, 2018

Alan Dershowitz reacts to Kavanaugh hearing

Tucker on Kavanaugh’s defiant defense

Ingraham on Dems Walking Out of Kavanaugh Hearing: They’re Whipping the Base Into a ‘Frenzy’

The Ingraham Angle 9\27\18 | FOX NEWS | September 27, 2018

Mark Levin Show PODCAST Thursday September 27 2018

Sen. Graham on Ford’s Kavanaugh testimony: There’s no corroboration

Sara Carter Responds to Brett Kavanaugh’s Testimony

Sharyl Attkisson – The Smear

 

Kavanaugh vote: Flake, Murkowski back FBI investigation; Senate committee advances nominee

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Sept. 28 on Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) was the deciding vote. 

September 28 at 3:01 PM

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted along party lines Friday to advance the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh after securing a key vote from Sen. Jeff Flake, who asked for a delay of up to a week before the full Senate votes.

Flake (R-Ariz.) said the delay would allow a limited FBI investigation of allegations of sexual assault while Kavanaugh was a teenager.

The 11-to-10 vote came a day after hearing riveting testimony from Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who has accused President Trump’s nominee of sexual assault at a house party in Maryland in the early 1980s.

Flake’s request cast doubt on whether the full Senate would move forward as planned, starting with a previously announced procedural vote on Saturday, as other wavering lawmakers started to join Flake. Earlier Friday, Republican leaders had vowed to take a final vote to confirm Kavanaugh by early next week.

Following Flake’s announcement, two other senators considered swing votes — Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Sens. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) — indicated that they support Flake’s call for a delay.

“The American people have been pulled apart by this entire spectacle and we need to take time to address these claims independently, so that our country can have confidence in the outcome of this vote,” Manchin said in a statement. “It is what is right and fair for Dr. Ford, Judge Kavanaugh, and the American people.”

With a slim 51-49 majority in the Senate, it would be difficult for the GOP to press ahead with a procedural vote on Saturday if two Republican senators defect and they are not able to bring on board any Democrats.

While the timing of the floor vote is up to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) said he would advocate for Flake’s request.

“This is all a gentlemen’s and women’s agreement,” Grassley said after the committee vote.

Speaking to reporters at the White House after the committee vote, Trump said he would defer to Senate leaders on how to proceed with his nominee. “Whatever they think is necessary is okay,” Trump said. “They have to do what they think is right.”

He continued to stand by Kavanaugh, saying he had not thought “even a little bit” about a replacement but also said he found Ford a “credible witness.”

As Kavanaugh’s nomination heads to the floor, his prospects remain unclear in the full Senate.

Two other senators considered swing votes — Susan Collins (Maine) and Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.) — remained silent about their intentions Friday.

Meanwhile, another red-state Democrat, Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) announced Friday that he would oppose Kavanaugh’s nomination. Republicans had been courting Donnelly, one of three Democrats, along with Manchin and Heitkamp, who supported previous Trump Supreme Court nominee Neil M. Gorsuch.

“I have deep reservations about Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination to this lifetime position and … we have been unable to get all the information necessary regarding this nomination, despite my best efforts,” Donnelly said in a statement. “Only 113 people have ever served on the Supreme Court, and I believe that we must do our level best to protect its sanctity.”

At the committee vote neared, senators on both sides of the aisle took turns giving their reasons for supporting or opposing Kavanaugh, many in impassioned terms.

“He does not have the veracity nor temperament for a lifetime appointment to the highest court in our nation,” Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) said of Kavanaugh. “And no such nominee should be confirmed in the face of such serious, credible and unresolved allegations of sexual assault.”

“I’ve never heard a more compelling defense of one’s honor and integrity,” Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) countered, referring to Kavanaugh’s performance at Thursday’s hearing.

Graham declared that judicial confirmations would now be starkly different going forward, noting the “process before Kavanaugh, and the process after Kavanaugh.”

“I can say about Ms. Ford, I feel sorry for her, and I do believe something happened to her, and I don’t know when and where,” Graham said. “But I don’t believe it was Brett Kavanaugh.”

Shortly after the Judiciary Committee convened Friday, the panel voted down a motion on party lines by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) to subpoena Mark Judge, a high school classmate of Kavanaugh. Ford has alleged that Judge witnessed the assault.

The committee then voted, again along party lines, to decide on Kavanaugh’s nomination at 1:30 p.m. The votes prompted outrage from Democrats.

“This is just totally ridiculous. What a railroad job,” said Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii).

Several Senate Democrats — including Blumenthal, Hirono, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (Calif.), and Sheldon Whitehouse (R.I.) — walked out in protest. Some later returned.

In a letter to the Judiciary Committee on Thursday, Judge wrote that he did not recall the events described by Ford in her testimony and never saw Kavanaugh act the way she described. Judge said that he does not want to testify and that he avoids public speaking because he struggles with depression and anxiety as a recovering alcoholic and cancer survivor.

Underscoring the acrimony surrounding Friday’s proceedings, a dozen House Democratic women who gathered to watch the Judiciary Committee stood up in the room in protest.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) later told reporters that she thinks President Trump “is trying to break the MeToo movement” with his continued support for Kavanaugh.

Meanwhile, shortly after Flake announced his support for Kavanaugh, two women tearfully and loudly confronted the Arizona senator in an el­e­va­tor, tell­ing him that he was dis­miss­ing the pain of sex­ual as­sault survivors.

“What you are doing is al­low­ing some­one who ac­tu­al­ly vio­lat­ed a woman to sit in the Su­preme Court,” one woman shout­ed during a live CNN broadcast as Flake was making his way to the Judiciary Committee meeting. “This is hor­rible. You have chil­dren in your fam­i­ly. Think a­bout them.”

Flake lis­tened quietly, then told the women: “Thank you.”

Before the committee meeting, White House officials fanned out across morning television shows to tout Kavanaugh’s fiery performance in Thursday’s hearing and press the Senate to vote.

“I think he was incredibly powerful and very clear,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said of Kavanaugh during an appearance on ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

She suggested that Ford was mistaken about her attacker and said Kavanaugh has “been unequivocal since Day One that this did not take place by him.”

During a television appearance Friday morning before the committee vote, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said he is “optimistic we’ll confirm the judge.”

Asked about Republican holdouts on “Fox & Friends,” Cornyn said, “They have not publicly committed, but we’ve been engaging in personal texts, conversations, face-to-face visits. It’s the norm for how thing happen here . . . I respect their right to make their own announcement, which I’m sure they’ll do in due course.”

The votes of several red-state Democrats have also been in play.

Late Thursday, one of them, Sen. Doug Jones (Ala.), said in a tweet that he would vote no if the chamber presses ahead with consideration of Kavanaugh the day after hearing from Ford, whom Jones said he found “credible & courageous.”

With her voice shaking at times, Ford described in stark detail Thursday being pinned on a bed at a house party by a drunken Kavanaugh, who she said groped her, tried to take off her clothes and put his hand over her mouth to stifle her screams. She said she was “100 percent” certain that Kavanaugh was her attacker.

In his tweet, Jones repeated a call for the Senate to postpone the vote and hear from Judge, who Ford said was in the room when Kavanaugh allegedly assaulted her in 1982.

“What message will we send to our daughters & sons, let alone sexual assault victims?” Jones said in his tweet. “The message I will send is this — I vote no. #RightSideofHistory”

Late Thursday, the American Bar Association, which had previously rated Kavanaugh “well-qualified” for the Supreme Court, called on the Judiciary Committee to halt the confirmation vote, saying it should not move forward until an FBI investigation into the sexual assault allegations against him can be completed.

