The Pronk Pops Show 836, February 10, 2017, Story 1: When Will Congress Reign In An Overreaching Judiciary Branch Giving Political Opinions Not Legal Opinions — Long Overdue —  Videos — Story 2: No Visas To Travel To United States If You Cannot Pass a Vigorous Vetting and Background Check Period — Videos — Story 3: American People Support President Trump — Videos

Posted on February 10, 2017. Filed under: American History, Blogroll, Breaking News, Communications, Congress, Constitutional Law, Corruption, Countries, Crime, Culture, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Donald Trump, Education, Empires, Employment, European History, Foreign Policy, Freedom of Speech, Government, History, House of Representatives, Human, Human Behavior, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Independence, Iraq, Islamic Republic of Iran, Islamic State, Law, Libya, Life, Media, Middle East, News, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Progressives, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Rule of Law, Security, Senate, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Terror, Terrorism, United States Constitution, United States of America, United States Supreme Court, Videos, Wall Street Journal, War, Wealth, Wisdom, Yemen | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 836: February 10, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 835: February 9, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 834: February 8, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 833: February 7, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 832: February 6, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 831: February 3, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 830: February 2, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 829: February 1, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 828: January 31, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 827: January 30, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 826: January 27, 2017 

Pronk Pops Show 825: January 26, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 824: January 25, 2017 

Pronk Pops Show 823: January 24, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 822: January 23, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 821: January 20, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 820: January 19, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 819: January 18, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 818: January 17, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 817: January 13, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 816: January 12, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 815: January 11, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 814: January 10,  2017

Pronk Pops Show 813: January 9, 2017

Pronk Pops Show 812: December 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 811: December 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 810: December 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 809: December 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 808: December 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 807: December 5, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 806: December 2, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 805: December 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 804: November 30, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 803: November 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 802: November 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 801: November 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 800: November 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 799: November 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 798: November 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 797: November 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 796: November 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 795: November 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 794: November 10, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 793: November 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 792: November 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 791: November 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 790: November 4, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 789: November 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 788: November 2, 2016

Story 1: When Will Congress Reign In An Overreaching Judiciary Branch Giving Political Opinions Not Legal Opinions — Long Overdue —  Videos

Article 3, Section 2

Section 2 – The Text
The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;—to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;—to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction;—to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party;—to Controversies between two or more States;—[between a State and Citizens of another State;-]8 between citizens of different States;—between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of different States [and between a State, or the Citizens thereof;—and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.]9

In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.

The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.

8. Modified by Amendment XI.

9. Modified by Amendment XI.

Section 2 – The Meaning
The federal courts will decide arguments over how to interpret the Constitution, all laws passed by Congress, and our nation’s rights and responsibilities in agreements with other nations. In addition, federal courts can hear disputes that may arise between states, between citizens of different states, and between states and the federal government.

In 1803, in the case of Marbury v. Madison, the Supreme Court, in an opinion written by Chief Justice John Marshall, interpreted Article III and Article VI to give the federal courts final say over the meaning of the federal Constitution and federal laws and the power to order state and federal officials to comply with its rulings. The federal courts can make decisions only on cases that are brought to them by a person who is actually affected by the law. Federal courts are not allowed to create cases on their own, even if they believe a law is unconstitutional, nor are they allowed to rule on hypothetical scenarios.

Almost all federal cases start in federal district courts, where motions are decided and trials held. The cases are then heard on appeal by the federal courts of appeal and then by the Supreme Court if four justices of the nine-member court decide to hear the case. Congress can limit the power of the appeals courts by changing the rules about which cases can be appealed. State cases that involve an issue of federal law can also be heard by the Supreme Court after the highest court in the state rules (or refuses to rule) in the case. The Supreme Court accepts only a small number of cases for review, typically around 80 cases each year. In a small number of lawsuits — those involving ambassadors, public ministers and consuls, or where a state is a party — the Supreme Court is the first court to hear the case.

