The Pronk Pops Show 887, May 5, 2017, Story 1: Labor Participation Rate Falls To 62.9% and Not In Labor Force Rises by 162,000 To 94,375,000 — Need To Get Back To Labor Participation Rate Between 66% to 67% — Do Not Celebrate 4.4% Unemployment Rate! — Not A Wow Number Except For Economics Challenged — Videos — Story 2: Republicans Bailing Out Insurance Companies By Subsidizing Individual Insurance — Republican Party Now For Socialized Medicine! — Videos — Story 3: Senator Rand Paul’s Repeal and Replacement Bill Is The Way To Go — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

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Pronk Pops Show 883 April 28, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 882: April 27, 2017

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Pronk Pops Show 865: March 31, 2017

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Pronk Pops Show 848: February 28, 2017

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Pronk Pops Show 841: February 17, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 840: February 16, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 839: February 15, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 838: February 14, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 837: February 13, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 836: February 10, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 835: February 9, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 834: February 8, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 833: February 7, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 832: February 6, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 831: February 3, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 830: February 2, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 829: February 1, 2017

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Story 1: Labor Participation Rate Falls To 62.9% and Not In Labor Force Rises by 162,000 To 94,375,000 — Need To Get Back To Labor Participation Rate Between 66% to 67% — Do Not Celebrate 4.4% Unemployment Rate! — Videos —

Image result for labor force labor participation rate and unemployment rate 2000-2017

Image result for labor force labor participation rate and unemployment rate 2000-2017

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How the Minimum Wage Creates Unemployment

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Civilian Labor Force

160,213,000

Series Id:           LNS11000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 142267(1) 142456 142434 142751 142388 142591 142278 142514 142518 142622 142962 143248
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732
2007 153144(1) 152983 153051 152435 152670 153041 153054 152749 153414 153183 153835 153918
2008 154063(1) 153653 153908 153769 154303 154313 154469 154641 154570 154876 154639 154655
2009 154210(1) 154538 154133 154509 154747 154716 154502 154307 153827 153784 153878 153111
2010 153484(1) 153694 153954 154622 154091 153616 153691 154086 153975 153635 154125 153650
2011 153263(1) 153214 153376 153543 153479 153346 153288 153760 154131 153961 154128 153995
2012 154381(1) 154671 154749 154545 154866 155083 154948 154763 155160 155554 155338 155628
2013 155695(1) 155268 154990 155356 155514 155747 155669 155587 155731 154709 155328 155151
2014 155295(1) 155485 156115 155378 155559 155682 156098 156117 156100 156389 156421 156238
2015 157022(1) 156771 156781 157043 157447 156993 157125 157109 156809 157123 157358 157957
2016 158362(1) 158888 159278 158938 158510 158889 159295 159508 159830 159643 159456 159640
2017 159716(1) 160056 160201 160213
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

 

Labor Participation Rate

62.9%

 

Series Id:           LNS11300000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.3 67.1 67.1 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.9 67.0
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 65.8
2009 65.7 65.8 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.0 65.0 64.6
2010 64.8 64.9 64.9 65.2 64.9 64.6 64.6 64.7 64.6 64.4 64.6 64.3
2011 64.2 64.1 64.2 64.2 64.1 64.0 64.0 64.1 64.2 64.1 64.1 64.0
2012 63.7 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.7 63.8 63.7 63.5 63.6 63.8 63.6 63.7
2013 63.6 63.4 63.3 63.4 63.4 63.4 63.3 63.3 63.3 62.8 63.0 62.9
2014 62.9 62.9 63.1 62.8 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.8 62.9 62.9 62.7
2015 62.9 62.7 62.7 62.8 62.9 62.6 62.6 62.6 62.4 62.5 62.5 62.7
2016 62.7 62.9 63.0 62.8 62.6 62.7 62.8 62.8 62.9 62.8 62.6 62.7
2017 62.9 63.0 63.0 62.9

Employment Level

153,156,000

Series Id:           LNS12000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 136559(1) 136598 136701 137270 136630 136940 136531 136662 136893 137088 137322 137614
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146028(1) 146057 146320 145586 145903 146063 145905 145682 146244 145946 146595 146273
2008 146378(1) 146156 146086 146132 145908 145737 145532 145203 145076 144802 144100 143369
2009 142152(1) 141640 140707 140656 140248 140009 139901 139492 138818 138432 138659 138013
2010 138438(1) 138581 138751 139297 139241 139141 139179 139438 139396 139119 139044 139301
2011 139250(1) 139394 139639 139586 139624 139384 139524 139942 140183 140368 140826 140902
2012 141584(1) 141858 142036 141899 142206 142391 142292 142291 143044 143431 143333 143330
2013 143225(1) 143315 143319 143603 143856 144006 144318 144304 144466 143577 144536 144741
2014 145055(1) 145102 145715 145673 145819 146222 146461 146501 146845 147426 147361 147521
2015 148061(1) 148108 148244 148522 148792 148742 148890 149092 148932 149255 149419 150030
2016 150533(1) 151043 151301 151028 151058 151090 151546 151655 151926 151902 152048 152111
2017 152081(1) 152528 153000 153156
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

