The Pronk Pops Show 573, November 12, 2015, Story 1: Lying Lunatic Left Spreading To Campus Crazies Radical Racists — Pampered Privileged Progressive Pupils & Professors, Pacifiers — Grow Up, Get A Job and Pay For Your Own Education! — Stop Using Government Coercion To Rob People To Subsidize Students! — Abolish The Minimum Wage — Cry Baby — Somebody To Love — Videos

Posted on November 12, 2015. Filed under: 2016 Presidential Campaign, 2016 Presidential Candidates, Addiction, Blogroll, Books, Communications, Constitutional Law, Education, Employment, Eugenics, Food, Independence, Investments, Law, Media, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Polls, President Barack Obama, Progressives, Success, Taxation, Taxes, Technology, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 573: November 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 572: November 11, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 571: November 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 570: November 6, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 569: November 5, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 568: November 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 567: November 3, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 566: November 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 565: October 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 564: October 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 563: October 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 562: October 27, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 561: October 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 560: October 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 559: October 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 558: October 21, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 557: October 20, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 556: October 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 555: October 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 554: October 15, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 553: October 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 552: October 13, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 551: October 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 550: October 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 549: October 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 548: October 7, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 547: October 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 546: October 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 545: October 1, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 544: September 30, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 543: September 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 542: September 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 541: September 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 540: September 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 539: September 23, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 538: September 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 537: September 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 536: September 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 535: September 17, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 534: September 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 533: September 15, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 532: September 14, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 531: September 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 530: September 10, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 529: September 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 528: September 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 524: August 31, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 523: August 27, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 522: August 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 521: August 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 516: August 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 515: August 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 514: August 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 513: August 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 512: August 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

Story 1: Lying Lunatic Left Spreading To Campus Crazies Radical Racists — Pampered Privileged Progressive Pupils & Professors,  Pacifiers– Grow Up, Get A Job and Pay For Your Own Education! — Stop Using Government Coercion To Rob People To Subsidize Students! — Abolish The Minimum Wage — Cry Baby — Somebody To Love — Videos

Janis Joplin Cry Baby live in toronto 1970 With Lyrics

“Cry Baby”

Cry baby, cry baby, cry baby,
Honey, welcome back home.I know she told you,
Honey I know she told you that she loved you
Much more than I did,
But all I know is that she left you,
And you swear that you just don’t know why,
But you know, honey I’ll always,
I’ll always be around if you ever want me
Come on and cry, cry baby, cry baby, cry baby,
Oh honey, welcome back home.Don’t you know, honey,
Ain’t nobody ever gonna love you
The way I try to do ?
Who’ll take all your pain,
Honey, your heartache, too ?
And if you need me, you know
That I’ll always be around if you ever want me
Come on and cry, cry baby, cry baby, cry baby,
Oh daddy, like you always saying to do.And when you walk around the world, babe,
You said you’d try to look for the end of the road,
You might find out later that the road’ll end in Detroit,
Honey, the road’ll even end in Kathmandu.
You can go all around the world
Trying to find something to do with your life, baby,
When you only gotta do one thing well,
You only gotta do one thing well to make it in this world, babe.
You got a woman waiting for you there,
All you ever gotta do is be a good man one time to one woman
And that’ll be the end of the road, babe,
I know you got more tears to share, babe,
So come on, come on, come on, come on, come on,
And cry, cry baby, cry baby, cry baby.

And if you ever feel a little lonely, dear,
I want you to come on, come on to your mama now,
And if you ever want a little love of a woman
Come on and baby baby baby babe babe baby now
Cry baby yeah.

Garnet Mimms & the Enchanters Cry Baby lyrics

Santana – Cry Baby Cry ft. Sean Paul, Joss Stone

Jefferson Airplane – White Rabbit, Live from Woodstock 1969 [HD] (Lyrics).

