The Pronk Pops Show 285, June 25, 2014, Story 2: The Obama Recession Kicks In With First Quarter 2014 Real Gross Domestic Product of -2.9% — Videos

Posted on June 25, 2014. Filed under: American History, Banking System, Blogroll, Budgetary Policy, Business, Communications, Computers, Constitutional Law, Economics, Education, Employment, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Government, Government Dependency, Government Spending, History, Illegal Immigration, Immigration, Investments, Labor Economics, Law, Media, Monetary Policy, Philosophy, Photos, Politics, Pro Life, Radio, Regulation, Tax Policy, Taxes, Unemployment, Videos, Wealth, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Project_1

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts

Pronk Pops Show 285 June 25, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 284: June 23, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 283: June 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 282: June 19, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 281: June 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 280: June 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 279: June 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 278: June 12, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 277: June 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 276: June 10, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 275: June 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 274: June 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 273: June 5, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 272: June 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 271: June 2, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 270: May 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 269: May 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 268: May 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 267: May 27, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 266: May 23, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 265: May 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 264: May 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 263: May 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 262: May 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 261: May 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 260: May 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 259: May 13, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 258: May 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 257: May 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 256: May 5, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 255: May 2, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 254: May 1, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 253: April 30, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 252: April 29, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 251: April 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 250: April 25, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 249: April 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 248: April 22, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 247: April 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 246: April 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 245: April 16, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 244: April 15, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 243: April 14, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 242: April 11, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 241: April 10, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 240: April 9, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 239: April 8, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 238: April 7, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 237: April 4, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 236: April 3, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 235: March 31, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 234: March 28, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 233: March 27, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 232: March 26, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 231: March 25, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 230: March 24, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 229: March 21, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 228: March 20, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 227: March 19, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 226: March 18, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 225: March 17, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 224: March 7, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 223: March 6, 2014

Pronk Pops Show 222: March 3, 2014

Story 2: The Obama Recession Kicks In With First Quarter 2014  Real Gross Domestic Product of  -2.9% — Videos

 

gdp_large

The Incredible Shrinking Economy GDP falls 2.9% in first quarter – Lonewolf Sager

US GDP Drops

Gold Ends Near Steady But Up From Early Low, Lifted By Weak U.S. Data

BBC News US GDP Shrinking economy hits small businesses

Dr. Paul Craig Roberts: Fed Laundering Treasury Bonds in Belgium, Real GDP was Negative & More

Marc Chandler looks at ECB policy & Catherine Austin Fitts on tech & future econ

Free Markets and Small Government Produce Prosperity

Deficits are Bad, but the Real Problem is Spending

Keynesian Economics Is Wrong: Bigger Gov’t Is Not Stimulus

Eight Reasons Why Big Government Hurts Economic Growth

The Empirical Evidence Against Big Government

Fiscal and Monetary Policy Overview

Income and Expenditure Views of GDP

Components of GDP

Introduction to Gross Domestic Product

This video introduces the concept of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measure of aggregate output or income and describes what is included in GDP.

Calculating Gross Domestic Product

 

 

MASSIVE GDP PLUNGE

Economists estimated U.S. GDP contracted in the first quarter, but not by this much.

 

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, GDP fell 2.9% at an annualized rate in Q1. This third estimate was down sharply from the BEA’s previous estimate of -1.0%.

This was also much worse than the -1.8% forecast by economists.

As expected, healthcare spending was revised down sharply. It went from adding 1.01 percentage points to subtracting 0.16 from the headline GDP growth number.

“It marked the second biggest downward revision from the agency’s second GDP estimate since records began in 1976,” reported Bloomberg’s Jeanna Smialek.

From the BEA: “The decrease in real GDP in the first quarter primarily reflected negative contributions from private inventory investment, exports, state and local government spending, nonresidential fixed investment, and residential fixed investment that were partly offset by a positive contribution from PCE. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.”

Personal-consumption growth was slashed to 1.0% from 2.4%.

The buildup in inventories subtracted 1.7 percentage points from GDP.

Real final sales, or GDP less the change in private inventories, was revised to -1.3%. That’s down from +0.6% a month ago. It was +2.7% in Q4.
http://www.businessinsider.com/q1-gdp-third-release-2014-6

Bad to worse: US economy shrank more than expected in Q1

 

The U.S. economy contracted at a much steeper pace than previously estimated in the first quarter, but there are indications that growth has sincerebounded strongly.

The Commerce Department said on Wednesday gross domestic product fell at a 2.9 percent annual rate, the economy’s worst performance in five years, instead of the 1.0 percent pace it had reported last month.

