Pronk Pops Show 15: February 8, 2011–From Texas Snow Storm To Washington Snow Job–Lies, Damn Lies, Statistics and Obama’s Unbelievable Unemployment Numbers–Obama Care Unconstitutional and Void–Part 2–Videos

Posted on February 8, 2011. Filed under: Business, Climate Change, College, Culture, Economics, Education, Government, Government Spending, History, Politics, Radio, Videos, Wisdom | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Pronk Pops Show 15: February 8, 2011 Hour 1 

Pronk Pops Show 15: February 8, 2011 Hour 2 

Pronk Pops Show 15: February 8, 2011 Hour 3

 

Listen To Pronk  Pops Podcast or Download Shows 10-15

Listen To Pronk Pops Podcast or Download Shows 1-9

 

“There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.”

~Benjamin Disraeli

Unemployment Falls to 9.0%, Only 36K New Jobs

The Shadow Unemployed

Rush – Obama Administration Is Massaging Unemployment Rate When It Is Really Seventeen Percent

 

What Clues Does ‘Strange’ Unemployment Report Hold?

 

 DAVID STOCKMAN: “WHERE ARE THE HALF-MILLION JOBS?” 2-4-2011

BLS U-3 Unemployment Rate Explained

The Unemployment Deception (9% Jobless, only 36k jobs in Jan )

How is Unemployment Going Down? BLS = BS

Low Job Numbers Blamed on Weather, Apprehensive Companies

Peter Schiff Video Blog – February 4, 2011

In October 2008 the United States Civilian Labor Force Level peaked at an estimated 154,953,000 or about 155 million.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics defines the labor force as all civilians classified as employed and unemployed.

The employed are those who work for pay for themselves or someone else or who work 15 hours or more as unpaid workers in a family-operated business.

Also included among the employed are those who were temporarily absent from work for reasons such as illness and child-care problems.

The unemployed include individuals who had no job but were available for work and looking for employment.

The civilian labor force grows approximately 100,000 to 150,000 each month from population growth as new entrants into the labor market either graduate or drop-out from high school and college and seek employment or their first job in the labor market.

Had the economy not gone into a recession in 2008 and 2009, the United States Labor Force Level would have grown approximately 2,700,000 to 3,700,000 over the 27 month period ending January 31, 2011.

In other words the civilian labor force level should be between 157,700,000 and 158,700,000 due to population growth alone by the end of 2010.

Yet in January 2011 the total estimated civilian labor force level was only 153,186,000 well below the peak level of October 2008 and the expected normal population growth levels.

The United States economy is simply not creating enough jobs each month to keep up with population growth as new entrants enter the labor market to seek employment.

Civilian Labor Force Level

http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet

Series Id:           LNS11000000 Seasonally Adjusted Series title:        (Seas) Civilian Labor Force Level
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 143800 143701 143924 143569 143318 143357 143654 143284 143989 144086 144240 144305  
2002 143883 144653 144481 144725 144938 144808 144803 145009 145552 145314 145041 145066  
2003 145937(1) 146100 146022 146474 146500 147056 146485 146445 146530 146716 147000 146729  
2004 146842(1) 146709 146944 146850 147065 147460 147692 147564 147415 147793 148162 148059  
2005 148029(1) 148364 148391 148926 149261 149238 149432 149779 149954 150001 150065 150030  
2006 150214(1) 150641 150813 150881 151069 151354 151377 151716 151662 152041 152406 152732  
2007 153133(1) 152966 153054 152446 152666 153038 153035 152756 153422 153209 153845 153936  
2008 154060(1) 153624 153924 153779 154322 154315 154432 154656 154613 154953 154621 154669  
2009 154185(1) 154424 154100 154453 154805 154754 154457 154362 153940 154022 153795 153172  
2010 153353(1) 153558 153895 154520 154237 153684 153628 154117 154124 153960 153950 153690  
2011 153186(1)                        
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

In order to reduce the official unemployment rate by .1% each month requires the creation of between 250,000 and 300,000 jobs per month.

The 300,000 jobs per month number includes new entrants into the labor force of about 150,000 plus another 150,000 or .1% of the civilian labor force.

Thus to reduce the official unemployment rate or U-3 by 1% per year requires the creation of approximately 3,600,000 jobs per year.

The 250,000 jobs per month number includes new entrants into the labor force of about 100,000 plus another 150,000 or .1% of the civilian labor force.

Thus to reduce the official unemployment rate or U-3 by 1% per year requires at the bare minimum the creation of approximately 3,000,000 jobs per year.

The United States economy has been creating less than half this number of new jobs.

The situation is actually much worse.

The civilian labor force participation rate represents the proportion of the working-age population either working or actively looking for work and is the relative size of labor resources available for the production of the United States economy goods and service.

The civilian labor force participation rate rose fairly steadily for more than six decades hitting a peak of 67.2% in March 2001.

The civilian labor force participation rate is normally between 66% and 67%.

Labor Force Participation Rate

http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet

Series Id:           LNS11300000 Seasonally Adjusted Series title:        (Seas) Labor Force Participation Rate
Labor force status:  Civilian labor force participation rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 67.2 67.1 67.2 66.9 66.7 66.7 66.8 66.5 66.8 66.7 66.7 66.7
2002 66.5 66.8 66.6 66.7 66.7 66.6 66.5 66.6 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.3
2003 66.4 66.4 66.3 66.4 66.4 66.5 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 65.9
2004 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.9 66.0 66.1 66.1 66.0 65.8 65.9 66.0 65.9
2005 65.8 65.9 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.0
2006 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.1 66.2 66.3 66.4
2007 66.4 66.3 66.2 65.9 66.0 66.0 66.0 65.8 66.0 65.8 66.0 66.0
2008 66.2 66.0 66.1 65.9 66.1 66.1 66.0 66.1 66.0 66.0 65.8 65.8
2009 65.7 65.7 65.6 65.6 65.7 65.7 65.5 65.4 65.1 65.1 65.0 64.7
2010 64.8 64.8 64.9 65.1 64.9 64.7 64.6 64.7 64.7 64.5 64.5 64.3
2011 64.2

However starting in December 2009 and continuing into February 2011 the civilian labor force participation rate had fallen below 65%.

January 2011 64.2% participation rate is the lowest in twenty-six years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US_Labor_Force_Participation_Rate.jpg

Over 6.6 million americans are so discouraged by the current unemployment situation that they have left the labor market.

BLS U-3 Unemployment Rate Explained

The U.S. employment level hit a peak in November 2007 at 146,504,000.

When President Bush left office in January 2009 the U.S. employment level had declined by over 3.3 million jobs to a level of 142,202,000.

Under President Obama the U.S employment level has declined even further by over 2.9 million jobs to a level of 139,323,00 in January 2011.

The U.S economy has lost over 7. 2 million jobs from November 2007 through January 2011.

Employment Level

http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet

 Series Id:           LNS12000000 Seasonally Adjusted Series title:        (Seas) Employment Level
Labor force status:  Employed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 137778 137612 137783 137299 137092 136873 137071 136241 136846 136392 136238 136047
2002 135701 136438 136177 136126 136539 136415 136413 136705 137302 137008 136521 136426
2003 137417(1) 137482 137434 137633 137544 137790 137474 137549 137609 137984 138424 138411
2004 138472(1) 138542 138453 138680 138852 139174 139556 139573 139487 139732 140231 140125
2005 140245(1) 140385 140654 141254 141609 141714 142026 142434 142401 142548 142499 142752
2006 143150(1) 143457 143741 143761 144089 144353 144202 144625 144815 145314 145534 145970
2007 146033(1) 146066 146334 145610 145901 146058 145886 145670 146231 145937 146584 146272
2008 146407(1) 146183 146143 146173 145925 145725 145479 145167 145056 144778 144068 143324
2009 142201(1) 141687 140822 140720 140292 139978 139794 139409 138791 138393 138590 137960
2010 138511(1) 138698 138952 139382 139353 139092 138991 139267 139378 139084 138909 139206
2011 139323(1)
1 : Data affected by changes in population controls.

Last week the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported the unemployment rate declined from 9.4% to 9.0% while only 36,000 new non-farm jobs were actually created.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/empsit.pdf

Unemployment Rate (U-3)

Series Id:           LNS14000000 Seasonally Adjusted Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over

Year

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.5 4.6 4.9 5.0 5.3 5.5 5.7
2002 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.9 6.0
2003 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.1 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.1 6.0 5.8 5.7
2004 5.7 5.6 5.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.5 5.4 5.4
2005 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9
2006 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4
2007 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.5 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.7 5.0
2008 5.0 4.8 5.1 4.9 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.1 6.2 6.6 6.8 7.3
2009 7.8 8.2 8.6 8.9 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.7 9.8 10.1 9.9 9.9
2010 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8 9.4
2011 9.0

The Bureau of Labor Statistics also reported upwardly revised numbers of 121,000 new non-farm jobs created in December 2010 and 93,000 new non-farm jobs created in November 2010.

While the number of new non-farm jobs was barely enough to keep up with population growth and new entrants into the labor market, it simply was no where near the range of 250,000 to 300,000 new jobs per month necessary to decreased the unemployment rate by .1%.

Yet according the the Bureau of Labor Statistics the unemployment rate dropped from 9.8% in November 2010 to 9% in January, 2011 or a total of .8% in just two month.

This would have required the creation of over 1,750,000 to 2,100,000 in just two months.

This did not happen and nobody believes it did including the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Economic growth rates for the economy would have to be over 8% to create from 875,000 to over 1,000,000 jobs per month. The current rate of economic growth for gross domestic product is 3.25%.

The only way to get a drop of this magnitude in the unemployment rate is for more than 2 million people to have been so discouraged as to have left the labor force by not looking for work.

In other words the civilian labor force participation rate would have to decline dramatically, which it has if you believe the Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers.

But did it?

I for one do not buys this.

It is becoming increasing apparent that the President and the White House through the Secretary of Labor have brought political pressure to bear on the Bureau of Labor statistics to manipulate the employment statistics to show that the official unemployment rate is falling and will soon be under 9%.

With the exception of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s who was re-elected as President with un-employment rates over 14%, no President since then has been re-elected with rates of un-employment exceeding 9% for over 21 months.

President Obama desperately needs the unemployment rate to fall below 9% and even 8% if he is to have any chance of being re-elected President of the United States.

This can be accomplished by making a political adjustment to the civilian labor participation rate by gradually lowering over several months the actually observed monthly rate.

When you are unemployed and need money to put food on the table and a roof over your head, you do not stop seeking employment no matter how discouraged you are.

Congress should investigate these unbelievable unemployment rate numbers by having the Secretary of Labor and head of the Bureau of Labor Statistics questioned by the appropriate Congressional House Committees.

Also, the time has come for a whistleblower to come forward and tell what is going on at the Department of Labor.

The official level of unemployment measured by U-3 dropped from 15,041,000 in November 2010 to 13,863,00 in January 2011 or a decline of over 1.2 million.

The only way for this to happen is to reclassify those who would normally be considered unemployed to discourage workers no longer considered in the civilian labor force resulting in lower labor participation rates.

Unemployment Level (U-3)

http://data.bls.gov/pdq/SurveyOutputServlet

Series Id:           LNS13000000 Seasonally Adjusted Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Level
Labor force status:  Unemployed
Type of data:        Number in thousands
Age:                 16 years and over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 6023 6089 6141 6271 6226 6484 6583 7042 7142 7694 8003 8258
2002 8182 8215 8304 8599 8399 8393 8390 8304 8251 8307 8520 8640
2003 8520 8618 8588 8842 8957 9266 9011 8896 8921 8732 8576 8317
2004 8370 8167 8491 8170 8212 8286 8136 7990 7927 8061 7932 7934
2005 7784 7980 7737 7672 7651 7524 7406 7345 7553 7453 7566 7279
2006 7064 7184 7072 7120 6980 7001 7175 7091 6847 6727 6872 6762
2007 7100 6900 6721 6836 6766 6980 7149 7085 7191 7272 7261 7664
2008 7653 7441 7781 7606 8398 8590 8953 9489 9557 10176 10552 11344
2009 11984 12737 13278 13734 14512 14776 14663 14953 15149 15628 15206 15212
2010 14842 14860 14943 15138 14884 14593 14637 14849 14746 14876 15041 14485
2011 13863

Well if you believe those numbers then I suggest you look at what Gallup estimates the unemployment rate to be:

“…Unemployment, as measured by Gallup without seasonal adjustment, increased to 9.8% at the end of January — up from 9.6% at the end of December, but down from 10.9% a year ago.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/145922/gallup-finds-unemployment-slightly-january.aspx

When you look at the Gallups’s underemployment rate and compare it with BLS U-6 total unemployment rate you see that Gallup is much higher and increasing compared to the rapidly falling U-6 rate in January 2011.

“… Underemployment Essentially Unchanged in January

Underemployment — the combination of part-time workers wanting full-time work and Gallup’s U.S. unemployment rate — was 18.9% in January, essentially the same as the 19.0% of December. Underemployment now stands one percentage point below the 19.9% of a year ago. …”

Total Unemployed Rate U-6

Series Id: LNS13327709
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title: (seas) Total unemployed, plus all marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of all civilian labor force plus all marginally attached workers
Labor force status: Aggregated totals unemployed
Type of data: Percent or rate
Age: 16 years and over
Percent/rates: Unemployed and mrg attached and pt for econ reas as percent of labor force plus marg attached

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 7.3 7.4 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.9 7.8 8.1 8.7 9.3 9.4 9.6
2002 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.7 9.5 9.5 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.6 9.7 9.8
2003 10.0 10.2 10.0 10.2 10.1 10.3 10.3 10.1 10.4 10.2 10.0 9.8
2004 9.9 9.7 10.0 9.6 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.4 9.7 9.4 9.2
2005 9.3 9.3 9.1 8.9 8.9 9.0 8.8 8.9 9.0 8.7 8.7 8.6
2006 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.1 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.2 8.1 7.9
2007 8.4 8.1 8.0 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.8
2008 9.1 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.7 10.1 10.5 10.9 11.2 11.9 12.7 13.6
2009 14.1 15.0 15.6 15.8 16.4 16.6 16.5 16.8 17.0 17.4 17.1 17.2
2010 16.5 16.8 16.8 17.0 16.5 16.5 16.5 16.7 17.1 17.0 17.0 16.7
2011 16.1

Yes, I know the Gallup numbers are not seasonally adjusted nor to my knowledge are they politically adjusted.

The Associated Press actually reported that the decline in the unemployment rates was the fastest in more than half a century.

AP Top Stories

Really.

At this rate by May the unemployment rate will be under 8.0% and the pace in the drop in unemployment rate will be the fastest in a century–truly unbelieveable.

Some economists blame it on snow, others consider it to be a snow job!

The American people people are being lied to once again by the Obama Administration.

This is par for the course where you find Barack Obama playing the game.

The hardest hit by unemployment are 16-19 yearolds, blacks and hispanics with unemployment rates of 25.7%, 15.7% and 11.9% in January 2011 respectively.

Unemployment Rate – 16-19 yrs.

Series Id:           LNS14000012
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - 16-19 yrs.
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 to 19 years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 13.8 13.7 13.8 13.9 13.4 14.2 14.4 15.6 15.2 16.0 15.9 17.0
2002 16.5 16.0 16.6 16.7 16.6 16.7 16.8 17.0 16.3 15.1 17.1 16.9
2003 17.2 17.2 17.8 17.7 17.9 19.0 18.2 16.6 17.6 17.2 15.7 16.2
2004 17.0 16.5 16.8 16.6 17.1 17.0 17.8 16.7 16.6 17.4 16.4 17.6
2005 16.2 17.5 17.1 17.8 17.8 16.3 16.1 16.1 15.5 16.1 17.0 14.9
2006 15.1 15.3 16.1 14.6 14.0 15.8 15.9 16.0 16.3 15.2 14.8 14.6
2007 14.8 14.9 14.9 15.8 15.9 16.3 15.3 15.9 16.0 15.4 16.2 16.8
2008 17.8 16.5 16.0 15.8 19.0 19.2 20.8 18.7 19.2 20.0 20.3 20.6
2009 20.8 21.9 22.1 22.1 23.3 24.6 24.4 25.4 26.1 27.1 26.9 26.8
2010 26.2 25.0 26.0 25.4 26.4 25.8 26.1 26.2 26.0 27.1 24.5 25.4
2011 25.7

Unemployment Rate – Black or African American

Series Id:           LNS14000006
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - Black or African American
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Race:                Black or African American
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 8.2 7.7 8.3 8.0 7.9 8.3 8.0 9.1 8.9 9.5 9.8 10.1
2002 10.0 9.9 10.5 10.7 10.2 10.5 9.8 9.8 9.7 9.8 10.7 11.3
2003 10.5 10.7 10.3 10.9 10.9 11.5 10.9 10.9 11.1 11.4 10.2 10.1
2004 10.4 9.7 10.3 9.8 10.1 10.2 11.0 10.5 10.3 10.8 10.7 10.7
2005 10.6 10.9 10.5 10.3 10.1 10.2 9.2 9.7 9.4 9.1 10.6 9.2
2006 8.9 9.5 9.5 9.4 8.7 8.9 9.5 8.8 9.0 8.4 8.5 8.3
2007 7.9 8.0 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.5 8.1 7.7 8.1 8.5 8.5 9.0
2008 9.1 8.3 9.1 8.6 9.6 9.5 10.0 10.7 11.4 11.4 11.5 12.1
2009 12.7 13.6 13.5 15.0 15.0 14.9 14.8 15.0 15.4 15.8 15.7 16.2
2010 16.4 15.8 16.5 16.5 15.5 15.4 15.7 16.2 16.1 15.7 16.0 15.8
2011 15.7

Unemployment Rate – Hispanic or Latino

Series Id:           LNS14000009
Seasonally Adjusted
Series title:        (Seas) Unemployment Rate - Hispanic or Latino
Labor force status:  Unemployment rate
Type of data:        Percent or rate
Age:                 16 years and over
Ethnic origin:       Hispanic or Latino
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
2001 5.8 6.1 6.2 6.4 6.3 6.6 6.2 6.5 6.7 7.1 7.3 7.7
2002 7.8 7.0 7.5 8.0 7.1 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.4 7.9 7.8 7.9
2003 7.9 7.6 7.8 7.6 8.1 8.4 8.1 7.7 7.3 7.4 7.5 6.6
2004 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.1 7.0 6.6 6.9 6.8 6.9 6.7 6.7 6.5
2005 6.2 6.4 5.8 6.4 5.9 5.7 5.5 5.8 6.5 5.9 6.2 6.1
2006 5.7 5.5 5.2 5.3 4.9 5.2 5.3 5.3 5.5 4.7 5.1 5.0
2007 5.7 5.3 5.1 5.4 5.8 5.6 5.9 5.5 5.8 5.6 5.8 6.3
2008 6.4 6.2 6.9 6.9 6.9 7.7 7.6 8.1 8.0 8.9 8.7 9.4
2009 9.9 11.1 11.5 11.4 12.8 12.2 12.5 13.1 12.7 13.1 12.6 12.8
2010 12.5 12.3 12.5 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.1 12.1 12.5 12.6 13.2 13.0
2011 11.9

US black men least likely to find employment

Does Obama ignore African Americans?

Time for a whistleblower WikiLeak to melt the snow or snow job of Obama’s unbelievable unemployment numbers.

60 Minutos – Julian Assange – Parte 01

60 Minutos – Julian Assange – Parte 02

Julian Assange – How To Leak 1/2

Julian Assange – How To Leak 2/2

New 60 Minutes Interview With Wikileaks Julian Assange

Background Articles and Videos

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/empsit.pdf

Mythical Green Shoots and the Big Government Lie on Unemployment

John Williams of Shadow Statistics (29-Dec-10)(FINANCE & ECONOMICS series)

Morning Market Update for February 4, 2011

Morning Market Update for February 3, 2011

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