During her appearance on ABC, Sanders suggested that was unnecessary, saying the FBI has conducted six previous background checks on Kavanaugh for federal positions.

“These allegations took place long before any of those background checks would have taken place,” she said, adding that senators had asked questions Thursday similar to what the FBI would ask if it reopened its process.

Rachel Mitchell, the outside counsel hired by Republicans to question Ford, told GOP senators in a closed-door meeting Thursday night that she would not have prosecuted the matter because there was no corroborating evidence, according to two GOP sources familiar with her presentation. She also told the senators that Ford was a compelling witness who had clearly suffered trauma.

Mitchell, a registered Republican, has not commented about the case. Republicans have rebuffed repeated requests from Democrats to call other witnesses who might have corroborated Ford’s account and also rejected Democratic calls for an FBI investigation.

Mitchell’s comments reassured Republicans who have been wavering about the nomination, according to GOP sources who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss private conversations.

During Thursday’s hearing, Kavanaugh angrily assailed Democrats for pushing what he said were false charges to “blow me up and take me down.”

The 53-year-old federal judge was often tearful and paused for gulps of water as he spoke about the toll that the allegations by Ford and two other women have taken on his wife, his children, his parents and his friends.

“This has destroyed my family and my good name,” he said, adding: “This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election.”

It remained unclear whether an FBI review would include two other Kavanaugh accusers.

Deborah Ramirez, a classmate of Kavanaugh’s at Yale University, told the New Yorker magazine that Kavanaugh exposed himself to her at a party when they were both first-year students.

Julie Swetnick, a Washington resident, said in a declaration that Kavanaugh was physically abusive toward girls in high school and present at a house party in 1982 where she says she was the victim of a “gang” rape. She is being represented by Michael Avenatti, whose clients also include Stormy Daniels, the adult-film actress who was paid to remain silent about an alleged decade-old affair with Trump.

“Because @realDonaldTrump and the Senate Republicans refuse to allow my client Julie Swetnick to testify, we will be taking her story directly to the American people this weekend,” Avenatti said in a Friday morning tweet. “This is about a search for the truth. Details to follow.”

Sean Sullivan, Paul Kane, Robert Barnes and Elise Viebeck contributed to this report.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/senate-committee-prepares-to-vote-on-kavanaugh-nomination-as-key-senators-remain-silent/2018/09/28/0b143292-c305-11e8-b338-a3289f6cb742_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.4f803af9f021

 

Donald Trump Tweets Victorious After Brett Kavanaugh’s Pugnacious Testimony: “Senate Must Vote!”

Donald Trump

“Judge Kavanaugh showed America exactly why I nominated him,” President Donald Trump crowed via twitter, literally as his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaughwas leaving the room after Senate Judiciary Committee testimony Thursday.

“His testimony was powerful, honest, and riveting. Democrats’ search and destroy strategy is disgraceful and this process has been a total sham and effort to delay, obstruct, and resist. The Senate must vote!”

Trump had canceled today’s planned meeting with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein so as to free up his time to watch the hearing at which one of Kavanaugh’s accusers, Christine Blasey Ford, testified.

Trump put Kavanaugh on notice, calling a rare press conference the afternoon before today’s hearing to say he would watch and left open the option of being convinced by Ford, while continuing to call allegations against Kavanaugh “a big fat lie.”

Trump reportedly advised Kavanaugh to jettison the school choirboy persona he’d taken on during his pre-buttal on Fox News Channel, and go after his accusers more aggressively. Which Kavanaugh did emphatically, calling today’s hearing and the two weeks leading up to it “a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election,” and “revenge on behalf of the Clintons.”

After the hearing, and Trump’s tweet, Democratic committee member Sen. Patrick Leahy, out in the hallway, told reporters of his Republican committee colleagues, “They’re going to do whatever the White House and Mitch McConnell tells them to do.”

Asked his thoughts on Kavanaugh’s testimony, Leahy responded: “I found it well rehearsed. It brought me back to memories of Clarence Thomas.”

Trump’s victory-lap tweet:

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

Judge Kavanaugh showed America exactly why I nominated him. His testimony was powerful, honest, and riveting. Democrats’ search and destroy strategy is disgraceful and this process has been a total sham and effort to delay, obstruct, and resist. The Senate must vote!

 

Fiery Kavanaugh denies quiet accuser Ford in Senate showdown

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an emotional day like few others in Senate history, California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford quietly but firmly recounted her “100 percent” certainty Thursday that President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers — and then Brett Kavanaugh defiantly testified he was “100 percent certain” he did no such thing.

That left senators to decide whether the long day tipped their confirmation votes for or against Trump’s nominee in a deeply partisan fight with the future of the high court and possibly control of Congress in the balance.

Showing their own certainty, Republicans quickly scheduled a recommendation vote for Friday morning in the Senate Judiciary Committee, where they hold n 11-10 majority. They’re hoping for a final Senate roll call next week, seating Kavanaugh on the court for the Oct. start of its new term.

In the committee’s packed hearing room for hour upon hour Thursday, both Kavanaugh and Ford said the alleged assault and the storm of controversy that has erupted 36 years later had altered their lives forever and for the worse — perhaps the only thing they agreed on during their separate testimony marked by a stark contrast of tone and substance.

Ford recounted for the senators and a nationwide TV audience her long-held secret of the alleged assault in a locked room at a gathering of friends when she was just 15. The memory — and Kavanaugh’s laughter during the act — was “locked” in her brain, she said. Ford delivered her testimony with deliberate certitude, though admitting gaps in her memory as she choked back tears at some points and said she “believed he was going to rape me.”

Hours later, Kavanaugh entered the hearing room fuming. He angrily denied her allegation, alternating a loud, defiant tone with near tears of his own, particularly when discussing his family. He decried his confirmation opposition as a “national disgrace.” He interrupted senators and dismissed some questions with a flippant “whatever.”

“You have replaced ‘advice and consent’ with ‘search and destroy,‘” he said, referring to the Constitution’s charge to senators’ duties in confirming high officials.

Democrats pressed the judge to call for an FBI investigation into the claims, but he would say only, “I welcome whatever the committee wants to do.”

Republicans are concerned, among other reasons, that further investigations could push a vote past the November elections that may switch Senate control back to the Democrats and make consideration of any Trump nominee more difficult.

Trump made his feelings newly clear that he was sticking by his choice. “His testimony was powerful, honest and riveting,” he tweeted. “The Senate must vote!”

Trump nominated the conservative jurist in what was supposed to be an election year capstone to the GOP agenda, locking in the court’s majority for years to come. Instead Kavanaugh has seemed in peril and on Thursday he faced the Senate hearing amid a national reckoning over sexual misconduct at the top of powerful institutions.

The day opened with Ford, now a 51-year-old college professor in California, raising her right hand to swear under oath about the allegations she said she never expected to share publicly until they leaked in the media two weeks ago and reporters started staking out her home and work.

As Anita Hill did more two decades ago when she alleged sexual misconduct by Clarence Thomas, the mom of two testified before a committee with only male senators on the Republican side of the dais.

The psychology professor described what she says was a harrowing assault in the summer of 1982: How an inebriated Kavanaugh and another teen, Mark Judge, locked her in a room at a house party as Kavanaugh was grinding and groping her. She said he put his hand over her mouth to muffle her screams. Judge has said does not recall the incident.

When the committee’s top Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, asked Ford how she could be sure that Kavanaugh was the attacker, Ford said, “The same way I’m sure I’m talking to you right now.” Later, she said her certainty was “100 percent.”

Her strongest memory of the alleged incident, Ford said, was the two boys’ laughter.

“Indelible in the hippocampus is the laughter,” said Ford, who is a research psychologist, “the uproarious laughter between the two.”