While the economy’s woes have been largely blamed on an unusually cold winter, the magnitude of the revisions suggest other factors at play beyond the weather. Growth has now been revised down by a total of 3.0 percentage points since the government’s first estimate was published in April, which hadthe economy expanding at a 0.1 percent rate.

The difference between the second and third estimates was the largest on records going back to 1976, the Commerce Department said. Economists had expected growth to be revised to show it contracting at a 1.7 percent rate. Sharp revisions to GDP numbers are not unusual as the government does not have complete data when it makes its initial and preliminary estimates.

The latest revisions reflect a weaker pace of healthcare spending than previously assumed, which caused a downgrading of the consumer spending estimate. Trade was also a bigger drag on the economy than previously thought. The economy grew at a 2.6 percent pace in the final three months of 2013. With the first quarter in the rear view and the April-June period looking stronger, investors are likely to ignore the report.

Data such as employment, manufacturing and services sectors point to a sharp acceleration in growth early in the second quarter. However, the pace of expansion could fall short of expectations, which range as high as a 3.6 percent rate. Economists estimate severe weather could have slashed asmuch as 1.5 percentage points from GDP growth in the first quarter. The government, however, gave no details on the impact of the weather.

Consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. economic activity, increased at a 1.0 percent rate. It was previously reported to have advanced at a 3.1 percent pace. Exports declined at a 8.9 percent rate, instead of 6.0 percent pace, resulting in a trade deficit that sliced off 1.53 percentage points from GDP growth. Weak export growth has been tied to frigid temperatures during the winter.

Businesses accumulated $45.9 billion worth of inventories, a bit less than the $49.0 billion estimated last month. Inventories subtracted 1.70 percentage points from first-quarter growth, but should be a boost to second-quarter growth.

A measure of domestic demand that strips out exports and inventories expanded at a 0.3 percent rate, rather than a 1.6 percent rate.

Durables tumble by more than expected

A separate report showed orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods unexpectedly fell in May, suggesting an anticipated rebound in growth this quarter could fall short of expectations, even as a measure of business capital spending plans rose.

The Commerce Department said durable goods orders declined 1.0 percent as demand for transportation, machinery, computers and electronic products, electrical equipment, appliances and components, and defense capital goods fell.

Orders for durable goods, items ranging from toasters to aircraft that are meant to last three years or more, increased by a revised 0.8 percent in April, when they were boosted by defense equipment.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast orders being flat last month after April’s previously reported 0.6 percent gain.

Non-defense capital goods orders excluding aircraft, a closely watched proxy for business spending plans, increased 0.7 percent after declining by a revised 1.1 percent in April.

Economists had expected orders for these so-called core capital goods to increase 0.5 percent after April’s previously reported 1.2 percent fall.

The increase in core capital goods points to some pick-up in business spending, which should support second-quarter growth.

While the economy has rebounded from its winter-induced slump in the first quarter, data such as retail sales and housing starts suggest growth could fall short of expectations. Growth forecasts range as high as a 3.6 percent annual pace. The economy shrunk at a 2.9 percent rate in the first quarter.

Core capital goods shipments rose 0.4 percent last month. Shipments of core capital goods are used to calculate equipment spending in the government’s GDP measurement. They had declined 0.4 percent in April.

Last month, orders for transportation equipment fell 3.0 percent as bookings for civilian aircraft fell 4.0 percent. Automobile orders increased 2.1 percent. Orders excluding transportation slipped 0.1 percent after rising 0.4 percent the prior month.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101787838

 

U.S. GDP Dropped 2.9% In The First Quarter 2014, Down Sharply From Second Estimate

The latest data shows the U.S. economy contracted significantly more than previously estimated in the first quarter of this year.

On Wednesday, the Bureau of Economic Analysis released its third and final estimate of real gross domestic product for the first three months of 2014. The release showed output in the U.S. declining at an annual rate of 2.9%. This is relative to fourth quarter 2013, when real GDP grew 2.6%.

The final number is also down from BEA’s negative 1% second estimate released last month and even more sharply from its first estimate that showed GDP growing 0.1%. While this makes Q1 the economy’s worst since Q1 2009, the heart of the recession, economists were anticipating the further downward revision.

“The bad weather in much of the U.S. in early 2014 was a significant drag on the economy, disrupting production, construction, and shipments, and deterring home and auto sales,” wrote PNC Senior Economist Gus Faucher in a note out prior to the release. “But data show growth rebounding in the second quarter, with improvements in home and auto sales and residential construction.”

