The Pronk Pops Show 803, November 29, 2016, Story 1: Breaking: Trump Greasing The Skids For A Massive Budget Busting $1,000 Billion Stimulus Bill For infrastructure Government Spending and/or Sells Bonds (Treasury Securities) For Private Investment in Infrastructure– Can You Say Toll Roads (82% of Profits Tax Free) or Privatize All Roads and Highways? — Trump Selects Elaine Chao as Secretary of Transportation (Wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell) — Videos — Story 2: Trump Selects Campaign Finance Chair Steve Mnuchin to serve as Treasury Secretary — Videos — Story 3: Trump Selects Leading Critic of Obamacare Representative and Dr. Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services — Videos — Three Great Choices!

Posted on November 29, 2016. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Breaking News, Budgetary Policy, Congress, Constitutional Law, Countries, Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, Donald Trump, Economics, Education, Elections, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Government, Government Spending, Health, History, House of Representatives, Human Behavior, Labor Economics, Law, Media, Medicare, Monetary Policy, News, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, Radio, Raymond Thomas Pronk, Regulation, Senate, Tax Policy, Taxation, Taxes, United States of America, Videos, Violence, Wall Street Journal, Wealth, Welfare Spending, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 803: November 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 802: November 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 801: November 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 800: November 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 799: November 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 798: November 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 797: November 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 796: November 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 795: November 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 794: November 10, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 793: November 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 792: November 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 791: November 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 790: November 4, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 789: November 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 788: November 2, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 787: October 31, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 786: October 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 785: October 27, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 784: October 26, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 783: October 25, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 782: October 24, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 781: October 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 780: October 20, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 779: October 19, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 778: October 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 777: October 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 776: October 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 775: October 13, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 774: October 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 773: October 11, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 772: October 10, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 771: October 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 770: October 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 769: October 5, 2016 

Pronk Pops Show 768: October 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 767: September 30, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 766: September 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 765: September 28, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 764: September 27, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 763: September 26, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 762: September 23, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 761: September 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 760: September 21, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 759: September 20, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 758: September 19, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 757: September 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 756: September 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 755: September 14, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 754: September 13, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 753: September 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 752: September 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 751: September 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 750: September 7, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 749: September 2, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 748: September 1, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 747: August 31, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 746: August 30, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 745: August 29, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 744: August 26, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 743: August 25, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 742: August 24, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 741: August 23, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 740: August 22, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 739: August 18, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 738: August 17, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 737: August 16, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 736: August 15, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 735: August 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 734: August 11, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 733: August 9, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 732: August 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 731: August 4, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 730: August 3, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 729: August 1, 2016

Story 1: Breaking: Trump Greasing The Skids For A Massive Budget Busting $1,000 Billion Stimulus Bill For infrastructure Government Spending and/or Sells Bonds (Treasury Securities) For Private Investment in Infrastructure– Can You Say Toll Roads (82% of Profits Tax Free) or Privatize All Roads and Highways? — Trump Selects Elaine Chao as Secretary of Transportation (Wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell) — Videos

Image result for elaine chao transportation secretary and mitch mcConnellImage result for elaine chao transportation secretaryImage result for elaine chao transportation secretary and mitch mcConnellImage result for elaine chao transportation secretary and mitch mcConnell

Trump’s Select Conservative Politicans For Cabinet

Is “Elaine Chao” part of the “swamp”?

Does she fit Trump’s description !?

Breaking: Trump picks Elaine Chao for Transportation secretary

Trump Cabinet – Donald Trump Picks Elaine Chao as Transportation Secretary

Published on Nov 29, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump is transitioning to the presidency and selecting members of his cabinet.
Trump Cabinet – Donald Trump Picks Elaine Chao as Transportation Secretary
Wife of Senate Majority Leader McConnell earlier served as secretary of labor under President George W. Bush
President-elect Donald Trump has selected Elaine Chao to be his transportation secretary, according to two transition officials.

Ms. Chao, who is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, would join South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, tapped for U.S. ambassador to the United Nations
Elaine Chao, who Donald Trump has nominated for Transportation Secretary, is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. The two have been married since 1993 and have no children.

Chao previously served as the director of the Peace Corps during President George H.W. Bush’s administration and was the Secretary of Labor for all eight years of the George W. Bush administration. The 63-year-old Chao was born in Taipei, Taiwan and has lived in the U.S. since she was eight years old.

As for McConnell, he has been the Senate Majority Leader since 2015, when Republicans took control of the Senate after the 2014 mid-term election. He was first elected to the Senate in 1985 and was named Senate Minority Leader in 2007. McConnell was previously married to Sherrill Redmon and the two have three daughters together.

Trump to Select Elaine Chao as Transportation Secretary

Trump’s Infrastructure Investment Plan Evokes Ayn Rand

Published on Nov 14, 2016

Donald Trump’s billion-dollar infrastructure plan calls for private investment to fund improvements. How would that work? And in what ways does it evoke Ayn Rand’s vision of a privatized nation? WSJ’s Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer. Photo: AP.

Can we afford Trump’s infrastructure spending?

Could Trump’s infrastructure plan create 1 million jobs?

Can Trump fulfill $1 trillion infrastructure promise?

Trump promises to make infrastructure a major focus

Published on Nov 12, 2016

Donald Trump has signaled that infrastructure will be a major issue in his administration. He has also promised to create 25 million jobs through infrastructure spending, tax reduction, trade deal reform and lifting restrictions on American energy development. Laura Bliss of CityLab and Binyamin Appelbaum, a correspondent for The New York Times, join Alison Stewart.

Can Trump Keep His Promises on Infrastructure?

Bernie Sanders Exposes Trump’s Infrastructure Plan as a SCAM

Elaine Chao

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Elaine Chao
Elaine Chao large.jpg
24th United States Secretary of Labor
In office
January 29, 2001 – January 20, 2009
President George W. Bush
Preceded by Alexis Herman
Succeeded by Hilda Solis
Director of the Peace Corps
In office
1991–1992
President George H. W. Bush
Preceded by Paul Coverdell
Succeeded by Carol Bellamy
Deputy Secretary of Transportation
In office
1989–1991
President George H. W. Bush
Preceded by Mary Ann Dawson
Succeeded by Mortimer L. Downey
Personal details
Born Elaine Lan Chao
March 26, 1953 (age 63)
Taipei, Taiwan
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Mitch McConnell
Alma mater Mount Holyoke College (BA)
Harvard University (MBA)
Elaine L. Chao
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese
Hanyu Pinyin Zhào Xiǎolán

Elaine Lan Chao (born March 26, 1953)[1] is an American politician who served as the 24th U.S. Secretary of Labor under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2009, and Deputy Secretary of Transportation under President George H. W. Bush. She was announced as the planned nominee for United States Secretary of Transportation by President-elect Donald Trump on November 29, 2016 [2]. Born in Taiwan to mainland Chinese parents, she was the first Asian American woman and the first Taiwanese American in U.S. history to be appointed to a U.S. president’s cabinet.[3] She is married to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.[4]

Early life and education

Elaine Chao was born in Taipei, Taiwan. The eldest of six daughters, Chao was born to Ruth Mulan Chu Chao (趙朱木蘭 Zhào Zhū Mùlán), an historian, and Dr. James S.C. Chao (趙錫成 Zhào Xīchéng), who began his career as a merchant mariner and later founded a successful shipping company in New York City called Foremost Shipping.[5] Chao’s parents had fled to Taiwan from Shanghai on mainland China after the Chinese Communists took over after the Chinese Civil War in 1949. When she was 8 years old, in 1961, Chao came to the United States on a freight ship with her mother and two younger sisters. Her father had arrived in New York three years earlier after receiving a scholarship.[6]

Chao attended private school Tsai Hsing Elementary School in Taipei, for kindergarten and first grade,[citation needed] and attended Syosset High School in Syosset, New York, on Long Island.[7] She received a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from Mount Holyoke College in 1975 and an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1979. At Mount Holyoke, she played field hockey and was a member of the horseback riding club; she also edited the yearbook, served as the student representative for the economics department, and worked as a Mount Holyoke recruiter.[8]

Chao has received 36 honorary doctorates,[9] most recently a Doctor of Humane Letters from Georgetown University.[10]

Career

Early career

Before entering politics, Chao was vice president for syndications at Bank of America Capital Markets Group in San Francisco, and an international banker at Citicorp in New York for four years.[11]

Chao was granted a White House Fellowship in 1983 during the Reagan administration. In October 2013, Chao told a game show audience that the fellowship was part of a special program with Citicorp. “They selected outstanding performers within the bank and gave them an opportunity to support them for a stint in the government,” Chao said.[12]

In 1986, Chao became deputy administrator of the Maritime Administration in the U.S. Department of Transportation. From 1988 to 1989, she served as chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission.[13] In 1989, President George H. W. Bush nominated Chao to be Deputy Secretary of Transportation. From 1991 to 1992, Chao was Director of the Peace Corps.[13] She was the first Asian Pacific American to serve in any of these positions. She expanded the Peace Corps’s presence in Eastern Europe and Central Asia by establishing the first Peace Corps programs in Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland, and other newly independent states of the former Soviet Union.[14]

Before a 1999 House panel during the 1996 United States campaign finance controversy, John Huang testified that Chao had asked him to give money to her husband, Mitch McConnell, and that his Indonesian employer illegally reimbursed him for $2,000 he ultimately gave to McConnell’s 1990 campaign. Huang later repeated the assertion in testimony in a federal suit, in which he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to violate campaign finance laws in funneling $100,000 in illegal donations to President Bill Clinton’s 1996 re-election campaign.[15]

United Way and Heritage Foundation

Following her service in the government, Chao worked for four years as President and CEO of United Way of America. She is credited with returning credibility and public trust in the organization after a financial mismanagement scandal involving former president William Aramony. From 1996 until her appointment as Secretary of Labor, Chao was a Distinguished Fellow with the Heritage Foundation, aconservative think tank in Washington, D.C. She was also a board member of the Independent Women’s Forum.[16] She returned to the Heritage Foundation after leaving the government in January 2009.

U.S. Secretary of Labor (2001–2009)

Portrait of Elaine Chao by Chen Yanning in the Great Hall of the U.S. Department of Labor’sFrances Perkins Building. It features the American flag, theKentucky state flag, the U.S. Capitol, and photos of her husband, Mitch McConnell, and her parents, James and Ruth Chao.[17]

Chao was the only cabinet member in the George W. Bush administration to serve for the entirety of his eight years.[18] She was also the longest-serving Secretary of Labor since Frances Perkins, who served from 1933 to 1945, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.[19]

Under her leadership, the U.S. Department of Labor undertook regulatory and legislative reforms in “protecting the health, safety, wages, and retirement security” of U.S. workers by “recovering record levels of back wages and monetary recoveries for pension plans, and obtaining record financial settlements for discrimination by federal contractors.” She also restructured departmental programs and modernized regulations.[20]

In 2002, a major west coast ports dispute costing the U.S. economy nearly $1 billion daily was resolved when the Bush administration obtained a national emergency injunction against both the employers and the union under the Taft–Hartley Act for the first time since 1971.[21] In 2003, for the first time in more than 40 years, the Department updated the labor union financial disclosure regulations under the Landrum–Griffin Act of 1959 to provide union members with more information on union finances. In 2004, the Department issued revisions of the white-collar overtime regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act.[22]

In July and August 2003, Chao and her colleagues, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow and Commerce Secretary Donald Evans, took a bus across the country on their “Jobs and Growth Tour” aimed at promoting the benefits of the Bush administration’s tax cuts.[23]

Criticism

After analyzing 70,000 closed case files from 2005 to 2007, the Government Accountability Office reported that the Department’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) inadequately investigated complaints from low- and minimum-wage workers alleging that employers failed to pay the federal minimum wage, required overtime, and failed to issue a last paycheck.[24]

Chao’s tenure as Labor Secretary saw two mine disasters for which she was criticized. Twelve miners were killed in the Sago Mine disaster on January 2, 2006, and three rescue workers died in the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster on August 6, 2007. Before the mines collapsed, Chao had cut more than a hundred coal mine safety inspections.[25] According to the Christian Science Monitor, “Nearly half of the 208 safety citations levied in 2005 against the Sago coal mine where 12 men died this week were ‘serious and substantial.'”[26] On December 10, 2008, Chao announced that the Department of Labor’s Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) had, in the first year of the agency’s 100 Percent Plan, achieved its goal of completing every mandated regular inspection for the year, a first in the agency’s 31-year history.[27]

A 2008 report by the department’s inspector general found that despite implementation of the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, mine safety regulators did not conduct federally required inspections at more than 14% of the country’s 731 underground coal mines, and that the number of worker deaths in mining accidents more than doubled to 47.[28] A 2009 internal audit appraising an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) initiative focusing on problematic workplaces revealed that employees had failed to gather needed data, conducted uneven inspections and enforcement, and failed to discern repeat fatalities because records misspelled the companies’ names or failed to notice when two subsidiaries with the same owner were involved.[29] However, OSHA statistics for 2007 and 2008 revealed that overall workplace fatality rates and workplace injury and illness rates were “both at all-time lows.”[30][31]

A 2008 Government Accountability Office report noted that the Labor Department gave Congress inaccurate numbers that understated the expense of contracting out its employees’ work to private firms during Chao’s tenure.[32][33]

A report by the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, under the Chairmanship of Henry A. Waxman (D–Calif.), alleged that Chao and other White House officials campaigned for Republican candidates at taxpayer expense.[34] The report described this as a violation of the Hatch Act of 1939, which restricts the use of public funds for partisan gain,[35] but no action was taken by any entity with responsibility for enforcing the Hatch Act.

Life after Bush administration (2009–2016)

In 2009 Chao resumed her previous role as a Distinguished Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, and she contributes to Fox News and other media outlets.

She also serves as a director on a number of corporate and non-profit boards,[11][36] including the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Wells Fargo,[37] NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital, News Corp,[38] Dole Food Company,[39] and Protective Life Corporation.[40][41][42] In June 2011, she was awarded the Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service.[43]

In January 2015 she resigned from the board of Bloomberg Philanthropies, which she had joined in 2012,[44] because of its plans to significantly increase support for the Sierra Club‘s “Beyond Coal” initiative.[45]

In 2011 and 2013, Chao attended Shanghai signing ceremonies for Capesize bulkers launched by the Foremost Group, her father’s company, where she spoke publicly about U.S.–China relations.[46] At the 2013 ceremony, Chao stated, “The U.S.-China relations[hip] is among the most important bilateral relationships in the world. And as such, there is no other alternative but to have a harmonious and a cooperative relationship. As with any relationship, there are bound to be ups, downs, disagreements, but in the overall scheme of things, in the overall direction, for the benefit of the world, [the] U.S. and China must get along, and must find a way to do so.”[47]

In 2013, Chao recorded a motivational video to inspire Asian-American children.[48]

She also organized the “orientation for the spouses of Republican senators” in Washington, D.C.[4]

U.S. Secretary of Transportation (2017–present)

As of November 29th, 2016 she was nominated by President-Elect Donald Trump to become his Secretary of Transportation.[49]

Personal life

In 1993, Chao married Mitch McConnell, the senior U.S. Senator from Kentucky and the Senate Majority Leader. They were introduced by Stuart Bloch, an early friend of McConnell’s, and his wife Julia Chang Bloch, a Chinese American and a future U.S. Ambassador to Nepal, the first Asian American to serve as US Ambassador, who mentored Elaine Chao. Bloch described Chao as a “tiger wife,” a reference to Amy Chua‘s 2011 book about her disciplinarian parenting style. Previously, she had dated C. Boyden Gray, the White House Counsel to President George H. W. Bush.[4]

The University of Louisville‘s Ekstrom Library opened the “McConnell-Chao Archives” in November 2009. It is a major component of the university’s McConnell Center.[50][51]

Husband’s campaigning

In the two years leading up to the 2014 U.S. Senate elections, she “headlined fifty of her own events and attended hundreds more with and on behalf of” her husband and was seen as “a driving force of his reelection campaign” and eventual victory over Democratic candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, who had portrayed McConnell as “anti-woman.”[52] After winning the election, McConnell said, “The biggest asset I have by far is the only Kentucky woman who served in a president’s cabinet, my wife, Elaine Chao.”[53]

Additionally, she adds “a softer touch” to McConnell’s style by speaking of him “in a feminine, wifely way,” as Jan Karzen, a longtime friend of McConnell’s, put it.[4] She has been described as “the campaign hugger”[52] and is also known for bipartisan socializing. For example, in 2014 she hosted a dinner with philanthropist Catherine B. Reynolds to welcome Penny Pritzker as Secretary of Commerce, where she spent the evening socializing with Valerie Jarrett, Obama’s top advisor.[4]

The New York Times has described her as “an unapologetically ambitious operator with an expansive network, a short fuse, and a seemingly inexhaustible drive to get to the top and stay there.” It reported that as labor secretary, she “had gold-colored coins minted with her name in bas-relief and employed a “Veep“-like staff member who carried around her bag.”[4]

Family

Chao is the oldest of six sisters, the others being Jeannette, May, Christine, Grace, and Angela.[54][55] The New York Times reported that “several of her five younger sisters married Wall Street titans, including Bruce Wasserstein, the late owner of New York Magazine.”

Her father, James S.C. Chao, is a shipping magnate who founded the Foremost Group. In April 2008, Chao’s father gave Chao and McConnell between $5 million and $25 million, which “boosted McConnell’s personal worth from a minimum of $3 million in 2007 to more than $7 million”[56] and “helped the McConnells after their stock portfolio dipped in the wake of the financial crisis that year.”[57]

In 2012 the family donated $40 million to Harvard Business School for scholarships for students of Chinese heritage and the Ruth Mulan Chu Chao Center, an executive education building named for Chao’s late mother.[58][59]Her mother Ruth Mulan Chu Chao returned to school at age 51 to earn a master’s degree in Asian literature and history from St. John’s University in the Queens borough of New York City.[54]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaine_Chao

Mitch McConnell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mitch McConnell
Sen Mitch McConnell official.jpg
Senate Majority Leader
Assumed office
January 6, 2015
Deputy John Cornyn
Preceded by Harry Reid
United States Senator
from Kentucky
Assumed office
January 3, 1985
Serving with Rand Paul
Preceded by Walter Huddleston
Senate Minority Leader
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2015
Deputy Trent Lott
Jon Kyl
John Cornyn
Preceded by Harry Reid
Succeeded by Harry Reid
Senate Majority Whip
In office
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Leader Bill Frist
Preceded by Harry Reid
Succeeded by Dick Durbin
Chairman of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration
In office
January 3, 1999 – June 6, 2001
Preceded by John Warner
Succeeded by Chris Dodd
Jefferson County Judge/Executive
In office
1977–1984
Preceded by Todd Hollenbach III
Succeeded by Bremer Ehrler
United States Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs
Acting
In office
1975
President Gerald Ford
Preceded by W. Vincent Rakestraw
Succeeded by Michael Uhlmann
Personal details
Born Addison Mitchell McConnell, Jr.
February 20, 1942 (age 74)
Sheffield, Alabama, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Sherrill Redmon (1968–1980)
Elaine Chao(1993–present)
Children 3
Alma mater University of Louisville
University of Kentucky
Religion Southern Baptist
Signature
Website Senate website
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 1967
Unit United States Army Reserve

Addison MitchellMitchMcConnell, Jr. (born February 20, 1942) is the senior United States Senator from Kentucky. A member of the Republican Party, he has been the Majority Leader of the Senate since January 3, 2015. He is the 15th Republican and the second Kentuckian to lead his party in the Senate.[1] Despite having the lowest approval rating in the Senate,[2] McConnell is the longest-serving U.S. Senator in Kentucky history.[3]

Early life and education

Mitch McConnell was born on February 20, 1942, in a hospital in Sheffield, Alabama, which is now called the Helen Keller Hospital, and raised as a young child in nearby Athens.[4]McConnell is the son of Addison Mitchell McConnell, and his wife, Julia (née Shockley). As a youth, he overcame polio.[5] His family moved to Georgia when he was eight.[6]

When he was a teenager, his family arrived in Louisville where he attended duPont Manual High School. He graduated with honors from the University of Louisville with a B.A. inhistory in 1966. McConnell was president of the Student Council of the College of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. He has maintained strong ties to his alma mater and “remains a rabid fan of its sports teams.”[7] Three years later, McConnell graduated from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he was president of the Student Bar Association. McConnell is of Irish and English descent.[8]

McConnell enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve at Louisville, Kentucky during his last year of law school. He received an Honorable Discharge for medical reasons (optic neuritis) after five weeks at Fort Knox.[9][10]

Early career

McConnell began interning for Senator John Sherman Cooper (R-KY) in 1964, and his time with Cooper inspired him to run for the Senate eventually himself.[11] Later, McConnell was an assistant to Senator Marlow Cook (R-KY) and was a Deputy Assistant Attorney General under PresidentGerald R. Ford, where he worked alongside future Justice Antonin Scalia.[12] In 1977, McConnell was elected the Jefferson County Judge/Executive, the former top political office in Jefferson County, Kentucky. He was re-elected in 1981.[11]

U.S. Senate

Elections

1984

In 1984, McConnell ran for the U.S. Senate against two-term Democratic incumbent Walter Dee Huddleston. The election race wasn’t decided until the last returns came in, and McConnell won by a thin margin—only 5,200 votes out of more than 1.8 million votes cast, just over 0.4%.[13] McConnell was the only Republican Senate challenger to win that year, despite Ronald Reagan‘s landslide victory in the presidential election. Part of McConnell’s success came from a series of television campaign spots called “Where’s Dee”, which featured a group of bloodhounds trying to find Huddleston,[14][15] implying that Huddleston’s attendance record in the Senate was less than stellar. His campaign bumper stickers and television ads asked voters to “Switch to Mitch”.[16]

1990

In 1990, McConnell faced a tough re-election contest against former Louisville Mayor Harvey I. Sloane, winning by 4.4%.

1996

In 1996, he defeated Steve Beshear by 12.6%, even as Bill Clintonnarrowly carried the state. In keeping with a tradition of humorous and effective television ads in his campaigns, McConnell’s campaign ran television ads that warned voters to not “Get BeSheared” and included images of sheep being sheared.[16]

2002

In 2002, he was re-elected against Lois Combs Weinberg by 29.4%, the largest majority by a statewide Republican candidate in Kentucky history.

2008

In 2008, McConnell faced his closest contest since 1990. He defeated Bruce Lunsford by 6%.[17]

2014

In 2014, McConnell faced Louisville businessman Matt Bevin in the Republican primary.[18] The 60.2% won by McConnell was the lowest voter support for a Kentucky U.S. Senator in a primary by either party since 1938.[19] He faced Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes in the general election. Although polls showed the race was very close, ultimately McConnell defeated Grimes by 56.2%–40.7%, 15.5 percentage points – one of his largest margins of victory, second only to his 2002 margin.

Leadership

During the 1998 and 2000 election cycles, McConnell was chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. Republicans maintained control of the Senate in both. He was first elected as Majority Whip in the 108th Congress and unanimously re-elected on November 17, 2004. Senator Bill Frist, the Majority Leader, did not seek re-election in the 2006 elections. In November 2006, after Republicans lost control of the Senate, they elected McConnell to replace Frist as Minority Leader. After Republicans took control of the Senate following the 2014 Senate elections, McConnell became the Senate Majority Leader.

Tenure

Reputation

According to The New York Times, in his early years as a politician in Kentucky, McConnell was “something of a centrist”. In recent years, however, McConnell has veered sharply to the right. He now opposed collective-bargaining rights and minimum-wage increases that he previously supported, and abandoned pork barrel projects he once delivered to the state of Kentucky. He believed that Reagan’s popularity made conservatism much more appealing.[11]

According to a profile in Politico, “While most politicians desperately want to be liked, McConnell has relished—and cultivated—his reputation as a villain.” The Politico profile also noted “For most of Obama‘s presidency, McConnell has been the face of Republican obstructionism.”[20] According to Salon, “Despite McConnell’s reputation as the man who said his No. 1 goal was to stop President Obama from winning a second term, it’s been McConnell at the table when the big deals—be they over threatened government shutdowns, debt defaults or fiscal cliffs—have been finalized.”[21]

With a 49% disapproval rate, he has the highest disapproval rate out of all senators.[22]

Foreign policy

After winning election to the U.S. Senate in 1984, McConnell backed anti-apartheid legislation with Chris Dodd.[23] McConnell went on to engineer new IMF funding to “faithfully protect aid to Egypt and Israel,” and “promote free elections and better treatment of Muslim refugees” in Myanmar, Cambodia and Macedonia. According to a March 2014 article in Politico, “McConnell was a ‘go-to guy’ for presidents of both parties seeking foreign aid,” but he has lost some of his idealism and has evolved to be more wary of foreign assistance.[24]

McConnell stands in front and directly to the right of President Obama as he signs tax cuts and unemployment insurance legislation on December 17, 2010.

In August 2007, McConnell introduced the Protect America Act of 2007, which allowed the National Security Agency to monitor telephone and electronic communications of suspected terrorists outside the United States without obtaining a warrant.[25] McConnell was the only party leader in Congress to oppose the resolution that would authorize military strikes againstSyria in September 2013, citing a lack of national security risk.[26]

On March 27, 2014, McConnell introduced the United States International Programming to Ukraine and Neighboring Regions bill, which would provide additional funding and instructions toRadio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in response to the 2014 Crimea crisis.[27][28]

Campaign finance

McConnell argues that campaign finance regulations reduce participation in political campaigns and protect incumbents from competition.[29] He spearheaded the movement against theBipartisan Campaign Reform Act (known since 1995 as the “McCain–Feingold bill” and from 1989–1994 as the “Boren–Mitchell bill”), calling it “neither fair, nor balanced, nor constitutional.”[30] His opposition to the bill culminated in the 2003 Supreme Court case McConnell v. Federal Election Commission and the 2009 Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. McConnell has been an advocate for free speech at least as far back as the early 1970s when he was teaching night courses at the University of Louisville. “No issue has shaped his career more than the intersection of campaign financing and free speech,” political reporter Robert Costa wrote in 2012.[31] In a recording of a 2014 fundraiser McConnell expressed his disapproval of the McCain-Feingold law, saying, “The worst day of my political life was when President George W. Bush signed McCain-Feingold into law in the early part of his first Administration.”[32]

On January 2, 2013, the Public Campaign Action Fund, a liberal nonprofit group that backs stronger campaign finance regulation, released a report highlighting eight instances from McConnell’s political career in which a vote or a blocked vote (filibuster), coincided with an influx of campaign contributions to McConnell’s campaign.[33][34]Progress Kentucky, a SuperPAC focused on defeating McConnell in 2014, hosted a press conference in front of the Senator’s Louisville office to highlight the report’s findings.[35][36]

Flag Desecration Amendment

McConnell opposed the Flag Desecration Amendment in 2000. According to McConnell: “We must curb this reflexive practice of attempting to cure each and every political and social ill of our nation by tampering with the Constitution. The Constitution of this country was not a rough draft. It was not a rough draft and we should not treat it as such.” McConnell offered an amendment to the measure that would have made flag desecration a statutory crime, illegal without amending the Constitution.[37]

Health policy

In August 2001, McConnell introduced the Common Sense Medical Malpractice Reform Act of 2001. The bill would require that a health care liability action must be initiated within two years, non-economic damages may not exceed $250,000, and punitive damages may only be awarded in specified situations.[38]

McConnell voted against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called ObamaCare or the Affordable Care Act) in December 2009,[39] and he voted against the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.[40] In 2014, McConnell repeated his call for the full repeal of Obamacare and said that Kentucky should be allowed to keep the state’s health insurance exchange website, Kynect, or set up a similar system.[41]

McConnell received the Kentucky Life Science Champion Awards for his work in promoting innovation in the life science sector.[42]

Economy

In July 2003, McConnell sponsored the Small Business Liability Reform Act of 2003. The bill would protect small businesses from litigation excesses and limit the liability of non-manufacturer product sellers.[43][44]

McConnell was the sponsor of the Gas Price Reduction Act of 2008. The bill, which did not pass, would have allowed states to engage in increased offshore and domestic oil exploration in an effort to curb rising gas prices.[45]

In June 2008, McConnell introduced the Alternative Minimum Tax and Extenders Tax Relief Act of 2008. The bill was intended to limit the impact of the Alternative Minimum Tax.[46][better source needed]

McConnell with President Barack Obama, August 2010.

In an interview with National Journal magazine published October 23, 2010, McConnell explained that “the single most important thing we want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one-term president.” Asked whether this meant “endless, or at least frequent, confrontation with the president,” McConnell clarified that “if [Obama is] willing to meet us halfway on some of the biggest issues, it’s not inappropriate for us to do business with him.”[47]

In September 2010, McConnell sponsored the Tax Hike Prevention Act of 2010. The bill would have permanently extended the tax relief provisions of 2001 and 2003 and provided permanent Alternative Minimum Tax and estate tax relief.[48][better source needed]

In 2010, McConnell requested earmarks for the defense contractor BAE Systems while the company was under investigation by the Department of Justice for alleged bribery of foreign officials.[49][unreliable source?]

In June 2011, McConnell introduced a Constitutional Balanced Budget Amendment. The amendment would require two-thirds votes in Congress to increase taxes or for federal spending to exceed the current year’s tax receipts or 18% of the prior year’s GDP. The amendment specifies situations when these requirements would be waived.[50][51]

In December 2012, McConnell called for a vote on giving the president unilateral authority to raise the federal debt ceiling. When Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) called for an up or down vote, McConnell objected to the vote and ended up filibustering it himself.[52] In 2014, McConnell voted to help break Ted Cruz‘s filibuster attempt against a debt limit increase and then against the bill itself.[53]

After two intersessions to get federal grants for Alltech, whose president T. Pearse Lyons made subsequent campaign contributions to McConnell, to build a plant in Kentucky for producing ethanol from algae, corncobs, and switchgrass, McConnell criticized President Obama in 2012 for twice mentioning biofuel production from algae in a speech touting his “all-of-the-above” energy policy.[54][55]

In April 2014, the United States Senate debated the Paycheck Fairness Act (S. 2199; 113th Congress). It was a bill that “punishes employers for retaliating against workers who share wage information, puts the justification burden on employers as to why someone is paid less and allows workers to sue for punitive damages of wage discrimination.”[56] McConnell said that he opposed the legislation because it would “line the pockets of trial lawyers” not help women.[56]

In July 2014, McConnell expressed opposition to a U.S. Senate bill that would limit the practice of corporate inversion by U.S. corporations seeking to limit U.S. tax liability.[57]

McConnell expressed skepticism that climate change is a problem, telling the Cincinnati Enquirer editorial board in 2014, “I’m not a scientist, I am interested in protecting Kentucky’s economy, I’m interested in having low cost electricity.” [58][59][60]

Gun rights

On the weekend of January 19–21, 2013, the McConnell for Senate campaign emailed and robo-called gun-rights supporters telling them that “President Obama and his team are doing everything in their power to restrict your constitutional right to keep and bear arms.” McConnell also said, “I’m doing everything in my power to protect your 2nd Amendment rights.”[61] On April 17, 2013, McConnell voted against expanding background checks for gun purchases.[62]

Iraq War

In October 2002, McConnell voted for the Iraq Resolution, which authorized military action against Iraq.[63] McConnell supported the Iraq War troop surge of 2007.[64] In 2010, McConnell “accused the White House of being more concerned about a messaging strategy than prosecuting a war against terrorism.”[65]

In 2006, McConnell publicly criticized Senate Democrats for urging that troops be brought back from Iraq.[66] According to Bush’s Decision Points memoir, however, McConnell was privately urging the then President to “bring some troops home from Iraq” to lessen the political risks. McConnell’s hometown paper, the Louisville Courier-Journal, in an editorial titled “McConnell’s True Colors”, criticized McConnell for his actions and asked him to “explain why the fortunes of the Republican Party are of greater importance than the safety of the United States.”[67]

Regarding the failure of the Iraqi government to make reforms, McConnell said the following on Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer: “The Iraqi government is a huge disappointment. Republicans overwhelmingly feel disappointed about the Iraqi government. I read just this week that a significant number of the Iraqi parliament want to vote to ask us to leave. I want to assure you, Wolf, if they vote to ask us to leave, we’ll be glad to comply with their request.”[68]

On April 21, 2009, McConnell delivered a speech to the Senate criticizing President Obama’s plans to close the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba, and questioned the additional 81 million dollar White House request for funds to transfer prisoners to the United States.[69][70]

Fundraising

From 2003 to 2008, the list of McConnell’s top 20 donors included five financial/investment firms: UBS, FMR Corporation (Fidelity Investments), Citigroup, Bank of New York and Merrill Lynch.[71][better source needed]

In April 2010, while Congress was considering financial reform legislation, a reporter asked McConnell if he was “doing the bidding of the large banks.” McConnell has received more money in donations from the “Finance, Insurance and Real Estate” sector than any other sector according to the Center for Responsive Politics.[71][72] McConnell responded “I’d say that that’s inaccurate. You could talk to the community bankers in Kentucky.” The Democratic Party’s plan for financial reform is actually a way to institute “endless taxpayer funded bailouts for big Wall Street banks”, said McConnell. He expressed concern that the proposed $50 billion, bank-funded fund that would be used to liquidate financial firms that could collapse “would of course immediately signal to everyone that the government is ready to bail out large banks”.[71][72] In McConnell’s home state of Kentucky, the Lexington Herald-Leader ran an editorial saying: “We have read that the Republicans have a plan for financial reform, but McConnell isn’t talking up any solutions, just trashing the other side’s ideas with no respect for the truth.”[73]According to one tally, McConnell’s largest donor from the period from Jan. 1, 2009 to Sept. 30, 2015 was Bob McNair, contributing $1,502,500.[74]

2016 Supreme Court vacancy

In an August 2016 speech in Kentucky, Senator McConnell, speaking of President Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court (to fill the vacancy caused by Antonin Scalia‘s death in February 2016) said, “One of my proudest moments was when I looked Barack Obama in the eye and I said, ‘Mr. President, you will not fill the Supreme Court vacancy.'”[75][76][77]

2016 Presidential Election

Senator McConnell initially endorsed fellow Kentucky Senator Rand Paul. Following Paul’s withdrawal, McConnell stayed neutral for the remainder of the primary. On May 4, 2016, McConnell endorsed then presumptive nominee Donald J. Trump. “I have committed to supporting the nominee chosen by Republican voters, and Donald Trump, the presumptive nominee, is now on the verge of clinching the nomination.”

On multiple occasions, McConnell criticized Trump but continued to endorse Trump’s candidacy. On May 27, 2016 after Trump suggested that a Federal Judge, Gonzalo P. Curiel, was biased against Trump because of his Mexican heritage, McConnell responded, “I don’t agree with what he (Trump) had to say. This is a man who was born in Indiana. All of us came here from somewhere else.” On July 31, 2016 after Trump had criticized the parents of Capt. Humayun Khan, a Muslim soldier who was killed in Iraq, McConnell stated, “Captain Khan was an American hero, and like all Americans, I’m grateful for the sacrifices that selfless young men like Captain Khan and their families have made in the war on terror. All Americans should value the patriotic service of the patriots who volunteer to selflessly defend us in the armed services.” On October 7, 2016, following the Donald TrumpAccess Hollywood controversy, McConnell stated: “As the father of three daughters, I strongly believe that Trump needs to apologize directly to women and girls everywhere, and take full responsibility for the utter lack of respect for women shown in his comments on that tape.”[78]

Committee assignments

Electoral history

Elections are shown with a map depicting county-by-county information. McConnell is shown in red and Democratic opponents shown in blue.

Year  % McConnell Opponent(s) Party affiliation  % of vote County-by-county map
1984 49.9% Walter Huddleston (incumbent)Dave Welters DemocraticSocialist Workers 49.5% KY-USA 1984 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
1990 52.2% Harvey I. Sloane Democratic 47.8% KY-USA 1990 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
1996 55.5% Steve BeshearDennis Lacy

Patricia Jo Metten

Mac Elroy

DemocraticLibertarian

Natural Law

U.S. Taxpayers

42.8% KY-USA 1996 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
2002 64.7% Lois Combs Weinberg Democratic 35.3% KY-USA 2002 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
2008 53.0% Bruce Lunsford Democratic 47.0% KY-USA 2008 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
2014 56.2% Alison Lundergan GrimesDavid Patterson DemocraticLibertarian 40.7% KY-USA 2014 Senate Results by County 2-color.svg
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Kentucky, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % +%
Republican Mitch McConnell 39,465 79.2%
Republican Roger Harker 3,798 7.6%
Republican Tommy Klein 3,352 6.7%
Republican Thurman Jerome Hamlin 3,202 6.4%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Kentucky, 1990
Party Candidate Votes % +%
Republican Mitch McConnell (inc.) 64,063 88.5%
Republican Tommy Klein 8,310 11.5%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Kentucky, 1996
Party Candidate Votes % +%
Republican Mitch McConnell (inc.) 88,620 88.6%
Republican Tommy Klein 11,410 11.4%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Kentucky, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % +%
Republican Mitch McConnell (inc.) 168,127 86.1%
Republican Daniel Essek 27,170 13.9%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Kentucky, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % +%
Republican Mitch McConnell (inc.) 213,753 60.2%
Republican Matt Bevin 125,787 35.4%
Republican Shawna Sterling 7,214 2.0%
Republican Chris Payne 5,338 1.5%
Republican Brad Copas 3,024 0.9%

Personal life

McConnell is a Southern Baptist. John E. Kleber, Kentucky Bicentennial Commission, His first wife was Sherrill Redmon,[79] who later divorced him; they have three daughters.

His second wife, who married him in 1993, is Elaine Chao, the former Secretary of Labor under George W. Bush.

McConnell is on the Board of Selectors of Jefferson Awards for Public Service.[80]

In 1997, he founded the James Madison Center for Free Speech, a Washington, D.C.-based legal defense organization.[81][82] McConnell was inducted as a member of the Sons of the American Revolution on March 1, 2013.[83]

In 2010, the OpenSecrets website ranked McConnell, because of net household worth, one of the wealthiest members of the U.S. Senate at the time,[84] because of gifts given to him and his wife in 2008 from his father-in-lawJames S.C. Chao after the death of his mother-in-law.[85][86]

In popular culture

McConnell appears in the title sequence of seasons 1 and 2 of Alpha House making a speech with Matt Malloy‘s Senator Louis Laffer apparently standing just behind him.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitch_McConnell

Story 2: Trump Selects Campaign Finance Chair Steve Mnuchin to serve as Treasury Secretary

Steve Mnuchin in 90 seconds

Gasparino: Sources say Trump wants Steve Mnuchin as Treasury Secretary

Trump down to two choices for Treasury secretary

Trump Wants Goldman Sachs For Treasury Secretary

Steven Mnuchin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Steven Mnuchin
Born Steven Terner Mnuchin
December 21, 1962 (age 53)[1]
Alma mater Yale University(BA)
Net worth $40 million+
Spouse(s) Heather deForest Crosby (1999–2014)
Partner(s) Louise Linton(engaged)
Children 3
Parent(s) Robert E. Mnuchin
Elaine Terner

Steven Terner Mnuchin (born December 21, 1962) is an American banker, film producer and political fundraiser.

Early life

Steven Mnuchin was born to a Jewish family, circa 1963.[2][3] He is the son of Elaine Terner Cooper, of New York, and Robert E. Mnuchin, of Washington, Connecticut.[2] His father was a banker, a partner at Goldman Sachs, in charge of equity trading and a member of the management committee, and the founder of the Mnuchin Gallery at 45 East 78th Street, New York.[2][4] He graduated from Yale University.[2]

Career

Mnuchin amassed a fortune estimated at over $40 million while working for Goldman Sachs for 17 years, where his father had worked for three decades and had also made a fortune.[5][6]

In 2002, Mnuchin left Goldman and worked briefly for his Yale roommate Edward Lampert, chief executive of Sears. He also briefly worked for Soros Fund Management in their private equity division during the “Goldman” period with Jacob Goldfield and Mark Schwartz.

After this stint, he founded RatPac-Dune Entertainment, which produced a number of notable films, including the X-Men film franchise and Avatar.[6] Dune bought the failed housing lender IndyMac in 2009, buying it out of bankruptcy from the FDIC and renaming it OneWest with Mnuchin as chair. According to The New York Times, OneWest “was involved in a string of lawsuits over questionable foreclosures, and settled several cases for millions of dollars.” OneWest was sold to CIT Group in 2015.[5]

In November 2016, two nonprofits filed a complaint with the Department of Housing and Urban Development, alleging redlining by OneWest Bank.[7]

The California Reinvestment Coalition, which opposed CIT Group’s acquisition of OneWest, helped to highlight a number of issues about the bank, using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. First, the “shared loss agreements” that Mnuchin and his group of investors secured from the FDIC when buying IndyMac and La Jolla banks proved to be quite lucrative. According to data obtained from the FDIC, as of December 2014, it had already paid out over $1 billion to OneWest for the costs of failed loans (foreclosures). The FDIC estimated it would have to pay out another $1.4 billion to OneWest before 2019.[8]

CRC also submitted a FOIA request to United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to learn more about OneWest’s reverse mortgage subsidiary, Financial Freedom. According to the data that HUD provided in its FOIA response, Financial Freedom foreclosed on 16,220 federally insured reverse mortgages from April 2009 to April 2016. This represents about 39% of all federally insured reverse mortgage foreclosures during that time frame. The 39% figure was criticized by CRC, who estimated that Financial Freedom only serviced about 17% of the market. In other words, Financial Freedom was foreclosing at twice the amount that one would expect, given its share of the market.[9]

CIT Group, which purchased OneWest, disclosed to investors that it had received subpoenas from HUD’s Office of the Inspector General in the third and fourth quarters of 2015.[10]

Because Mnuchin received stock in CIT Group when it purchased OneWest, it’s possible he could sell it tax free if he were confirmed to be Treasury Secretary and if he reinvested the proceeds in Treasuries or government approved funds, according to Bloomberg, which suggests Mnuchin has $97 million in CIT stock.[11]

In Hollywood, Mnuchin, along with film producer Brett Ratner and financier James Packer, working with RatPac-Dune Entertainment, produced American Sniper and Mad Max: Fury Road. Mnuchin was co-chairman of the trio’s movie company, Relativity Media, but left before it went bankrupt.[5] A source close to the company said that he had resigned because of the potential for a conflict of interest between his duties at Relativity and OneWest, which had been sold days ago; weeks prior to Relativity’s insolvency filling, OneWest was allowed to drain $50 million from it.[6]

Political activity

Mnuchin supported Mitt Romney during the 2012 U.S. presidential election.[5] In May 2016, he was named finance chair of the Donald Trump 2016 presidential campaign.[5]

Personal life

In 1999, he married Heather deForest Crosby,[2] who was his second wife,[12] and they had three children together.[13] They divorced in 2014. He is engaged to the actress Louise Linton, and they live in a $26.5 million house that he owns in Bel Air, California.[12][13]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Mnuchin

Story 3: Trump Selects Leading Critic of Obamacare Representative and Dr. Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services — Videos

Tom Price, Obamacare Critic, Chosen For Health And Human Services Secretary | Morning Joe | MSNBC

President-elect Trump to name Rep. Tom Price as HHS secretary

Trump Nominates Tom Price For HHS SECY – America’s Newsroom

Tom Price Will Be The Secretary Of Health & Human Services

Tom Price: Trump’s Secretary of Health and Human Services

Trump Chooses Tom Price as Health Secretary

Donald Trump selects Rep. Price for HHS secretary

Congressman Tom Price on Repealing Obamcare and Reforming Our Healthcare System

Price Discusses Obamacare Repeal on Fox News

Tom Price (U.S. politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tom Price
Tom Price.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia‘s 6th district
Assumed office
January 3, 2005
Preceded by Johnny Isakson
Chairman of the House Budget Committee, Nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services
Assumed office
January 3, 2015
Preceded by Paul Ryan
Member of the Georgia Senate
from the 56th district
In office
January 3, 1997 – January 3, 2005
Preceded by Sallie Newbill
Succeeded by Dan Moody
Personal details
Born Thomas Edmunds Price
October 8, 1954 (age 62)
Lansing, Michigan, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Betty Clark
Children Robert
Residence Roswell, Georgia, U.S.
Alma mater University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (BA, MD)
Religion Presbyterianism

Thomas Edmunds “Tom” Price (born October 8, 1954) is an American physician, and the U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 6th congressional district, serving since 2005. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district is based in the northern suburbs of Atlanta. He previously served as chairman of the Republican Study Committee and the Republican Policy Committee.[1][2] Price currently serves as chairman of the House Budget Committee.[3]

On November 29, 2016, President-elect Donald Trump announced his plans to nominate Price to be Secretary of Health and Human Services, after Trump becomes inauguratedpresident.[4] Price’s nomination is subject to confirmation by the Senate.

Early life, education, and medical career

Price was born in the Michigan capital, Lansing. He grew up in Dearborn, where he attended Adams Jr. High and Dearborn High School.

He graduated with an M.D. from the University of Michigan. He completed his residency at Emory University in Atlanta, and decided to settle in the suburb of Roswell, where he still lives. He is a past President of the Roswell Rotary Club and has served on the Boards of the North Fulton Chamber of Commerce.[5]

He ran an orthopedic clinic in Atlanta for 20 years before returning to Emory as assistant professor of orthopedic surgery. Price also was the director of the orthopedic clinic at Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital.

Georgia Senate (1996–2005)

Elections

In 1996, State Senator Sallie Newbill (R) decided not to run for re-election. Price was the Republican nominee for Georgia’s 56th senate district. In the November general election, he defeated Democrat Ellen Milholland 71%–29%.[6] In 1998, he won re-election to a second term by defeating her in a rematch, 75%–25%.[7] In 2000 and 2002, he won re-election to a third and fourth term unopposed.[8][9]

Committee assignments

  • Administrative Affairs
  • Appropriations
  • Economic Development and Tourism (Vice Chair)
  • Education[10]
  • Ethics
  • Insurance and Labor
  • Health and Human Services
  • Reapportionment
  • Reapportionment and Redistricting (Chair)
  • Rules (Secretary)
  • Veterans and Consumer Affairs[11]

U.S. House of Representatives (2005–present)[edit]

Elections

2004

In 2004, U.S. Congressman Johnny Isakson of Georgia’s 6th congressional district decided not to run for re-election in order to run for the U.S. Senate. No Democrat even filed, meaning that whoever won the Republican primary would be virtually assured of being the district’s next congressman. The 6th district was so heavily Republican that any Democratic candidate would have faced nearly impossible odds in any event. Six other Republican candidates filed to run, most notably state senators Robert Lamutt and Chuck Clay. Price was the only major candidate from Fulton County, while Lamutt and Clay were both from Cobb County. On July 20, 2004, Price ranked first with 35% of the vote, but failed to reach the 50% threshold needed to win the Republican nomination. Lamutt qualified for the run-off, ranking second with 28% of the vote. Price won two of the district’s three counties: Fultonwith 63% and Cherokee with 35%. Lamutt carried Cobb with 31% of the vote.[12] In the August 10 run-off election, Price defeated Lamutt 54%–46%. They split the vote in Cherokee, but Price carried Fulton by a landslide of 79% of the vote. Lamutt couldn’t eliminate that deficit as he won Cobb with just 59% of the vote.[13] Price won the general election unopposed.[14]

2006

In 2006, Price drew one primary challenger, John Konop, who he easily defeated 82%–18%.[15] In November, he won re-election to a second term with 72% of the vote.[16]

2008–2014

Price won re-election in 2008 (68%),[17] 2010 (99.9%),[18] and 2012 (65%).[19]

2016

Tom Price won the election in 2016 against Rodney Stooksbury (Democratic). Price received 61.6% of the votes.

Tenure

Congressman Price speaking at the 2010 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC)

Congressman Price speaking at Freedomworks New Fair Deal Rally outside the US Capitol

In 2011, Price voted to prohibit funding of NPR,[20] to terminate the Emergency Mortgage Relief Program,[21] to extend the PATRIOT act,[22][23] to repeal portions of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 on multiple occasions,[24][25] to reduce non-security discretionary spending to 2008 levels [26] [27][28](and subsequently voted against several amendments offered via motions to recommit with instructions)[29]),to reduce Federal spending and the deficit by terminating taxpayer financing of presidential election campaigns and party conventions,[30] to provide funding for government agencies, including the Department of Defense, through September 30, 2011,[31] to cut the Federal Housing Authority’s refinancing program,[32] and against a resolution which would force the president to withdraw American forces from Iraq.[33] In 2013, he was the main sponsor of the Require A PLAN Act;[34][35] he voted for the No Budget, No Pay Act[36][37] and a resolution establishing a budget for the United States Government for FY 2014 that passed the House of Representatives.[38]

Tom Price opposes abortion and supported the proposed Protect Life Act, which would have denied Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) funding to health care plans that offered abortion (the PPACA already prevented public funding covering abortions) and allowed hospitals to decline to provide emergency abortion care.[39][40] He was rated at 100 by the National Right to Life Center. He was rated at 0 by Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America.[41][42] He participated in the 2011 March for Life.[43]

Tom Price opposes gun control. He praised the Supreme Court’s decisions in District of Columbia v. Heller, which found that the absolute prohibition of handguns in the District of Columbiawas unconstitutional, and McDonald v. Chicago, which stated that the Second Amendment applied to the states.[44] He was given an “A” grade by the National Rifle Association Political Victory Fund, a 92% approval rating overall from the National Rifle Association and an 83% approval rating[45] from the Gun Owners of America, and a 0% approval rating from the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence.[42][46]

Tom Price voted against a bill prohibiting job discrimination based on sexual orientation (Nov 2007). He voted in favor of constitutionally defining marriage as one-man-one-woman (Jul 2006). Representative Price voted against H.R. 2965, which would have ended Don’t ask, don’t tell. He receives a 0% rating by the Human Rights Campaign, a gay rights organization.[47]

Tom Price does not support federal regulation of farming. He has voted against regulating and restricting farmers, earning him a 70% from the American Farm Bureau Federation. However, due to this belief, the National Farmers Union gave him a 0% approval rate.[48] He supported the Farm Dust Regulation Prevention Act, stating that it would keep theEnvironmental Protection Agency from applying too many regulations to farming and ranching.[49] He also voted for the Agricultural Disaster Assistance Act of 2012 which, had it become law, would have made supplemental agricultural disaster assistance available, if needed.[50][51]

In 2008 Price signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity promising to vote against any Global Warming legislation that would raise taxes.[52]

Legislation

Price speaking on a panel about healthcare at the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference.

Price is the sponsor of the Empowering Patients First Act (EPFA), which he first introduced in the 111th Congress and has reintroduced in each Congress since then. Originally intended to be a Republican alternative to Democratic efforts to reform the health care system, it has since been positioned by Price and other Republicans as a potential replacement to the PPACA. The bill, among other things, creates and expands tax credits for purchasing health insurance, allows for some interstate health insurance markets, and reforms medical malpractice lawsuits.

Price introduced the Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2013 (H.R. 1874; 113th Congress) on May 8, 2013.[53] The bill would require the Congressional Budget Office to provide a macroeconomic impact analysis for bills that are estimated to have a large budgetary effect.[54] Price said it was necessary because the Congressional Budget Office’s current method of reviewing bills just to see what they would cost. Price said “that is a model that has proven to be incapable of providing the type of macroeconomic diagnosis folks need to make sure we are pursuing policies that will help generate economic opportunity and bring down the nation’s debt.”[55] H.R. 1874 has passed the House but has yet to become law.

In total, Price has sponsored 55 bills, including:[56]

109th Congress (2005–2006)

  • H.R. 3693, a bill to prevent all illegal border crossings after a certain date, introduced September 7, 2005
  • H.R. 3860, a bill to require each state and U.S. territory to maintain a sex offender registry, to increase punishments for sexual and violent crimes against children and minors, and to require background checks of individuals before approval of adoptive or foster services, introduced September 22, 2005
  • H.R. 3941, a bill to reduce foreign oil consumption to less than 25% of total oil consumption by no later than 2015, introduced September 29, 2005, reintroduced in the 110th Congress as H.R. 817
  • H.R. 6133, a bill to create national standards for work in laboratories that includes requiring proficiency in cytology, introduced September 21, 2006. H.R. 6133’s companion bill was S. 4056.

110th Congress (2007–2008)

  • H.R. 1685, a bill to require holders of personal financial data to increase security of such data, introduced March 26, 2007
  • H.R. 1761, a bill to create a competitive grant program to reward such grants to educational institutions and systems to develop and implement performance-based compensation systems for teachers to encourage teachers to improve educational outcomes, introduced March 29, 2007, reintroduced in the 111th Congress as H.R. 3683
  • H.R. 2626, a bill to allow for tax credits and deductions for purchasing health insurance, to revise government employer contribution amounts, to reform malpractice lawsuits, to provide financial aid to introduce health information technology, to allow for a tax credit for emergency room physicians to offset costs incurred because of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, and to promote interstate health insurance markets, introduced June 7, 2007. This bill served as the precursor to EPFA, and most of H.R. 2626’s provisions are included in EPFA.
  • H.R. 4464, a bill to amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to clarify that it is not unlawful for any employer to require proficiency in English as a condition of employment, introduced December 12, 2007, reintroduced in the 111th Congress as H.R. 1588
  • H.R. 6910, a bill to expand oil and natural gas drilling and use revenue generated from such drilling to fund monetary rewards for advancing the research, development, demonstration, and commercial application of alternative fuel vehicles, introduced September 18, 2008

111th Congress (2009–2010)

  • H.R. 464, a bill to require states to cover 90% of eligible children for the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) in the program for households with incomes below 200% of the federal poverty level (FPL), with special rules above 200% of the FPL, to prohibit SCHIP from funding child health care for children in households above 250% of the FPL, and to require more than one health plan to be offered in SCHIP, introduced January 13, 2009. Modified versions of this bill’s provisions make up Title IV of EPFA.
  • H.R. 3140, a bill to repeal all unpaid provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to terminate the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), and to allocate TARP repayments to reducing the federal government’s public debt, introduced July 9, 2009
  • H.R. 3372, a bill to develop best practice guidelines for treating medical conditions and to reform malpractice lawsuits, introduced July 29, 2009, reintroduced in the 112th Congress as H.R. 2363. Modified versions of this bill’s provisions make up Title V of EPFA.
  • H.R. 6170, a bill to prevent the Secretary of Health and Human Services from precluding an enrollee, participant, or beneficiary in a health benefits plan from entering into any contract or arrangement for health care with any health care provider, excluding Medicaid and TRICARE, introduced September 22, 2010. This bill’s provisions are included in Title X of EPFA.
  • H.R. 6171, a bill to prevent the Secretary of Health and Human Services or any state from requiring any health care provider to participate in any health plan as a condition of licensure of the provider in any state, introduced September 22, 2010, reintroduced in the 112th and 113th Congresses as H.R. 969. This bill’s provisions are included in Title X of EPFA.

112th Congress (2011–2012)

  • H.R. 1700, a bill to allow for Medicare beneficiaries to contract with any health care professionals that provide care covered under the Medicare program, with special circumstances, introduced March 3, 2011, reintroduced in the 113th Congress as H.R. 1310. This bill’s provisions are included in Title X of EPFA.
  • H.R. 2077, a bill to repeal the medical loss ratio provision of the PPACA, introduced June 1, 2011
  • H.R. 4066, a bill to exclude pathologists from Medicare and Medicaid incentive payments and penalties relating to electronic health records, introduced February 6, 2012, reintroduced in the 113th Congress as H.R. 1309
  • H.R. 6616, a bill to exempt U.S. securities transactions from financial taxes and penalties imposed by other nations, introduced November 19, 2012, reintroduced in the 113th Congress as H.R. 2546

113th Congress (2013–2014)

  • H.R. 1990 and H.R. 2009, bills to prohibit the Secretary of the Treasury, or any delegate of the Secretary, from implementing or enforcing any provisions of or amendments made by the PPACA or the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, introduced May 15 and 16, 2013. H.R. 2009 has passed the House but has yet to become law.

Committee assignments

Personal life

Price and his wife Betty reside in Roswell, and have one child, Robert Price.[57] Betty served on the Roswell City Council and was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in a 2015 special election to succeed the lateHarry Geisinger.[58] Price is a Presbyterian.

See also

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