Republican strategists were privately hand-wringing after Ford’s testimony. The GOP special counsel Rachel Mitchell, a Phoenix sex crimes prosecutor, who Republicans had hired to avoid the optics of their all-male line up questioning Ford, left Republicans disappointed.

Mitchell’s attempt to draw out a counter-narrative — mainly that Ford was coordinating with Democrats — was disrupted by the panel’s decision to allow alternating five-minute rounds of questions from Democratic senators.

During a lunch break, even typically talkative GOP senators on the panel were without words.

John Kennedy of Louisiana said he had no comment. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said he was “just listening.”

Then Kavanaugh strode into the committee room, arranged his nameplate, and with anger on his face started to testify with a statement he said he had shown only one other person. Almost immediately he choked up.

“My family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed,” he said.

He lashed out over the time it took the committee to convene the hearing after Ford’s allegations emerged, singling out the Democrats for “unleashing” forces against him. He mocked Ford’s allegations — and several others since — that have accused him of sexual impropriety.

Even if senators vote down his confirmation, he said, “you’ll never get me to quit.”

Kavanaugh, who has two daughters, said one of his girls said they should “pray for the woman” making the allegations against him, referring to Ford. “That’s a lot of wisdom from a 10-year-old,” he said choking up. “We mean no ill will.”

The judge repeatedly refused to answer senators’ questions about the hard-party atmosphere that has been described from his peer group at Georgetown Prep and Yale, treating them dismissively.

“Sometimes I had too many beers,” he acknowledged. “I liked beer. I still like beer. But I never drank beer to the point of blacking out, and I never sexually assaulted anyone. ”

When Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., pressed if he ever drank so much he blacked out, he replied, “Have you?” After a break in the proceedings, he came back and apologized to Klobuchar. She said her father was an alcoholic.

Behind him in the audience as he testified, his wife, Ashley, sat looking stricken.

Republicans who had been scheduled to vote as soon as Friday at the committee — and early next week in the full Senate — alternated between their own anger and frustration at the allegations and the process.

“You’re right to be angry,” said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, his voice rising in anger, called the hearing the “most unethical sham since I’ve been in politics.”

___

Associated Press writers Kevin Freking, Mary Clare Jalonick, Padmananda Rama, Matthew Daly, Julie Pace and AP photographers J. Scott Applewhite and Carolyn Kaster contributed to this report.

Rachel Mitchell in front of Senators
Trump allies who want to see Brett Kavanaugh confirmed were concerned that Rachel Mitchell (above) had not managed to poke any holes in Christine Blasey Ford’s account or character that would make her story less believable. | Tom Williams/Pool Image via AP

KAVANAUGH CONFIRMATION

Rachel Mitchell’s disappearing act confirms GOP blunder

Senate Republicans thought that bringing a female prosecutor to question Christine Blasey Ford would help them avoid looking like they were ganging up an alleged victim of sexual assault.

But once the hearing was underway, they seemed to quickly regret outsourcing their work to former sex crimes prosecutor Rachel Mitchell. She lasted through the first part of the hearing featuring Ford, but was quickly relegated to the sidelines once Brett Kavanaugh started testifying, never to be heard from again.

At the outset of the hearing, Mitchell’s seemingly picayune lines of questioning failed to dent Ford’s credibility and put Republicans on the defensive over the sexual abuse allegations against Kavanaugh. The five-minute rounds of questioning — a request from Ford’s legal team that not every Democrat was comfortable with initially — didn’t help the GOP’s cause, either. Mitchell couldn’t establish any rhythm, clearly frustrating Republicans.

“I haven’t seen the whole thing but I wish our counsel had a longer period of time rather than breaking it up into five minute segments,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.). “It’s just chopped up [so] you don’t have … a really good fact-finding type of exchange. That’s been unfortunate.”

During a lunch break a little over halfway through Ford’s testimony, some Senate Republicans expressed concern on the chamber floor over where Mitchell was going with her questioning, according to a GOP senator present for the exchange. They were told that Mitchell was not trying to score points against Ford, but that she would put together a case that Republicans could lay out during the committee vote on Kavanaugh Friday.

The No. 2 Senate Republican, Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, said Mitchell was doing “very well” midway through her questioning of Ford, crediting the prosecutor with asking “respectful questions and [getting] pertinent information.” But Cornyn acknowledged that the format was “a little awkward with five-minute rounds.”

Despite Cornyn’s claim that Mitchell performed well, she asked only two rounds of questions of Kavanaugh and then was effectively yanked by Republican senators who chose not to cede more of their time to her.

Earlier in the day, towards the end of the questioning of Ford, it became clear Mitchell was chafing at her predicament. She asked Ford if she knew about the ideal way to interview trauma victims.

“Would you believe me if I told you that there’s no study that says this setting, in five-minute increments, is the best way to do that?” Mitchell asked, prompting laughter from Ford and many in the room.

“We’ll stipulate to that,” one Ford’s lawyers, Michael Bromwich, replied.

Moments later Mitchell raised the time limits again.

“Instead of submitting to an interview in California, we’re having a hearing here today—in five-minute increments,” the prosecutor said.

The negative reviews down at the other end of Pennsylvania Ave. were far more blunt, with one administration official calling the hearing a “disaster” for Kavanaugh’s confirmation hopes. The official said Republican lawmakers made a mistake by hiring a woman out of fear of the optics of Ford being questioned by an unbroken line of old white men.

Trump allies who want to see Kavanaugh confirmed were concerned that Mitchell had not managed to poke any holes in Ford’s account or character that would make her story less believable. But during the Judiciary Committee’s lunch break, they were still holding out hope that her lines of questions would lead to a breakthrough finale.

“Rachel Mitchell not only is not laying a glove on her, but, in my view, is actually helping her credibility by the gentility with which these questions are being asked and the open-ended answers that the witness is being permitted to give” Trump ally and former Judge Andrew Napolitano said on Fox News. “The president cannot be happy with this.”

As the hearing continued with testimony from Kavanaugh in the afternoon, Republicans soon pushed Mitchell aside. She asked a couple of a rounds of questions at the outset of the session, laying out a definition of sexual activity and asking if he’d ever engaged in such actions with Ford, which Kavanaugh denied.

Mitchell also asked him about drinking to the point of “black out,” which he again denied. She may have actually done some damage to the nominee by beginning to question him about a party mentioned on his calendar which appeared to involve at least two people Ford identified as being at the event where she was attacked. But she never returned to complete that line of questioning.

After that, the Arizona sex-crimes prosecutor remained at a small table in front of the dais, but became little more than window-dressing as Republican senators asserted their right to handle subsequent rounds of questioning themselves, or to use their time to express outrage about at how Kavanaugh had been treated by Democrats.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) launched into a fiery diatribe against his Democratic colleagues, accusing them of deliberately smearing Kavanaugh in order to block Trump from filling the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement. Each of the other GOP senators followed in turn, but Mitchell was never heard from again.

Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) said he wasn’t aware of any plan to stop using Mitchell following Graham’s tirade, but it worked out that way.

“By that time, it had moved on,” Crapo said. “When it came my turn, I just went.”

Many outside lawyers watching the hearing panned Mitchell’s role, though there was disagreement about where blamed lied for the lackluster performance.

“I think the committee members have put Rachel Mitchell at a significant disadvantage by forcing her to conduct such a disjointed examination. She is unable to complete a line of questioning before her time expires,” said former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade.

The Federalist Society distributed talking points defending Mitchell’s line of questioning, noting that she had been able to show that “whoever drove [Ford] home doesn’t exist,” according to a person who received the talking points. The Federalist Society also noted that Mitchell had managed to prove that “there was no witness to support what she’s alleging happened.”