When the truth is found to be lies
And all the joy within you dies
Don’t you want somebody to love, don’t you
Need somebody to love, wouldn’t you
Love somebody to love, you better
Find somebody to love

When the garden flowers baby are dead, yes and
Your mind, your mind is so full of red
Don’t you want somebody to love, don’t you
Need somebody to love, wouldn’t you
Love somebody to love, you better
Find somebody to love

Your eyes, I say your eyes may look like his
Yeah, but in your head, baby, I’m afraid you don’t know where it is
Don’t you want somebody to love, don’t you
Need somebody to love, wouldn’t you
Love somebody to love, you better
Find somebody to love

Tears are running down and down and down your breast
And your friends, baby they treat you like a guest
Don’t you want somebody to love, don’t you
Need somebody to love, wouldn’t you
Love somebody to love, you better
Find somebody to love

pacifier

pacifers

Cavuto-College-Protests-Keely-Mullen education is a right Keely_Mullen million-student-march thatcher-the-problem-with-socialismRight_vs_Theft

minimum wage graphicminimum wage

minimum wage 2  minimum wage Screen-Shot-2014-04-03-at-6.59.02-PM ted_20140403b

The Top 1 Percent Pays More in Taxes than the Bottom 90 Percent

By Andrew Lundeen

The top 1 percent of taxpayers pay more in federal income taxes than the bottom 90 percent. As you can see in the chart below, this is a stark change from the 1980s and early 1990s. But since the early 1980s, the share of taxes paid by the bottom 90 percent has steadily declined.

In 1980, the bottom 90 percent of taxpayers paid 50.72 percent of income taxes. In 2011 (the most recent year the data is available), the bottom 90 percent paid 31.74 percent of taxes. On the flip side, the top 1 percent paid 19.05 percent of taxes in 1980 and now pay 35.06 percent of taxes.

An interesting piece of information from the chart below is that after the 01/03 Bush tax cuts, often claimed to be a tax cut for the rich, the tax burden of the top 1 percent actually increased significantly.

One reason for the decline in the bottom 90 percent’s tax share is likely the proliferation of tax credits. In the last 30 years, the number of tax credits has increased, specifically refundable tax credits. The combined cost of refundable and standard tax credits has gone from around $20 billion in 1990 to $176 billion in 2010, with refundable credits accounting for about $100 billion of that growth.

Beyond the unfairness of saddling an increasingly smaller number of taxpayers with an increasingly larger percentage of the tax burden (the top 50 percent of income earners paid 97 percent of all taxes in 2011), there are basic government finance issues with such a tax code. Tax structures that rely on such a small base (specifically a small income tax base) are more susceptible to the ups and downs of the economy.

The best solution would be to shift away from a tax code that punishes high-earners, savings, and investment and towards a tax code that collects revenue from a consumption base, which provides more stable revenue and mitigates the current code’s bias against savings, investment, and, correspondingly, economic growth.

http://taxfoundation.org/blog/top-1-percent-pays-more-taxes-bottom-90-percent

December 18, 2013

Introduction

The Internal Revenue Service has released new data on individual income taxes, reporting on calendar year 2011.[1] The IRS data continues to reflect the fact that half of all taxpayers pay nearly all income taxes. However, the improving economy resulted in a spreading of the tax burden as the number of filers increased along with incomes and taxes paid for all income groups except the top 0.1 percent. The higher incomes pushed taxpayers into higher brackets, resulting in an increase in average income tax rates for all income groups except the top 0.1 percent, whose effective rate remained about the same as in 2010. The income shares of the top 1 and 2 percentiles fell in 2011, as did their shares of taxes paid.

The Top 50 Percent of All Taxpayers Paid 97 Percent of All Income Taxes; the Top 5 Percent Paid 57 Percent of All Income Taxes; and the Top 1 Percent Paid 35 Percent of All Income Taxes in 2011

Table 1 breaks down the latest IRS data on number of returns, adjusted gross income, income taxes paid, and average tax rate by income group. In 2011, the bottom 50 percent of taxpayers (those with Adjusted Gross Incomes (AGI) below $34,823) accounted for 11.55 percent of total AGI. This group of taxpayers paid approximately $30 billion in taxes, or 2.89 percent of all income taxes in 2011. In contrast, the top 50 percent of taxpayers (those with AGIs above $34,823) accounted for 88.5 percent of total AGI. The top 50 percent of taxpayers paid $1.01 trillion in income taxes, or 97.1 percent of all income taxes in 2011.

In 2011, the top 10 percent of taxpayers (with AGIs above $120,000) accounted for 45.4 percent of all AGI and 68.3 percent of all income taxes paid. Taxpayers in the top 5 percent accounted for 33.9 percent of all AGI and 56.5 percent of all income taxes paid. The top 1 percent of all taxpayers accounted for 18.7 percent of all AGI and 35.1 percent of all income taxes paid.

Economy Improved, Pushing Incomes and Taxes Paid for all Income Groups Higher, Except for Those in the Top 0.1 Percent

The improving economy added about 1.6 million new filers, from 135 million in 2010 to 136.6 million in 2011. This alone tended to spread the tax burden, as many of these new filers also paid taxes. As well, incomes and taxes paid increased for all income groups except those in the top 0.1 percent (taxpayers making $1,717,675 or more). (See Tables 3 and 4.) Income increased only slightly for the top 1 percent and remains below the levels seen in 2005 through 2008. Likewise, taxes paid for the top 1 percent remains significantly lower than the peak year of 2007. As a result, the income and tax shares for the top percentiles, including the top 1 and 2 percent, fell in 2011.

Average Tax Rate Increased for All Groups and Remained Essentially Flat for the Top 0.1 Percent

Higher AGIs pushed taxpayers into higher tax brackets, resulting in higher average income tax rates for most income groups (Table 8). The average tax rate for the bottom 50 percent of taxpayer increased from 2.37 percent in 2010 to 3.13 percent in 2011, but still remains lower than the average of 3.4 percent since 2001. This increase in tax rate is likely due to the expiration of the Making Work Pay tax credit. The top 50 percent’s average income tax rate increased from 13.05 percent to 13.76 percent.

The average tax rate for taxpayers in the top 1 percent also increased from 23.4 percent to 23.5 percent—the highest average tax rate of any income group. However, the average tax rate for the top 0.1 percent remained essentially flat, changing from 22.84 in 2010 to 22.82 percent in 2011.

For all taxpayers, the average tax rate increased from 11.81 percent to 12.54 percent.

wmtaxespaidbyincomechart1_590

Table 1. Summary of Federal Income Tax Data, 2011
Number of Returns* AGI ($ millions) Income Taxes Paid ($ millions) Group’s Share of Total AGI (IRS) Group’s Share of Income Taxes Income Split Point Average Tax Rate
All Taxpayers 136,585,712 8,317,188 1,042,571 100% 100.0%
Top 1% 1,365,857 1,555,701 365,518 18.7% 35.1% > $388,905 23.5%
1-5% 5,463,429 1,263,178 223,449 15.2% 21.4% 17.7%
Top 5% 6,829,286 2,818,879 588,967 33.9% 56.5% > $167,728 20.9%
5-10% 6,829,285 956,099 122,696 11.5% 11.8% 12.8%
Top 10% 13,658,571 3,774,978 711,663 45.4% 68.3% > $120,136 18.9%
10-25% 20,487,857 1,865,607 180,953 22.4% 17.4% 9.7%
Top 25% 34,146,428 5,640,585 892,616 67.8% 85.6% > $70,492 15.8%
25-50% 34,146,428 1,716,042 119,844 20.6% 11.5% 7.0%
Top 50% 68,292,856 7,356,627 1,012,460 88.5% 97.1%  > $34,823 13.8%
Bottom 50% 68,292,856 960,561 30,109 11.55% 2.89%  < $34,823 3.13%
*Does not include dependent filers.

http://taxfoundation.org/article/summary-latest-federal-income-tax-data

Summary of Latest Federal Income Tax Data

Neil Cavuto embarrasses student who wants free college and has no idea how to pay for it

A painful exchange with a young student who’s organizing for free public colleges, cancellation of all student debt and $15/hour minimum wage for all campus employees. She doesn’t really know how to pay for it, unfortunately.

Million Student March Organizer Keely Mullen: This is Only The Beginning

Who Needs College Anyway? Remarks by Charles Murray

Debate: “Too Many Kids Go To College” Robert Rosenkranz Introduction

Too Many Kids Go To College- Intelligence Squared U.S.

Coming Apart: The Class Divide in America Today

Anti-capitalism Million Masks March held around the world

Yale Students Harass Professor For Defending Halloween

The Rise of Socialism: Campus Crazies on Million Student March

What does the intolerance of student activism mean for 2016?

EAT THE RICH!

Why Is Higher Education So Expensive? – Learn Liberty

Is Student Loan Debt Forgiveness a Good Idea?

Students Plan Nationwide Protests Over Institutionalized Racism, Debt, and Minimum Wage

Yale University Students March Against Racism On Campus – Newsy

Yale University students marched in protest of what some call “systemic racism on campus.”

What’s the Right Minimum Wage?

Does the Minimum Wage Hurt Workers?

What You Weren’t Told About The Minimum Wage

3 Reasons Why You Can’t Find a Job – Learn Liberty

Yale University students marched in protest of what some call “systemic racism on campus.”

Milton Friedman – Should Higher Education Be Subsidized?

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [1/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [2/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [3/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [4/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [5/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [6/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Ep. 6 – What’s Wrong With Our Schools [7/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980)

Milton Friedman – A Conversation On Minimum Wage

Milton Friedman on Minimum Wage

Milton Friedman – Who Protects the Worker (Union, Government, Minimum Wage)

Milton Friedman – Redistribution of Wealth

Milton Friedman: There’s No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

Janis Joplin – Me and Bobby McGee

Bobby McGee ~ Janis Joplin ~ Woodstock ’69

Woodstock – 16/08/1969 – Janis Joplin

Jefferson Airplane. White Rabbit. Live Woodstock 1969. Original video, improved vers.

***LIVE UPDATES*** CAMPUS CRAZIES ON ‘MILLION STUDENT MARCH’

Student demonstrations are set to engulf the U.S. today in the ‘Million Student March’, as activists from campuses around the country stage a day of protests against tuition fees and student debt, further inflamed by recent social justice protests at Yale and Missouri.

A statement from the activists reads: “We are people of all colors, genders, and sexual orientation, and we are united to fight for education as a human right.” Protesters are calling for tuition-free public college, cancellation of student debt, and a $15 minimum wage for college workers… plus a lot of other stuff about “straight white male patriarchy” and rape culture on campus.

The atmosphere is likely to be particularly charged given that the day of protests occurs after a week of political unrest on U.S campuses, particularly Yale and the University of Missouri, over racial issues. Breitbart News will bring you live updates from around the country as the protests unfold.

  • #MillionStudentMarch trending worldwide on Twitter
  • March organiser can’t explain how she’d pay for free tuition 
  • TRUMP: Mizzou protests “disgusting,” says he should be Principal
  • Black students silence Asian girl for saying blacks can be racist too 
  • “Defaced” Black Culture Center sign probably a Photoshop hoax
  • Turnout said to be under expectations everywhere 
  • Anti-Israel chants and Palestinian flags out at UMass Amherst
  • ANOTHER SCALP: Claremont McKenna Dean OUT

What You Need To Know About The Huge Student Protest Sweeping The Country Today

On Thursday, students across the country will walk out of their classrooms and march for the right to a free college education. According to organizers, 110 college campuses across the country are expected to participate in the grassroots event.

“Education should be free. The United States is the richest country in the world, yet students have to take on crippling debt in order to get a college education,” the organizers of Thursday’s event, dubbed the Million Student March, explain on their website. “We are united to fight for education as a human right.”

The day of student activism comes just a few days after fast food workers in hundreds of citiesheld their biggest strike yet as they fight for higher wages and the right to form a union. The biggest marches are expected to be held in Santa Barbara, California, New York City, Philadelphia, Portland, and Seattle, according to Keely Mullen, one of the lead organizers of the event.

What is the march asking for?

All of the participants in the Million Student March are focused on three primary economic goals to improve the situation for students: the right to a free education, the elimination of all current student debt, and better paying jobs on campus. Individual marches may also touch on issues that affect university staff, such as better pay for adjunct professors.

“There is a serious concentration of wealth right now in college campuses and administrators are making exponentially more than the average worker on campus,” Mullen said in an interview with ThinkProgress.

As the movement grows, Mullen hopes the call for free college will eventually come to include things like fees, textbooks, and housing. “Obviously that is going to be a huge battle, and will happen incrementally, but I see that as instrumental in providing free education,” she said.

Where did the idea of the march come from?

The idea for the march was sparked by comments that presidential candidate Bernie Sanders made earlier this year about the need for a movement of student activists calling for a plan to end national student loan debt, which swelled to more than $1 trillion dollars earlier this year.

“If a million young people march on Washington they [say] to the Republican leadership, we know what’s going on, and you better vote to deal with student debt. You better vote to make public universities and colleges tuition free, that’s when it will happen,” Sanders said during an interview with Yahoo’s Katie Couric in June.

Mullen, who attends Northeastern University, said that Sanders’ remarks inspired student organizers to create a Facebook page to start planning the type of march that he was referencing. It became much more popular than she expected, and soon the organizers were receiving a “massive influx” of emails. Now, the movement has a central organizing committee that developed the list of demands for the marches and is organizing the day of action.

Who is marching?

A large portion of students who will march on Thursday are graduates or students of for-profit colleges, though many of the organizers are people who are attending or have graduated from traditional four-year colleges. Issues such as legacy admissions haven’t been on most of the lists of demands because the population of marchers aren’t going to Ivy League colleges, Mullen said.

“The graduates of for-profit colleges are working numerous jobs to try to pay off this predatory debt and afford basic living. They don’t have the capacity to organize quite as much,” Mullen said.

Mullen said that similar advocacy groups like Debt Collective and Strike Debt have not yet been in touch with the Million Student March, but she expects there will be more involvement from those groups’ organizers soon. Luke Herrine, an organizer and legal coordinator with the Debt Collective, which is an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street, said it was likely several Debt Collective members would attend the marches.

Adjuncts have also played a “key role” in the movement, making pay parity for adjuncts or an adjunct union a demand in a number of marches across the country. One of the more vocal organizers, James Hoff, who has been quoted in The Wall Street Journal, is an adjunct English professor at Borough of Manhattan Community College.

Does the march support any candidates?

One of the challenges of the march is organizing outside party politics, Mullen said. Although she acknowledges that some presidential candidates’ platforms on higher education meet their goals better than others — with Bernie Sanders meeting two of them and Jill Stein meeting all three of them — the point of the march is not to support any one candidate.

Although Jill Stein, who is running for president under the Green Party, will attend the Boston march, Mullen emphasized that Stein’s appearance should not be seen as an endorsement from the march’s organizers.

“One of the things that’s really hard for us right now is organizing outside the electoral system because people have forgotten the importance of movements, and yeah, we can vote someone into office, but the world isn’t going to significantly change with one person in one office. You need millions of people in the streets demanding change,” Mullen said. “Our goal is to build a movement and not an electoral campaign.”

Mullen does hope the movement will force government offices and presidential candidates to take notice of the group’s demands, however.

“One of the reasons I think it’s not being handled way more aggressively by the Department of Education is that hasn’t been a massive student movement yet,” she said. “The approach of the Department of Education and particularly Hillary Clinton, who has probably the most centrist position on education, is a product of there not being pressure from below and I’m hoping that this movement blows up and provides that type of motivation to offices to take a stand on this.”

http://thinkprogress.org/education/2015/11/12/3721211/million-student-march/

Chaos on campus: Students protest, call for heads to roll at schools around country

Chaos swept over college campuses around the nation Thursday, as the ousters of the embattled University of Missouri system’s president and chancellor earlier this week were followed by dozens of other student protests calling for more faculty and staff heads to roll.

A popular professor at Missouri said he resigned Wednesday after students lashed out at him for pledging to give a scheduled exam amid spiraling protests, but the university said Thursday it rejected his resignation.

The Dean of Students at Claremont McKenna College in California, Mary Spellman, resigned in a letter to the community Thursday, after some at the school called for hunger strikes over what they perceived as a lack of support for students of color.

Students at Ithaca College in New York, Yale University and Vanderbilt University in Tennessee were also calling to ax administrators, and even more campuses were pledging solidarity with the burgeoning social justice movement.

As many as 20 other campuses around the country were planning marches Thursday, including St. John’s, Syracuse and Columbia universities in New York, Harvard and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Disaffected students at Loyola University in Chicago and the University of Michigan were preparing a list of demands and threatening action, according to The Seattle Times. Black alumni at Georgia Tech were crafting a letter to that university’s president, urging a continued commitment to diversity.

More on this…

  • University of Missouri president, chancellor resign

  • ‘Assaulted’ journalist speaks out against prof Melissa Click

A Change.org petition signed by about 1,500 people called for the job of Vanderbilt University professor Carol Swain for “unprofessional intimidation on social media” and “discriminatory practices in the classroom.”

The spreading unrest has dominated the media and even seeped its way into the presidential race, with Republican candidate Dr. Ben Carson, who attended Yale, lashing out at demonstrators during an appearance on “The Kelly File” on Wednesday.

“Well we’re being a little bit too tolerant, I guess you might say, accepting infantile behavior,” Carson said. “I don’t care which side it comes from. To say that I have the right to violate your civil rights because you’re offending me is un-American. It is unconstitutional. And the officials at these places must recognize that and have the moral courage to stand up it. Because if they don’t, it will grow, it will exacerbate the situation and we will move much further toward anarchy than anybody can imagine, and much more quickly.”

The school at the focal point of the current crisis, the University of Missouri, hired an interim system president on Thursday afternoon. Mike Middleton previously attended Missouri as a student and also served as a faculty member and administrator. Middleton, who is black, said he felt marginalized “every day” in each of those roles.

“It’s so subtle,” Middleton said. “I think women understand it. I think people with a sexual orientation that is not a male-centered perspective on sexuality understand it. I think other people of color understand it. I think folks in power, in the majority, who have never lived it and have never experienced it have difficult understanding it the way those of us who have been minoritized do.

“But it is just the feeling of not being heard, not being respected,” he said. “Being placed at the margins of what’s really happening in the world. And it happens inadvertently. Nobody is really to blame for this.”

Middleton will attempt to hold together a fracturing university system. Earlier this week, an associate professor teaching nutrition and exercise tried to resign when angry students accused him of insensitivity. The administration rejected his attempt, a spokesperson told FoxNews.com on Thursday.

Dale Brigham, who has been described by previous students in glowing terms such as a “sweetheart” and “adorable,” had emailed students that he was canceling an exam and quitting his post in response to a backlash from current students upset that he wouldn’t delay a test.

“The exam is canceled,” Brigham wrote on Wednesday. “No one will have to come to class today. And, I am resigning my position.”

“I made a mistake, and I do not want to cause further harm”

– Dale Brigham

Some students were upset that Brigham initially refused to postpone the test amid the wave of protests, which have been mostly peaceful, but have also brought much of ordinary life on campus to a grinding halt. Some students apparently feared coming to class could be dangerous.

Brigham initially responded to students’ request to delay the exam with an email in which he urged them not to “give in to bullies.”

“If you don’t feel safe coming to class, then don’t come to class,” Brigham wrote to his class on Tuesday. “I will be there, and there will be an exam administered in our class.

“If you give in to bullies, they win. The only way bullies are defeated is by standing up to them. If we cancel the exam, they win; if we go through with it, they lose. I know which side I am on. You make your own choice.”

Brigham could not be reached for comment on whether he intends to follow through on his vow to leave the school. While known as a popular instructor, his call to stand up to threats and come to class did not sit well with some minority students in Brigham’s class.

“My teacher had the nerve to email me, ‘If we cancel class, then we let the bullies win,’” one sophomore tweeted. “Like this is a game or something.”

Brigham apologized to some students Tuesday evening, telling at least one student, who posted what appeared to be a copy of Brigham’s email to Twitter, that he would offer the exam as scheduled Wednesday but also offer a make-up test.

“I could have and should have used much better words in trying to say that we must stand up to hatred and not let those kind of people who make threats run our lives,” Brigham said in the email. “Obviously, I wrote poorly.”

But by the following day, Brigham had gone even further, canceling the exam outright and offering his resignation, which was eventually not accepted.

“I am just trying to do what I think is best for our students and the university as an institution,” Brigham told KOMU8News. “If my leaders think that my leaving would help, I am all for it. I made a mistake, and I do not want to cause further harm.”

Protests at the University of Missouri have already led to the resignations of system President Tim Wolfe and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin. Assistant Prof. Melissa Click, who appeared in a viral video obstructing a journalist from filming protests, resigned her courtesy appointment to the journalism school but is still ostensibly employed by the university. A Missouri spokesperson said Wednesday the school would not comment on the employment status of its professors.

Brigham is a seemingly well-liked professor, who earned a 5.0 rating and “A” grade in 59 reviews on ratemyprofessors.com. Students who commented used terms such as “adorable” and “nicest” to describe Brigham.

A Ph.D. in human nutrition, Brigham has served as a guest lecturer, presented dozens of seminars and workshops and spoken at numerous conferences. In addition to a lengthy list of published creative works, he has an extensive number of peer-reviewed publications. Among several honors, Brigham received awards for teamwork in 2006 and 2007, and was awarded the 1995 Penn State Continuing and Distance Education Program Development Award. He served as an honorary coach for men’s basketball, women’s softball, women’s gymnastics and men’s baseball. Active with student organizations, he’s been a faculty advisor for the Triathlon Club, Waterski and Wakeboard Club and Students Walking Students. Brigham also functioned as a representative for numerous physical activity campaigns.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/11/12/university-missouri-does-not-accept-professor-resignation-over-email-flap/

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 565-573

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 556-564

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 546-555

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 538-545

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 532-537

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 526-531

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 519-525

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 510-518

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 500-509

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 490-499

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 480-489

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 473-479

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 464-472

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 455-463

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 447-454

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 439-446

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 431-438

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 422-430

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 414-421

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 408-413

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 400-407

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 391-399

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 383-390

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 376-382

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 369-375

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 360-368

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 354-359

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 346-353

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 338-345

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 328-337

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 319-327

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 307-318

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 296-306

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 287-295

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 277-286

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 93

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 92

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 01-09

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