The federal courts also have final say over guilt or innocence in federal criminal cases. A defendant in a criminal case, except impeachment, has a right to have his or her case heard by a jury in the state where the crime occurred.

http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/page/article-iii-section-2

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release

Presidential Proclamation–Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons Who Participate in Serious Human Rights and Humanitarian Law Violations and Other Abuses

SUSPENSION OF ENTRY AS IMMIGRANTS AND NONIMMIGRANTS OF PERSONS WHO PARTICIPATE IN SERIOUS HUMAN RIGHTS AND HUMANITARIAN LAW VIOLATIONS AND OTHER ABUSES

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

The United States enduring commitment to respect for human rights and humanitarian law requires that its Government be able to ensure that the United States does not become a safe haven for serious violators of human rights and humanitarian law and those who engage in other related abuses.  Universal respect for human rights and humanitarian law and the prevention of atrocities internationally promotes U.S. values and fundamental U.S. interests in helping secure peace, deter aggression, promote the rule of law, combat crime and corruption, strengthen democracies, and prevent humanitarian crises around the globe.  I therefore have determined that it is in the interests of the United States to take action to restrict the international travel and to suspend the entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, of certain persons who have engaged in the acts outlined in section 1 of this proclamation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, by the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1182(f)), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, hereby find that the unrestricted immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of persons described in section 1 of this proclamation would be detrimental to the interests of the United States.  I therefore hereby proclaim that:

Section 1.  The entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, of the following persons is hereby suspended:

(a)  Any alien who planned, ordered, assisted, aided and abetted, committed or otherwise participated in, including through command responsibility, widespread or systematic violence against any civilian population based in whole or in part on race; color; descent; sex; disability; membership in an indigenous group; language; religion; political opinion; national origin; ethnicity; membership in a particular social group; birth; or sexual orientation or gender identity, or who attempted or conspired to do so.

(b)  Any alien who planned, ordered, assisted, aided and abetted, committed or otherwise participated in, including through command responsibility, war crimes, crimes against humanity or other serious violations of human rights, or who attempted or conspired to do so.

Sec. 2.  Section 1 of this proclamation shall not apply with respect to any person otherwise covered by section 1 where the entry of such person would not harm the foreign relations interests of the United States.

Sec. 3.  The Secretary of State, or the Secretary’s designee, in his or her sole discretion, shall identify persons covered by section 1 of this proclamation, pursuant to such standards and procedures as the Secretary may establish.

Sec. 4.  The Secretary of State shall have responsibility for implementing this proclamation pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, may establish.

Sec. 5.  For any person whose entry is otherwise suspended under this proclamation entry will be denied, unless the Secretary of State determines that the particular entry of such person would be in the interests of the United States.  In exercising such authority, the Secretary of State shall consult the Secretary of Homeland Security on matters related to admissibility or inadmissibility within the authority of the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Sec. 6.  Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to derogate from United States Government obligations under applicable international agreements, or to suspend entry based solely on an alien’s ideology, opinions, or beliefs, or based solely on expression that would be considered protected under U.S. interpretations of international agreements to which the United States is a party.  Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to limit the authority of the United States to admit or to suspend entry of particular individuals into the United States under the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.) or under any other provision of U.S. law.

Sec. 7.  This proclamation is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Sec. 8.  This proclamation is effective immediately and shall remain in effect until such time as the Secretary of State determines that it is no longer necessary and should be terminated, either in whole or in part.  Any such termination shall become effective upon publication in the Federal Register.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-press-office/2011/08/04/presidential-proclamation-suspension-entry-immigrants-and-nonimmigrants-

President Trump, at the Pentagon on Friday, signed an executive order titled “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States.” Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

President Trump signed an executive order on Friday titled “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States.” Following is the language of that order, as supplied by the White House.

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq., and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals admitted to the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Purpose. The visa-issuance process plays a crucial role in detecting individuals with terrorist ties and stopping them from entering the United States. Perhaps in no instance was that more apparent than the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, when State Department policy prevented consular officers from properly scrutinizing the visa applications of several of the 19 foreign nationals who went on to murder nearly 3,000 Americans. And while the visa-issuance process was reviewed and amended after the September 11 attacks to better detect would-be terrorists from receiving visas, these measures did not stop attacks by foreign nationals who were admitted to the United States.