During the first half of the day, Mitchell steered clear of giving Ford more opportunities to describe the details of the assault she claims was perpetrated in an upstairs bedroom of a house by Kavanaugh and his friend, Matt Judge, in the early 1980s.

But Mitchell pursued some seemingly trivial rounds of questioning that didn’t elicit any information to undermine Ford’s testimony. Mitchell and Ford had a lengthy exchange over Ford’s fear of flying, although they established that Ford often flew for her job as a psychologist and to attend family events. Some of Mitchell’s precious time was used to question Ford about her fear of flying and to ask if she’d been to Australia. She said she had not.

Mitchell clearly suffered from the fact that neither the committee nor the FBI had questioned Ford previously, which left Mitchell probing a lot of dry holes and sometimes drawing answers that were unhelpful to the GOP side.

A question about why a polygraph was done in a hotel near an airport led to the sympathetic and probably unexpected answer from Ford that she was attending her grandmother’s funeral.

“She was out of her element,” said one defense attorney who knows Mitchell and asked not to be named. “Usually, she coddles the putative victim and excoriates the defendant and his witnesses. Her job for SJC Republicans is exactly opposite. And she has no second chair and staff with her at her table. Recipe for looking bad.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) argued that “the prosecutor is bolstering her credibility.”

“They’re nitpicking,” the Connecticut Democrat asserted. “Why did she cry in one place and not another? Irrelevant!”

He added: “There’s an old saying, as an old prosecutor I learned it well: Don’t ask a question if you don’t know the answer. And she has no idea what the answer will be.”

Annie Karni contributed to this report.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/09/27/gop-senators-outside-ford-questioner-mistake-849246

 

Story 2: Senate Judiciary Committee Vote 11 to 10 Along Party Lines to Send Judge Kavanagh Nomination To Full Senate — Waiting For Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Decision For Date of Confirmation Vote — Videos —

SENATE PANEL VOTES “YES” ON BRETT KAVANAUGH

Story 3: President Trump Orders Supplemental FBI Investigation Delaying Confirmation Vote For One More Week — Videos —

Donald Trump Orders FBI Investigation On Kavanaugh To Be ‘Limited In Scope’ | MTP Daily | MSNBC

Trump orders supplemental FBI investigation of Kavanaugh allegations before floor vote

 

The Latest: Ford lawyer thanks senators for new FBI probe

5:30 p.m.

A lawyer for Christine Blasey Ford is praising the efforts of several senators who successfully pushed for a new FBI investigation of Ford’s sexual assault claim against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Debra Katz says Ford “welcomes this step in the process” and appreciates the efforts of Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona and others. Senate Republican leaders agreed Friday to ask for the investigation and delay a final vote on Kavanaugh after Flake requested it. Flake is a crucial swing vote on the nomination.

President Donald Trump later ordered the investigation, saying it should be limited in scope and last no longer than a week. Katz says there should be no “artificial limits as to time or scope” on the investigation.

__

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Chilean president Sebastian Pinera, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Sept. 28, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

5:25 p.m.

Alaska’s junior U.S. senator missed Thursday’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing to undergo an emergency appendectomy.

Matt Shuckerow, a spokesman for Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan, says Sullivan was diagnosed with appendicitis and underwent the procedure early Thursday.

Shuckerow says Sullivan is recovering and “currently reviewing yesterday’s hearing in its entirety.”

He is not saying how long the senator will be recovering or unable to vote. Republicans are struggling to round up votes for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The committee heard Thursday from Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, and from Kavanaugh, who has denied the allegations.

Sullivan said early on he planned to support Kavanaugh. In a statement earlier this week, he said allegations of sexual assault should be taken seriously and both Ford and Kavanaugh deserve to be heard.

__

5:10 p.m.

A Maryland police chief and prosecutor have informed a group of state lawmakers that they have not received any reports that would lead to the opening of a criminal investigation of the sexual assault allegation against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Montgomery County Police Chief Tom Manger and State’s Attorney John McCarthy responded Friday to a request earlier this week by 11 Democrats to investigate the allegations against Kavanaugh if his alleged victims support investigating.

Kavanaugh has denied Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation that he assaulted her at a high school party in the 1980s.

The letter to the lawmakers notes that assault and attempted rape were misdemeanors with a one-year statute of limitations in 1982. But the officials stressed that both of their offices are prepared to investigate any sexual assault investigation “from any victim where the incident occurred in our jurisdiction.”

__

5:05 p.m.

President Donald Trump is directing the FBI to launch a supplemental investigation into his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at the request of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Trump says in a statement that the updated investigation, which comes in response to sexual misconduct allegations, “must be limited in scope” and “completed in less than one week.”

The decision marks a reversal for the administration, which had argued that Kavanaugh had already been vetted.

Kavanaugh has adamantly denied the allegations.

Senate Republican leaders agreed Friday to delay a final vote on Kavanaugh to allow time for an investigation by the FBI at the request of Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake.

Kavanaugh says he’s done “everything” the Senate has asked of him and “will continue to cooperate.”

__

5 p.m.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh says in a statement released by the White House that he “will continue to cooperate” after senators asked President Donald Trump to open a supplemental background investigation of the embattled Supreme Court nominee.

Kavanaugh says he’s been interviewed by the FBI during his confirmation process and conducted “background” calls with the Senate. He says he answered questions under oath Thursday “about every topic the Senators and their counsel asked me.”

Kavanaugh says, “I’ve done everything they have requested and will continue to cooperate.”

Trump is ordering the new FBI probe of Kavanaugh, saying it must be “limited in scope” and last no longer than a week.

__

4:40 p.m.

Two Republican senators who could be the deciding votes on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are endorsing a FBI background investigation into the sexual misconduct accusations against him.

Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska told reporters they support a deal reached among senators to delay a vote on Kavanaugh.

Collins says the deal “is an important development and I believe it will let us go forward.”

Murkowski says she wants to make sure senators “do our due diligence.”

President Donald Trump will have to ask the FBI for the investigation into Kavanaugh. The Senate Judiciary Committee said the probe should be limited to “current credible allegations against the nominee” and be finished by Oct. 5.

Kavanaugh denies the allegations.

Both Collins and Murkowski are undecided on whether to vote for Kavanaugh.

__

4 p.m.

The Senate Judiciary Committee says it will ask President Donald Trump to open a supplemental background investigation of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

In a statement, the committee says it will ask that the FBI’s probe be limited to “current credible allegations against the nominee.” It also says that investigation should be completed no later than Oct. 5.

Democrats for days have been demanding an FBI investigation into the sexual misconduct allegations against Kavanaugh, but Republicans had refused to seek one. That changed Friday when Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona said a background investigation should be conducted before a final Senate vote on the nominee.

Only Trump can order the FBI to reopen the investigation.

__

3:50 p.m.

Senate Republican leaders have agreed to delay a final vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh to allow time for an investigation by the FBI of the sexual misconduct allegations against him.

Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Republican, says, “There’s going to be a supplemental background investigation,” which would delay a vote “no later than one week.”

Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, called earlier Friday for the FBI to investigate the sexual misconduct claims against Kavanaugh. He said the process should not take longer than a week.

After Flake made that call, the Judiciary Committee sent Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate in an 11-10 vote.

__

3:15 p.m.

A high school friend of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh says he will cooperate with any law enforcement agency that will “confidentially investigate” sexual misconduct allegations against him and Kavanaugh.

Mark Judge sent a signed letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Friday, saying he “categorically” denies sexual misconduct allegations made by Julie Swetnick.

