Pronk Pops Show 23, April 12, 2011: Segment 2:The FairTax (National Consumption Sales Tax) vs. The Flat Tax (One Rate Federal Income Tax)–Who Pays The Most Federal Individual Income Tax? Videos

Posted on April 11, 2011. Filed under: American History, Budgetary Policy, Business, Economics, Federal Government, Fiscal Policy, Government, Government Spending, History, Philosophy, Politics, Radio, Tax Policy, Violence, War, Wisdom | Tags: , , , |



Pronk Pops Show 23: April 12,  2011

Pronk Pops Show 22 (Part 2): April 7,  2011

Pronk Pops Show 22 (Part 1): April 7,  2011

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 22 (Part 2)-23

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 16-22 (Part 1)

Listen To Pronk  Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1-9


Segment 2: The FairTax (National Consumption Sales Tax) vs. The Flat Tax (One Rate Federal Income Tax)–Who Pays The Most Federal Individual Income Tax? Videos

“The income tax created more criminals than any other single act of government.”
~Barry Goldwater

Income Tax vs. Consumption Tax

 

What is the FairTax legislation?

“…What is the FairTax plan?

The FairTax plan is a comprehensive proposal that replaces all federal income and payroll based taxes with an integrated approach including a progressive national retail sales tax, a prebate to ensure no American pays federal taxes on spending up to the poverty level, dollar-for-dollar federal revenue neutrality, and, through companion legislation, the repeal of the 16th Amendment.

The FairTax Act (HR 25, S 13) is nonpartisan legislation. It abolishes all federal personal and corporate income taxes, gift, estate, capital gains, alternative minimum, Social Security, Medicare, and self-employment taxes and replaces them with one simple, visible, federal retail sales tax administered primarily by existing state sales tax authorities.

The FairTax taxes us only on what we choose to spend on new goods or services, not on what we earn. The FairTax is a fair, efficient, transparent, and intelligent solution to the frustration and inequity of our current tax system.

The FairTax:

  • Enables workers to keep their entire paychecks
  • Enables retirees to keep their entire pensions
  • Refunds in advance the tax on purchases of basic necessities
  • Allows American products to compete fairly
  • Brings transparency and accountability to tax policy
  • Ensures Social Security and Medicare funding
  • Closes all loopholes and brings fairness to taxation
  • Abolishes the IRS

We offer a library of information throughout this Web site about the features and benefits of the FairTax plan. Please explore! …”

http://www.fairtax.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_main

 

The FairTax: It’s Time

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 1

 

Why is the FairTax better than a flat income tax?

 

Dan Mitchell explains the fair tax

 

Laura Ingraham Interviews John Linder And Steve Forbes On Fair Tax Or Flat Tax

 

Five Key Reasons to Reject Class-Warfare Tax Policy

Who Pays Federal Income Taxes?

 

Uncle Sam Wants Your Money

 

It’s Simple to Balance The Budget Without Higher Taxes

Controlling Leviathan: The Battle for Limited Government

Question and Answer Session: The Fight Against Big Government

 

Table 1
Summary of Federal Individual Income Tax Data, 2008

(Updated October 2010)

Number of Returns with Positive AGI AGI
($ millions)
Income Taxes Paid
($ millions)
Group’s Share of Total AGI Group’s Share of Income Taxes Income Split Point Average Tax Rate
All Taxpayers 139,960,580 8,426,625 1,031,512 100% 100% 12.24%
Top 1% 1,399,606 1,685,472 392,149 20.00% 38.02% $380,354 23.27%
1-5% 5,598,423 1,241,229 213,569 14.73% 20.70% 17.21%
Top 5% 6,998,029 2,926,701 605,718 34.73% 58.72% $159,619 20.70%
5-10% 6,998,029 929,761 115,703 11.03% 11.22% 12.44%
Top 10% 13,996,058 3,856,462 721,421 45.77% 69.94% $113,799 18.71%
10-25% 20,994,087 1,821,717 169,193 21.62% 16.40% 9.29%
Top 25% 34,990,145 5,678,179 890,614 67.38% 86.34% $67,280 15.68%
25-50% 34,990,145 1,673,932 113,025 19.86% 10.96% 6.75%
Top 50% 69,980,290 7,352,111 1,003,639 87.25% 97.30% >$33,048 13.65%
Bottom 50% 69,980,290 1,074,514 27,873 12.75% 2.70% <$33,048 2.59%
Source: Internal Revenue Service Table 6 

Total Income Tax Shares, 1980-2008 (Percent of federal income tax paid by each group)
Year Total Top 0.1% Top 1% Top 5% Between 5% & 10% Top 10% Between 10% & 25% Top 25% Between 25% & 50% Top 50% Bottom 50%
1980 100% 19.05% 36.84% 12.44% 49.28% 23.74% 73.02% 19.93% 92.95% 7.05%
1981 100% 17.58% 35.06% 12.90% 47.96% 24.33% 72.29% 20.26% 92.55% 7.45%
1982 100% 19.03% 36.13% 12.45% 48.59% 23.91% 72.50% 20.15% 92.65% 7.35%
1983 100% 20.32% 37.26% 12.44% 49.71% 23.39% 73.10% 19.73% 92.83% 7.17%
1984 100% 21.12% 37.98% 12.58% 50.56% 22.92% 73.49% 19.16% 92.65% 7.35%
1985 100% 21.81% 38.78% 12.67% 51.46% 22.60% 74.06% 18.77% 92.83% 7.17%
1986 100% 25.75% 42.57% 12.12% 54.69% 21.33% 76.02% 17.52% 93.54% 6.46%
Tax Reform Act of 1986 changed the definition of AGI, so data above and below this line not strictly comparable
1987 100% 24.81% 43.26% 12.35% 55.61% 21.31% 76.92% 17.02% 93.93% 6.07%
1988 100% 27.58% 45.62% 11.66% 57.28% 20.57% 77.84% 16.44% 94.28% 5.72%
1989 100% 25.24% 43.94% 11.85% 55.78% 21.44% 77.22% 16.94% 94.17% 5.83%
1990 100% 25.13% 43.64% 11.73% 55.36% 21.66% 77.02% 17.16% 94.19% 5.81%
1991 100% 24.82% 43.38% 12.45% 55.82% 21.46% 77.29% 17.23% 94.52% 5.48%
1992 100% 27.54% 45.88% 12.12% 58.01% 20.47% 78.48% 16.46% 94.94% 5.06%
1993 100% 29.01% 47.36% 11.88% 59.24% 20.03% 79.27% 15.92% 95.19% 4.81%
1994 100% 28.86% 47.52% 11.93% 59.45% 20.10% 79.55% 15.68% 95.23% 4.77%
1995 100% 30.26% 48.91% 11.84% 60.75% 19.62% 80.36% 15.03% 95.39% 4.61%
1996 100% 32.31% 50.97% 11.54% 62.51% 18.80% 81.32% 14.36% 95.68% 4.32%
1997 100% 33.17% 51.87% 11.33% 63.20% 18.47% 81.67% 14.05% 95.72% 4.28%
1998 100% 34.75% 53.84% 11.20% 65.04% 17.65% 82.69% 13.10% 95.79% 4.21%
1999 100% 36.18% 55.45% 11.00% 66.45% 17.09% 83.54% 12.46% 96.00% 4.00%
2000 100% 37.42% 56.47% 10.86% 67.33% 16.68% 84.01% 12.08% 96.09% 3.91%
2001 100% 16.06% 33.89% 53.25% 11.64% 64.89% 18.01% 82.90% 13.13% 96.03% 3.97%
2002 100% 15.43% 33.71% 53.80% 11.94% 65.73% 18.16% 83.90% 12.60% 96.50% 3.50%
2003 100% 15.68% 34.27% 54.36% 11.48% 65.84% 18.04% 83.88% 12.65% 96.54% 3.46%
2004 100% 17.44% 36.89% 57.13% 11.07% 68.19% 16.67% 84.86% 11.85% 96.70% 3.30%
2005 100% 19.26% 39.38% 59.67% 10.63% 70.30% 15.69% 85.99% 10.94% 96.93% 3.07%
2006 100% 19.56% 39.89% 60.14% 10.65% 70.79% 15.47% 86.27% 10.75% 97.01% 2.99%
2007 100% 20.19% 40.41% 60.61% 10.59% 71.20% 15.37% 86.57% 10.54% 97.11% 2.89%
2008 100% 18.47% 38.02% 58.72% 11.22% 69.94% 16.40% 86.34% 10.96% 97.30% 2.70%
Source: IRS

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.taxfoundation.org/news/show/250.html

US State Sales Tax Rates – 2010
State
State sales tax rate (January 1st, 2010)%
Alabama
4.0
Alaska
nil
Arizona
5.6
Arkansas
6.0
California
8.25
Colorado
2.9
Connecticut
6.0
Delaware
nil
Florida
6.0
Georgia
4.0
Hawaii
4.0
Idaho
6.0
Illinois
6.25
Indiana
7.0
Iowa
6.0
Kansas
5.3
Kentucky
6.0
Louisiana
4.0
Maine
5.0
Maryland
6.0
Massachusetts
6.25
Michigan
6.0
Minnesota
6.875
Mississippi
7.0
Missouri
4.225
Montana
nil
Nebraska
5.5
Nevada
6.85
New Hampshire
nil
New Jersey
7.0
New Mexico
5.0
New York
4.0
North Carolina
5.75
North Dakota
5.0
Ohio
5.5
Oklahoma
4.5
Oregon
nil
Pennsylvania
6.0
Rhode Island
7.0
South Carolina
6.0
South Dakota
4.0
Tennessee
7.0
Texas
6.25
Utah
4.7
Vermont
6.0
Virginia
5.0
West Virginia
6.0
Wisconsin
5.0
Washington
6.5
Washington DC
6.0
Wyoming
4.0

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.usa-sales-use-tax-e-commerce.com/table_sales_rates.asp

The 48 Contiguous States and DC
Persons in family Poverty guideline
1 $10,830
2 14,570
3 18,310
4 22,050
5 25,790
6 29,530
7 33,270
8 37,010
For families with more than 8 persons, add $3,740 for each additional person.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.atdn.org/access/poverty.html

 

Background Articles and Videos

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 1

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 2

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 3

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 4

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 5

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 6

 

Tom Wright on the FairTax part 7

 

Why is the FairTax better than other tax reform efforts?

 

Does the FairTax repeal the federal income tax?

 

How does the FairTax affect the economy?

 

Is the FairTax truly progressive?

 

How does the “prebate” work?

 

Is it fair for rich people to get the same prebate as poor people?

 

Do corporations get a windfall break from the FairTax?

 

How do we keep exemptions and exclusions from undermining the FairTax?

 

Wouldn’t it be more fair to exempt food and medicine from the FairTax?

 

How does the FairTax rate compare to today’s?

 

Is the FairTax rate really 23%?

 

How is the FairTax different from a Value Added Tax (VAT)?

 

Will the prebate create a massive new entitlement system?

 

How does the FairTax impact the middle class?

 

How will the FairTax impact seniors?

 

How does the FairTax affect tax preparers and CPAs?

 

How does the FairTax impact charitable giving?

 

 

How does the FairTax affect compliance costs?

 

Will the FairTax hurt home ownership with no mortgage interest deduction?

 

Will the FairTax hurt home ownership with no mortgage interest deduction?

 

How will the FairTax help people who don’t hire an accountant?

 

How will the FairTax impact people who don’t file income taxes?

 

Will the FairTax drive the economy down if people stop buying?

 

How will the FairTax affect state sales tax systems?

 

Are any significant economies funded by a sales tax?

 

Is education taxed under the FairTax?

 

Will government pay taxes under the FairTax?

 

Will the FairTax impact tax deferred retirement accounts like 401(k)s?

 

What will happen to cities who depend on tax free bonds?

How does the FairTax impact tax free bonds?

 

How will Social Security payments be calculated under the FairTax?

 

What will happen to government programs like Social Security and Medicare?

 

How can you tax life saving medical treatment?

 

Will bartering present a compliance problem under the FairTax?

 

How will used goods be taxed?

 

Can’t Americans just cross the border to avoid the FairTax

 

How does the FairTax affect illegal immigration?

 

Isn’t it a stretch to say the IRS will go away?

 

What will the transition be like from the income tax to the FairTax?

 

FairTax Show – Part 1

 

FairTax Show – Part 2

 

Ron Paul on Taxes

Policy Resources

The following organizations provide policy analysis on taxation and related issues:

Tax Policy Organizations:

Small Business Policy Organizations:

General Public Policy Research Organizations:

http://www.fairtax.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_links

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