Numerous foreign-born individuals have been convicted or implicated in terrorism-related crimes since September 11, 2001, including foreign nationals who entered the United States after receiving visitor, student, or employment visas, or who entered through the United States refugee resettlement program. Deteriorating conditions in certain countries due to war, strife, disaster, and civil unrest increase the likelihood that terrorists will use any means possible to enter the United States. The United States must be vigilant during the visa-issuance process to ensure that those approved for admission do not intend to harm Americans and that they have no ties to terrorism.

Sec. 2. Policy. It is the policy of the United States to protect its citizens from foreign nationals who intend to commit terrorist attacks in the United States; and to prevent the admission of foreign nationals who intend to exploit United States immigration laws for malevolent purposes.

Sec. 3. Suspension of Issuance of Visas and Other Immigration Benefits to Nationals of Countries of Particular Concern. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall immediately conduct a review to determine the information needed from any country to adjudicate any visa, admission, or other benefit under the INA (adjudications) in order to determine that the individual seeking the benefit is who the individual claims to be and is not a security or public-safety threat.

(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall submit to the President a report on the results of the review described in subsection (a) of this section, including the Secretary of Homeland Security’s determination of the information needed for adjudications and a list of countries that do not provide adequate information, within 30 days of the date of this order. The Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide a copy of the report to the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence.

(c) To temporarily reduce investigative burdens on relevant agencies during the review period described in subsection (a) of this section, to ensure the proper review and maximum utilization of available resources for the screening of foreign nationals, and to ensure that adequate standards are established to prevent infiltration by foreign terrorists or criminals, pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens from countries referred to in section 217(a)(12) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1187(a)(12), would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants and nonimmigrants, of such persons for 90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas).

(d) Immediately upon receipt of the report described in subsection (b) of this section regarding the information needed for adjudications, the Secretary of State shall request all foreign governments that do not supply such information to start providing such information regarding their nationals within 60 days of notification.

(e) After the 60-day period described in subsection (d) of this section expires, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, shall submit to the President a list of countries recommended for inclusion on a Presidential proclamation that would prohibit the entry of foreign nationals (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas) from countries that do not provide the information requested pursuant to subsection (d) of this section until compliance occurs.

(f) At any point after submitting the list described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretary of State or the Secretary of Homeland Security may submit to the President the names of any additional countries recommended for similar treatment.

(g) Notwithstanding a suspension pursuant to subsection (c) of this section or pursuant to a Presidential proclamation described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may, on a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.

(h) The Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall submit to the President a joint report on the progress in implementing this orderwithin 30 days of the date of this order, a second report within 60 daysof the date of this order, a third report within 90 days of the date of this order, and a fourth report within 120 days of the date of this order.

Sec. 4. Implementing Uniform Screening Standards for All Immigration Programs. (a) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall implement a program, as part of the adjudication process for immigration benefits, to identify individuals seeking to enter the United States on a fraudulent basis with the intent to cause harm, or who are at risk of causing harm subsequent to their admission. This program will include the development of a uniform screening standard and procedure, such as in-person interviews; a database of identity documents proffered by applicants to ensure that duplicate documents are not used by multiple applicants; amended application forms that include questions aimed at identifying fraudulent answers and malicious intent; a mechanism to ensure that the applicant is who the applicant claims to be; a process to evaluate the applicant’s likelihood of becoming a positively contributing member of society and the applicant’s ability to make contributions to the national interest; and a mechanism to assess whether or not the applicant has the intent to commit criminal or terrorist acts after entering the United States.

(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the Secretary of State, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall submit to the President an initial report on the progress of this directive within 60 days of the date of this order, a second report within 100 days of the date of this order, and a third report within 200 days of the date of this order.

Sec. 5. Realignment of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for Fiscal Year 2017. (a) The Secretary of State shall suspend the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for 120 days. During the 120-day period, the Secretary of State, in conjunction with the Secretary of Homeland Security and in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence, shall review the USRAP application and adjudication process to determine what additional procedures should be taken to ensure that those approved for refugee admission do not pose a threat to the security and welfare of the United States, and shall implement such additional procedures. Refugee applicants who are already in the USRAP process may be admitted upon the initiation and completion of these revised procedures. Upon the date that is 120 days after the date of this order, the Secretary of State shall resume USRAP admissions only for nationals of countries for which the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Director of National Intelligence have jointly determined that such additional procedures are adequate to ensure the security and welfare of the United States.

(b) Upon the resumption of USRAP admissions, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, is further directed to make changes, to the extent permitted by law, to prioritize refugee claims made by individuals on the basis of religious-based persecution, provided that the religion of the individual is a minority religion in the individual’s country of nationality. Where necessary and appropriate, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall recommend legislation to the President that would assist with such prioritization.

Image result for cartoons branco 9th circuit 2017

Image result for cartoons branco 9th circuit 2017

Image result for cartoons 9th circuit

“They’re immature“ Donald Trump attacks judges blocking his Muslim ban

Published on Feb 10, 2017

Trump to federal judges: Even a ‘bad high school student’ would rule in my favour. Trump Says Travel Ban ‘Done For The Security Of Our Nation’

US President Donald Trump speaks to members of the law enforcement at the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) Winter Conference in Washington, U.S., February 8, 2017.

US President Donald Trump sought to lend his own legal argument for his executive order banning travel from certain Muslim-majority countries on Wednesday, discounting a legal challenge to the order as anti-security.

Contending that a US President has wide powers to control who comes into the country, Trump said that even a “bad high school student” would rule in his favour, CNN reported.

“This isn’t just me. This is for Obama, for Ronald Reagan, for the President. This was done, very importantly, for security,” Trump said.

“It was done for the security of our nation, for the security of our citizens, so people don’t come in who are going to do us harm. That is why is was done. It couldn’t have been written more precisely,” he said.

Trump said his executive order was “written beautifully” and fully within the bounds of US statute.

“We’re in an area that, let’s just say, they’re interpreting things differently than probably 100 per cent of people in this room,” Trump told a group of major city police officers and sheriffs in Washington.

“We want security,” Trump said.

On Tuesday evening, a federal appeals court heard arguments in the legal battle over the travel ban. The California-based Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals will decide soon whether to reinstate the executive order.

The top legal officials in 16 states, including Pennsylvania and Iowa which voted for Trump, filed a memorandum in support of efforts to halt the travel ban.

The state attorneys general from these states argued that they have standing as the executive order inflicts harm on states, including disruption at state universities and medical institutions.

President Donald Trump is asserting that he had the right to enact his travel ban, saying it was “done for the security of our nation.”

Speaking to the Washington, D.C. conference of the Major Cities Chiefs Association, which represents sheriffs and heads of large police forces around the country, the president said the order was written “beautifully” and was within his executive authority.

“A bad high school student would understand this,” he said of the ban. “It’s as plain as you can have it and I was a good student. I understand things, I comprehend things very well.”

Trump said one of the reasons he was elected president was “because of law and order and security.”

“I think it’s a sad day. I think our security is at risk today and it will be at risk until such time as we are entitled and get what we are entitled to,” he said.

Trump also read parts of his order aloud, saying it allows the chief executive the ability to suspend the “entry of all aliens or of any class of aliens” into the country, CBS News reported.

“You can suspend, you can put restrictions, you can do whatever you want,” he said. “You’re the chiefs, you’re the sheriffs, you understand this.”

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is weighing the appeal of Trump’s executive order on immigration, including a temporary travel ban on those from seven Muslim-majority countries.

The appeals court challenged the administration’s claim that the ban was motivated by terrorism fears, but it also questioned an attorney’s argument that it unconstitutionally targeted Muslims.

While awaiting a decision, Trump said “courts seem to be so political.”

“They are interpreting things differently than probably 100 percent of people in this room,” the president said. “I never want to call a court biased, so I won’t call it biased.”

He added “it would be so great for our justice system if they would be able to read a statement and do what’s right.”

Earlier Wednesday morning, the president tweeted: “If the U.S. does not win this case as it so obviously should, we can never have the security and safety to which we are entitled. Politics!”

DID THE 9th CIRCUIT COURT IGNORE THE LAW?

Will Trump rewrite the immigration order?

Alan Dershowitz on immigration ban: Trump has to write a new order

Kellyanne Conway Confident in Legal Merits of Executive Order:’We Will Prevail’

What legal avenue is left for the Trump administration?

Legal showdown over Trump’s immigration order continues

Judge Napolitano Says These Appeal Judges HAVE NO RIGHT to Override The President

Judge Napolitano to Trump: Rescind the executive order, issue a new one

Krauthammer: Court’s decision on Trump’s order ‘disgraceful’

Source: White House not likely to appeal 9th Circuit ruling

Muslim activist explains why she supports extreme vetting

“Slouching Towards Gomorrah” with Robert Bork

A Conversation with Judge Robert H. Bork 6-26-07

Uploaded on Apr 21, 2011

As part of our 25th Anniversary celebration the Federalist Society presented a full-day Conference on June 26, 2007, honoring Judge Robert H. Bork and his contributions to the law. The conference luncheon featured this conversation between Judge Bork and Judge A. Raymond Randolph of the United States Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit.

–Judge Robert H. Bork, Former Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia
–Judge A. Raymond Randolph, U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit
–Introduction: Hon. Theodore B. Olson, Gibson, Dunn, & Crutcher and former U.S. Solicitor General

The Mayflower Hotel,
Washington, DC

Pat Buchanan on The Laura Ingraham Show (2/10/2017)

Trump Must Break Judicial Power

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By Patrick J. Buchanan

“Disheartening and demoralizing,” wailed Judge Neil Gorsuch of President Trump’s comments about the judges seeking to overturn his 90-day ban on travel to the U.S. from the Greater Middle East war zones.

What a wimp. Did our future justice break down crying like Sen. Chuck Schumer? Sorry, this is not Antonin Scalia. And just what horrible thing had our president said?

A “so-called judge” blocked the travel ban, said Trump. And the arguments in court, where 9th Circuit appellate judges were hearing the government’s appeal, were “disgraceful.” “A bad student in high school would have understood the arguments better.”

Did the president disparage a couple of judges? Yep.

Yet compare his remarks to the tweeted screeds of Elizabeth Warren after her Senate colleague, Jeff Sessions, was confirmed as attorney general.

Sessions, said Warren, represents “radical hatred.” And if he makes “the tiniest attempt to bring his racism, sexism & bigotry” into the Department of Justice, “all of us” will pile on.

Now this is hate speech. And it validates Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s decision to use Senate rules to shut her down.

These episodes reveal much about America 2017.

They reflect, first, the poisoned character of our politics. The language of Warren — that Sessions is stepped in “racism, sexism & bigotry” echoes the ugliest slander of the Hillary Clinton campaign, where she used similar words to describe Trump’s “deplorables.”

Such language, reflecting as it does the beliefs of one-half of America about the other, rules out any rapprochement in America’s social or political life. This is pre-civil war language.

For how do you sit down and work alongside people you believe to be crypto-Nazis, Klansmen and fascists? Apparently, you don’t. Rather, you vilify them, riot against them, deny them the right to speak or to be heard.

And such conduct is becoming common on campuses today.

As for Trump’s disparagement of the judges, only someone ignorant of history can view that as frightening.

Have something to say about this column?
Visit Pat’s FaceBook page and post your comments….

Thomas Jefferson not only refused to enforce the Alien & Sedition Acts of President John Adams, his party impeached Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase who had presided over one of the trials.

Jackson defied Chief Justice John Marshall’s prohibition against moving the Cherokees out of Georgia to west of the Mississippi, where, according to the Harvard resume of Sen. Warren, one of them bundled fruitfully with one of her ancestors, making her part Cherokee.

When Chief Justice Roger Taney declared that President Abraham Lincoln’s suspension of the writ of habeas corpus violated the Constitution, Lincoln considered sending U.S. troops to arrest the chief justice.

FDR proposed adding six justices to emasculate a Supreme Court of the “nine old men” he reviled for having declared some New Deal schemes unconstitutional.

President Eisenhower called his Supreme Court choices Earl Warren and William Brennan two of the “worst mistakes” he made as president. History bears Ike out. And here we come to the heart of the matter.

Whether the rollout of the president’s temporary travel ban was ill-prepared or not, and whether one agrees or not about which nations or people should be subjected to extreme vetting, the president’s authority in the matter of protecting the borders and keeping out those he sees as potentially dangerous is universally conceded.

That a district judge would overrule the president of the United States on a matter of border security in wartime is absurd.

When politicians don black robes and seize powers they do not have, they should be called out for what they are — usurpers and petty tyrants. And if there is a cause upon which the populist right should unite, it is that elected representatives and executives make the laws and rule the nation. Not judges, and not justices.

Indeed, one of the mightiest forces that has birthed the new populism that imperils the establishment is that unelected justices like Warren and Brennan, and their progeny on the bench, have remade our country without the consent of the governed — and with never having been smacked down by Congress or the president.

Consider. Secularist justices de-Christianized our country. They invented new rights for vicious criminals as though criminal justice were a game. They tore our country apart with idiotic busing orders to achieve racial balance in public schools. They turned over centuries of tradition and hundreds of state, local and federal laws to discover that the rights to an abortion and same-sex marriage were there in Madison’s Constitution all along. We just couldn’t see them.

Trump has warned the judges that if they block his travel ban, and this results in preventable acts of terror on American soil, they will be held accountable. As rightly they should.

Meanwhile, Trump’s White House should use the arrogant and incompetent conduct of these federal judges to make the case not only for creating a new Supreme Court, but for Congress to start using Article III, Section 2, of the Constitution — to restrict the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, and to reclaim its stolen powers.

A clipping of the court’s wings is long overdue.

http://buchanan.org/blog/trump-must-break-judicial-power-126521

Today in Conservative Media: The 9th Circuit Court’s Dangerous

By Jacob Brogan

634133704-president-donald-trump-listens-as-he-meets-with-county
Conservative outlets are torn on whether Donald Trump should appeal the court’s decision.

Andrew Harrer – Pool/Getty Images

170106_Logo_Conservative_Media5

A daily roundup of the biggest stories in right-wing media.

Late Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit upheld a nationwide injunction against Donald Trump’s immigration executive order. Conservative media outlets were largely unified in their frustration, deriding the court’s supposedly liberal tendencies, attributing the decision to political motivations rather than legal ones, and expressing grave concern about national security. A statement from National Review’s editors captured the general tone: “The Ninth Circuit’s decision against President Trump’s immigration order is worse than wrong. It is dangerous.”

Breitbart offered one vision of what those dangers might entail, writing that the judgment “would have allowed one of the 9/11 hijackers to sue the government to come to, or stay in, the United States.”  Because that hijacker, Hani Hasan Hanjour held a student visa, the article claims, he “would have due process rights to challenge his exclusion from the United States.”* (As the article acknowledges, Hansour was from Saudi Arabia—a country not included in the ban.) Another Breitbart post offered a similar objection, warning in its headline, “Judges Declare Judges Can Grant Immigration Visas, Even When Elected President Disagrees.”

Other right-wing publications, including National Review suggested that the decision was representative of a larger power grab by the judiciary, an attempt to claim powers that should be held by the executive branch. “The modern judiciary, and the modern Left whose water it carries, holds that no aspect of governance evades supervision by unelected federal judges,” National Review wrote. LifeZette, similarly, wrote, “No federal court should be considering any claims about these executive orders because … they fall squarely within a class of cases which the Supreme Court has said the judicial branch has no business reviewing.”

The president himself responded quickly to the news, tweeting (in all caps) “SEE YOU IN COURT,” a message that the Daily Caller described as “fiery.”

Sean Hannity’s website suggested that Trump would be right to appeal the decision. “While the ruling is being celebrated by those on the left, some legal scholars are baffled by the court’s decision,” it claimed, before citing objections from a handful of legal commentators, including a post from the blog Lawfare that closes with a reference to “the incompetent malevolence with which this order was promulgated.” If Trump does appeal to the Supreme Court, he might have reason for hope: The Daily Caller writes, “The 9th Circuit, which is known for its liberal tendencies, has the second-highest reversal rate of the 13 appellate courts below the Supreme Court.”

Not all conservative commentators were convinced, however. A separate article in the Daily Caller acknowledged, “Applying for a stay could also be a strategically unsound move for the administration.” In National Review, David French took a similar tack, arguing that the administration might do well to avoid taking its case to the Supreme Court. “Victory is far from assured, and a tie in the eight-member Court would uphold the Ninth Circuit’s dreadful decision,” he wrote. LifeZette likewise observed that an appeal might be dangerous, warning, “Justice Anthony Kennedy’s record on the bench suggests he is no lock to side with the conservative bloc on the court.”

Not all voices in the conservative media agreed that the immigration order was worth defending. In a National Review article titled, “The Travel Moratorium: A Hopeless Disaster,” Charles Krauthammer describes the executive order as a “pointless cul-de-sac,” writing, “It was a bad idea to begin with, and its implementation has been even worse.”

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2017/02/10/the_9th_circuit_court_s_decision_was_the_big_story_in_conservative_media.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/us/politics/refugee-muslim-executive-order-trump.html

Story 2: No Visas To Travel To the United States If You Cannot Pass a Vigorous Vetting and Background Check Period — Videos –

USA: Trump blocks entry of refugees in ‘extreme vetting’ order

President Trump Signs Executive Order Halting ALL Immigration From 7 Primarily Muslim Countries

Trump Travel Ban – Here Is the Opinion of Trey Gowdy And Jason Chaffetz

Trump Proposes Extreme Vetting Process For Visa Applicants

Published on Aug 15, 2016

At Youngstown State University in Ohio Monday, Donald Trump called for a new screening test for immigrants wishing to enter the United States.

Donald Trump:
“And we will be tough. We will be even extreme. We should only admit into this country those who share our values and respect our people. In the Cold War, we had an ideological screening test. The time is overdue to develop a new screening test for the threats we face today. I call it extreme vetting. I call it extreme, extreme vetting. Our country has enough problems. We don’t need more. And these are problems like we’ve never had before. In addition to screening out all members of the sympathizers of terrorist groups we must also screen out any hostile attitude towards our country or its principles, or who believe that Sharia law should supplant American law. Those who did not believe in our Constitution or who support bigotry and hatred will not be admitted for immigration into our country. Only those who we expect to flourish in our country and to embrace a tolerant American society should be issued Visas.”

Story 3: American People Support President Trump — Videos

Americans still support Donald Trump’s immigration ban, poll shows

President Donald Trump give a 'thumbs-up' during his arrival at Philadelphia International airport
Donald Trump gets off a plane after travelling to Philadelphia Credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Despite breaking records for the lowest approval ratings for a new President, Donald Trump’s immigration ban is still backed by a majority of Americans, according to recent polling.

The Republican president suffered the biggest defeat of his presidency yesterday as a court refused to reinstate his executive order banning refugees and restricting travel to the United States from seven Muslim-majority countries.

His decision to halt immigration has been widely criticised with protests across the world, legal challenges and condemnation from Barack Obama. The President sacked his interim Attorney General for failing to enforce his immigration ban, with the White House saying that she had “betrayed” the Justice Department.

But the most recent polling done on the policy shows that most Americans still back the policy.

Polling by Morning Consult and Politico reveals that the travel ban is, at the same time, one of Trump’s most popular and most divisive

A majority of people (55 per cent) approve of the controversial immigration ban, while just 38 per cent disapprove.

At the same time, the immigration order had the lowest proportion of people saying that they don’t know what their opinion is, out of any of the executive orders signed by Trump.

Further signalling the divides in American society after a brutal presidential election, the support for Trump’s policy is split heavily along partisan lines. Some four out of five Republicans support the order, while over three out of five Democrats oppose it.

Watch | Protests against Trump’s travel ban from around the world

02:53

The executive order in question has imposed a 90-day ban on people entering the country from Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It also prevents all refugees from entering the US for 120 days.

One of the first polls conducted when the order was first made indicated that half of Americans agreed with it.

It addition to more people agreeing with the ban than disagreeing with it, 31 per cent of respondents said the travel ban made them feel safer, compared to 26 per cent who said it made them feel less safe.

The Ipsos and Reuters poll also showed that 31 per cent of Americans said that it made them feel more safe, while 26 per cent said it made them feel less safe.

Morning Consult’s national survey polled 2,070 registered voters and has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/10/americans-still-support-donald-trumps-immigration-ban-poll-shows/

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