In a sworn statement released Wednesday, Swetnick accused Kavanaugh and Judge of excessive drinking and inappropriate treatment of women in the early 1980s, among other accusations.

Judge says in his letter that he doesn’t know Swetnick and does not recall any parties in the early 1980s where he “fondled or grabbed women in an aggressive or unwanted manner.”

He says Swetnick’s allegations are “so bizarre” and he “would remember actions so outlandish.”

__

3:10 p.m.

One of the few Senate Democrats who remains undecided on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court is backing calls for an FBI investigation of sexual misconduct claims against the nominee.

Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia said senators need to slow down on confirming Kavanaugh so the investigation can be conducted. The probe should happen, in his words, “so that our country can have confidence in the outcome of this vote.”

He applauded the “courage” of Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, who on Friday urged a delay of up to one week on Kavanaugh’s nomination to allow time for the FBI investigation.

Manchin is facing a tough re-election race this year in West Virginia, a state President Donald Trump won handily in the 2016 election.

__

2:50 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is meeting with Republicans senators in his office to discuss the next steps on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate Friday afternoon. GOP senators from the panel dashed to McConnell’s office immediately after the vote.

Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, a member of the committee, has called for the FBI to investigate the sexual misconduct claims against Kavanaugh. Asked what he hoped to accomplish, Flake replied: “A better process.”

Flake wants a delay of up to a week. The decision rests with Republican leaders.

Entering McConnell’s office, Sen. John Kennedy called the developments a “grotesque carnival.”

Kavanaugh denies the charges.

__

2:35 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he found Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her in high school, “a very credible witness.”

Trump told reporters Friday at the White House that he thought Ford’s testimony Thursday to the Senate Judiciary Committee “was very compelling” and that “she looks like a very fine woman, very fine woman.”

But Trump also says he though Kavanaugh’s adamant denial “really something that I hadn’t seen before. It was incredible.”

Trump called it “an incredible moment I think in the history of our country.”

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Friday to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Senate floor – but Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake said the full Senate vote should be delayed for a week.

__

 adamant denial “really something that I hadn’t seen before. It was incredible.”

Trump called it “an incredible moment I think in the history of our country.”

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Friday to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Senate floor – but Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake said the full Senate vote should be delayed for a week.

__

2:25 p.m.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham says it’s going to fall to him to lay out to President Donald Trump why Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation vote has been delayed.

He spoke after Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake said he would vote to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate only if the final confirmation vote is delayed for an FBI investigation into sexual assault allegations.

Christine Blasey Ford says Kavanaugh attacked her in a locked room at a high school house party. Kavanaugh denies that.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Friday to advance the nomination to the full Senate, but Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley noted the timing on Senate vote was up to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Graham, of South Carolina, is a Trump ally who is on the panel. Graham told reporters after the committee vote that somebody is going to have to explain the delay to Trump. Graham added: “I guess that’ll be my job.”

__

2:18 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he’ll leave it to the Senate to determine when it will vote on his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. But Trump is expressing optimism, saying: “I’m sure it will all be very good.”

Trump told reporters Friday during a meeting with the President of Chile that undecided Republican senators “have to do what they think is right” and “be comfortable with themselves” on the Kavanaugh vote.

But he said he hadn’t thought at all about a replacement, “Not even a little bit.”

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Friday along party lines to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Senate floor.

But Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona said at the last minute that he could not promise to vote for Kavanaugh on the Senate floor and called for a delay of up to a week for a further investigation of sexual assault accusations.

Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

__

2:10 p.m.

Sen Jeff Flake says Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination should on hold so the FBI can investigate the sexual misconduct allegations against him.

Flake, the deciding vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee, voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to a full floor vote, but said the vote should be delayed for up to a week to allow time for the investigation of Christine Blasey Ford’s claims.

Ford says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her while the two were in high school.

Kavanaugh has denied Ford’s accusation.

__

2 p.m.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has voted along party lines to advance Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination to the Senate floor.

The 11-10 vote Friday came just one day after Republicans heard testimony from Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teens. Kavanaugh denied the accusation.

At the last minute, Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, said he could not promise to vote for Kavanaugh on the Senate floor and called for a delay of up to a week for a further investigation.

Republicans voted to move ahead with Kavanaugh’s nomination.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley noted the timing on Senate vote was up to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

__

1:40 p.m.

The Senate Judiciary Committee was supposed to be voting at 1:30 p.m. Friday on whether to recommend Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation, but something is afoot.

Behind-the-scenes negotiations have delayed the committee vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination.

It wasn’t clear what was being discussed. Republicans believed they had to votes to advance Kavanaugh out of the committee when Sen. Jeff Flake announced his support earlier Friday.

But senators seated in the hearing room are talking among themselves — and Flake is not seated. Some senators have stepped out of the room.

__

1:10 p.m.

Senate Republicans do not yet have the votes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. That’s according to Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the third-ranking member of Republican leadership.

Thune said that Republicans still have “a little work to do” to get enough support.

Whether Kavanaugh is confirmed to the Supreme Court could hinge on the votes of two Republican senators: Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. It does not appear that President Donald Trump or the White House is reaching out to them to try and influence their decision.

Thune said while such calls may be well-intended, “it’s better to let people decide on their own up here.”

Republicans have set a committee vote for Friday afternoon to send Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate.

__

1:10 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota says “there are a lot of lawyers in America who can sit on the court” and Brett Kavanaugh isn’t the only person who can do the job.

Heitkamp said Friday she hasn’t decided whether to support Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court. But her remarks to the AP suggest she may vote no.

Heitkamp is facing a tough re-election this year in a Republican-leaning state. Her decision on Kavanaugh is being closely watched.

She said she found testimony from both Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who accused him of sexual assault, “compelling” but “this is not a criminal case.”

Heitkamp says appointees “don’t all have to come from Harvard and Yale and they don’t all have to come from prep schools

__

12:40 p.m.

Montana Sen. Jon Tester says he will join other Democrats in voting against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Tester is up for re-election this year in his deeply Republican home state. But he said he has concerns about Kavanaugh’s positions on privacy issues, campaign finance and about a California professor’s claim that he sexually assaulted her when both were teenagers. Kavanaugh denied Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations in a hearing Thursday.

Tester said he has requested a meeting with Kavanaugh “numerous times” but the White House wouldn’t commit.

The Montana senator said his office had received “thousands of calls and emails from Montanans” about Kavanaugh, a majority of which were opposed to his confirmation.

___

12:30 p.m.

The dean of Yale Law School is calling for additional investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate votes on his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Dean Heather Gerken said in statement Friday that she agrees with the American Bar Association that more investigation is needed. Gerken said proceeding with the confirmation process without more review is not in the best interest of the Supreme Court or the legal profession.

Kavanaugh received his undergraduate and law degrees from Yale.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination Friday afternoon. A vote in favor will send the nomination to the full Senate.

Kavanaugh denies allegations by Christine Blasey Ford that he assaulted her when they were in high school. Kavanaugh says he’s never sexually assaulted anyone.

___

11:50 a.m.

Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly says he’ll vote against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Donnelly is a moderate Democrat who voted for President Donald Trump’s first nominee to the high court, Neil Gorsuch (GOR’-suhch).

Donnelly is up for re-election this year in Indiana, which is a strongly Republican state.

His decision comes after a hearing Thursday when a California professor testified that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school when they were teenagers. Kavanaugh also testified and denied Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations.

Donnelly says Ford’s allegations are “disturbing and credible” and should be investigated by the FBI, which Trump and Senate Republicans say isn’t needed.

___

11:45 a.m.

Anita Hill says one of the things that stood out to her from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s testimony was how emotional and angry it was compared with the “calm” words coming from the woman accusing him of sexual assault when they were teenagers.

Kavanaugh denies the accusation.

Hill gave Senate testimony in 1991 about her allegations of sexual harassment by then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Hill – speaking Friday in Houston – says Kavanaugh “was able to express a real anger, an aggression, as well as a lot of emotion.”

She said no woman nomination to the high court “would ever have the license to express (herself) in that way.”

Hill says she was impressed with the calm and careful testimony of Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

___

11:40 a.m.

Sen. John Cornyn of Texas says it is “cruel” and “indecent” for Democrats to seek public testimony from Mark Judge, a high school friend of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Judge has told the committee in a signed statement that he doesn’t recall the events described by Christine Blasey (BLAH’-zee) Ford.

She accuses Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teens. Kavanaugh denies the accusation.

Ford has told senators that Judge was in the room during the alleged assault. Democrats have asked for the committee to subpoena Judge, but Republicans have voted down the request.

Cornyn says Judge admits to being a recovering alcoholic and is a cancer survivor. Cornyn says Democrats are ignoring that and seeking to “drag Mr. Judge into this circus-like atmosphere” and subject his battles with addition to public ridicule.

In Cornyn’s words: “That is cruel. That is reckless. That is indecent.”

___

11:10 a.m.

CNN cameras caught an extraordinary scene of Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake being confronted by two protesters as he waited in an elevator to take him to the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting.

Moments earlier, Flake had announced he’d vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Flake stood looking downcast as one of the women said to Flake: “Tell me, I’m standing right here in front of you, do you think he’s telling the truth to the country?”

The senator listened for nearly two minutes until the elevator door closed. He told the women he had put out a statement and would have more to say before the committee.

CNN’s Jim Scutto said: “I don’t think we’ve witnessed a moment like that in recent memory.”

___

10:50 a.m.

“Feels like Alice in Wonderland.”

That’s what a top Democrat says about the Senate Judiciary Committee in moving forward with Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Vermont’s Patrick Leahy is denouncing the way that majority Republicans have handled Kavanaugh’s nomination. Leahy says the committee has lost its independence and become, in his words, “an arm, and a very weak arm, of the Trump White House.”

The committee has set a vote for later Friday on whether to recommend the nomination to the full Senate.

Leahy says Kavanaugh has been “credibly accused of sexual assault” and the committee has failed to conduct a meaningful investigation.

Christine Blasey Ford testified Thursday that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teens. Kavanaugh says the accusation is “categorically” false.

___

10:30 a.m.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (FYN’-styn) says the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh is “a real test” for the Senate and the nation “to see how we treat women, especially women who are survivors of sexual assault.”

The top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee says that 27 years after the Clarence Thomas hearings, Republicans appear to have a new strategy for handling sexual assault allegations.

She says, “The Republican strategy is no longer ‘attack the victim.’ It is to ignore the victim.”

Feinstein says she’s disappointed the committee is set to vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination less than a day after emotional testimony by Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who accuses Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when both were teenagers. He denies the allegation.

___

10:25 a.m.

The wife of Justice Clarence Thomas is praising Sen. Lindsey Graham for his criticism of Senate Democrats for their treatment of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Ginni Thomas says on her Facebook page “Thank you, Senator Graham, for speaking for so many of us!”

Thomas included a link to video from Graham’s fiery comments Thursday when he called the Democrats’ actions the “most despicable thing” he has seen in politics.

The link says Graham “exposes Democrat Kavanaugh sham.”

Ginni Thomas is a conservative activist who once worked for congressional Republicans. She made headlines in 2010 when she called Anita Hill and asked Hill to apologize for making sexual harassment allegations about Clarence Thomas after he had been nominated to the Supreme Court.

___

10:15 a.m.

Several Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee have walked out of a hearing on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Kamala Harris of California, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island left after the GOP chairman set a vote on the nomination for 1:30 p.m. Friday.

That was approved by a committee vote. Democrats say Republicans are rushing the confirmation.

During that vote, Hirono yelled: “”I strongly object! What a railroad job! No, no, NO.”

___

10:05 a.m.

Republicans have blocked Democratic efforts to subpoena a high school friend of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh who’s been described as a witness to an alleged assault involving Kavanaugh about three decades ago.

The Senate Judiciary Committee’s vote to subpoena Mark Judge has been defeated in a party-line vote, with all 11 Republicans on the panel voting against the motion and all 10 Democrats voting for it.

Democrats say Judge has never been interviewed by the FBI or questioned by a member of the committee, and that committee has a responsibility to subpoena Judge before it votes on whether to recommend Kavanaugh to the full Senate.

Kavanaugh denies the allegation.

The committee chairman, Iowa Republican Chuck Grassley, has read a statement from Judge that says he doesn’t recall the events described by Kavanaugh’s accuser and “never saw Brett act” in the way that he’s accused of.

___

10 a.m.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote at 1:30 p.m. on whether to recommend Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate.

The chairman, Iowa Republican Chuck Grassley, announced the vote as the committee began its meeting.

Kavanaugh has just picked up a key vote of support from a committee Republican, Arizona’s Jeff Flake.

Republicans have slim 11-10 majority on the committee. With Flake’s support, Kavanaugh’s nomination is expected to clear the committee and go to the full Senate.

The Senate could begin taking procedural votes over the weekend ahead of a final confirmation vote early next week.

___

9:55 a.m.

Emotions in the Capitol are running high over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh.

Soon after Republican Sen. Jeff Flake announced he’d vote to confirm Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, he was cornered by two women as he got into an elevator to head to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Through tears, the women implored him to change his mind about his Kavanaugh vote.

The women were seen in TV footage blocking the Arizona senator from closing the elevator door. One woman begged Flake to look him in the eye. She said: “Look at me and tell me that it doesn’t matter what happened to me.”

Another woman said Flake was allowing someone who “violated someone” to serve on the Supreme Court. Both women cried as they spoke to him.

Eventually a member of Flake’s staff said they needed to go and the doors closed. A committee confirmation vote is set for 1:30 p.m.

Kavanaugh has denied that he sexually assaulted a woman when they were teenagers. The committee on Thursday heard emotional and sometimes combative testimony from both Kavanaugh and his accuser.

___

9:40 a.m.

It’ll be a “yes” vote on Brett Kavanaugh from one of the most closely watched Republican senators who’s determining the fate of the Supreme Court nominee.

The announcement from Arizona’s Jeff Flake that he’ll vote to confirm Kavanaugh virtually ensures that the nomination will advance to the full Senate from the Judiciary Committee.

The committee is expected to vote Friday – and if the nomination advances to the full Senate, then senators could begin voting as early as Saturday.

Flake says he wishes he could express the confidence in Kavanaugh that some of his other GOP colleagues have. But Flakes says in a statement he still has “much doubt” after the committee’s explosive hearing Thursday.

Kavanaugh has denied Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation that he sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers.

Flake says that without evidence to corroborate Ford’s story, he believes “our system of justice affords a presumption of innocence.”

___

9:10 a.m.

A Democratic senator who’s facing a tough re-election race has come out against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh.

Bill Nelson of Florida tweets that he’ll vote “no” if the nomination comes to the full Senate. The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote on Kavanaugh on Friday.

Nelson’s decision comes a day after Kavanaugh told the committee that he didn’t sexually assault a woman when they were teenagers. The accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, says she’s “100 percent” certain that he did.

Nelson hadn’t taken a public position on the nomination before his announcement Friday. Nelson had never met with Kavanaugh even though his office said they tried several times to schedule a meeting.

The senator is in a tight re-election race with Florida’s Republican governor, Rick Scott, who has previously come out in support of Kavanaugh. Scott’s campaign hasn’t responded to questions about Ford’s testimony.

___

8:45 a.m.

Former President George W. Bush has been advocating for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh with wavering senators in recent days. That’s according to a person familiar with the outreach who wasn’t authorized to discuss the development publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Kavanaugh is a former top aide in Bush’s administration.

Bush has reached out to Republicans Jeff Flake of Arizona and Susan Collins of Maine. Bush spoke earlier this month to Democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia in a call the senator’s office says Manchin initiated.

-Associated Press writer Catherine Lucey.

__

8:05 a.m.

The White House is pushing back against a call from the American Bar Association to slow the vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh until the FBI can do a full background check.

Spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters Friday that Kavanaugh has already “been through six separate background investigations by the FBI.”

Kavanaugh testified Thursday to the Senate Judiciary Committee over an allegation of sexual assault when he was in high school. His accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, also appeared before the committee during the emotionally charged day.

Sanders stressed Trump’s support for Kavanaugh and said he wanted to see a vote. She said Trump thought Kavanaugh’s testimony was “powerful, it was riveting and it was honest.”

___

1:30 a.m.

The American Bar Association has urged the Senate Judiciary Committee and the full Senate to slow down on the vote on Brett Kavanaugh for a position on the Supreme Court until the FBI has time to do a full background check on claims of sexual assault made by Christine Blasey (blah-zee) Ford and other women.

“We make this request because of the ABA’s respect for the rule of law and due process under law,” the ABA letter to committee leadership said. “Each appointment to our nation’s highest court (as with all others) is simply too important to rush to a vote.”

The Judiciary committee plans a vote on Kavanaugh Friday.

___

12:35 a.m.

Senate Republicans are plowing forward with a committee vote Friday on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination. Voting at the Senate Judiciary Committee comes after an extraordinary and highly emotional hearing over Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teens. The marathon session appears to have only deepened the partisan divide.

The Judiciary committee is narrowly split with the slimmest Republican majority. And Democrats are expected to oppose President Donald Trump’s nominee.

But even if the panel deadlocks over recommending Kavanaugh, the nomination can push forward. The full Senate may start taking procedural votes as soon as Saturday toward confirmation next week.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the committee’s going to vote Friday and “move forward.”

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, pauses as he speak to media as he leaves at the conclusion of Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018, with Christine Blasey Ford and Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sen. Jeff Flake, R- Ariz., right, walks out at the end of the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting with Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Friday, Aug. 28, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., pauses as he speaks to media about the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, Friday, Sept. 28, 2018 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Chilean president Sebastian Pinera, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Sept. 28, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., speaks during the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting on Friday, Sept. 28, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flake said it would be ‘proper’ to delay a Senate floor vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh for a week. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-6218953/The-Latest-Democratic-Sen-Nelson-opposing-Kavanaugh-bid.html

The Latest: Ford lawyer thanks senators for new FBI probe

GOP agrees to FBI probe of Kavanaugh, delaying Senate vote

 After a dramatic flurry of last-minute negotiations, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh cleared a key procedural hurdle Friday, but his confirmation prospects were still deeply uncertain as Republicans agreed to ask for a new FBI investigation into sexual assault allegations.

Under pressure from moderate members, Republican leaders said they would allow the new probe for up to one week, slowing their rush to confirm Kavanaugh shortly after the new high court term opens on Monday.

It was unclear whether President Donald Trump backed the new timeline, cobbled together in private negotiations Friday. The talks were forced by Sen. Jeff Flake, a moderate Republican who surprised colleagues by announcing his support for Kavanaugh early Friday only to call for further investigation a few hours later.

Trump, who previously accused the Democrats of obstruction and opposed the FBI probing the allegations against his nominee, said merely that he would “let the Senate handle that.” In fact, it’s the White House that would have to ask the FBI to investigate.

Friday’s developments unfolded a day after Kavanaugh and an accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, testified in an emotional, hours-long hearing that was televised nationwide. Kavanaugh angrily denied the allegation that he assaulted Ford while they were both in high school, but she said she was “100 percent” certain he was her attacker.

Flake, a key moderate Republican, was at the center of Friday’s drama and uncertainty. In the morning, he announced that he would support Kavanaugh’s nomination. Shortly after, he was confronted in an elevator by two women who, through tears, implored him to change his mind. The stunning confrontation was captured by television cameras.

After huddling privately with his colleagues, Flake announced he would vote to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination to the full Senate only if the FBI were to investigate the allegations against the judge. Democrats have been calling for such an probe, though Republicans and the White House have insisted it’s unnecessary.

The committee vote was 11-10 along party lines.

Flake said that after discussing the matter with fellow senators, he felt it “would be proper to delay the floor vote for up to but not more than one week.”

Attention quickly turned to a handful of undecided senators. West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin said he supported Flake’s call to push off a full Senate vote until the FBI investigates Ford’s allegation. He said the probe should happen “so that our country can have confidence in the outcome of this vote.”

It was unclear if Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska would do the same.

With a 51-49 majority, Senate Republicans have little margin for error on a final vote, especially given the fact that several Democrats facing tough re-election prospects this fall announced their opposition to Kavanaugh on Friday. Sens. Bill Nelson of Florida, Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Jon Tester of Montana all said they would vote no.

During Thursday’s hearing, Democrats repeatedly peppered Kavanaugh with questions about whether he would support an FBI investigation. He demurred, saying he would back whatever the committee decided to do.

The FBI conducts background checks for federal nominees, but the agency does not make judgments on the credibility or significance of allegations. It compiles information about the nominee’s past and provides its findings to the White House, which passes them along to the committee. Republicans say reopening the FBI investigation is unnecessary because committee members have had the opportunity to question both Kavanaugh and Ford and other potential witnesses have submitted sworn statements.

If the FBI does reopen the background investigation, agents could interview accusers and witnesses and gather additional evidence or details that could help corroborate or disprove the allegations.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

Democrats have been particularly focused on getting more information from Mark Judge, a high school friend of Kavanaugh who Ford said was also in the room during her alleged assault. In her gripping testimony, Ford said Kavanaugh and Judge’s laughter during the incident has stuck with her nearly four decades later.

Judge has said he does not recall any such incident. In a new letter to the Senate panel, he said he would cooperate with any law enforcement agency assigned to investigate “confidentially.”

Flake, a 55-year-old Arizonan, has made himself a central character in the drama. As a retiring Republican, with no public plans to face GOP voters soon, Flake has emerged this year as a vocal and biting Trump critic and an advocate for bipartisan cooperation in Washington, even has he largely votes with his party.

Flake’s post on the committee has given him another platform. In recent weeks, he’s acted as a committee liaison to the Democrats and moderates Republicans urging a slower process. Last weekend, he pushed the committee to give Ford more time to decide whether to testify. Democrats have been eyeing him as a possible “no” vote, leaving many surprised to see him announce Friday morning that he backed the judge. He made clear hours later his vote wasn’t yet secure.

https://apnews.com/e894392938b54ee3b82f4ea18ec1ed5c

Prosecutor who questioned Christine Ford says she wouldn’t prosecute Brett Kavanaugh

The prosecutor at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing questioning Christine Blasey Ford about her allegation of sexual assault has asked about her fear of flying. (Sept. 27) AP

Rachel Mitchell, the Arizona prosecutor who questioned Christine Blasey Ford at Thursday’s Senate Judiciary Committee, privately told GOP senators she would not prosecute Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh based on the evidence she heard, according to the Washington Post.

That detail was spotlighted Friday by Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, whose office sent out  a news release Friday referring to Mitchell’s conclusion.

Mitchell was hand-picked to lead the questioning of Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault when both were high school students in the posh suburbs of suburban Maryland.

