The Pronk Pops Show 657, April 13, 2016, Story 1: When The Going Gets Rough — The Rich Buy Bomb-Proof Bunkers — Trump Bunkers — Trump Underground Cities — Preparing For The First Nuclear War — Are You Ready For Doomsday? — Closing The Bunker Gap — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 657: April 13, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 656: April 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 655: April 11, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 652: April 6, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 650: April 1, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 640: March 10, 2016

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Pronk Pops Show 603: January 13, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 602: January 12, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 601: January 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 600: January 8, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 599: January 6, 2016

Pronk Pops Show 598: January 5, 2016

Story 1: When The Going Gets Rough — The Rich Buy Bomb-Proof Bunkers — Trump Bunkers — Trump Underground Cities — Preparing For The First Nuclear War — Are You Ready For Doomsday? — Closing The Bunker Gap — Videos

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Trump Nuke

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Donald Trump breaks with US policy on nuclear proliferation

Trump questions NATO, Asia nuclear weapons

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Donald Trump Would Consider Nuking ISIS | MSNBC

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Several have argued that the “Confessions of a Republican” ad, which was used by the Lyndon Johnson campaign in the 1964 presidential election, seems oddly relevant in 2016 — simply change Senator Barry Goldwater to Donald Trump.

KKK for Goldwater (1964) – Classic Lyndon B. Johnson Campaign Ad

Barry Goldwater Documentary Part I – KVOA/Tucson 1983

Barry Goldwater Documentary Part II – KVOA/Tucson 1983

Mr.Conservative: Goldwater on Goldwater 2006 Documentary HD

LBJ vs. RFK: Lyndon Johnson, Robert Kennedy, and the Feud that Defined a Decade (1998)

President Trump Won’t Actually Have His Finger On The Nuclear Codes…

nuclear express

Thomas Reed: A Political History of Nuclear Weapons: 1938 – 2008

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Newsmax Prime | Gen. Paul E. Vallely & Col. Derek Harvey – does Iran already has a nuclear weapon?

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How To Launch Nuclear Missile*The National Security Presidential Directive 28 (NSPD-28)

Dr. Strangelove (1964) – War Room Scene

Dr. Strangelove and the Bomb

The Bomb Run Sequence from Dr. Strangelove

Dr. Strangelove – Final Scene

Dr.strangelove ending (good quality)

Top 10 Nuclear Bomb Scenes in Movies

ELITE PREPARING FOR TOTAL COLLAPSE – Ultra Rich are Quietly Preparing to Bug Out

Luxurious Underground Bomb/Nuke Shelters For The Worlds Elites

Ultimate Tour of a Doomsday Bunker, Inside the Luxury Survival Condos

Switzerland Bunkers — Where Preparedness is a Matter of Policy

TOP Secret Underground Bunkers – Full Documentary

The U.S. Army’s Top Secret Arctic City Under the Ice! “Camp Century” Restored Classified Film

World’s largest Underground City Full Documentary

Inside one of the world’s safest mansions

Schweiz – Underground House – Amazing Homes around The World

Peter Schiff: Social Security’s Worst Nightmare

[MUST HEAR] Peter Schiff & Stefan Molyneux Myths About Economic Collapse 2016

Archie Bunker on Democrats

All in the Family – George and Archie Make a Deal

Archie Bunker on what makes American Great!

Donald Trump thinks more countries should have nuclear weapons. Here’s what the research says.

By Gene Gerzhoy and Nick Miller

According to Donald Trump, the United States should not try so hard to stop nuclear proliferation. On Sunday night, during a Republican town hall hosted by CNN’s Anderson Cooper, Trump declared that proliferation is “going to happen anyway.” And just a week earlier, Trump told the New York Times, “If Japan had that nuclear threat, I’m not sure that would be a bad thing for us.” Nor would it be so bad, he’s said, if South Korea and Saudi Arabia had nuclear weapons, too.

We can break down Trump’s assertions into two ideas: Proliferation is inevitable, and it is good for the United States — at least when its allies are the ones going nuclear. What can political science tell us about each of these beliefs?

It turns out that both propositions fly in the face of a wide range of recent scholarship.

Is nuclear proliferation inevitable?

Trump’s logic for this idea is based on his belief that the United States is weak and that past proliferation ensures future proliferation. Here’s what Trump told the Times about Japan: “If the United States keeps on … its current path of weakness, [Japan is] going to want to have [nuclear weapons] anyway with or without me discussing it.”

Trump also implied that South Korea and Japan would inexorably seek nuclear weapons — regardless of what the United States does — because so many countries have already gone nuclear. As he said to Anderson Cooper: “It’s only a question of time. … You have so many [nuclear] countries already.”

But as we show in a number of research articles, those assumptions don’t match the historical record. For the past 70 years, through mutually reinforcing policies — including security guarantees, troop deployments, arms sales, nuclear umbrellas and sanctions threats — U.S. administrations from both parties have inhibited nuclear proliferation.

When another country built nuclear weapons, the United States limited the repercussions by discouraging that country from conducting nuclear tests.

What about Trump’s belief that U.S. allies will inevitably seek nuclear weapons because the United States is economically and militarily weak? That doesn’t match the facts, either. The United States remains the world’s dominant military power — it spends three to four times as much on its military than China does, and it has the world’s most advanced nuclear arsenal. The United States also has a dynamic and growing economy, while its rivals’ economies are slowing or even declining.

But even when the U.S. economy was flagging, the government successfully prevented other countries from acquiring nuclear arms. The 1970s were a period of high inflation and low economic growth in the United States. Yet that’s when Washington launched some of its most determined and successful nonproliferation efforts, including founding the Nuclear Suppliers’ Group, a global body that restricts the spread of sensitive nuclear technology, and passing laws that imposed mandatory nonproliferation sanctions, which have successfully deterred other countries from embarking on nuclear weapons programs.

Trump’s foreign policies would make his predictions come true

Although history suggests that proliferation is not inevitable, recent research on nonproliferation suggests that Trump’s proposed foreign policy might make it so.

Trump says he would scale back or entirely end U.S. alliance commitments unless our allies made major financial concessions. In his interview with the Times, Trump said that the United States “take[s] tremendous monetary hits on protecting countries” such as Japan, South Korea, Germany and Saudi Arabia. He also denounced the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security Treaty as “one-sided,” said that the United States doesn’t need to maintain forces in South Korea and described the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as “obsolete.”

But if those security institutions and military deployments disappeared, U.S. allies — including Japan and South Korea — might well pursue nuclear weapons of their own. Recent research shows that alliances are a powerful tool for preventing proliferation, both because they reassure states that their security will be protected in case of attack and because they give senior partners the leverage to restrain their allies’ nuclear ambitions. Research also demonstrates that the type of U.S. troop withdrawals Trump envisions have a history of prompting allies to consider developing their own nuclear weapons.

Consider the last time the United States had a president who was skeptical about nonproliferation and who tried to reduce U.S. commitments to its allies in Asia. As part of his Guam Doctrine — a plan to increase Asian allies’ military self-reliance — President Nixon withdrew 20,000 troops from South Korea. Famously, he also traveled to China to improve Sino-American relations. As a result, South Korea launched a covert nuclear weapons program, and Taiwan ramped up its own nuclear ambitions. So why didn’t they end up with nuclear weapons? The administrations that followed Nixon’sredoubled efforts to stop them.

Research does not support the idea that the spread of nuclear weapons is inevitable. But isolationist “America First” policies could prompt that spread. Defining U.S. strategic interests primarily in terms of monetary gain, and curtailing U.S. global engagement toward that end, would boost the probability that our allies would respond by going nuclear.

Would nuclear proliferation be good for U.S. interests?

What about Trump’s second proposition: that proliferation by our allies would be good for U.S. interests? This argument is based on the idea that nuclear-armed allies could help contain U.S. adversaries and enable the United States to save money. As Trump told Cooper, “I would rather see Japan having some form of defense, and maybe even offense, against North Korea.” And as he suggested, the United States can’t afford to protect Japan and South Korea — and therefore, “they have to pay us or we have to let them protect themselves.”

Reducing military commitments and letting allies build their own nuclear weapons might save money for the United States. But international relations scholarship suggests that allied proliferation would have broader negative repercussions. Among these would be declining U.S. influence. When nations gain their own military capabilities, they rely less on their allies and becomeless subject to their sway. And that can undermine a senior partner’s ability to hold its junior allies back from risky military actions.

In other words, allowing or encouraging proliferation would worsen the “American weakness” that Trump decries.

Recent nonproliferation research underscores this proposition. Mark Bellshows that nuclear allies are likely to become more independent of their patrons and in some cases can develop more assertive foreign policies. AndFrancis Gavin and Matthew Kroenig show that the fear of declining influence was one reason why most American administrations vigorously opposed the spread of nuclear weapons.

Nuclear allies can also become security risks. Vipin Narang demonstrates that when weaker states gain nuclear weapons, they often seek to coerce their senior partners into intervening on their behalf by threatening to use nuclear weapons. That’s what Israel did at the height of the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. That’s what South Africa did during its 1988 confrontation with Cuban forces in Angola. And that’s what Pakistan did in the midst of its 1990 military crisis with India.

Instead of relieving the United States of a military burden, as Donald Trump suggests, having more nuclear allies could increase the risk that the United States would get involved in conflicts that might turn nuclear.

Furthermore, were South Korea or Japan to begin developing nuclear weapons, their rivals might be tempted to launch preventive military strikes, which research suggests has been frequently considered in the past. The road to nuclear acquisition is often rocky and increases the likelihood of militarized conflict. For example, Soviet worries that West Germany would acquire nuclear weapons helped trigger the Berlin Crisis.

And if Japan or South Korea actually acquired nuclear weapons, we could possibly see a nuclear arms race in Asia. Japan’s neighbors, including South Korea, would fear resurgent Japanese militarism. North Korea would expand its nuclear capabilities. China would continue to expand its own nuclear arsenal.

Why haven’t we seen nuclear arms races before?

Nuclear “domino effects” have not been common historically. But that’s largely because of determined U.S. efforts to stop them.

Since the dawn of the nuclear age, the United States has pursued nonproliferation as a top policy priority. That includes sponsoring and enforcing the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). Research suggests the NPT has been instrumental in limiting the spread of nuclear weapons, in part by coordinating states’ beliefs about one another’s nonproliferation commitments. To develop nuclear weapons, Japan and South Korea would need to violate or withdraw from the NPT. That could prompt U.S. allies and adversaries in other regions — including Saudi Arabia, Germany and Iran — to question the treaty’s viability and consider seeking their own nuclear arsenals.

Would this be so bad? After all, no two nuclear armed states have fought a major war with each other, and nuclear weapons have not been used in conflict since the United States bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

But the conclusion that nuclear weapons produce peace is subject to debate. It’s true that there has been no war between major powers since 1945. But that may be due to other factors. The quantitative evidence linking nuclear weapons to a reduced risk of conflict is limited at best.

Further, theoretical and historical evidence suggests that nuclear accidents and miscalculations are likely. More countries with nuclear weapons would mean more opportunities for catastrophic nuclear mistakes.

So what’s the takeaway?

A look at history shows us that nuclear proliferation is anything but inevitable. U.S. nonproliferation efforts have been surprisingly successful, even when the United States was weaker than it is today.

Without firm U.S. opposition to the spread of nuclear weapons — a policy implemented through “carrots” like alliances and “sticks” like sanctions — the world would probably have far more than nine countries with nuclear weapons. What’s more, research suggests that nuclear proliferation would reduce U.S. world influence, undermine global stability and increase the risk of nuclear war.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2016/04/06/should-more-countries-have-nuclear-weapons-donald-trump-thinks-so/

ELITE UNDERGROUND BUNKERS – Why Are So Many Of The Super Wealthy Preparing Bug Out Locations?

ELITE UNDERGROUND BUNKERS – Why Are So Many Of The Super Wealthy Preparing Bug Out Locations? It is believed to be large enough to house 60,000 persons, with a special air filtration system designed to withstand a , chemical or biological . Enough food and water is believed to be stored at the site to sustain the entire underground population for months on end -hard [U.S.] planners actually have their eyes on in Russia and China, including and leadership bunkers. For these planners, the Cold never ended. Their top two candidates [i.e., targets] in Russia are located inside the Yamantau and Kosvinsky mountains in the central and southern Urals.

They have also been constructing thousands of new underground shelters in major cities such as Moscow. Nearly 5,000 new emergency shelters will be built in Moscow by 2012 to save people in case of potential . Though the bunkers are supposed to be designed to shelter the population in the event of a , government officials say it’s only a precaution and they do not expect such an or outbreak (e.g. Chernobyl) to occure
The Russians also recently finished work on a brand new national center in Moscow that contains extensive underground facilities Russia is launching a new national defense facility, which is meant to monitor to national security in peacetime, but would take control of the entire country in case of .

In addition, the Russians have also been developing a new system that is designed to keep U.S. from getting to their targets in the first place.

If Obama does decide to send lethal aid to the , the Russians are going to flip out. We just continue to take even more steps along the road toward , and it is a that the United States is completely and utterly unprepared for. uncovers one of the biggest and most dangerous issues in recent history, a Rosetta Stone that will decode the deception taking place throughout our world.

As Russians build gigantic underground bunkers, spanning 400 square miles, the elite are planning their escape from America by purchasing airstrips, farms and underground shelters in record numbers. bunker “underground bunker” “emergency shelter” elite millionaire billionaire “new zealand” 2015 2016 russia china shelter insider mountain fema prediction news media entertainment book author “secret society” secret enemy collapse ” ” gold silver prepare food “food storage” prepper savings strategy humanity leader liberty freedom “self ” banking security “elite nwo agenda” drone trends trending trendy false flag chicago nyc fema camp police state usa new world order illuminati 1984 orwell alex jones infowars crazy gerald celente max keiser jim rogers glenn beck anonymous coast to coast am end game collapse demcad montagraph bohemian grove jsnip4 g4t lindsey williams louis farrakhan exposed jay-z illuminati off the grid living

As preparations for intensify, the public is being told it’s not a danger anymore. Get this emergency broadcast out to everyone you know before the time for action runs out. Over the past few years, wealthy people all over America have been equipping their homes with futuristic high tech security systems that go far beyond the kinds of things portrayed in recent Hollywood films such as “The “. We are talking about security bunkers with their own sustainable sources of food and water, hidden passageways that lead to ballistics-proof panic suites, and thermal heat detectors that can detect someone hiding up to 15 kilometers away. Most of these security measures will probably never even be needed if things stay pretty much as they are today.

A lot of ultra-rich people are quietly preparing to “bug out” when the time comes. They are buying survival properties, they are buying farms in far away countries and they are buying deep underground bunkers. In fact, a prominent insider at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland says that “very powerful people are telling us they’re scared” and he shocked his audience when he revealed that he knows “hedge fund managers all over the world who are buying airstrips and farms in places like New Zealand”. So what do they know? Why are so many of the super wealthy suddenly preparing bug out locations? When the elite of the world start preparing for doomsday, that is a very troubling sign. And right now the elite appear to be quietly preparing for disaster like never before.

Ultimate Tour of a Doomsday Bunker, Inside the Luxury Survival Condos

The Luxury Survival Condos & doomsday bunkers are built to protect against a catastrophic event while offering privacy and comfort for its residents. Our charge was to design audiovisual systems in each private residence and all public spaces to make residents feel at home. This bunker has been featured on CNN, NBC News, Discovery Channel, National Geographic Channel, and many more new stations world wide.

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Samsung LCD screen window “landscapes” for HD viewing of the live world outside.

 

PANICKED ELITE BUYING BOMB-PROOF LUXURY SURVIVAL BUNKERS TO ESCAPE CIVIL UNREST, DISASTERS

Underground shelters protect “high net worth individuals” from “the general public”

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