The major stock indices slipped into the red as the opening bell approached but quickly returned to positive territory. This seems to indicate that investors were also writing off the contraction as temporary.

In an interview following the release Stephen Auth, Chief Investment Officer at Federated Investors, called the revision “pretty incredible” but says that underlying trends have shown improvement that has simply been “masked” by the weather. He expects second quarter GDP growth to come in north of 4% and continual market gains.

The revision, BEA explained in a release, was largely due to a smaller than previously estimated increase in personal consumption and larger that previously estimated decline in exports. The 2.9% decrease in real GDP reflected the negative contribution from exports as well as declines in private inventory investment  both residential and nonresidential fixed investment and lower local government spending. The rate was also negatively impacted by an increase in imports but partially offset by an increase in federal government spending (the first in a year and a half) and in personal consumption.

The price index for gross domestic purchases — which measures prices paid by U.S. residents — increased 1.3% in line with the prior estimate and compared to 1.5% growth in the fourth quarter. Real personal consumption expenditures increased by 1%, down sharply from the 3.1% second estimate and from the increase of 3.3% in the fourth quarter.

BEA — a division of the Department of Commerce – will release its advance estimate of Q2 GDP estimate on July 30.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/samanthasharf/2014/06/25/u-s-gdp-dropped-2-9-in-the-first-quarter-2014-sharply-lower-from-second-estimate/

 

EMBARGOED UNTIL RELEASE AT 8:30 A.M. EDT, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014
BEA 14-28

* See the navigation bar at the right side of the news release text for links to data tables,
contact personnel and their telephone numbers, and supplementary materials.

Lisa S. Mataloni: (202) 606-5304 (GDP) gdpniwd@bea.gov
Kate Shoemaker: (202) 606-5564 (Profits) cpniwd@bea.gov
Jeannine Aversa: (202) 606-2649 (News Media)
National Income and Product Accounts
Gross Domestic Product: First Quarter 2014 (Third Estimate)
Corporate Profits: First Quarter 2014 (Revised Estimate)
      Real gross domestic product -- the output of goods and services produced by labor and property
located in the United States -- decreased at an annual rate of 2.9 percent in the first quarter of 2014
according to the "third" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.  In the fourth quarter of
2013, real GDP increased 2.6 percent.

      The GDP estimate released today is based on more complete source data than were available for
the "second" estimate issued last month.  In the second estimate, real GDP was estimated to have
decreased 1.0 percent.  With the third estimate for the first quarter, the increase in personal consumption
expenditures (PCE) was smaller than previously estimated, and the decline in exports was larger than
previously estimated (for more information, see "Revisions" on page 3).

      The decrease in real GDP in the first quarter primarily reflected negative contributions from
private inventory investment, exports, state and local government spending, nonresidential fixed
investment, and residential fixed investment that were partly offset by a positive contribution from PCE.
Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.

BOX.____________

                     Annual Revision of the National Income and Product Accounts

      The annual revision of the national income and product accounts will be released along with the
"advance" estimate of GDP for the second quarter of 2014 on July 30.  In addition to the regular revision
of estimates for the most recent 3 years and for the first quarter of 2014, GDP and select components
will be revised back to the first quarter of 1999.  More information is available in "Preview of Upcoming
NIPA Revision" in the May Survey of Current Business and on BEA's Web site.
The August Survey will contain an article describing the annual revision in detail.

FOOTNOTE.______

      Quarterly estimates are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, unless otherwise
specified.  Quarter-to-quarter dollar changes are differences between these published estimates.  Percent
changes are calculated from unrounded data and are annualized.  "Real" estimates are in chained (2009)
dollars.  Price indexes are chain-type measures.

      This news release is available on BEA’s Web site along with the Technical Note and Highlights
related to this release. For information on revisions, see "Revisions to GDP, GDI, and Their Major Components".

______________

      Real GDP declined 2.9 percent in the first quarter, after increasing 2.6 percent in the fourth.  This
downturn in the percent change in real GDP primarily reflected a downturn in exports, a larger decrease
in private inventory investment, a deceleration in PCE, and downturns in nonresidential fixed
investment and in state and local government spending that were partly offset by an upturn in federal
government spending.

      The price index for gross domestic purchases, which measures prices paid by U.S. residents,
increased 1.3 percent in the first quarter, the same increase as in the second estimate; this index
increased 1.5 percent in the fourth quarter.  Excluding food and energy prices, the price index for gross
domestic purchases increased 1.3 percent in the first quarter, compared with an increase of 1.8 percent in
the fourth.

      Real personal consumption expenditures increased 1.0 percent in the first quarter, compared with
an increase of 3.3 percent in the fourth.  Durable goods increased 1.2 percent, compared with an increase
of 2.8 percent.  Nondurable goods decreased 0.3 percent, in contrast to an increase of 2.9 percent.
Services increased 1.5 percent, compared with an increase of 3.5 percent.

      Real nonresidential fixed investment decreased 1.2 percent in the first quarter, in contrast to an
increase of 5.7 percent in the fourth.  Nonresidential structures decreased 7.7 percent, compared with a
decrease of 1.8 percent.  Equipment decreased 2.8 percent, in contrast to an increase of 10.9 percent.
Intellectual property products increased 6.3 percent, compared with an increase of 4.0 percent.  Real
residential fixed investment decreased 4.2 percent, compared with a decrease of 7.9 percent.

      Real exports of goods and services decreased 8.9 percent in the first quarter, in contrast to an
increase of 9.5 percent in the fourth.  Real imports of goods and services increased 1.8 percent,
compared with an increase of 1.5 percent.

      Real federal government consumption expenditures and gross investment increased 0.6 percent
in the first quarter, in contrast to a decrease of 12.8 percent in the fourth.  National defense decreased 2.5
percent, compared with a decrease of 14.4 percent.  Nondefense increased 5.9 percent, in contrast to a
decrease of 10.0 percent.  Real state and local government consumption expenditures and gross
investment decreased 1.7 percent; it was unchanged in the fourth quarter.

      The change in real private inventories subtracted 1.70 percentage points from the first-quarter
change in real GDP, after subtracting 0.02 percentage point from the fourth-quarter change.  Private
businesses increased inventories $45.9 billion in the first quarter, following increases of $111.7 billion
in the fourth quarter and $115.7 billion in the third.

      Real final sales of domestic product -- GDP less change in private inventories -- decreased 1.3
percent in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of 2.7 percent in the fourth.


Gross domestic purchases

      Real gross domestic purchases -- purchases by U.S. residents of goods and services wherever
produced -- decreased 1.4 percent in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of 1.6 percent in the
fourth.


Gross national product

      Real gross national product -- the goods and services produced by the labor and property
supplied by U.S. residents -- decreased 3.6 percent in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of 3.1
percent in the fourth.  GNP includes, and GDP excludes, net receipts of income from the rest of the
world, which decreased $27.4 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of $17.0 billion in the
fourth; in the first quarter, receipts decreased $9.8 billion, and payments increased $17.6 billion.


Current-dollar GDP

      Current-dollar GDP -- the market value of the nation's output of goods and services -- decreased
1.7 percent, or $73.6 billion, in the first quarter to a level of $17,016.0 billion.  In the fourth quarter,
current-dollar GDP increased 4.2 percent, or $176.7 billion.


Gross domestic income

      Real gross domestic income (GDI), which measures the output of the economy as the costs
incurred and the incomes earned in the production of GDP, decreased 2.6 percent in the first quarter, in
contrast to an increase of 2.6 percent in the fourth.  For a given quarter, the estimates of GDP and GDI
may differ for a variety of reasons, including the incorporation of largely independent source data.
However, over longer time spans, the estimates of GDP and GDI tend to follow similar patterns of
change.


Revisions

      The downward revision to the percent change in real GDP primarily reflected downward
revisions to personal consumption expenditures and to exports and an upward revision to imports.


                                            Advance Estimate  Second Estimate  Third Estimate
                                                  (Percent change from preceding quarter)
Real GDP.....................................        0.1           -1.0           -2.9
Current-dollar GDP...........................        1.4            0.3           -1.7
Real GDI.....................................         …            -2.3           -2.6
Gross domestic purchases price index.........        1.4            1.3            1.3



                                          Corporate Profits

Profits from current production

      Profits from current production (corporate profits with inventory valuation adjustment (IVA) and
capital consumption adjustment (CCAdj)) decreased $198.3 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to an
increase of $47.1 billion in the fourth.  The IVA decreased $33.2 billion, compared with a decrease of
$0.5 billion.  The CCAdj decreased $195.3 billion, compared with a decrease of $1.5 billion.  The IVA
and CCAdj convert inventory withdrawals and depreciation of fixed assets reported on a tax-return,
historical-cost basis to the current-cost economic measures used in the national income and product
accounts.