Mitchell avoided a high-decibel grilling Thursday and instead displayed a considerate, business-like manner befitting an experienced sex crimes prosecutor.

Cornyn, who as Senate majority whip is deputy to GOP Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told Fox News’ Fox & Friends Friday morning that he thought Mitchell performed admirably.

“I spent 13 years as a judge back in Texas, and I recognize the need to have somebody who does this for a living day after day carefully question somebody who has claimed to be a victim of sexual assault,” he said. “I thought she did a good job getting the basic facts out.”

More: Despite fear of planes, Christine Blasey Ford found ‘gumption’ to fly to D.C. for hearing

More: Republicans keep invoking Joe Biden’s words to bolster Supreme Court strategy. Here’s why.

Story 4: Prospects for Tax Reform — Videos

Tax reform will prolong long-term economic forecast for US, says Rep. Kevin Brady

 

61% of voters see tax plan as helping the rich over middle class: poll

 

Tax Cut 2.0 Push Seen Ending in Whimper, But There’s Always 2025

(Bloomberg) — A Republican effort to make last year’s individual tax changes permanent is expected to be approved by the House on Friday, before the initiative likely gets shelved because the Senate won’t act on it.

But, if history is any guide, taxpayers who benefited from the overhaul shouldn’t think all hope is lost — they’ll just have to be patient until shortly before the provisions are set to expire at the end of 2025.

Lawmakers, regardless of whether Democrats or Republicans control Congress, have often voted to extend tax breaks just before they’re scheduled to disappear. Members who have decried the changes when they’re initially inserted into the code are generally reluctant to erase all of the benefits years later.

“As history has proven, once the public and taxpayers get used to certain tax benefits, that increases the pressure on Congress to extend them or make them permanent,” said Jorge Castro, a tax consultant and former House and Senate aide.

That’s what happened with the tax cuts passed in 2001 (which had a follow-up enhancement bill in 2003) under former President George W. Bush. The cuts were set to expire in 2010, but were extended for two additional years. Then, in the early days of 2013, President Barack Obama and Congress worked out a budget deal to make the tax cuts permanent for most earners.

“As time passes, the political nature of a piece of legislation can be detached from its reality,” said Mattie Duppler, a senior fellow at the right-leaning National Taxpayers Union. “A Democrat voting in 2013 wasn’t voting in support of President Bush’s philosophy. They were supporting current law.”

House Republicans have forged ahead with holding a vote on “Tax Reform 2.0” legislation before the congressional elections this November. Yet that vote has largely been viewed as a political exercise, since the Senate is unlikely to take up the issue this year because it does not have the votes to pass.

In another example of congressional reluctance to kill off tax breaks, lawmakers have repeatedly extended the deduction for mortgage insurance premiums, which helps homeowners who can’t afford a 20 percent down payment. The deduction, which expired at the end of 2017, is likely to get extended again to cover 2018 and possibly years beyond in an end-of-the year vote.

Republicans have hoped that the 2.0 legislation could be used to remind voters of President Donald Trump’s $1.5 trillion tax cut — which has had a lukewarm reception so far — and force Democrats to take an uncomfortable vote against providing middle-class relief.

Tax Law Perception

The tax overhaul slashed income tax rates across the board, while also almost doubling the standard deduction and providing an enhanced child tax credit. It removed personal exemptions and eliminated or limited itemized deductions, such as for state and local taxes.

It also provided a special break for owners of pass-through businesses, such as partnerships. All of the individual changes are set to expire at the end of 2025 for budgetary reasons. On the corporate side, the law permanently slashed the rate.

The non-partisan Joint Committee on Taxation estimates making the individual cuts permanent would cost about $545.1 billion over the next 10 years, after taking economic growth into account.

So far, the tax law has not been the political pot of gold that Republicans had hoped. No Democrats voted for it, and party members have not hesitated to attack it. Even some Republicans — particularly those in high-tax Northeastern states hurt by the new cap on the so-called SALT deduction — don’t want to talk about their party’s signature legislative achievement.

survey commissioned by the Republican National Committee obtained by Bloomberg News shows that Republicans acknowledge that voters overwhelmingly believe the tax overhaul helps the wealthy instead of average Americans.

Sixty Votes

The political landscape in about seven years is likely to be much different. Trump will no longer be president. There are four election cycles in the House between now and then. The tax law talking points will be long gone from the public discourse.

Kevin Brady of Texas, chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, has acknowledged that his plan to pass the legislation out of the House now isn’t likely to lead to anything reaching Trump’s desk imminently.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell “has told me directly that when he sees 60 votes available for that provision, that’s when he’ll make a decision,” Brady said.

Sixty votes — the number of votes needed to pass most legislation in the Senate — aren’t likely to materialize while Democrats oppose the 2.0 campaign. But Democrats haven’t been universally opposed to making temporary tax cuts permanent, especially those that have been on the books for a decade or more.

That’s what happened when Obama signed the tax legislation in 2013 — passed by a Republican House and a Democratic Senate — making the majority of his Republican predecessor’s tax cuts permanent. Congress is setting themselves up for a “2024 or 2025 showdown” this time around, said John Gimigliano, head of federal tax legislative and regulatory services at accounting firm KPMG.

‘Balance of Power’

Still, there were adjustments to the Bush tax cuts “reversing provisions for those at the top and adding things for lower-wage workers,” said Chuck Marr, director of Federal Tax Policy at the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. “It reflected the balance of power at the time.”

Those earning more than $400,000 as an individual or $450,000 as a couple saw their top rates raised to 39.6 percent and the long-term capital gains rate increased to 20 percent.

For the 2017 law, it’s possible some provisions like the $10,000 SALT deduction cap are likely to continue to be controversial and could be tweaked. But cornerstones of the legislation, such as the standard deduction increase, which means more taxpayers can file their taxes using a simplified process, are likely to be favored by both parties.

“I don’t think in 2025 anybody is going to be excited about a middle-class tax hike,” Duppler said.

https://www.bloombergquint.com/markets/all-you-need-to-know-going-into-trade-on-sept-28

 

 

 

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1145-1148

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1139-1144

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1131-1138

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1122-1130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1112-1121

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1101-1111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1091-1100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1082-1090

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1073-1081

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1066-1073

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1058-1065

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1048-1057

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1041-1047

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1033-1040

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1023-1032

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1017-1022

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1010-1016

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1001-1009

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 993-1000

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 984-992

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 977-983

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 970-976

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 963-969

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 955-962

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 946-954

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 938-945

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 926-937

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 916-925

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 906-915

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 889-896

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 884-888

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 878-883

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 870-877

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 864-869

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 857-863

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 850-856

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 845-849

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 840-844

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 833-839

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 827-832

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 821-826

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 815-820

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 806-814

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 800-805

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 793-799

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 785-792

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 777-784

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 769-776

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 759-768

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 751-758

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 745-750

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 738-744

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 732-737

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 727-731

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 720-726

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 713-719

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShows 705-712

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 695-704

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 685-694

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 675-684

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 668-674

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 660-667

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 651-659

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 644-650

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 637-643

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 629-636

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 617-628

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 608-616

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 599-607

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 590-598

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 585- 589

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 575-584

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 565-574

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 556-564

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 546-555

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 538-545

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 532-537

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 526-531

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 519-525

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 510-518

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 500-509

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 490-499

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 480-489

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 473-479

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 464-472

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 455-463

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 447-454

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 439-446

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 431-438

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 422-430

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 414-421

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 408-413

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 400-407

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 391-399

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 383-390

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 376-382

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 369-375

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 360-368

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 354-359

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 93

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 92

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1-9

 

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: