The Pronk Pops Show 572, November 11, 2015, Story 1: Apparently The Activist Students and Assistant Professor Melissa Click At The University of Missouri Are Political Correctness Thugs When It Comes To Freedom of The Press — Suggest They Take A Course On United States Constitution and Bill of Rights — Standing up to Social Justice Warriors — Dear White People — Memory — Videos

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The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 572: November 11, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 571: November 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 570: November 6, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 569: November 5, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 568: November 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 567: November 3, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 566: November 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 565: October 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 564: October 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 563: October 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 562: October 27, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 561: October 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 560: October 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 559: October 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 558: October 21, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 557: October 20, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 556: October 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 555: October 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 554: October 15, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 553: October 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 552: October 13, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 551: October 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 550: October 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 549: October 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 548: October 7, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 547: October 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 546: October 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 545: October 1, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 544: September 30, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 543: September 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 542: September 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 541: September 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 540: September 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 539: September 23, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 538: September 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 537: September 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 536: September 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 535: September 17, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 534: September 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 533: September 15, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 532: September 14, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 531: September 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 530: September 10, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 529: September 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 528: September 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 524: August 31, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 523: August 27, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 522: August 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 521: August 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 516: August 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 515: August 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 514: August 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 513: August 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 512: August 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

Story 1: Apparently The Activist Students and  Assistant Professor Melissa Click At The University of Missouri Are Political Correctness Thugs When It Comes To Freedom of The Press — Suggest They Take A Course On United States Constitution and Bill of Rights — Standing up to Social Justice Warriors — Dear White People — Videos

milessa clickstudent report and staff student protestssafe space no media

The tent city at the Concerned Students 1950 protest on Monday, Nov. 9 2015, in Columbia, Mo. Concerned Students 1950 is a group named after the first year that black students were allowed to attend MU. (Michael Cali/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS) ORG XMIT: 1176357

The tent city at the Concerned Students 1950 protest on Monday, Nov. 9 2015, in Columbia, Mo. Concerned Students 1950 is a group named after the first year that black students were allowed to attend MU.

ap-the-latest-on-missouri-protests-coach-tweets-team-unitedsafe space 2

Judge Nap: ‘Missouri Professor Calling for ‘Muscle’ to Eject Reporter from Protest is wrong!’

New censorship concerns as Mizzou becomes focus of reporting

Published on Nov 10, 2015

As protests at the University of Missouri continue, a video is quickly spreading of a professor trying to prevent a reporter from taking pictures on the public school’s campus.

Tim Tai, a student photographer on a freelance assignment for ESPN, was trying to take pictures of protesters on a public area of the campus.

Another photographer who uploaded video of the incident to YouTube wrote, “Students form a perimeter around the #ConcernedStudent1950 tent village and ask media to leave. This is what civic-level censorship looks like at a university with the largest and oldest public college for journalism.”

A woman who began yelling at Tai to leave was later identified as Melissa Click, a professor in the university’s communications department.

“Who wants to help me get this reporter out of here? I need some muscle over here,” she screamed to some of the other protesters at the conclusion of the video.

Tai was also accused of violating the protesters’ privacy rights at one point.

On Monday, the university’s president resigned following accusations that the school has not done enough following a string of racial incidents on campus.

It came after a group of football players vowed not to play until president Tim Wolfe resigned, expressing solidarity with a student who went on a hunger strike in protest.

Judge Andrew Napolitano reacted to the video on Fox Business Network, likening the professor’s reaction to the “playbook” of Russian Communist leader Vladimir Lenin.

The judge and Stuart Varney agreed that “this is what happens when the leftists of the 1960s take over America’s universities and create this socialism essentially and a denial of free speech and rights.”

Napolitano said the photojournalist had the “absolute unfettered right” to take pictures out in the open on a public university’s campus.

Watch the judge’s analysis above and the viral video below.

Ben Shapiro w/Megyn Kelly; Mizzou Controversy; 11-10-2015

University of Missouri: Bully professors and students harass reporters covering protests – TomoNews

The University of Missouri situation, explained

Standing up to Social Justice Warriors

Dear White People VIRAL VIDEO – Banned Winchester U Diversity Video (2014) – Comedy HD

Dear White People – Trailer #1

Dear White People – Trailer #2

#DearWhitePeople Movie Review

Homophobia In Dear White People

Director of “Dear White People” Talks His Movie, Race, And Being Gay + Black In America

The Problem with ‘Dear White People’

#ConcernedStudent1950 vs the media

Published on Nov 9, 2015

Students form a perimeter around the #ConcernedStudent1950 tent village and ask media to leave. This is what civic-level censorship looks like at a university with the largest and oldest public college for journalism.

The U.S. Constitution is the key to securing liberty for all Americans — yet very few know exactly what it says and what freedoms it protects. Hillsdale College is working to make 2015 the “Year of the Constitution,” dedicating this year to educating millions of Americans about this critical document. That’s why the College is offering its most popular course, “Constitution 101” for free, when you sign up now. 

#ConcernedStudent1950 and Feminists vs the media – DISGRACEFUL!

Missouri protesters try to block student reporter from taking photos

ESPN First Take – The Fallout at Missouri #ConcernedStudent1950

Racism at The University of Missouri (Mizzou) Imaginary or Real?

University of Missouri campus protests: ‘This is just a beginning’

Malkin: ‘Mob Rule on College Campuses’ Responsible for Ouster of Missouri Street President

The Brain of a Social Justice Warrior/Progressive

PC Principal Is A Violent Social Justice Warrior

Real Time – Bill Maher on SJWs (Social Justice Warriors) and Crazy Political Correctness

Social Justice Warriors Are Making the World Boring

Powerful Student Action Forces US University President to Resign

Missouri Board of Curators to meet Monday; football team says it won’t practice

Missouri football coach Gary Pinkel: “Mizzou Family stands as one”

Serenity’s Commentary on Mizzou’s protesting athletes, & students

#ConcernedStudent1950 Missouri Football Players Boycott in Protest of President

‘I Felt Unsafe’: Mizzou Student Who Went on Hunger Strike Speaks Out on CNN

Barbra Streisand – HD STEREO – Memory – CC for lyrics

Midnight, not a sound from the pavement
Has the moon lost her memory?
She is smiling alone in the lamplight

The withered leaves collect at my feet
And the wind begins to moan
Memory all alone in the moonlight

I can smile happy your days
( I can dream of the old days)
Life was beautiful then
I remember the time
I knew what happiness was

Let the memory live again
Every street lamp seems to beat
A fatalistic warning
Someone mutters
And the street lamp sputters

And soon it will be morning
Daylight
I must wait for the sunrise
I must think of a new life

And I mustn’t give in
When the dawn comes
Tonight will be a memory too
And a new day will begin

Burnt out ends of smoky days
The still cold smell of morning
A street lamp dies ,another night is over
Another day is dawning, touch me

It is so easy to leave me
All alone with the memory
Of my days in the sun
If you touch me
You’ll understand what happiness is
Look, a new day has begun

The Tyranny of Social Justice Warriors

The last 58 days at the University of Missouri

Contact Reporter

The University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe’s resignation has been all over the news on Monday. Hat tip to the Columbia Missourian for covering this issue closely and compiling a comprehensive timeline.

Here are 10 key moments, incidents, posts, remarks and protests that led up to the announcement.

Someone called the student body president the N-word.

As the Missourian notes, the outcry at Mizzou can be traced back to Sept. 12, when Missouri Students Assn. President Payton Head posted a note on his Facebook page about how a man on a pickup truck repeatedly called him a racial epithet while he was on campus.

Last night as I walking through campus, some guys riding on the back of a pickup truck decided that it would be okay to continuously scream [the N-word] at me. I really just want to know why my simple existence is such a threat to society. … I’ve experienced moments like this multiple times at THIS university, making me not feel included here.

Head concluded with a call to action.

Is it weird that I think that I have the right to feel safe here too? If you see violence like this and don’t say anything, you, yes YOU, are a part of the problem. It’s time to wake up Mizzou.”

The post went viral, with more than 800 likes and almost 2,000 shares by Monday. Responses to the post showed that Head’s experience wasn’t isolated. “Same thing happened to me,” one student wrote. “You live and learn. Smh.”

Other students also were targeted.

Other students began to share their brushes with racism. On Oct. 5, the Legion of Black Collegians, the school’s black student government, posted this letter about racism on Twitter.

The letter described an incident during which a drunk, white man interrupted a play rehearsal and was overheard on his phone, using a racial epithet while saying the students were “getting aggressive with me,” a Black Collegians member named Naomi Collier wrote. She added that a safety officer “was aware of the entire situation, even admitting to hearing the racial slur,” and that the group was “sorely disappointed” when the officer only walked “at a moderate speed” instead of running after the man, who was not identified.

We feel that this incident is completely heinous and unacceptable. We were … made victims of blatant racism in a space that we should be made to feel safe.

Naomi Collier, Black Collegians member

The chancellor posted a video.

In response, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin responded on Twitter and by posting this video condemning racism:

He also announced mandatory diversity training for job searches, a campus climate survey and a search for a “vice chancellor for inclusion, diversity and equity.”

Students called for a stronger response.

To many students, the chancellor’s response was insufficient. A group of students who each called themselves “Concerned Student 1950,” referring to Mizzou’s first year admitting black students, blocked President Tim Wolfe’s car during homecoming to protest the administration’s handling of racial issues,the Missourian reported.

The students blocked the street, chanted and sang.

We’ve sent emails, we’ve sent tweets, we’ve messaged but we’ve gotten no response back from the upper officials at Mizzou to really make change on this campus. And so we directed it to him personally. That we are here. We want to make our presence known, that we are here and we deserve respect, we deserve humanity.

Jonathan Butler, Missouri graduate student

The students demanded the president’s firing.

The protesters circulated a list of demands, which the Missourian published. The group called for Wolfe’s firing, more black faculty and staff, and an apology.

Butler published a letter on Twitter signed by Concerned Student 1950 describing the protest.

“As Tim Wolfe’s driver began to try to go around us, we moved the line in front of the vehicle and even allowed some of our bodies to be hit to ensure we were heard,” Butler wrote. “While closing in a solidarity chant, Columbia Police Department (CPD) officers arrived and immediately threatened us with pepper spray and forcefully shoved us back from the car though we were not violent.”

A swastika was found.

In late October, another incident occurred: A swastika drawn with human feces appeared on the wall of a campus bathroom, further escalating the protests.

A student embarked on a hunger strike.

On Nov. 2, graduate student Jonathan Butler announced on Facebook that he would be starting “an indefinite hunger strike  in opposition to having Tim Wolfe as the University of Missouri system president.” He pledged to not consume food “or nutritional sustenance at the expense of my health until either Tim Wolfe is removed from office or my internal organs fail and my life is lost.”

Wolfe responded by issuing a statement saying he hopes “that Mr. Butler will consider a different method of advocating for this cause.”

Students supported Butler by camping out on the Carnahan Quad.

One day into it, Butler posted on Facebook that “It’s officially been 24hrs of the #MizzouHungerStrike. My body is holding up and my spirit is strong from all the support I’ve seen. I love you all dearly. Please remember this strike is not directed towards Chancellor Loftin and his staff or even Mr. Wolfe and his staff this is directed towards the University of Missouri Curators who have the power necessary to make change and remove Tim Wolfe from office.” In addition to the racial slurs and the swastika, he listed the stripping of Planned Parenthood services from campus as well as #ConcernedStudent1950 protesters being threatened with pepper spray as triggers.

Protesters boycotted their own school’s services.

The Concerned Student 1950 protesters organized a boycott of University of Missouri merchandise, events and dining services, and on Nov. 5, the group organized a protest before the Missouri-Mississippi State football game. “Join us in the revolution,” students chanted, according to the Missourian.

That same day, Head posted a slideshow of racist remarks made on social media.

The football team declared its support.

On Saturday night, black members of the Mizzou football team announced their support of the protests, and said they would boycott Mizzou activities.

More stories about the football team’s protest:

But at least one student thought they might obscure the deeper movement:

The student government told the board to fire Wolfe.

On Sunday, the Missouri Students Assn. posted a public letter to the University of Missouri System Board of Curators describing the school’s pattern of greeting racism with silence since the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown. They concluded: “We formally demand the immediate removal of UM System President Tim Wolfe.”

On Sunday evening, the #WolfeGottaGo campaign continued to grow. Last night, Newsy posted this video about it.

On Monday, Wolfe resigned.

I take full responsibility for this frustration and I take full responsibility for the inaction that has occurred. Use my resignation to heal and start talking again.

Loftin said he would step down from the administration to lead research efforts by the start of 2016.

Butler ended his hunger strike.

http://www.latimes.com/local/education/la-na-last-days-university-of-missouri-presidents-ouster-20151109-htmlstory.html

Mizzou journalism faculty voting on booting out ‘I need some muscle’ professor who blocked reporter

Offficials at the Missouri School of Journalism are deciding the fate of an instructor who was filmed in a heated confrontation with a photojournalist who was snapping photos of a protest at the university, the Missourian reports.Melissa Click could be barred from the journalism department after a confrontation with freelancer Tim Tai and another cameraman Mark Schierbecker, who posted it to YouTube.

Schierbecker approaches Click, and says, “I’m media, can I talk to you?”

Click responds by pointing her finger and saying, “No, you need to get out. You need to get out.”

When he says he does not need to leave, she tries to grab his camera. She then hollers, “Hey, who wants to help me get this reporter out of here? I need some muscle over here!”

Earlier, another woman could be seen pushing Tai, who could be heard telling demonstrators that he had the First Amendment right to cover the protest. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of the press and allows reporters to cover news without censorship.

The Missouri School of Journalism clarified in a statement that Click is not a professor there.

“Also, for clarification, Assistant Professor Melissa Click, featured in several videos confronting journalists, is not a faculty member in the Missouri School of Journalism,” the statement reads. “She is a member of the MU Department of Communication in the College of Arts and Science. In that capacity she holds a courtesy appointment with the School of Journalism. Journalism School faculty members are taking immediate action to review that appointment.”

Revoking Click’s courtesy appointment only prevents her from teaching journalism classes. According to the Federalist, Click’s current research involves, “50 Shades of Grey readers, the impact of social media in fans’ relationship with Lady Gaga, masculinity and male fans, messages about class and food in reality television programming, and messages about work in children’s television programs.”

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/11/mizzou-journalism-faculty-voting-on-booting-out-i-need-some-muscle-professor-who-blocked-reporter/

Melissa Click: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

A communications professor at the University of Missouri is facing harsh criticism on social media after she was recorded blocking student journalists who were trying to cover the protests occurring on the school’s campus.

The professor, Melissa Click, is seen in the video telling a student photographer, Mark Schierbecker, he “needs to get out” of the area where protesters had camped. The area is part of the campus quad, which is a public space.

Click, 44, has not commented about the video and made her Twitter account private amid the backlash.

The protests were led by a group called Concerned Student 1950 (a reference to the year the university first admitted black students), who were outraged over the way the university’s administration handled a series of racist events on campus, including slurs directed toward the student body president and a swastika made out of feces that was found in a dorm. The protests, along with a boycott by the school’s football team and a hunger strike by a graduate student, led to the resignation of the university’s president, Tim Wolfe.

Mitchell McKinney, the chair of the Department of Communication said in a statement that they “support the First Amendment as a fundamental right and guiding principle underlying all that we do as an academic community.”

“We applaud student journalists who were working in a very trying atmosphere to report a significant story,” McKinney continued. “Intimidation is never an acceptable form of communication. We reiterate our commitment as communication scholars to the transformative power of dialogue; we believe words shape our realities and that engaging multiple perspectives is vital.”

McKinney said the department cannot comment about personnel matters.

Here’s what you need to know about Click:


1. Click Called for ‘Muscle’ to Remove the Student Journalist

Professor Melissa Click can be heard and briefly seen at the beginning of the video, screaming, “you need to back up if you are with the media,” while student journalist Tim Tai is confronted by a group of protesters while he is taking photos.

“You need to back up, respect the students,” Click says. “BACK UP! They have asked you to respect their space, move back. This is their time. You need to step out of here now. You need to go.”

Click appears in the video again at the end, at about the 6:18 mark when she tells the student photographer filming the incident, Mark Schierbecker, who was asking a student if she wanted to be interviewed, that he has to “get out.”

Schierbecker says “no I don’t” have to leave the area, and Click responds by grabbing his camera and again telling him to “get out.”

After he again refuses, she steps away and yells out, “Hey who wants to help me get this reporter out of here. I need some muscle over here!”

The video then ends. Schierbecker posted a longer version of the video on Tuesday, showing more of his interaction with Click:

After Click calls for muscle, Schierbecker begins speaking to a student. Click then comes over and yells at him, “you need to get out.”

He responds, “this is public property,” and Click puts her hand over his camera and mockingly says, “that’s a really good one, I’m a communications faculty and I really get that argument, but you need to go. You need to go, you need to go.”

She then tells a group of students to move so he can get out, and says “don’t let him back in.”

Click then walks around the inside of the circle, telling the students to not let reporters in. She spots Schierbecker and points at him and says, “oh he’s a good one,” as he films from outside the circle.

2. She Is Researching ’50 Shades of Grey’ Readers & the ‘Impact of Social Media in Fans’ Relationship With Lady Gaga’

Melissa Click, Melissa Click missouri

Melissa Click. (University of Missouri)

Click is an assistant professor of mass media in Missouri’s Department of Communication.

According to the university’s website, “Her research interests center on popular culture texts and audiences, particularly texts and audiences disdained in mainstream culture. Her work in this area is guided by audience studies, theories of gender and sexuality, and media literacy. Current research projects involve 50 Shades of Grey readers, the impact of social media in fans’ relationship with Lady Gaga, masculinity and male fans, messages about class and food in reality television programming, and messages about work in children’s television programs.”

The journalism and communication departments are separate at Missouri, but Click is the chair of a committee that oversees student publications at the university.

“The charge to the Student Publications Committee is to recommend to the vice chancellor for Student Affairs policies and regulations regarding the publication of the Maneater and Savitar,” the university’s website says.

Click graduated in 1993 with degrees in retail marketing and women’s studies from James Madison University. She then earned her master’s in communication and Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Click, who has been an assistant professor at Mizzou since 2008, is paid $57,798 a year.

In 2010, she wrote about the role of media during a crisis for the Antenna, a University of Wisconsin publication:

I really hate US television news. I detest its lack of historical context and investigative journalism, and its drive for ratings through fantastical and voyeuristic stories. There are moments, however, when I turn to television news to provide the visual, immediate, and ongoing coverage of stories not easily gained through newspapers, radio programs, or the Web: moments like 9/11, the Indian Ocean tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the Kashmir earthquake and now the earthquake in Haiti. Many American television journalists, like Brian Williams, Katie Couric, Diane Sawyer, and Anderson Cooper, arrived in Haiti before much of the “relief effort” arrived. Like many of you, I have watched the coverage with my jaw dropped, overwhelmed and distraught by what these journalists have shown me.

Once the initial shock wore off, I wanted more information about Haiti, and the television news hater in me returned. Much of the television coverage has lacked historical information about Haiti and its relationship to the United States, focusing instead on images of flattened buildings, suffering people and stories of survivors searching for loved ones. I was truly appalled when I watched Anderson Cooper place a microphone deep into a demolished building to allow viewers to hear the screams of the 15-year-old girl trapped in the rubble.

Click’s work focuses often on women in the media and feminism. In May, she told Unearthed, a blog run by the Missouri School of Journalism, she became involved in feminism while she was a student at James Madison.

“I do think we have a bias against things that women like,” she told Unearthed. “Fifty Shades orTwilight are considered to be stupid, mindless and dangerous messages for women, but nobody questions what messages Batman or Iron Man are doing to young boys and men in the same way that Fifty Shades is to women. The presumption is that women’s messages are harmful, while men’s messages are entertainment and mindless fun.”

She has won several awards at Missouri, including Outstanding Mentor in 2011 from the Association of Communication Graduate Students and Graduate Advisor of the Year in 2013.

“The nice thing about Melissa is that no matter what kind of problem you take to her – a question or a concern or even just, you know a good piece of news – she will respond to you,” doctoral candidate Cristin Compton told Unearthed. “She’s made my experience at Mizzou so much better than it could have been.”

3. She Asked for Media Coverage of the Protests on Her Facebook Page

Melissa Click

(Facebook)

On November 7, two days before the confrontation on the quad with the student journalists, Click put out a call for media coverage of the protests at Missouri.

“Hey folks, students fighting racism on the MU campus want to get their message into the national media,” Click wrote on her Facebook page. “Who among my friends knows someone who would want a scoop into this incredible topic? This story involves the failure of administrators, a student on day 6 of a hunger strike, and creative, fearless students. If you can help, please let me know!”

4. The School’s Assistant Director of Greek Life Was Also Seen in the Video Blocking Journalists

In the video filmed by Schierbecker, the university’s Assistant Director of Greek Life is seen confronting and blocking another student journalist, Tim Tai, who was talking to students who wanted him to leave the area.

Janna Basler, who has also not commented on the video, is seen telling Tai, “You need to back off.” She also appears to shove Tai, and puts her hand in front of his face.

When Tai asks her name, she says, “I am Concerned Student 1950.”

Tai tells the other students and Basler he has a “job to do.”

She responds, “They have a life to live, they have an education to get and a life to live.”

Tai tweeted about the reaction to the video:

Basler earns $67,812 a year as the assistant director of Greek Life & Leadership in the Student Life office.

The university has not responded to requests for comment about the actions of the professor and administrator.

Read more about Basler at the link below:

Janna Basler: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Janna Basler, University of Missouri’s director of Greek Life, is under fire after confronting a student journalist who was covering protests at the school.

Click here to read more


5. The Organizers of Concerned Student 1950 Have Asked the Media to Stay Out of Their ‘Safe Space’

The hunger strike and football players’ boycott drew the national media, along with local media and student journalists, to Columbia to cover the on-campus protests. After Tim Wolfe stepped down, some of the media attempting to cover the Concerned Student 1950 protests and the student protesters clashed on the university’s quad.

The students put out signs saying “no media,” and chanted “reporters have to go,” at the journalists while linking arms to form a shield.

Concerned Student 1950 said on Twitter the camp site where they were protesting is there “safe space” and asked the media not to interfere.

Members of the media said on Twitter that the campus quad is a public space, and they were trying to do their jobs and cover the story.

On Tuesday, the protest’s organizers took down the “no media” signs and welcome  the press in.

The Missouri School of Journalism wrote about the issues that came out of Monday’s protests:

The space in question, Carnahan Quad, was a public space in which protestors should have been able to hold their event, and journalists should have been able to cover it freely. Ideally, the space would have had neutral parties to maintain order between the groups, and no such official referees existed to do that.

The Carnahan Quad incident was different than scenes often portrayed by the media involving protesters and counter-protesters. The media were there as neutral agents trying to cover an event. They were there to gather information and did not have a position to support.

At question is the role of two university officials at the event. It makes a difference if they were there as university officials or if they were there as participants. Some would argue that an on-campus event involving Missouri students would require the two employees to step in and act as neutral parties.

Read more about the “key questions” raised by the incident here.

http://heavy.com/news/2015/11/melissa-click-janna-basler-missouri-communications-professor-video-block-student-journalists-facebook-salary-photos-tim-tai-mark-schierbecker/

Understand the Constitution like never before – for FREE

Hillsdale’s course, Constitution 101: The Meaning and History of the Constitution, features the same professors who teach this course on Hillsdale College’s campus. Hillsdale is one of the only colleges in America — outside of the military academies — that requires every student to take a course on the Constitution to graduate.

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University of Missouri Protests Spur a Day of Change

The incidents that led to the University of Missouri president’s resignation

Tim Wolfe’s resignation Monday as the University of Missouri System president came after months of escalating racial tension surrounding high-profile incidents on the flagship campus in Columbia, Mo., and student criticism about the administration’s response.

Here’s a rundown of what happened leading up to Wolfe’s announcement that he was stepping down from his post leading the four-campus system.

Ferguson protests: 2014

Thousands of people took to the streets last year in Ferguson, Mo., just hours away from Columbia, following the August 2014 police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old.

Dozens of Missouri students joined demonstrators in August and again in November after a grand jury decided against indicting Darren Wilson, the white officer who fatally shot Brown. Following the initial protests, three Mizzou students started the activist group MU for Michael Brown, which later gave rise to a second group, Concerned Student 1950; that group’s name was a nod to the year black students were first admitted to the university.

In light of the unrest in Ferguson, members of the student groups lamented the university’s lack of official response to racial tensions on campus.

Swastika etched onto dorm stairwell wall: April

A swastika and the word “heil” were drawn in what appeared to be charcoal on the wall of a residence hall stairway in April. Authorities arrested freshman resident Bradley Becker days later and charged him with second-degree property damage motivated by discrimination. Becker pleaded guiltyin October to a lesser charge and will serve two years probation

Student body president called the n-word: Sept. 12

Payton Head said he was walking with a friend when a pickup truck slowed down and a group of young people inside screamed a racial epithet at him. The Missouri Students Association president, who is black, shared the story in a social media post that went viral and prompted a response from Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin.

Head said at the time that he had been previously called a racial slur on campus, as well.

Black students’ play rehearsal interrupted by racial slurs: Oct. 5

Members of the Legion of Black Collegians were rehearsing on campus for a homecoming court performance when an “inebriated white man” walking by interrupted and called the students the n-word, the group publicly announced.

“There was a silence that fell over us all, almost in disbelief that this racial slur in particular was used in our vicinity,” the group wrote.

Mandatory diversity training announced: Oct. 8

The university said that all incoming freshman will have to receive online diversity training. The move was welcomed by some students. But activists were more skeptical, calling the move a “knee-jerk” reaction to improve the school’s image.

Homecoming protesters block Wolfe’s car: Oct. 10

Police removed Concerned Student 1950 protesters who blocked the president’s car during the campus homecoming parade. Wolfe did not leave his car to speak with the students.

“We disrupted the parade specifically in front of Tim Wolfe because we need him to get our message,” graduate student Jonathan Butler, one of the protesters, told the Missourian. “We’ve sent emails, we’ve sent tweets, we’ve messaged, but we’ve gotten no response back from the upper officials at Mizzou to really make change on this campus. And so we directed it to him personally.”

Student group demands Wolfe resign: Oct. 20

Concerned Student 1950 released a list of demands, including from Wolfe apologize to the homecoming parade demonstrators and be removed from his post. The students also demanded increasing black faculty and staff; mandatory racial awareness and inclusion curriculum for all staff, faculty and students; and additional funding and resources for mental health professionals, particularly those of color, to boost campus programming and outreach to students.

Feces used to draw swastika in residence hall: Oct. 24

Months after the anti-Semitic symbol was found in the Mark Twain residence hall, officials found another swastika on Oct. 24. This one was drawn using feces smeared on the floor and wall of a bathroom.

“After this event, it has become clear to me that the inclusivity of our residence halls has been threatened,” Resident Halls Association president Bill Donley said in a statement.

Wolfe meets with student group: Oct. 26

Concerned Student 1950 announced it had met with Wolfe, but said that he wasn’t meeting any of their demands.

“Wolfe verbally acknowledged that he cared for Black students at the University of Missouri, however he also reported he was ‘not completely’ aware of systemic racism, sexism, and patriarchy on campus,” a statement from the group read.

Graduate student begins hunger strike: Nov. 2

A 25-year-old graduate student announced a hunger strike that, he said, he would not break unless Wolfe resigned. Jonathan Butler, a member of Concerned Student 1950, said he was ready to die for his cause, and other students began camping out on campus in support.

Wolfe apologizes, acknowledges racism: Nov. 6

Wolfe released a statement Friday apologizing for how student protests at homecoming were handled and expressing concern for Butler’s health.

“My behavior seemed like I did not care,” Wolfe said of the parade incident. “That was not my intention. I was caught off guard in that moment. Nonetheless, had I gotten out of the car to acknowledge the students and talk with them perhaps we wouldn’t be where we are today.”

He added: “Racism does exist at our university, and it is unacceptable. It is a long-standing, systemic problem which daily affects our family of students, faculty and staff.”

Football players threaten to boycott: Nov. 7

A group of black football players announced that they were joining ongoing student protests and pledged to stop participating in football-related activitiesfor the remainder of the season unless Wolfe resigned or was fired.

Head coach Gary Pinkel tweeted his support for his players and included a photo showing what appeared to include staff with both black and white players from the Mizzou football team.

This move, from one of the most popular, profitable and visible groups on campus, helped propel the situation into the national spotlight. It also raised the stakes for Wolfe; the university would have to pay $1 million to Bringham Young University if it canceled an upcoming game.

Wolfe pledges to stay: Nov. 8

The president released a statement Sunday night, making no indications he had plans to step down and saying that his administration was “confident that we can come together to improve the student experience on our campuses.”

“I am dedicated to ongoing dialogue to address these very complex, societal issues as they affect our campus community,” Wolfe said.

Wolfe said the majority of Concerned Student 1950 demands were already in a draft strategic plan to improve system-wide diversity and inclusion.

Legislators call for Wolfe’s resignation: Nov. 8

Rep. Steven Cookson (R), chairman of the Missouri House Committee on Higher Education, said Wolfe “can no longer effectively lead” the university system and called Wolfe’s reaction to protesters’ concerns “callous.” Another Republican lawmaker also urged Wolfe to resign.

Gov. Jay Nixon (D) said he supported the campus protesters. “These concerns must be addressed to ensure the University of Missouri is a place where all students can pursue their dreams in an environment of respect, tolerance and inclusion.”

Some faculty members said they would stage a walk-out on Monday.

Wolfe resigns

At a special meeting called by the university’s governing body, Wolfe announced his resignation.

From The Post:

“My motivation in making this decision comes from love,” he said. “I love MU, Colubmia, where I grew up, the state of Missouri.

“This is not the way change should come about,” he said, calling on the community to stop yelling and start listening to one another. But he said, “I take full responsibility for this frustration. I take full responsibility for this inaction.”

Wolfe said his resignation was effective immediately.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2015/11/09/the-incidents-that-led-to-the-university-of-missouri-presidents-resignation/

https://cm.g.doubleclick.net/push?client=ca-pub-3980300725513096//

Melissa Click’s Professor Husband Also Harassed Media At Mizzou

richcallahan

CHUCK ROSS

Prohibiting journalists from exercising their First Amendment rights was a husband-wife affair at the University of Missouri on Monday.

Mass media professor Melissa Click’s anti-media aggression, as recorded by student-journalist Mark Schierbecker, has already gone viral. Videos show Click calling for “muscle” to help remove Sheirbecker as he was filming protests following the resignation of school president Tim Wolfe.

But as The Daily Caller has learned, Click was joined in her media blockade crusade by her husband, Richard “Chip” Callahan.

Callahan, who chairs Mizzou’s religious studies department, is seen at the beginning of Shierbecker’s video shutting down photojournalist Tim Tai as he was attempting to document Monday’s events.Ji

 While Callahan’s involvement has been reported — Washington Post media blogger Erik Wemple has called for his and Click’s firing — it had not been revealed that the professors are married.

A news article from 2002 documents their engagement. Callahan also acknowledged Click as his wife in a 2008 book he wrote about faith in the Kentucky coal mines.

In the video, Callahan is seen rebuking Tai as he is swarmed by a mob of student-protesters hellbent on blocking media from accessing the protests.

“You cannot push them to get closer and closer,” Callahan told Tai, though the photojournalist appeared to be standing still. As he was swarmed by the advancing mob of student-protesters, Tai asked them to stop pushing him.

“Don’t talk to me. It’s not my problem,” Callahan responds callously.

According to The Post’s Wemple, Callahan apologized to Tai in a phone call on Tuesday. Asked what Callahan apologized for, Tai told the reporter, “Just like the way he acted — “I guess, getting in my face and yelling about it.”

“He tried to follow me around the circle a little bit…hounding me,” Tai said.

Click also apologized to Tai personally and in an open letter. She also resigned from a special position she held with Mizzou’s school of journalism. She does not teach journalism courses, so the move was moot.

The Daily Caller left multiple voice mails for Callahan, including one asking him whether he and Click coordinated in any way Monday to stifle the media. He has not responded.

http://dailycaller.com/2015/11/11/melissa-clicks-professor-husband-also-harassed-media-at-mizzou-video/#ixzz3rDpkvGnL

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