      Taxes on corporate income increased $27.8 billion in the first quarter, compared with an increase
of $13.3 billion in the fourth.  Profits after tax with IVA and CCAdj decreased $226.0 billion, in contrast
to an increase of $33.8 billion.  The first-quarter changes in taxes on corporate income and in the CCAdj
mainly reflect the expiration of bonus depreciation provisions.  For further explanation, see the box
below.

      Dividends decreased $87.1 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to an increase of $90.5 billion
in the fourth.  Undistributed profits decreased $139.1 billion, compared with a decrease of $56.7 billion.
Net cash flow with IVA -- the internal funds available to corporations for investment -- decreased
$119.5 billion, compared with a decrease of $43.0 billion.

BOX.________

                    Impacts of Bonus Depreciation on the First Quarter of 2014

      The first-quarter changes in taxes on corporate income and in the capital consumption
adjustment (CCAdj) mainly reflect the expiration of both the 50-percent bonus depreciation provision
and increased Section 179 expensing limits claimed under the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012.
For detailed data, see the table "Net Effects of the Tax Acts of 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012
on Selected Measures of Corporate Profits".

             Bonus depreciation does not affect profits from current production.  Profits from current
production are based on consistent depreciation profiles of fixed assets valued at current cost, not on the
depreciation-accounting practices used for federal income tax returns. For a discussion on the effect of
tax act provisions on the CCAdj, see FAQ 1002, "How do the economic stimulus acts impact NIPA
Corporate Profits?".

____________

      The rest-of-the-world component of profits decreased $25.7 billion in the first quarter, in contrast
to an increase of $22.9 billion in the fourth.  This measure is calculated as the difference between
receipts from the rest of the world and payments to the rest of the world.


Domestic corporate profits with IVA

      Profits of financial corporations decreased $52.6 billion in the first quarter, in contrast to an
increase of $6.1 billion in the fourth.  This decrease was almost entirely accounted for by "other"
financial industries.  Profits of nonfinancial corporations increased $75.4 billion, compared with an
increase of $19.5 billion.  This increase primarily reflected increases in "other" nonfinancial industries,
in utilities industries, in durable-goods manufacturing industries, and in information industries that were
partly offset by a decrease in nondurable-goods manufacturing industries.


Gross value added of nonfinancial domestic corporate business

       In the first quarter, both real gross value added of nonfinancial corporations and profits per unit
of real value decreased.  The decrease in unit profits reflected increases in unit labor and nonlabor costs
incurred by corporations that were partly offset by an increase in unit prices.


                                        *          *          *


       BEA's national, international, regional, and industry estimates; the Survey of Current Business;
and BEA news releases are available without charge on BEA's Web site at www.bea.gov.  By visiting
the site, you can also subscribe to receive free e-mail summaries of BEA releases and announcements.


                                        *          *          *


                          Next release -- July 30, 2014 at 8:30 A.M. EDT for:
                   Gross Domestic Product:  Second Quarter 2014 (Advance Estimate)
                     Annual Revision of the National Income and Product Accounts

Related Posts On Pronk Pops

The Pronk Pops Show 285, June 25, 2014, Story 1: Tea Party Candidates Get Knocked Downed But Not Out — it is not who wins or loses but how you play the game — Lost But Won — Make The Rest Of Your Life, The Best of Your Life — Live Your Dreams — Videos

The Pronk Pops Show 285, June 25, 2014, Story 3: IRS Credibility Problem In Free Fall — Cover-Up and Stonewalling Continues — Republicans Are Still Not Asking The Right Questions To The Right Witnesses (IRS IT Supervisors) — Provide Us The Server Hard Drive Copies of Lois Lerner’s Emails — House Select Committee Needed Months Ago! —  Games People Play — Videos

 

The Pronk Pops Show Podcasts Portfolio

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 277-285

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 264-276

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 250-263

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 236-249

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 222-235

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 211-221

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or DownloadShow 202-210

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 194-201

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 184-193

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 174-183

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 165-173

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 158-164

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 151-157

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 143-150

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 135-142

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 131-134

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 124-130

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 121-123

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 118-120

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 113 -117

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Show 112

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 108-111

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 106-108

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 104-105

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 101-103

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 98-100

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 94-97

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 93

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 92

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 91

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 88-90

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 84-87

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 79-83

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 74-78

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 71-73

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 68-70

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 65-67

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 62-64

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 58-61

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 55-57

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 52-54

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 49-51

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 45-48

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 41-44

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 38-40

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 34-37

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 30-33

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 27-29

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 17-26

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 01-09

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: