The Pronk Pops Show 571, November 9, 2015, Story 1: The Inmates Are Running The Asylum — President of University of Missouri Resigns — Should Have Given Football Players A Choice — Play or You Are Off The Football Team and Lose Scholarships — Videos

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Pronk Pops Show 571: November 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 570: November 6, 2015 

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Pronk Pops Show 568: November 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 567: November 3, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 566: November 2, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 565: October 30, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 564: October 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 563: October 28, 2015 

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Pronk Pops Show 561: October 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 560: October 23, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 559: October 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 558: October 21, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 557: October 20, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 556: October 19, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 555: October 16, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 554: October 15, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 553: October 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 552: October 13, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 551: October 12, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 550: October 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 549: October 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 548: October 7, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 547: October 5, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 546: October 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 545: October 1, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 544: September 30, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 543: September 29, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 542: September 28, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 541: September 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 540: September 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 539: September 23, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 538: September 22, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 537: September 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 536: September 18, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 535: September 17, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 534: September 16, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 533: September 15, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 532: September 14, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 531: September 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 530: September 10, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 529: September 9, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 528: September 8, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 527: September 4, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 526: September 3, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 525: September 2, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 524: August 31, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 523: August 27, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 522: August 26, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 521: August 25, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 520: August 24, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 519: August 21, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 518: August 20, 2015  

Pronk Pops Show 517: August 19, 2015 

Pronk Pops Show 516: August 18, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 515: August 17, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 514: August 14, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 513: August 13, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 512: August 12, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 511: August 11, 2015

Pronk Pops Show 510: August 10, 2015

 

Story 1: The Inmates Are Running The Asylum — President of University of Missouri Resigns — Should Have Given Football Players A Choice — Play or You Are Off The Football Team and Lose Scholarships — Videos

University of Missouri president resigns

Tim Wolfe, the president of the University of Missouri system, has resigned over allegations that he mishandled racial tensions at the school.

Powerful Student Action Forces US University President to Resign

University of Missouri President Refuses to Resign Amid Racial Unrest

Black football players at Missouri: We’ll sit out until system president resigns

Mizzou football players go on strike over ‘injustice’

Members of the University of Missouri football team say they “will no longer participate in any football related activities until President Tim Wolfe resigns or is removed.” Wolfe has been criticized for his response to student concerns over racism.

Black Panthers

The Original Black Panther Party – Power to the People

University of Missouri shakeup in wake of racial turmoil

Matt Pearce and Lauren RaabContact Reporters

Uiversity of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resigned Monday morning, forced out of office by student protests alleging he had not done enough to address racism and other issues on campus.Hours later, the university’s governing body said Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin would resign at the end of the year and transition to research.

Wolfe, a businessman who took charge of Missouri’s public university system in 2012, had become the focal point of demonstrators’ demands that he do something about the campus climate.

“The frustration and anger that I see is clear, real, and I don’t doubt it for a second,” Wolfe said at a meeting of the university’s governing body, called over the weekend after the football team said it would strike in support of a hunger striker who was demanding Wolfe’s ouster.

Students have highlighted a series of disturbing racist incidents on campus, including being called racial epithets, and accused Wolfe of not acting decisively to address race issues.

“We stopped listening to each other,” Wolfe told a packed room of reporters at an open meeting of the system’s board of curators. “This is not the way change should come about.”

“I take full responsibility for this frustration and I take full responsibility for the inaction that has occurred,” Wolfe said, adding: “Use my resignation to heal and start talking again.”

Missouri’s curators then voted to go to closed session.

The resignations of Wolfe and Loftin, a physicist, came after a series of protests on campus.

The school’s football team had gone on strike, and some professors were staging a walkout from their classes. A tent city had sprouted on a campus quad. A graduate student had gone on a hunger strike.

Some state legislators also joined in calls for Wolfe’s removal. The university’s student government called for the president to resign Monday.

Wolfe was holed up in university offices past 1 a.m. Monday morning — seen through windows talking on a cellphone and meeting with other officials — having become the latest Missouri public figure caught in a maelstrom of radical protest as pressure on campus built for a year, incident after incident.

There was the anonymous threat University of Missouri students spotted on social media app Yik Yak in December, after riots in Ferguson, Mo.: “Let’s burn down the black culture center & give them a taste of their own medicine.”

This September, the president of the Missouri Student Assn., Payton Head, who is black, said that he was walking through campus when a man in a pickup truck shouted a racial epithet at him.

“I’ve experienced moments like this multiple times at THIS university, making me not feel included here,”  Head said in a Facebook post that went viral, with other students echoing his account with versions of their own.

Last month someone drew a swastika on a residence hall wall, using human feces.

The campus has since been increasingly roiled by protest, and campus observers say the dissatisfaction isn’t just limited to racial incidents.

Students also have accused university administrators of a lack of decisiveness in protecting graduate students’ health insurance plans from elimination and defending the university’s relationship with Planned Parenthood against attacks from conservative state lawmakers.

But race appears to have become the most volatile issue on a campus where racial unease has long simmered among black students and staff.

In 2010, two white students scattered white cotton balls on the lawn of the campus’ black culture center in what black students saw as a racist attack. They were convicted of littering.

Cynthia Frisby, a journalism professor, wrote in the Missourian newspaper this week that in her 18 years at the university, “I have been called the n-word too many times to count.”

Kim English, a black former player on the university’s basketball team, wrote on Twitter this weekend that “Oppression at my alma mater and in the state of my alma mater occurred LONG before the tenure of this System President.”

“If U were black at my alma mater, and ur name was not Maclin, Denmon, Pressey, English, Weatherspoon, Carroll, etc. You didn’t feel welcome,” English said, listing the names of some of the university’s most prominent black athletes over the last decade.

But campus activists appear to have been emboldened by the protests they watched last year in Ferguson, about a two-hour drive away.

“A lot of Mizzou students traveled to Ferguson,” and those who didn’t “wanted to stand up and make a change,” said Ayanna Poole, a 22-year-old senior from Tyler, Texas, who is one of the founding members of the black campus activist group Concerned Student 1950. “I do believe it’s been a domino effect.”

The campus coalition’s name reflects the year the university began accepting black students. Today, more than 75% of the university’s 35,000 students are white.

Several black students have said some white students use the n-word or otherwise discriminated against them.

Poole recalled how she was kicked out of a fraternity party her freshman year after a man used the n-word and said, “All you … girls have to leave.”

Andrea Fulgiam, 21, a junior studying psychology and sociology, said when she sat down in a lecture class freshman year, the student next to her muttered, “I’m not about to sit next to this black girl.”

Fulgiam said a professor once told her she was at the university only because of affirmative action.

Parnell said when she transferred to the university last year, other black students warned her, “Don’t walk through Greektown,” the cluster of fraternities and sororities just off campus.

Wolfe, a former businessman, became president of the University of Missouri system in 2012 and has been targeted by students who accuse him of a lack of empathy for racial minorities.

Campus tensions reached a boiling point during the Oct. 10 homecoming parade, when student protesters blocked the parade route by standing in front of a car containing Wolfe. The car inched forward and, according to communications professor Melissa Click, bumped into a protester. Wolfe did not speak to the protesters, and police took them off the street, threatening arrest.

Wolfe “allowed his driver to try to drive around us, even hit one of us,” said Parnell, who participated in the demonstration. She said police threatened protesters with pepper spray and pushed them, and Wolfe “did not intervene whatsoever.”

Students also confronted Wolfe on Friday night outside a fundraiser in Kansas City, Mo., and challenged him to define “systematic oppression.”

A video clip shows him replying, “Systematic oppression is because you don’t believe that you have the equal opportunity for success,” before he is cut off by a chorus of people upset that he characterized oppression as a perception rather than a reality.

“Did you just blame us for systematic oppression, Tim Wolfe?” someone off-camera shouts as Wolfe walks away. “Did you just blame black students?”

Wolfe has issued a series of statements in recent days, including one Sunday in which he said, “It is clear to all of us that change is needed.”

He did not indicate any intention to resign at that time, but added that his administration is reflecting on how to address the situation and said that the university had been working on a “systemwide diversity and inclusion strategy” due out by April.

In interviews with members of Concerned Student 1950 on Sunday night, they said the time for dialogue was over and that it was time for the campus to systematically address racism.

“I’m sick of it,” Fulgiam said. “I don’t want to graduate and come back and see students still doing this.”

http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-missouri-campus-racism-20151109-story.html

Missouri protest: List of demands issued to university

 

Members of the University of Missouri football team raised awareness of the school’s racial turmoil Saturday, joining forces with the student protesters and threatening to boycott football activities until president Tim Wolfe is removed from his position.