U-3 Unemployment Rate

4.4%

Series Id:           LNS14000000
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 4.0 4.1 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.9
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.9 5.1 5.0 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.3 8.7 9.0 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.8 10.0 9.9 9.9
2010 9.8 9.8 9.9 9.9 9.6 9.4 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.8 9.3
2011 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.1 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.8 8.6 8.5
2012 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.9
2013 8.0 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.3 7.2 7.2 6.9 6.7
2014 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.2 6.3 6.1 6.2 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.8 5.6
2015 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
2016 4.9 4.9 5.0 5.0 4.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.7
2017 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4

U-6 Unemployment Rate

8.6%

Series Id:           LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status:  Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Percent/rates:       Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Download:
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
2000 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.9 7.1 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.0 6.8 7.1 6.9
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.2 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.4 8.8
2008 9.2 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.8 11.0 11.8 12.6 13.6
2009 14.2 15.2 15.8 15.9 16.5 16.5 16.4 16.7 16.7 17.1 17.1 17.1
2010 16.7 17.0 17.1 17.1 16.6 16.4 16.4 16.5 16.8 16.6 16.9 16.6
2011 16.2 16.0 15.9 16.1 15.8 16.1 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.8 15.5 15.2
2012 15.2 15.0 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.8 14.6 14.8 14.4 14.4 14.4
2013 14.5 14.4 13.8 14.0 13.8 14.2 13.8 13.6 13.7 13.6 13.1 13.1
2014 12.7 12.6 12.6 12.3 12.1 12.0 12.2 12.0 11.8 11.5 11.4 11.2
2015 11.3 11.0 10.9 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.3 10.2 10.0 9.8 9.9 9.9
2016 9.9 9.8 9.8 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.5 9.3 9.2
2017 9.4 9.2 8.9 8.6

Employment Situation Summary

Transmission of material in this release is embargoed until                  USDL-17-0551
8:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday, May 5, 2017

Technical information:
 Household data:     (202) 691-6378  *  cpsinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/cps
 Establishment data: (202) 691-6555  *  cesinfo@bls.gov  *  www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact:      (202) 691-5902  *  PressOffice@bls.gov


                          THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- APRIL 2017


Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 211,000 in April, and the unemployment
rate was little changed at 4.4 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported
today. Job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality, health care and social
assistance, financial activities, and mining.

Household Survey Data

Both the unemployment rate, at 4.4 percent, and the number of unemployed persons,
at 7.1 million, changed little in April. Over the year, the unemployment rate has
declined by 0.6 percentage point, and the number of unemployed has fallen by 854,000.
(See table A-1.)

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for adult men declined to 4.0
percent in April. The jobless rates for adult women (4.1 percent), teenagers (14.7
percent), Whites (3.8 percent), Blacks (7.9 percent), Asians (3.2 percent), and
Hispanics (5.2 percent) showed little change. (See tables A-1, A-2, and A-3.)

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was essentially
unchanged at 1.6 million in April and accounted for 22.6 percent of the unemployed. Over
the year, the number of long-term unemployed was down by 433,000. (See table A-12.)

The labor force participation rate, at 62.9 percent, changed little in April and has
shown little movement over the past year. The employment-population ratio, at 60.2
percent, was also little changed over the month but was up by 0.5 percentage point since
December. (See table A-1.)

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to
as involuntary part-time workers) declined by 281,000 to 5.3 million in April. These
individuals, who would have preferred full-time employment, were working part time
because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find full-time
jobs. Over the past 12 months, the number of persons employed part time for economic
reasons has decreased by 698,000. (See table A-8.)

In April, 1.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down by 
181,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals
were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a
job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they
had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. (See table A-16.)

Among the marginally attached, there were 455,000 discouraged workers in April, down
by 113,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged
workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are 
available for them. The remaining 1.1 million persons marginally attached to the labor
force in April had not searched for work for reasons such as school attendance or
family responsibilities. (See table A-16.)

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 211,000 in April. Employment rose in
leisure and hospitality, health care and social assistance, financial activities, and
mining. (See table B-1.)

In April, leisure and hospitality added 55,000 jobs. Employment in food services and
drinking places continued to trend up over the month (+26,000) and has increased by
260,000 over the year.

Employment in health care and social assistance increased by 37,000 in April. Health
care employment continued to trend up over the month (+20,000). This is in line with
the industry's average monthly job growth during the first quarter of this year but
below the average gain of 32,000 per month in 2016. Social assistance added 17,000
jobs in April, with all of the gain in individual and family services.

In April, financial activities added 19,000 jobs, with insurance carriers and related
activities accounting for most of the gain (+14,000). Over the year, financial
activities has added 173,000 jobs.

Employment in mining rose by 9,000 in April, with most of the increase in support
activities for mining (+7,000). Since a recent low in October 2016, mining has added
44,000 jobs, with three-fourths of the gain in support activities for mining.

Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in April
(+39,000). The industry has added 612,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

Employment in other major industries, including construction, manufacturing, wholesale
trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, and government,
showed little change over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.1
hour to 34.4 hours in April. In manufacturing, the workweek edged up by 0.1 hour to
40.7 hours, and overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.2 hours. The average workweek
for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by
0.1 hour to 33.7 hours. (See tables B-2 and B-7.)

In April, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose
by 7 cents to $26.19. Over the year, average hourly earnings have risen by 65 cents,
or 2.5 percent. In April, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and
nonsupervisory employees increased by 6 cents to $21.96. (See tables B-3 and B-8.)

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for February was revised up from +219,000
to +232,000, and the change for March was revised down from +98,000 to +79,000. With
these revisions, employment gains in February and March combined were 6,000 lower than
previously reported. Monthly revisions result from additional reports received from
businesses since the last published estimates and from the recalculation of seasonal
factors. Over the past 3 months, job gains have averaged 174,000.

______________
The Employment Situation for May is scheduled to be released on Friday, June 2, 2017,
at 8:30 a.m. (EDT).



 

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted

HOUSEHOLD DATA
Summary table A. Household data, seasonally adjusted
[Numbers in thousands]
Category Apr.
2016
Feb.
2017
Mar.
2017
Apr.
2017
Change from:
Mar.
2017-
Apr.
2017

Employment status

Civilian noninstitutional population

252,969 254,246 254,414 254,588 174

Civilian labor force

158,938 160,056 160,201 160,213 12

Participation rate

62.8 63.0 63.0 62.9 -0.1

Employed

151,028 152,528 153,000 153,156 156

Employment-population ratio

59.7 60.0 60.1 60.2 0.1

Unemployed

7,910 7,528 7,202 7,056 -146

Unemployment rate

5.0 4.7 4.5 4.4 -0.1

Not in labor force

94,031 94,190 94,213 94,375 162

Unemployment rates

Total, 16 years and over

5.0 4.7 4.5 4.4 -0.1

Adult men (20 years and over)

4.6 4.3 4.3 4.0 -0.3

Adult women (20 years and over)

4.5 4.3 4.0 4.1 0.1

Teenagers (16 to 19 years)

16.0 15.0 13.7 14.7 1.0

White

4.3 4.1 3.9 3.8 -0.1

Black or African American

8.8 8.1 8.0 7.9 -0.1

Asian

3.8 3.4 3.3 3.2 -0.1

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

6.1 5.6 5.1 5.2 0.1

Total, 25 years and over

4.1 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.2

Less than a high school diploma

7.5 7.9 6.8 6.5 -0.3

High school graduates, no college

5.4 5.0 4.9 4.6 -0.3

Some college or associate degree

4.1 4.0 3.7 3.7 0.0

Bachelor’s degree and higher

2.4 2.4 2.5 2.4 -0.1

Reason for unemployment

Job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs

3,864 3,709 3,519 3,538 19

Job leavers

864 802 798 789 -9

Reentrants

2,337 2,197 2,066 2,032 -34

New entrants

847 773 790 712 -78

Duration of unemployment

Less than 5 weeks

2,573 2,566 2,334 2,335 1

5 to 14 weeks

2,155 2,138 2,109 2,135 26

15 to 26 weeks

1,281 1,057 1,115 1,108 -7

27 weeks and over

2,059 1,801 1,687 1,626 -61

Employed persons at work part time

Part time for economic reasons

5,970 5,704 5,553 5,272 -281

Slack work or business conditions

3,706 3,574 3,402 3,174 -228

Could only find part-time work

1,993 1,864 1,852 1,802 -50

Part time for noneconomic reasons

20,471 20,773 20,723 20,700 -23

Persons not in the labor force (not seasonally adjusted)

Marginally attached to the labor force

1,715 1,723 1,595 1,534

Discouraged workers

568 522 460 455

– Over-the-month changes are not displayed for not seasonally adjusted data.
NOTE: Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Detail for the seasonally adjusted data shown in this table will not necessarily add to totals because of the independent seasonal adjustment of the various series. Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

Employment Situation Summary Table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
Summary table B. Establishment data, seasonally adjusted
Category Apr.
2016
Feb.
2017
Mar.
2017(p)
Apr.
2017(p)

EMPLOYMENT BY SELECTED INDUSTRY
(Over-the-month change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

153 232 79 211

Total private

158 222 77 194

Goods-producing

-9 88 23 21

Mining and logging

-9 12 9 10

Construction

-1 54 1 5

Manufacturing

1 22 13 6

Durable goods(1)

-1 4 8 -3

Motor vehicles and parts

8.8 -5.5 2.3 2.8

Nondurable goods

2 18 5 9

Private service-providing

167 134 54 173

Wholesale trade

5.1 10.8 1.1 8.2

Retail trade

-5.7 -28.7 -27.4 6.3

Transportation and warehousing

11.3 7.6 6.6 3.5

Utilities

-0.1 -0.4 -0.3 0.7

Information

2 -6 -6 -7

Financial activities

18 5 4 19

Professional and business services(1)

66 35 57 39

Temporary help services

7.0 9.8 13.0 5.8

Education and health services(1)

52 68 10 41

Health care and social assistance

36.9 35.8 16.4 36.8

Leisure and hospitality

15 33 9 55

Other services

4 10 0 7

Government

-5 10 2 17

(3-month average change, in thousands)

Total nonfarm

205 201 176 174

Total private

189 192 168 164

WOMEN AND PRODUCTION AND NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES
AS A PERCENT OF ALL EMPLOYEES(2)

Total nonfarm women employees

49.5 49.6 49.5 49.5

Total private women employees

48.1 48.1 48.1 48.1

Total private production and nonsupervisory employees

82.3 82.4 82.5 82.4

HOURS AND EARNINGS
ALL EMPLOYEES

Total private

Average weekly hours

34.4 34.3 34.3 34.4

Average hourly earnings

$25.54 $26.10 $26.12 $26.19

Average weekly earnings

$878.58 $895.23 $895.92 $900.94

Index of aggregate weekly hours (2007=100)(3)

105.0 106.3 106.3 106.8

Over-the-month percent change

0.1 -0.1 0.0 0.5

Index of aggregate weekly payrolls (2007=100)(4)

128.3 132.6 132.8 133.7

Over-the-month percent change

0.5 0.2 0.2 0.7

DIFFUSION INDEX
(Over 1-month span)(5)

Total private (261 industries)

52.1 65.1 58.8 60.2

Manufacturing (78 industries)

42.3 64.7 55.1 53.2

Footnotes
(1) Includes other industries, not shown separately.
(2) Data relate to production employees in mining and logging and manufacturing, construction employees in construction, and nonsupervisory employees in the service-providing industries.
(3) The indexes of aggregate weekly hours are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate hours by the corresponding annual average aggregate hours.
(4) The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls are calculated by dividing the current month’s estimates of aggregate weekly payrolls by the corresponding annual average aggregate weekly payrolls.
(5) Figures are the percent of industries with employment increasing plus one-half of the industries with unchanged employment, where 50 percent indicates an equal balance between industries with increasing and decreasing employment.
(p) Preliminary

NOTE: Data have been revised to reflect March 2016 benchmark levels and updated seasonal adjustment factors.

https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.b.htm

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https://www.paul.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/ObamacareReplacementActSections.pdf

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Fact check: Pence makes strange claim about selling health insurance across state lines

Glenn KesslerWashington Post

“Under President Trump‘s leadership, we’re actually also going to finally allow Americans to purchase health insurance across state lines – the way you buy life insurance, the way you buy car insurance.”

Vice President Mike Pence, speech in Louisville, March 12, 2017G

“Who could be against allowing insurance to be sold over state lines? It’s something that you can do [with] your car insurance.”

White House press secretary Sean Spicer, news briefing, March 14

“We’re going to give the American people the freedom to buy health insurance across state lines – the way you buy life insurance, the way you buy car insurance.”

– Pence, speech in Jacksonville, Florida, March 18

“President Trump’s vision is very simple . . . allowing the American people to purchase health insurance across state lines the way you buy life insurance, the way you buy car insurance.”

– Pence, speech to the Club for Growth, West Palm Beach, Fla., March 19

– – –

One of President Donald Trump’s signature promises is to allow the purchase of health insurance across state lines. This was supposed to be tackled in “phase three” of the administration’s plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, now in doubt because of the administration’s failure to advance the “phase one” bill in the House.

Many experts are skeptical about whether buying health insurance across state lines would work – more on that below – but we were interested in claims made by administration officials such as Vice President Pence and White House press secretary Sean Spicer that this would be similar to buying life insurance and car insurance.

The way they talk about it, we have to wonder whether administration officials even understand how insurance is bought and sold in the United States.

The Facts

In 1945, Congress passed the McCarran-Ferguson Act, which exempted insurance companies from aspects of federal antitrust law and ensured that individual states remained the primary regulators of insurance. That had been the case since 1868, but a Supreme Court ruling had placed the state role in doubt until Congress reaffirmed it.

So insurance companies must be licensed in each state. In other words, this standard exists with all insurance products. Generally, there are two types of insurance companies: life and health insurance companies; and property and casualty insurance companies. The latter sell products such as homeowners’ insurance and automobile insurance.

There are obviously big differences among the products. Car insurance is strictly limited to a period of time, and rates depend on the value of the vehicle, the use of the vehicle, the driver’s record and so forth. Health insurance, by contrast, is heavily regulated at the federal level (especially after the Affordable Care Act mandated that all plans cover a group of essential benefits). And health insurance companies are required to set up provider networks and negotiate prices.

But the bottom line is that all insurance products are sold state by state, overseen by state insurance commissioners. You may be able to get Geico car insurance in both Virginia and California, but the products may be different, depending on state regulations. Similarly, you may buy Aetna health insurance policies in each state, but again they are subject to state regulations and obviously have different provider networks.

Essentially, if Trump were to push through a plan to sell health insurance across state lines, he would need to repeal all or part of the McCarran-Ferguson Act. But as we mentioned, that act applies to all insurance products.

“Insurance is regulated at the state level in accordance with the McCarran-Ferguson Act, which has been in place for 64 years,” said Lynne McChristian, executive director of Florida State University’s Center for Risk Management Education and Research. “It is not accurate to say that car insurance and life insurance are regulated across state lines. In fact, it is false.”

She said that many people may not realize that when they call an insurer that has an out-of-state location, they are talking to someone who is licensed to contract business in the prospective customer’s state of residence. If you move to a different state, you might stick with the same company, but your policy is updated to reflect the laws of the new state – and your premiums are likely to change.

Five states have passed laws that have either allowed interstate health-insurance sales or encouraged the concept of forming a compact, allowing for products to be sold in a group of states. But no insurance company has shown much interest, in part because entering a new health insurance market is time-consuming and difficult.

An official at the National Association of Insurance Commissioners said the concept was especially unworkable for health insurance because different states may mandate different coverage, leading to fewer people getting insured, reducing insurance options for consumers and preventing regulators from protecting consumers in their states.

For example, one state might require coverage of autism, while another might not. If insurance could be bought across state lines, people seeking autism coverage would flock to the product with coverage. That in turn would make the risk pool unbalanced and force premiums up. Moreover, when people have complaints about insurance coverage today, they can seek redress from a state insurance commissioner. That would be more difficult if someone bought a product from another state.

The ACA, in section 1333, encouraged the formation of such regional compacts after January 2016, although as far as we can tell, no regulatory guidance was issued by the Obama administration.

Chris Jennings, a health-care consultant who worked for presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, says the provision – which allows two or more states to form a regional health-insurance compact – was inserted by a Republican lawmaker during Senate markups of the ACA. But he thinks the Obama administration did not promote the option “because it was a low priority and there was no evidence it would make a positive difference addressing the myriad of issues they thought they were dealing with.”

Now that the ACA remains intact, however, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price could issue guidance on the provision and the administration could claim to have begun to fulfill a campaign promise without even passing a law in Congress.

We sought an explanation from Pence’s office and from the White House communications staff but did not get a response.

The Pinocchio Test

Car and life insurance currently is sold exactly the same way as health insurance – regulated by state insurance regulators, with policies tailored to the rules and laws set by the state. So it is false to suggest there is any difference.

Rating: Pence and Spicer earn Four Pinocchios.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/factcheck/ct-fact-check-pence-insurance-state-lines-20170401-story.html

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