The student group leading the protest, Concerned Student 1950, issued its list of demands, which the Columbia Daily Tribune published, to the university last month. It’s unclear if the university has taken steps to adopt any of the proposed changes, or if the striking football players want all of these demands met.

 

 

I was a black student at the University of Missouri. Racism there is nothing new.

 

In the days since the story of racial tensions at the University of Missouri began making headlines, I’ve wanted to defend my alma mater. I’ve wanted to make the case that the portrayal of the university, and the people who go there, doesn’t reflect the experiences I had at Mizzou.

But that would not be true.

I’m the kind of alumna who carries a Mizzou koozie in my purse, the kind who can still sing every word of the school’s fight song. But during the three and a half years I spent on the overwhelmingly white campus in Columbia, Missouri, I was also incredibly alone.

I was one of few black students in the dormitory that mostly housed students in the university’s Honors College. My roommate, my closest friends, my peer advisor and the vast majority of my professors were white, too.

And campus wasn’t exactly an easy place to be black. For such a big school, the university was incredibly segregated. (Today, more than 75% of the 35,000 students at Mizzou are white.) I figured that out early when I decided to go through “formal recruitment,” otherwise known as “rush,” for a sorority. I’d gone to an all-girls (and, yes, nearly all-white) high school, and was nervous about getting lost on the massive campus. I thought joining a sorority could help it feel more like home.

I remember standing on the streets of Greektown in front of house after house, waiting for the members to burst out in their matching outfits. I rarely, if ever, saw a face that looked like my own. At one sorority house, I spoke to another black woman. I wanted to hug her because I was so relieved I wasn’t the only black person in the room. It was unwritten but immediately clear: I was in the wrong place. I’d ended up at white rush, rather than pledging one of the black Greek letter organizations on campus.

It was a week before my first day of classes and I was already feeling like an outsider, a theme that would play out until I graduated in 2009. It’s why nothing that happened on campus recently has surprised me much. This has been going on for a long time.

Former Missouri basketball player Kim English made that case this weekend, tweeting that “oppression at my alma mater and in the state of my alma mater occurred LONG before the tenure of this System President.”

“If U were black at my alma mater, and ur name was not Maclin, Denmon, Pressey, English, Weatherspoon, Carroll, etc. You didn’t feel welcome,” English continued, listing the names of some of the university’s most well-known athletes.

He’s right. The history of racial incidents at Mizzou long predates the university system’s current leadership.

Tim Wolfe, who resigned as University of Missouri System President on Monday after weeks of protests including a graduate student’s hunger strike and a boycott by dozens of black players on the school’s football team, wasn’t in charge when I attended Mizzou.

He wasn’t the university system president in 2010 when two white students threw cotton balls onto the lawn of the school’s black culture center and were later convicted of … littering. Nor was Wolfe at Mizzou when, in 2011, a student painted a racist slur outside a residence hall.

Wolfe also wasn’t on campus the day students threw a beer bottle at me from the balcony of an off-campus apartment building. My offense? Daring to date someone of a different race and to leave a party with him.

My most memorable assignment while working for the university’s student newspaper was covering the 2007 neo-Nazi march near the journalism school, on the thin border between campus and downtown Columbia.

Mizzou is where I met my closest friends and fell in love with journalism, but it is also where I was called a n*gger for the first time that I can remember.

Wolfe’s resignation as UM System President after a galling lack of empathy for the every day struggle of students of color is a first step. But it won’t change years of systemic racism or the persistent microaggressions — subtle examples of bias — that I as well as other students and even faculty routinely faced on campus.

“I have lived in Columbia and been at the University for almost 18 years. During this time, I have been called the n word too many times to count,” Cynthia Frisby, a black Missouri School of Journalism professor, wrote in a Facebook post that has been shared hundreds of times.

I have been silent on FB about the racial situation on the Mizzou campus for a variety of reasons, but the main one is…

Posted by Cyndi Smith Frisby on Saturday, November 7, 2015

The university has a complicated history when it comes to race, and I’m hopeful that the dialogue happening on campus today can create a Mizzou that’s more welcoming to students of all backgrounds.

http://mashable.com/2015/11/09/mizzou-campus-black/#Eo1t.M37JGqp

 

Concerned Student 1­9­5­0

presents  List of Demands  to  The University of Missouri

To: The University of Missouri  October 20, 2015

During the University of Missouri’s 104th homecoming parade, Saturday, October 10, 2015,  eleven Black student leaders on campus interjected themselves into the parade, presenting UM  system president, Tim Wolfe, and the Columbia community with a demonstration addressing  Mizzou’s history of racial violence and exclusivity.

The demonstration covered the raw, painful,  and often silenced history of racism and discrimination on the University of Missouri’s campus.  This history of racism at Mizzou dates back to 1935 when Lloyd Gaines petitioned the university  to be its first Black law student and was denied admission. The actual year that the first Black  student, Gus T. Ridgel, was accepted in the University of Missouri wasn’t until 1950, hence  where the concept of “Concerned Student 1950” comes from.

Concerned Student 1950, thus, represents every Black student admitted to the University of  Missouri since then and their sentiments regarding race­related affairs affecting their lives at a  predominantly white institution. Not only do our white peers sit in silence in the face of our  oppression but also our administrators who perpetuate that oppression through their inaction.  The Black experience on Mizzou’s campus is cornered in offices and rarely attended to until it  reaches media. Then, and only then, do campus administrators seek reactionary initiatives to  attest to the realities of oppressed students, faculty, and staff. These temporary adjustments to  the university’s behaviors are not enough to assure that future generations of marginalized  students will have a safe and inclusive learning experience during their time at Mizzou.

It is important to note that, as students, it is not our job to ensure that the policies and practices of the University of Missouri work to maintain a safe, secure and unbiased campus climate for  all of its students. We do understand, however, that change does not happen without a catalyst.  Concerned Student 1950 has invested time, money, intellectual capital, and excessive energy to  bring to the forefront these issues and to get administration on board so that we, as students,  may turn our primary focus back to what we are on campus to do: obtain our degrees.     The following document presents the demands of Concerned Student 1950. This document  reflects the adjustments that we feel should be made to the University. We expect a response to  these demands by 5:00pm on October 28, 2015.     If we do not receive a response to these demands by the date above, we will take appropriate  nonviolent actions. If there are any questions, comments or concerns, you may forward them to  ConcernedStudent1950@gmail.com.     The struggle continues, Concerned Student 1950

List of Demands

I. We demand that the University of Missouri System President, Tim Wolfe, writes a handwritten  apology to the Concerned Student 1­9­5­0 demonstrators and holds a press conference in the  Mizzou Student Center reading the letter. In the letter and at the press conference, Tim Wolfe  must acknowledge his white male privilege, recognize that systems of oppression exist, and  provide a verbal commitment to fulfilling Concerned Student 1­9­5­0 demands. We want Tim  Wolfe to admit to his gross negligence, allowing his driver to hit one of the demonstrators,  consenting to the physical violence of bystanders, and lastly refusing to intervene when  Columbia Police Department used excessive force with demonstrators.

II. We demand the immediate removal of Tim Wolfe as UM system president. After his removal  a new amendment to UM system policies must be established to have all future UM system  president and Chancellor positions be selected by a collective of students, staff, and faculty of  diverse backgrounds.

III. We demand that the University of Missouri meets the Legion of Black Collegians’ demands  that were presented in 1969 for the betterment of the black community.

IV. We demand that the University of Missouri creates and enforces comprehensive racial  awareness and inclusion curriculum throughout all campus departments and units, mandatory  for all students, faculty, staff, and administration. This curriculum must be vetted, maintained,  and overseen by a board comprised of students, staff, and faculty of color.

V. We demand that by the academic year 2017­2018, the University of Missouri increases the  percentage of black faculty and staff campus­wide to 10%.

VI. We demand that the University of Missouri composes a strategic 10 year plan by May 1,  2016 that will increase retention rates for marginalized students, sustain diversity curriculum and  training, and promote a more safe and inclusive campus.

VII. We demand that the University of Missouri increases funding and resources for the  University of Missouri Counseling Center for the purpose of hiring additional mental health  professionals; particularly those of color, boosting mental health outreach and programming  across campus, increasing campus­wide awareness and visibility of the counseling center, and  reducing lengthy wait times for prospective clients.

VIII. We demand that the University of Missouri increases funding, resources, and personnel for  the social justices centers on campus for the purpose of hiring additional professionals,  particularly those of color, boosting outreach and programming across campus, and increasing  campus­wide awareness and visibility.

http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/columbiatribune.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/45/345ad844-9f05-5479-9b64-e4b362b4e155/563fd24f5a949.pdf.pdf

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